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Sample records for adenosine-to-inosine a-to-i rna

  1. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  2. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing meets cancer.

    PubMed

    Dominissini, Dan; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon

    2011-11-01

    The role of epigenetics in tumor onset and progression has been extensively addressed. Discoveries in the last decade completely changed our view on RNA. We now realize that its diversity lies at the base of biological complexity. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing emerges a central generator of transcriptome diversity and regulation in higher eukaryotes. It is the posttranscriptional deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA catalyzed by enzymes of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family. Thought at first to be restricted to coding regions of only a few genes, recent bioinformatic analyses fueled by high-throughput sequencing revealed that it is a widespread modification affecting mostly non-coding repetitive elements in thousands of genes. The rise in scope is accompanied by discovery of a growing repertoire of functions based on differential decoding of inosine by the various cellular machineries: when recognized as guanosine, it can lead to protein recoding, alternative splicing or altered microRNA specificity; when recognized by inosine-binding proteins, it can result in nuclear retention of the transcript or its degradation. An imbalance in expression of ADAR enzymes with consequent editing dysregulation is a characteristic of human cancers. These alterations may be responsible for activating proto-oncogenes or inactivating tumor suppressors. While unlikely to be an early initiating 'hit', editing dysregulation seems to contribute to tumor progression and thus should be considered a 'driver mutation'. In this review, we examine the contribution of A-to-I RNA editing to carcinogenesis.

  3. Altered adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Paz, Nurit; Levanon, Erez Y; Amariglio, Ninette; Heimberger, Amy B; Ram, Zvi; Constantini, Shlomi; Barbash, Zohar S; Adamsky, Konstantin; Safran, Michal; Hirschberg, Avi; Krupsky, Meir; Ben-Dov, Issachar; Cazacu, Simona; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya; Eisenberg, Eli; Rechavi, Gideon

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing was recently shown to be abundant in the human transcriptome, affecting thousands of genes. Employing a bioinformatic approach, we identified significant global hypoediting of Alu repetitive elements in brain, prostate, lung, kidney, and testis tumors. Experimental validation confirmed this finding, showing significantly reduced editing in Alu sequences within MED13 transcripts in brain tissues. Looking at editing of specific recoding and noncoding sites, including in cancer-related genes, a more complex picture emerged, with a gene-specific editing pattern in tumors vs. normal tissues. Additionally, we found reduced RNA levels of all three editing mediating enzymes, ADAR, ADARB1, and ADARB2, in brain tumors. The reduction of ADARB2 correlated with the grade of malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive of brain tumors, displaying a 99% decrease in ADARB2 RNA levels. Consistently, overexpression of ADAR and ADARB1 in the U87 glioblastoma multiforme cell line resulted in decreased proliferation rate, suggesting that reduced A-to-I editing in brain tumors is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Altered epigenetic control was recently shown to play a central role in oncogenesis. We suggest that A-to-I RNA editing may serve as an additional epigenetic mechanism relevant to cancer development and progression.

  4. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by ADARs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan-Ru; Qiao, Jun-Jing; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Zhu, Ying-Hui; Li, Fang-Fang; Liu, Haibo; Fei, Jing; Li, Yan; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Leilei

    2014-02-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the major histologic form of esophageal cancer, is a heterogeneous tumor displaying a complex variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Aberrant RNA editing of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I), as it is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR), represents a common posttranscriptional modification in certain human diseases. In this study, we investigated the status and role of ADARs and altered A-to-I RNA editing in ESCC tumorigenesis. Among the three ADAR enzymes expressed in human cells, only ADAR1 was overexpressed in primary ESCC tumors. ADAR1 overexpression was due to gene amplification. Patients with ESCC with tumoral overexpression of ADAR1 displayed a poor prognosis. In vitro and in vivo functional assays established that ADAR1 functions as an oncogene during ESCC progression. Differential expression of ADAR1 resulted in altered gene-specific editing activities, as reflected by hyperediting of FLNB and AZIN1 messages in primary ESCC. Notably, the edited form of AZIN1 conferred a gain-of-function phenotype associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Our findings reveal that altered gene-specific A-to-I editing events mediated by ADAR1 drive the development of ESCC, with potential implications in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this disease.

  5. Attenuated adenosine-to-inosine editing of microRNA-376a* promotes invasiveness of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Yukti; Tay, Felix Chang; Lam, Dang Hoang; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Tang, Carol; Ang, Beng-Ti; Wang, Shu

    2012-11-01

    In the human brain, microRNAs (miRNAs) from the microRNA-376 (miR-376) cluster undergo programmed "seed" sequence modifications by adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing. Emerging evidence suggests a link between impaired A-to-I editing and cancer, particularly in high-grade gliomas. We hypothesized that disruption of A-to-I editing alters expression of genes regulating glioma tumor phenotypes. By sequencing the miR-376 cluster, we show that the overall miRNA editing frequencies were reduced in human gliomas. Specifically in high-grade gliomas, miR-376a* accumulated entirely in an unedited form. Clinically, a significant correlation was found between accumulation of unedited miR-376a* and the extent of invasive tumor spread as measured by magnetic resonance imaging of patient brains. Using both in vitro and orthotopic xenograft mouse models, we demonstrated that the unedited miR-376a* promoted glioma cell migration and invasion, while the edited miR-376a* suppressed these features. The effects of the unedited miR-376a* were mediated by its sequence-dependent ability to target RAP2A and concomitant inability to target AMFR. Thus, the tumor-dependent introduction of a single base difference in the miR-376a* sequence dramatically alters the selection of its target genes and redirects its function from inhibiting to promoting glioma cell invasion. These findings uncover a new mechanism of miRNA deregulation and identify unedited miR-376a* as a potential therapeutic target in glioblastoma cells.

  6. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing controls cathepsin S expression in atherosclerosis by enabling HuR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Gatsiou, Aikaterini; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Perisic Matic, Ljubica; John, David; Lunella, Federica Francesca; Jaé, Nicolas; Rossbach, Oliver; Amrhein, Carolin; Sigala, Frangiska; Boon, Reinier A; Fürtig, Boris; Manavski, Yosif; You, Xintian; Uchida, Shizuka; Keller, Till; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Maegdefessel, Lars; Chen, Wei; Schwalbe, Harald; Bindereif, Albrecht; Eriksson, Per; Hedin, Ulf; Zeiher, Andreas M; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, which is catalyzed by a family of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is important in the epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. However, the role of A-to-I RNA editing in vascular disease is unknown. Here we show that cathepsin S mRNA (CTSS), which encodes a cysteine protease associated with angiogenesis and atherosclerosis, is highly edited in human endothelial cells. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the CTSS transcript contains two inverted repeats, the AluJo and AluSx(+) regions, which form a long stem-loop structure that is recognized by ADAR1 as a substrate for editing. RNA editing enables the recruitment of the stabilizing RNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR; encoded by ELAVL1) to the 3' UTR of the CTSS transcript, thereby controlling CTSS mRNA stability and expression. In endothelial cells, ADAR1 overexpression or treatment of cells with hypoxia or with the inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and tumor-necrosis-factor-α induces CTSS RNA editing and consequently increases cathepsin S expression. ADAR1 levels and the extent of CTSS RNA editing are associated with changes in cathepsin S levels in patients with atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, aortic aneurysms and advanced carotid atherosclerotic disease. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of RNA editing in gene expression in human atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  7. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-03-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state-dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites.

  8. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state–dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites. PMID:24448449

  9. Noncoding regions of C. elegans mRNA undergo selective adenosine to inosine deamination and contain a small number of editing sites per transcript.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Emily C; Washburn, Michael C; Major, Francois; Rusch, Douglas B; Hundley, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    ADARs (Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) "edit" RNA by converting adenosines to inosines within double-stranded regions. The primary targets of ADARs are long duplexes present within noncoding regions of mRNAs, such as introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Because adenosine and inosine have different base-pairing properties, editing within these regions can alter splicing and recognition by small RNAs. However, despite numerous studies identifying multiple editing sites in these genomic regions, little is known about the extent to which editing sites co-occur on individual transcripts or the functional output of these combinatorial editing events. To begin to address these questions, we performed an ultra-deep sequencing analysis of 4 Caenorhabditis elegans 3' UTRs that are known ADAR targets. Synchronous editing events were determined for the long duplexes in vivo. Furthermore, the validity of each editing event was confirmed by sequencing the same regions of mRNA from worms that lack A-to-I editing. This analysis identified a large number of editing sites that can occur within each 3' UTR, but interestingly, each individual transcript contained only a small fraction of these A-to-I editing events. In addition, editing patterns were not random, indicating that an editing event can affect the efficiency of editing at subsequent adenosines. Furthermore, we identified specific sites that can be both positively and negatively correlated with additional sites leading to mutually exclusive editing patterns. These results suggest that editing in noncoding regions is selective and hyper-editing of cellular RNAs is rare.

  10. The mechanism of adenosine to inosine conversion by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity: A high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polson, A.G.; Crain, P.F.; Pomerantz, S.C.; McCloskey, J.A.; Bass, B.L. )

    1991-12-10

    The authors have used directly combined high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to examine the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity. A double-stranded RNA substrate in which all adenosines were uniformly labeled with {sup 13}C was synthesized. An LC/MS analysis of the nucleoside products from the modified, labeled substrate confirmed that adenosine is modified to inosine during the unwinding/modifying reaction. Most importantly, they found that no carbons are exchanged during the reaction. By including H{sub 2} {sup 18}O in the reaction, they showed that water serves efficiently as the oxygen donor in vitro. These results are consistent with a hydrolytic deamination mechanism and rule out a base replacement mechanism. Although the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity appears to utilize a catalytic mechanism similar to that of adenosine deaminase, coformycin, a transition-state analogue, will not inhibit the unwinding/modifying activity.

  11. Aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates adenosine-to-inosine editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Yu; Tian, Nan; Zhao, Xingli; Du, Chao; Han, Liang; Zhang, Haishan

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is the most common type of RNA editing in mammals, and is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). ADAR2 is the main enzyme responsible for A-to-I editing in humans, and A-to-I underediting at the glutamine (Q)/arginine (R) site of the glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) is associated with the pathogenesis and invasiveness of glioma. The level of ADAR2 mRNA expression and the alternative splicing of the ADAR2 pre-mRNA both affect the catalytic activity of ADAR2. However, reports of ADAR2 mRNA expression in glioma are inconsistent. The mechanism regulating ADAR2 pre-mRNA splicing is also unknown. In this study, we explored the deregulation of A-to-I RNA editing in glioma. We confirmed the underediting at the Q/R site of GluR-B mRNA in the glioma cell lines U87, U251 and A172 compared with that in normal human astrocytes (NHAs) HA1800. However, we demonstrated with reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) that the expression of ADAR2 mRNA was not significantly altered in the glioma cell lines. Three alternative splicing sites are utilized in the glioma cell lines and NHAs: the first, located between exons -1 and 1, causes the inclusion of exon 1a; the second causes the removal of exon 2, which encodes two double-stranded RNA-binding domains; and the third, located between exons 4 and 6, causes the inclusion of alternative exon 5a, introducing a 120-nucleotide coding Alu-repeat sequence in frame. However, the expression ratio of two types of transcripts (with and without exon 5a) was altered in the glioma cells. Transcripts with exon 5a, which generate an ADAR2 isoform with ~50% reduced activity, were predominantly expressed in the glioma cell lines, whereas transcripts without exon 5a were predominantly expressed in the NHAs. From these results, we conclude that this aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates A-to-I editing in glioma.

  12. Reduced adenosine-to-inosine miR-455-5p editing promotes melanoma growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Einav; Mobley, Aaron K; Braeuer, Russell R; Kamiya, Takafumi; Huang, Li; Vasquez, Mayra E; Salameh, Ahmad; Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Sun Jin; Ivan, Cristina; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Nip, Ka Ming; Zhu, Kelsey; Brooks, Denise; Jones, Steven J M; Birol, Inanc; Mosqueda, Maribel; Wen, Yu-ye; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Sood, Anil K; Hwu, Patrick; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Robertson, A Gordon; Calin, George A; Markel, Gal; Fidler, Isaiah J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2015-03-01

    Although recent studies have shown that adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing occurs in microRNAs (miRNAs), its effects on tumour growth and metastasis are not well understood. We present evidence of CREB-mediated low expression of ADAR1 in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumour specimens. Re-expression of ADAR1 resulted in the suppression of melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. Consequently, we identified three miRNAs undergoing A-to-I editing in the weakly metastatic melanoma but not in strongly metastatic cell lines. One of these miRNAs, miR-455-5p, has two A-to-I RNA-editing sites. The biological function of edited miR-455-5p is different from that of the unedited form, as it recognizes a different set of genes. Indeed, wild-type miR-455-5p promotes melanoma metastasis through inhibition of the tumour suppressor gene CPEB1. Moreover, wild-type miR-455 enhances melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas the edited form inhibits these features. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for RNA editing in melanoma progression.

  13. Construction of a guide-RNA for site-directed RNA mutagenesis utilising intracellular A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masatora; Umeno, Hiromitsu; Nose, Kanako; Nishitarumizu, Azusa; Noguchi, Ryoma; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-02

    As an alternative to DNA mutagenesis, RNA mutagenesis can potentially become a powerful gene-regulation method for fundamental research and applied life sciences. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters genetic information at the transcript level and is an important biological process that is commonly conserved in metazoans. Therefore, a versatile RNA-mutagenesis method can be achieved by utilising the intracellular RNA-editing mechanism. Here, we report novel guide RNAs capable of inducing A-to-I mutations by guiding the editing enzyme, human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). These guide RNAs successfully introduced A-to-I mutations into the target-site, which was determined by the reprogrammable antisense region. In ADAR2-over expressing cells, site-directed RNA editing could also be performed by simply introducing the guide RNA. Our guide RNA framework provides basic insights into establishing a generally applicable RNA-mutagenesis method.

  14. Construction of a guide-RNA for site-directed RNA mutagenesis utilising intracellular A-to-I RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Umeno, Hiromitsu; Nose, Kanako; Nishitarumizu, Azusa; Noguchi, Ryoma; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    As an alternative to DNA mutagenesis, RNA mutagenesis can potentially become a powerful gene-regulation method for fundamental research and applied life sciences. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters genetic information at the transcript level and is an important biological process that is commonly conserved in metazoans. Therefore, a versatile RNA-mutagenesis method can be achieved by utilising the intracellular RNA-editing mechanism. Here, we report novel guide RNAs capable of inducing A-to-I mutations by guiding the editing enzyme, human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). These guide RNAs successfully introduced A-to-I mutations into the target-site, which was determined by the reprogrammable antisense region. In ADAR2-over expressing cells, site-directed RNA editing could also be performed by simply introducing the guide RNA. Our guide RNA framework provides basic insights into establishing a generally applicable RNA-mutagenesis method. PMID:28148949

  15. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  16. Altered A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1–p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1–p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24–48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development. PMID:22859999

  17. Altered A-to-I RNA editing in human embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Germanguz, Igal; Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1-p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1-p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24-48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development.

  18. Adaptation of A-to-I RNA editing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is hypothesized to facilitate adaptive evolution by expanding proteomic diversity through an epigenetic approach. However, it is challenging to provide evidences to support this hypothesis at the whole editome level. In this study, we systematically characterized 2,114 A-to-I RNA editing sites in female and male brains of D. melanogaster, and nearly half of these sites had events evolutionarily conserved across Drosophila species. We detected strong signatures of positive selection on the nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains, and the beneficial editing sites were significantly enriched in genes related to chemical and electrical neurotransmission. The signal of adaptation was even more pronounced for the editing sites located in X chromosome or for those commonly observed across Drosophila species. We identified a set of gene candidates (termed “PSEB” genes) that had nonsynonymous editing events favored by natural selection. We presented evidence that editing preferentially increased mutation sequence space of evolutionarily conserved genes, which supported the adaptive evolution hypothesis of editing. We found prevalent nonsynonymous editing sites that were favored by natural selection in female and male adults from five strains of D. melanogaster. We showed that temperature played a more important role than gender effect in shaping the editing levels, although the effect of temperature is relatively weaker compared to that of species effect. We also explored the relevant factors that shape the selective patterns of the global editomes. Altogether we demonstrated that abundant nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains were adaptive and maintained by natural selection during evolution. Our results shed new light on the evolutionary principles and functional consequences of RNA editing. PMID:28282384

  19. Adaptation of A-to-I RNA editing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuange; Dou, Shengqian; Luo, Shiqi; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is hypothesized to facilitate adaptive evolution by expanding proteomic diversity through an epigenetic approach. However, it is challenging to provide evidences to support this hypothesis at the whole editome level. In this study, we systematically characterized 2,114 A-to-I RNA editing sites in female and male brains of D. melanogaster, and nearly half of these sites had events evolutionarily conserved across Drosophila species. We detected strong signatures of positive selection on the nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains, and the beneficial editing sites were significantly enriched in genes related to chemical and electrical neurotransmission. The signal of adaptation was even more pronounced for the editing sites located in X chromosome or for those commonly observed across Drosophila species. We identified a set of gene candidates (termed "PSEB" genes) that had nonsynonymous editing events favored by natural selection. We presented evidence that editing preferentially increased mutation sequence space of evolutionarily conserved genes, which supported the adaptive evolution hypothesis of editing. We found prevalent nonsynonymous editing sites that were favored by natural selection in female and male adults from five strains of D. melanogaster. We showed that temperature played a more important role than gender effect in shaping the editing levels, although the effect of temperature is relatively weaker compared to that of species effect. We also explored the relevant factors that shape the selective patterns of the global editomes. Altogether we demonstrated that abundant nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains were adaptive and maintained by natural selection during evolution. Our results shed new light on the evolutionary principles and functional consequences of RNA editing.

  20. Transcript Diversification in the Nervous System: A to I RNA Editing in CNS Function and Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Aamira; Jantsch, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases that act on RNA converts adenosines to inosines in coding and non-coding regions of mRNAs. Inosines are interpreted as guanosines and hence, this type of editing can change codons, alter splice patterns, or influence the fate of an RNA. A to I editing is most abundant in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, targets for this type of nucleotide modification frequently encode receptors and channels. In many cases, the editing-induced amino acid exchanges alter the properties of the receptors and channels. Consistently, changes in editing patterns are frequently found associated with diseases of the CNS. In this review we describe the mechanisms of RNA editing and focus on target mRNAs of editing that are functionally relevant to normal and aberrant CNS activity. PMID:22787438

  1. Deciphering the functions and regulation of brain-enriched A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin Billy; Church, George M

    2013-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, in which genomically encoded adenosine is changed to inosine in RNA, is catalyzed by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). This fine-tuning mechanism is critical during normal development and diseases, particularly in relation to brain functions. A-to-I RNA editing has also been hypothesized to be a driving force in human brain evolution. A large number of RNA editing sites have recently been identified, mostly as a result of the development of deep sequencing and bioinformatic analyses. Deciphering the functional consequences of RNA editing events is challenging, but emerging genome engineering approaches may expedite new discoveries. To understand how RNA editing is dynamically regulated, it is imperative to construct a spatiotemporal atlas at the species, tissue and cell levels. Future studies will need to identify the cis and trans regulatory factors that drive the selectivity and frequency of RNA editing. We anticipate that recent technological advancements will aid researchers in acquiring a much deeper understanding of the functions and regulation of RNA editing.

  2. Reduced levels of protein recoding by A-to-I RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khermesh, Khen; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Barak, Michal; Annese, Anita; Wachtel, Chaim; Levanon, Erez Y.; Picardi, Ernesto; Eisenberg, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR enzyme family, acts on dsRNA structures within pre-mRNA molecules. Editing of the coding part of the mRNA may lead to recoding, amino acid substitution in the resulting protein, possibly modifying its biochemical and biophysical properties. Altered RNA editing patterns have been observed in various neurological pathologies. Here, we present a comprehensive study of recoding by RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of irreversible dementia. We have used a targeted resequencing approach supplemented by a microfluidic-based high-throughput PCR coupled with next-generation sequencing to accurately quantify A-to-I RNA editing levels in a preselected set of target sites, mostly located within the coding sequence of synaptic genes. Overall, editing levels decreased in AD patients’ brain tissues, mainly in the hippocampus and to a lesser degree in the temporal and frontal lobes. Differential RNA editing levels were observed in 35 target sites within 22 genes. These results may shed light on a possible association between the neurodegenerative processes typical for AD and deficient RNA editing. PMID:26655226

  3. Screening of human SNP database identifies recoding sites of A-to-I RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Gommans, Willemijn M.; Tatalias, Nicholas E.; Sie, Christina P.; Dupuis, Dylan; Vendetti, Nicholas; Smith, Lauren; Kaushal, Rikhi; Maas, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are DNA sequence variations that can affect the expression or function of genes. As a result, they may lead to phenotypic differences between individuals, such as susceptibility to disease, response to medications, and disease progression. Millions of SNPs have been mapped within the human genome providing a rich resource for genetic variation studies. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing also leads to the production of RNA and protein sequence variants, but it acts on the level of primary gene transcripts. Sequence variations due to RNA editing may be misannotated as SNPs when relying solely on expressed sequence data instead of genomic material. In this study, we screened the human SNP database for potential cases of A-to-I RNA editing that cause amino acid changes in the encoded protein. Our search strategy applies five molecular features to score candidate sites. It identifies all previously known cases of editing present in the SNP database and successfully uncovers novel, bona fide targets of adenosine deamination editing. Our approach sets the stage for effective and comprehensive genome-wide screens for A-to-I editing targets. PMID:18772245

  4. Abnormalities in A-to-I RNA editing patterns in CNS injuries correlate with dynamic changes in cell type composition

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Mark, Nurit; Shallev, Lea; Sweetat, Sahar; Barak, Michal; Billy Li, Jin; Levanon, Erez Y.; Eisenberg, Eli; Behar, Oded

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a co- or post-transcriptional mechanism that modifies genomically encoded nucleotides at the RNA level. A-to-I RNA editing is abundant in the brain, and altered editing levels have been reported in various neurological pathologies and following spinal cord injury (SCI). The prevailing concept is that the RNA editing process itself is dysregulated by brain pathologies. Here we analyzed recent RNA-seq data, and found that, except for few mammalian conserved editing sites, editing is significantly higher in neurons than in other cell populations of the brain. We studied A-to-I RNA editing in stab wound injury (SWI) and SCI models and showed that the apparent under-editing observed after injury correlates with an approximately 20% reduction in the relative density of neurons, due to cell death and immune cell infiltration that may account for the observed under-editing. Studies of neuronal and astrocyte cultures and a computational analysis of SCI RNA-seq data further supported the possibility that a reduction in neuronal density is responsible for alterations in the tissue-wide editing patterns upon injury. Thus, our data suggest that the case for a mechanistic linkage between A-to-I RNA editing and brain pathologies should be revisited. PMID:28266523

  5. Abnormalities in A-to-I RNA editing patterns in CNS injuries correlate with dynamic changes in cell type composition.

    PubMed

    Gal-Mark, Nurit; Shallev, Lea; Sweetat, Sahar; Barak, Michal; Billy Li, Jin; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Behar, Oded

    2017-03-07

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a co- or post-transcriptional mechanism that modifies genomically encoded nucleotides at the RNA level. A-to-I RNA editing is abundant in the brain, and altered editing levels have been reported in various neurological pathologies and following spinal cord injury (SCI). The prevailing concept is that the RNA editing process itself is dysregulated by brain pathologies. Here we analyzed recent RNA-seq data, and found that, except for few mammalian conserved editing sites, editing is significantly higher in neurons than in other cell populations of the brain. We studied A-to-I RNA editing in stab wound injury (SWI) and SCI models and showed that the apparent under-editing observed after injury correlates with an approximately 20% reduction in the relative density of neurons, due to cell death and immune cell infiltration that may account for the observed under-editing. Studies of neuronal and astrocyte cultures and a computational analysis of SCI RNA-seq data further supported the possibility that a reduction in neuronal density is responsible for alterations in the tissue-wide editing patterns upon injury. Thus, our data suggest that the case for a mechanistic linkage between A-to-I RNA editing and brain pathologies should be revisited.

  6. Trans and cis factors affecting A-to-I RNA editing efficiency of a noncoding editing target in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Michael C; Hundley, Heather A

    2016-05-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing by ADARs affects thousands of adenosines in an organism's transcriptome. However, adenosines are not edited at equal levels nor do these editing levels correlate well with ADAR expression levels. Therefore, additional mechanisms are utilized by the cell to dictate the editing efficiency at a given adenosine. To examine cis-and trans-acting factors that regulate A-to-I editing levels specifically in neural cells, we utilized the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans We demonstrate that a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein, ADR-1, inhibits editing in neurons, which is largely masked when examining editing levels from whole animals. Furthermore, expression of ADR-1 and mRNA expression of the editing target can act synergistically to regulate editing efficiency. In addition, we identify a dsRNA region within the Y75B8A.83' UTR that acts as acis-regulatory element by enhancing ADR-2 editing efficiency. Together, this work identifies mechanisms that regulate editing efficiency of noncoding A-to-I editing sites, which comprise the largest class of ADAR targets.

  7. A-to-I RNA Editing: Current Knowledge Sources and Computational Approaches with Special Emphasis on Non-Coding RNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nigita, Giovanni; Veneziano, Dario; Ferro, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a dynamic mechanism for gene regulation attained through the alteration of the sequence of primary RNA transcripts. A-to-I (adenosine-to-inosine) RNA editing, which is catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes, is the most common post-transcriptional modification in humans. The ADARs bind double-stranded regions and deaminate adenosine (A) into inosine (I), which in turn is interpreted by the translation and splicing machineries as guanosine (G). In recent years, this modification has been discovered to occur not only in coding RNAs but also in non-coding RNAs (ncRNA), such as microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, transfer RNAs, and long non-coding RNAs. This may have several consequences, such as the creation or disruption of microRNA/mRNA binding sites, and thus affect the biogenesis, stability, and target recognition properties of ncRNAs. The malfunction of the editing machinery is not surprisingly associated with various human diseases, such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and carcinogenic diseases. Despite the enormous efforts made so far, the real biological function of this phenomenon, as well as the features of the ADAR substrate, in particular in non-coding RNAs, has still not been fully understood. In this work, we focus on the current knowledge of RNA editing on ncRNA molecules and provide a few examples of computational approaches to elucidate its biological function. PMID:25859542

  8. The Landscape of A-to-I RNA Editome Is Shaped by Both Positive and Purifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Pan, Bohu; Chen, Longxian; Wang, Hongbing; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) in precursor mRNA induces variable gene products at the post-transcription level. How and to what extent A-to-I RNA editing diversifies transcriptome is not fully characterized in the evolution, and very little is known about the selective constraints that drive the evolution of RNA editing events. Here we present a study on A-to-I RNA editing, by generating a global profile of A-to-I editing for a phylogeny of seven Drosophila species, a model system spanning an evolutionary timeframe of approximately 45 million years. Of totally 9281 editing events identified, 5150 (55.5%) are located in the coding sequences (CDS) of 2734 genes. Phylogenetic analysis places these genes into 1,526 homologous families, about 5% of total gene families in the fly lineages. Based on conservation of the editing sites, the editing events in CDS are categorized into three distinct types, representing events on singleton genes (type I), and events not conserved (type II) or conserved (type III) within multi-gene families. While both type I and II events are subject to purifying selection, notably type III events are positively selected, and highly enriched in the components and functions of the nervous system. The tissue profiles are documented for three editing types, and their critical roles are further implicated by their shifting patterns during holometabolous development and in post-mating response. In conclusion, three A-to-I RNA editing types are found to have distinct evolutionary dynamics. It appears that nervous system functions are mainly tested to determine if an A-to-I editing is beneficial for an organism. The coding plasticity enabled by A-to-I editing creates a new class of binary variations, which is a superior alternative to maintain heterozygosity of expressed genes in a diploid mating system. PMID:27467689

  9. Alu sequences in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells display high levels of A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Osenberg, Sivan; Paz Yaacov, Nurit; Safran, Michal; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Shtrichman, Ronit; Sherf, Ofra; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Keshet, Gilmor; Amariglio, Ninette; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rechavi, Gideon

    2010-06-21

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a site-specific modification of RNA transcripts, catalyzed by members of the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) protein family. RNA editing occurs in human RNA in thousands of different sites. Some of the sites are located in protein-coding regions but the majority is found in non-coding regions, such as 3'UTRs, 5'UTRs and introns - mainly in Alu elements. While editing is found in all tissues, the highest levels of editing are found in the brain. It was shown that editing levels within protein-coding regions are increased during embryogenesis and after birth and that RNA editing is crucial for organism viability as well as for normal development. In this study we characterized the A-to-I RNA editing phenomenon during neuronal and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified high editing levels of Alu repetitive elements in hESCs and demonstrated a global decrease in editing levels of non-coding Alu sites when hESCs are differentiating, particularly into the neural lineage. Using RNA interference, we showed that the elevated editing levels of Alu elements in undifferentiated hESCs are highly dependent on ADAR1. DNA microarray analysis showed that ADAR1 knockdown has a global effect on gene expression in hESCs and leads to a significant increase in RNA expression levels of genes involved in differentiation and development processes, including neurogenesis. Taken together, we speculate that A-to-I editing of Alu sequences plays a role in the regulation of hESC early differentiation decisions.

  10. Small RNA and A-to-I Editing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eran, Alal

    One in every 88 children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), a set of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social impairments, communication deficits, and repetitive behavior. ASDs have a substantial genetic component, but the specific cause of most cases remains unknown. Understanding gene-environment interactions underlying ASD is essential for improving early diagnosis and identifying critical targets for intervention and prevention. Towards this goal, we surveyed adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing in autistic brains. A-to-I editing is an epigenetic mechanism that fine-tunes synaptic function in response to environmental stimuli, shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. We used ultradeep sequencing to quantify A-to-I receding of candidate synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from individuals with ASD and neurotypical controls. We found unexpectedly wide distributions of human A-to-I editing levels, whose extremes were consistently populated by individuals with ASD. We correlated A-to-I editing with isoform usage, identified clusters of correlated sites, and examined differential editing patterns. Importantly, we found that individuals with ASD commonly use a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme ADARB1. We next profiled small RNAs thought to regulate A-to-I editing, which originate from one of the most commonly altered loci in ASD, 15q11. Deep targeted sequencing of SNORD115 and SNORD116 transcripts enabled their high-resolution detection in human brains, and revealed a strong gender bias underlying their expression. The consistent 2-fold upregulation of 15q11 small RNAs in male vs. female cerebella could be important in delineating the role of this locus in ASD, a male dominant disorder. Overall, these studies provide an accurate population-level view of small RNA and A-to-I editing in human cerebella, and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism

  11. A-to-I RNA editing occurs at over a hundred million genomic sites, located in a majority of human genes.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Lily; Haviv, Ami; Barak, Michal; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Deng, Patricia; Zhang, Rui; Isaacs, Farren J; Rechavi, Gideon; Li, Jin Billy; Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-03-01

    RNA molecules transmit the information encoded in the genome and generally reflect its content. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing by ADAR proteins converts a genomically encoded adenosine into inosine. It is known that most RNA editing in human takes place in the primate-specific Alu sequences, but the extent of this phenomenon and its effect on transcriptome diversity are not yet clear. Here, we analyzed large-scale RNA-seq data and detected ∼1.6 million editing sites. As detection sensitivity increases with sequencing coverage, we performed ultradeep sequencing of selected Alu sequences and showed that the scope of editing is much larger than anticipated. We found that virtually all adenosines within Alu repeats that form double-stranded RNA undergo A-to-I editing, although most sites exhibit editing at only low levels (<1%). Moreover, using high coverage sequencing, we observed editing of transcripts resulting from residual antisense expression, doubling the number of edited sites in the human genome. Based on bioinformatic analyses and deep targeted sequencing, we estimate that there are over 100 million human Alu RNA editing sites, located in the majority of human genes. These findings set the stage for exploring how this primate-specific massive diversification of the transcriptome is utilized.

  12. A Fluorescent Adenosine Analogue as a Substrate for an A-to-I RNA Editing Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Rena A; Shin, Dongwon; Sinkeldam, Renatus W; Phelps, Kelly J; Fin, Andrea; Tantillo, Dean J; Tor, Yitzhak; Beal, Peter A

    2015-07-20

    Adenosine to inosine RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR enzymes is common in humans, and altered editing is associated with disease. Experiments using substrate RNAs with adenosine analogues at editing sites are useful for defining features of the ADAR reaction mechanism. The reactivity of ADAR2 was evaluated with RNA containing the emissive adenosine analogue thieno[3,4-d]-6-aminopyrimidine ((th)A). This nucleoside was incorporated into a mimic of the glutamate receptor B (GluR B) mRNA R/G editing site. We found that (th)A is recognized by AMV reverse transcriptase as A, and is deaminated rapidly by human ADAR2 to give (th)I. Importantly, ADAR reaction progress can be monitored by following the deamination-induced change in fluorescence of the (th)A-modified RNA. The observed high (th)A reactivity adds to our understanding of the structural features that are necessary for an efficient hADAR2 reaction. Furthermore, the new fluorescent assay is expected to accelerate mechanistic studies of ADARs.

  13. A-to-I RNA Editing Up-regulates Human Dihydrofolate Reductase in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masataka; Fukami, Tatsuki; Gotoh, Saki; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-03-24

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a key role in folate metabolism and is a target molecule of methotrexate. An increase in the cellular expression level of DHFR is one of the mechanisms of tumor resistance to methotrexate. The present study investigated the possibility that adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, which causes nucleotide conversion by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, might modulate DHFR expression. In human breast adenocarcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells, 26 RNA editing sites were identified in the 3'-UTR of DHFR. Knockdown of ADAR1 decreased the RNA editing levels of DHFR and resulted in a decrease in the DHFR mRNA and protein levels, indicating that ADAR1 up-regulates DHFR expression. Using a computational analysis, miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p were predicted to bind to the non-edited 3'-UTR of DHFR but not to the edited sequence. The decrease in DHFR expression by the knockdown of ADAR1 was restored by transfection of antisense oligonucleotides for these miRNAs, suggesting that RNA editing mediated up-regulation of DHFR requires the function of these miRNAs. Interestingly, we observed that the knockdown of ADAR1 decreased cell viability and increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to methotrexate. ADAR1 expression levels and the RNA editing levels in the 3'-UTR of DHFR in breast cancer tissues were higher than those in adjacent normal tissues. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that ADAR1 positively regulates the expression of DHFR by editing the miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p binding sites in the 3'-UTR of DHFR, enhancing cellular proliferation and resistance to methotrexate.

  14. The dsRBP and inactive editor ADR-1 utilizes dsRNA binding to regulate A-to-I RNA editing across the C. elegans transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Michael C; Kakaradov, Boyko; Sundararaman, Balaji; Wheeler, Emily; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W; Hundley, Heather A

    2014-02-27

    Inadequate adenosine-to-inosine editing of noncoding regions occurs in disease but is often uncorrelated with ADAR levels, underscoring the need to study deaminase-independent control of editing. C. elegans have two ADAR proteins, ADR-2 and the theoretically catalytically inactive ADR-1. Using high-throughput RNA sequencing of wild-type and adr mutant worms, we expand the repertoire of C. elegans edited transcripts over 5-fold and confirm that ADR-2 is the only active deaminase in vivo. Despite lacking deaminase function, ADR-1 affects editing of over 60 adenosines within the 3' UTRs of 16 different mRNAs. Furthermore, ADR-1 interacts directly with ADR-2 substrates, even in the absence of ADR-2, and mutations within its double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domains abolish both binding and editing regulation. We conclude that ADR-1 acts as a major regulator of editing by binding ADR-2 substrates in vivo. These results raise the possibility that other dsRNA binding proteins, including the inactive human ADARs, regulate RNA editing through deaminase-independent mechanisms.

  15. Discriminative Prediction of A-To-I RNA Editing Events from DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangming; Singh, Pratibha; Bagge, Annika; Valtat, Bérengère; Vikman, Petter; Spégel, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional alteration of RNA sequences that, via insertions, deletions or base substitutions, can affect protein structure as well as RNA and protein expression. Recently, it has been suggested that RNA editing may be more frequent than previously thought. A great impediment, however, to a deeper understanding of this process is the paramount sequencing effort that needs to be undertaken to identify RNA editing events. Here, we describe an in silico approach, based on machine learning, that ameliorates this problem. Using 41 nucleotide long DNA sequences, we show that novel A-to-I RNA editing events can be predicted from known A-to-I RNA editing events intra- and interspecies. The validity of the proposed method was verified in an independent experimental dataset. Using our approach, 203 202 putative A-to-I RNA editing events were predicted in the whole human genome. Out of these, 9% were previously reported. The remaining sites require further validation, e.g., by targeted deep sequencing. In conclusion, the approach described here is a useful tool to identify potential A-to-I RNA editing events without the requirement of extensive RNA sequencing. PMID:27764195

  16. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1(FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA(1831)GUA(1834)G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites inF. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs.PUK1orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides Furthermore,F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing inF. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs.

  17. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  18. A Role for A-to-I RNA Editing in Temperature Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Sandra C.; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.

    2014-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing can recode mRNAs, giving organisms the option to express diverse, functionally distinct protein isoforms. Here, we propose that RNA editing is inherently geared for temperature adaptation because it tends to recode to smaller, less stabilizing amino acids. Studies on how editing affects protein function support this idea. PMID:23223630

  19. Accurate identification of A-to-I RNA editing in human by transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Li, Gang; Greer, Christopher; Peng, Guangdun; Xiao, Xinshu

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing enhances the diversity of gene products at the post-transcriptional level. Approaches for genome-wide identification of RNA editing face two main challenges: separating true editing sites from false discoveries and accurate estimation of editing levels. We developed an approach to analyze transcriptome sequencing data (RNA-seq) for global identification of RNA editing in cells for which whole-genome sequencing data are available. We applied the method to analyze RNA-seq data of a human glioblastoma cell line, U87MG. Around 10,000 DNA-RNA differences were identified, the majority being putative A-to-I editing sites. These predicted A-to-I events were associated with a low false-discovery rate (∼5%). Moreover, the estimated editing levels from RNA-seq correlated well with those based on traditional clonal sequencing. Our results further facilitated unbiased characterization of the sequence and evolutionary features flanking predicted A-to-I editing sites and discovery of a conserved RNA structural motif that may be functionally relevant to editing. Genes with predicted A-to-I editing were significantly enriched with those known to be involved in cancer, supporting the potential importance of cancer-specific RNA editing. A similar profile of DNA-RNA differences as in U87MG was predicted for another RNA-seq data set obtained from primary breast cancer samples. Remarkably, significant overlap exists between the putative editing sites of the two transcriptomes despite their difference in cell type, cancer type, and genomic backgrounds. Our approach enabled de novo identification of the RNA editome, which sets the stage for further mechanistic studies of this important step of post-transcriptional regulation.

  20. REDIportal: a comprehensive database of A-to-I RNA editing events in humans

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Lo Giudice, Claudio; Pesole, Graziano

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing by A-to-I deamination is the prominent co-/post-transcriptional modification in humans. It is carried out by ADAR enzymes and contributes to both transcriptomic and proteomic expansion. RNA editing has pivotal cellular effects and its deregulation has been linked to a variety of human disorders including neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Despite its biological relevance, many physiological and functional aspects of RNA editing are yet elusive. Here, we present REDIportal, available online at http://srv00.recas.ba.infn.it/atlas/, the largest and comprehensive collection of RNA editing in humans including more than 4.5 millions of A-to-I events detected in 55 body sites from thousands of RNAseq experiments. REDIportal embeds RADAR database and represents the first editing resource designed to answer functional questions, enabling the inspection and browsing of editing levels in a variety of human samples, tissues and body sites. In contrast with previous RNA editing databases, REDIportal comprises its own browser (JBrowse) that allows users to explore A-to-I changes in their genomic context, empathizing repetitive elements in which RNA editing is prominent. PMID:27587585

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of A-to-I RNA Editing.

    PubMed

    Savva, Yiannis A; Laurent, Georges St; Reenan, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA editing is a fundamental posttranscriptional modification that ensures the deamination of A-to-I in double-stranded (ds) RNA molecules. Intriguingly, the A-to-I RNA editing system is particularly active in the nervous system of higher eukaryotes, altering a plethora of noncoding and coding sequences. Abnormal RNA editing is highly associated with many neurological phenotypes and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying RNA editing-mediated pathogenesis still remain enigmatic and have attracted increasing attention from researchers. Over the last decade, methods available to perform genome-wide transcriptome analysis, have evolved rapidly. Within the RNA editing field researchers have adopted next-generation sequencing technologies to identify RNA-editing sites within genomes and to elucidate the underlying process. However, technical challenges associated with editing site discovery have hindered efforts to uncover comprehensive editing site datasets, resulting in the general perception that the collections of annotated editing sites represent only a small minority of the total number of sites in a given organism, tissue, or cell type of interest. Additionally to doubts about sensitivity, existing RNA-editing site lists often contain high percentages of false positives, leading to uncertainty about their validity and usefulness in downstream studies. An accurate investigation of A-to-I editing requires properly validated datasets of editing sites with demonstrated and transparent levels of sensitivity and specificity. Here, we describe a high signal-to-noise method for RNA-editing site detection using single-molecule sequencing (SMS). With this method, authentic RNA-editing sites may be differentiated from artifacts. Machine learning approaches provide a procedure to improve upon and experimentally validate sequencing outcomes through use of computationally predicted, iterative feedback loops

  2. A strategy for developing a hammerhead ribozyme for selective RNA cleavage depending on substitutional RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Tanaka, Yasuyoshi; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Substitutional RNA editing plays a crucial role in the regulation of biological processes. Cleavage of target RNA that depends on the specific site of substitutional RNA editing is a useful tool for analyzing and regulating intracellular processes related to RNA editing. Hammerhead ribozymes have been utilized as small catalytic RNAs for cleaving target RNA at a specific site and may be used for RNA-editing-specific RNA cleavage. Here we reveal a design strategy for a hammerhead ribozyme that specifically recognizes adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and cytosine to uracil (C-to-U) substitutional RNA-editing sites and cleaves target RNA. Because the hammerhead ribozyme cleaves one base upstream of the target-editing site, the base that pairs with the target-editing site was utilized for recognition. RNA-editing-specific ribozymes were designed such that the recognition base paired only with the edited base. These ribozymes showed A-to-I and C-to-U editing-specific cleavage activity against synthetic serotonin receptor 2C and apolipoprotein B mRNA fragments in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the ribozyme designed for recognizing A-to-I RNA editing at the Q/R site on filamin A (FLNA) showed editing-specific cleavage activity against physiologically edited FLNA mRNA extracted from cells. We demonstrated that our strategy is effective for cleaving target RNA in an editing-dependent manner. The data in this study provided an experimental basis for the RNA-editing-dependent degradation of specific target RNA in vivo. PMID:22798264

  3. Splicing variants of ADAR2 and ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Zhao, Xingli; Li, Zhaohui; Wei, Jun; Tian, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The roles of alternative splicing and RNA editing in gene regulation and transcriptome diversity are well documented. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are responsible for adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing and exemplify the complex association between RNA editing and alternative splicing. The self-editing activity of ADAR2, which acts on its own pre-mRNA, leads to its alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs independently at nine splicing sites on ADAR2 pre-mRNA, generating numerous alternative splicing variants with various catalytic activities. A-to-I RNA editing is important in a range of physiological processes in humans and is associated with several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mood disorders, epilepsy and glioma. Reduced editing at the glutamine/arginine site of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in glioma, without any alteration in ADAR2 expression, is a notable phenomenon. Several studies have tried to explain this alteration in the catalytic activity of ADAR2; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present review summarizes the relevant literature and shares experimental results concerning ADAR2 alternative splicing. In particular, the present review demonstrates that shifts in the relative abundance of the active and inactive splicing variants of ADAR2 may reduce the ADAR2 editing activity in glioma. Dominant expression of ADAR2 splicing variant with low enzyme activity causes reduced RNA editing of GluA2 subunit at the glutamine/arginine site in glioma.

  4. Fmrp Interacts with Adar and Regulates RNA Editing, Synaptic Density and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Porath, Hagit T.; Barak, Michal; Pinto, Yishay; Wachtel, Chaim; Zilberberg, Alona; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Efroni, Sol; Levanon, Erez Y.; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent inherited form of mental retardation. The cause for this X-linked disorder is the silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene and the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (Fmrp). The RNA-binding protein Fmrp represses protein translation, particularly in synapses. In Drosophila, Fmrp interacts with the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (Adar) enzymes. Adar enzymes convert adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and modify the sequence of RNA transcripts. Utilizing the fmr1 zebrafish mutant (fmr1-/-), we studied Fmrp-dependent neuronal circuit formation, behavior, and Adar-mediated RNA editing. By combining behavior analyses and live imaging of single axons and synapses, we showed hyperlocomotor activity, as well as increased axonal branching and synaptic density, in fmr1-/- larvae. We identified thousands of clustered RNA editing sites in the zebrafish transcriptome and showed that Fmrp biochemically interacts with the Adar2a protein. The expression levels of the adar genes and Adar2 protein increased in fmr1-/- zebrafish. Microfluidic-based multiplex PCR coupled with deep sequencing showed a mild increase in A-to-I RNA editing levels in evolutionarily conserved neuronal and synaptic Adar-targets in fmr1-/- larvae. These findings suggest that loss of Fmrp results in increased Adar-mediated RNA editing activity on target-specific RNAs, which, in turn, might alter neuronal circuit formation and behavior in FXS. PMID:26637167

  5. RNA editing in RHOQ promotes invasion potential in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Jeong, Eun-Goo; Lee, Won-Chul; Kim, Keon Young; Park, Sang Youn; Lee, Dae-Won; Won, Jae-Kyung; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Park, Jae-Gahb; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il; Kim, Tae-You

    2014-04-07

    RNA editing can increase RNA sequence variation without altering the DNA sequence. By comparing whole-genome and transcriptome sequence data of a rectal cancer, we found novel tumor-associated increase of RNA editing in ras homologue family member Q (RHOQ) transcripts. The adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing results in substitution of asparagine with serine at residue 136. We observed a higher level of the RHOQ RNA editing in tumor compared with normal tissue in colorectal cancer (CRC). The degree of RNA editing was associated with RhoQ protein activity in CRC cancer cell lines. RhoQ N136S amino acid substitution increased RhoQ activity, actin cytoskeletal reorganization, and invasion potential. KRAS mutation further increased the invasion potential of RhoQ N136S in vitro. Among CRC patients, recurrence was more frequently observed in patients with tumors having edited RHOQ transcripts and mutations in the KRAS gene. In summary, we show that RNA editing is another mechanism of sequence alteration that contributes to CRC progression.

  6. Comparative RNA editing in autistic and neurotypical cerebella.

    PubMed

    Eran, A; Li, J B; Vatalaro, K; McCarthy, J; Rahimov, F; Collins, C; Markianos, K; Margulies, D M; Brown, E N; Calvo, S E; Kohane, I S; Kunkel, L M

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a neurodevelopmentally regulated epigenetic modification shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. Little is known about human A-to-I editing, but it is thought to constitute one of many molecular mechanisms connecting environmental stimuli and behavioral outputs. Thus, comprehensive exploration of A-to-I RNA editing in human brains may shed light on gene-environment interactions underlying complex behavior in health and disease. Synaptic function is a main target of A-to-I editing, which can selectively recode key amino acids in synaptic genes, directly altering synaptic strength and duration in response to environmental signals. Here, we performed a high-resolution survey of synaptic A-to-I RNA editing in a human population, and examined how it varies in autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder in which synaptic abnormalities are a common finding. Using ultra-deep (>1000 × ) sequencing, we quantified the levels of A-to-I editing of 10 synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from 14 neurotypical and 11 autistic individuals. A high dynamic range of editing levels was detected across individuals and editing sites, from 99.6% to below detection limits. In most sites, the extreme ends of the population editing distributions were individuals with autism. Editing was correlated with isoform usage, clusters of correlated sites were identified, and differential editing patterns examined. Finally, a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme adenosine deaminase acting on RNA B1 was found more commonly in postmortem cerebella from individuals with autism. These results provide a population-level, high-resolution view of A-to-I RNA editing in human cerebella and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism.

  7. RNA editing of non-coding RNA and its role in gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Lagergren, Jens; Öhman, Marie

    2015-10-01

    It has for a long time been known that repetitive elements, particularly Alu sequences in human, are edited by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, ADAR, family. The functional interpretation of these events has been even more difficult than that of editing events in coding sequences, but today there is an emerging understanding of their downstream effects. A surprisingly large fraction of the human transcriptome contains inverted Alu repeats, often forming long double stranded structures in RNA transcripts, typically occurring in introns and UTRs of protein coding genes. Alu repeats are also common in other primates, and similar inverted repeats can frequently be found in non-primates, although the latter are less prone to duplex formation. In human, as many as 700,000 Alu elements have been identified as substrates for RNA editing, of which many are edited at several sites. In fact, recent advancements in transcriptome sequencing techniques and bioinformatics have revealed that the human editome comprises at least a hundred million adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) editing sites in Alu sequences. Although substantial additional efforts are required in order to map the editome, already present knowledge provides an excellent starting point for studying cis-regulation of editing. In this review, we will focus on editing of long stem loop structures in the human transcriptome and how it can effect gene expression.

  8. Hippocampus-specific deficiency in RNA editing of GluA2 in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Kravitz, Efrat; Feiler, Yulia; Safran, Michal; Biegon, Anat; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a base recoding process within precursor messenger RNA, catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family. A notable example occurs at the Q/R site of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptor subunit GluA2. Abnormally, low editing at this site leads to excessive calcium influx and cell death. We studied hippocampus and caudate samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched healthy controls, using direct sequencing and a high accuracy primer-extension technique to assess RNA editing at the Q/R GluA2 site. Both techniques revealed lower, more variable RNA editing in AD, specific to the hippocampus and the GluA2 site. Deficient editing also characterized the hippocampus of apolipoprotein ε4 allele carriers, regardless of clinical diagnosis. In AD, messenger RNA expression of neuronal markers was decreased in the hippocampus, and expression of the Q/R-site editing enzyme ADAR2 was decreased in caudate. These findings provide a link between neurodegenerative processes and deficient RNA editing of the GluA2 Q/R site, and may contribute to both diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  9. Reovirus-mediated induction of ADAR1 (p150) minimally alters RNA editing patterns in discrete brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer L.; Morabito, Michael V.; Martinez, Charles R.; Gilbert, James A.; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Transcripts encoding ADAR1, a double-stranded, RNA-specific adenosine deaminase involved in the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of mammalian RNAs, can be alternatively spliced to produce an interferon-inducible protein isoform (p150) that is up-regulated in both cell culture and in vivo model systems in response to pathogen or interferon stimulation. In contrast to other tissues, p150 is expressed at extremely low levels in the brain and it is unclear what role, if any, this isoform may play in the innate immune response of the central nervous system (CNS) or whether the extent of editing for RNA substrates critical for CNS function is affected by its induction. To investigate the expression of ADAR1 isoforms in response to viral infection and subsequent alterations in A-to-I editing profiles for endogenous ADAR targets, we used a neuro-tropic strain of reovirus to infect neonatal mice and quantify A-to-I editing in discrete brain regions using a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing strategy. While intracranial injection of reovirus resulted in a widespread increase in the expression of ADAR1 (p150) in multiple brain regions and peripheral organs, significant changes in site-specific A-to-I conversion were quite limited, suggesting that steady-state levels of p150 expression are not a primary determinant for modulating the extent of editing for numerous ADAR targets in vivo. PMID:24906008

  10. Functions of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR1 and Their Relevance to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunzi; Sakurai, Masayuki; Shiromoto, Yusuke; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Among the three types of mammalian ADARs, ADAR1 has long been recognized as an essential enzyme for normal development. The interferon-inducible ADAR1p150 is involved in immune responses to both exogenous and endogenous triggers, whereas the functions of the constitutively expressed ADAR1p110 are variable. Recent findings that ADAR1 is involved in the recognition of self versus non-self dsRNA provide potential explanations for its links to hematopoiesis, type I interferonopathies, and viral infections. Editing in both coding and noncoding sequences results in diseases ranging from cancers to neurological abnormalities. Furthermore, editing of noncoding sequences, like microRNAs, can regulate protein expression, while editing of Alu sequences can affect translational efficiency and editing of proximal sequences. Novel identifications of long noncoding RNA and retrotransposons as editing targets further expand the effects of A-to-I editing. Besides editing, ADAR1 also interacts with other dsRNA-binding proteins in editing-independent manners. Elucidating the disease-specific patterns of editing and/or ADAR1 expression may be useful in making diagnoses and prognoses. In this review, we relate the mechanisms of ADAR1′s actions to its pathological implications, and suggest possible mechanisms for the unexplained associations between ADAR1 and human diseases. PMID:27999332

  11. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR).

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-05-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery.

  12. Principles Governing A-to-I RNA Editing in the Breast Cancer Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Debora; Gacquer, David; Rothé, Françoise; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frederick; Brown, David; Kheddoumi, Naima; Shlien, Adam; Konopka, Tomasz; Salgado, Roberto; Larsimont, Denis; Polyak, Kornelia; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Desmedt, Christine; Piccart, Martine; Abramowicz, Marc; Campbell, Peter J; Sotiriou, Christos; Detours, Vincent

    2015-10-13

    Little is known about how RNA editing operates in cancer. Transcriptome analysis of 68 normal and cancerous breast tissues revealed that the editing enzyme ADAR acts uniformly, on the same loci, across tissues. In controlled ADAR expression experiments, the editing frequency increased at all loci with ADAR expression levels according to the logistic model. Loci-specific "editabilities," i.e., propensities to be edited by ADAR, were quantifiable by fitting the logistic function to dose-response data. The editing frequency was increased in tumor cells in comparison to normal controls. Type I interferon response and ADAR DNA copy number together explained 53% of ADAR expression variance in breast cancers. ADAR silencing using small hairpin RNA lentivirus transduction in breast cancer cell lines led to less cell proliferation and more apoptosis. A-to-I editing is a pervasive, yet reproducible, source of variation that is globally controlled by 1q amplification and inflammation, both of which are highly prevalent among human cancers.

  13. A-to-I RNA editing promotes developmental stage-specific gene and lncRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Boaz; Agranat-Tamir, Lily; Light, Dean; Ben-Naim Zgayer, Orna; Fishman, Alla; Lamm, Ayelet T

    2017-03-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a conserved widespread phenomenon in which adenosine (A) is converted to inosine (I) by adenosine deaminases (ADARs) in double-stranded RNA regions, mainly noncoding. Mutations in ADAR enzymes in Caenorhabditis elegans cause defects in normal development but are not lethal as in human and mouse. Previous studies in C. elegans indicated competition between RNA interference (RNAi) and RNA editing mechanisms, based on the observation that worms that lack both mechanisms do not exhibit defects, in contrast to the developmental defects observed when only RNA editing is absent. To study the effects of RNA editing on gene expression and function, we established a novel screen that enabled us to identify thousands of RNA editing sites in nonrepetitive regions in the genome. These include dozens of genes that are edited at their 3' UTR region. We found that these genes are mainly germline and neuronal genes, and that they are down-regulated in the absence of ADAR enzymes. Moreover, we discovered that almost half of these genes are edited in a developmental-specific manner, indicating that RNA editing is a highly regulated process. We found that many pseudogenes and other lncRNAs are also extensively down-regulated in the absence of ADARs in the embryo but not in the fourth larval (L4) stage. This down-regulation is not observed upon additional knockout of RNAi. Furthermore, levels of siRNAs aligned to pseudogenes in ADAR mutants are enhanced. Taken together, our results suggest a role for RNA editing in normal growth and development by regulating silencing via RNAi.

  14. Evidence for large diversity in the human transcriptome created by Alu RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Barak, Michal; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Paz, Nurit; Rechavi, Gideon; Church, George M; Mehr, Ramit

    2009-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters the original genomic content of the human transcriptome and is essential for maintenance of normal life in mammals. A-to-I editing in Alu repeats is abundant in the human genome, with many thousands of expressed Alu sequences undergoing editing. Little is known so far about the contribution of Alu editing to transcriptome complexity. Transcripts derived from a single edited Alu sequence can be edited in multiple sites, and thus could theoretically generate a large number of different transcripts. Here we explored whether the combinatorial potential nature of edited Alu sequences is actually fulfilled in the human transcriptome. We analyzed datasets of editing sites and performed an analysis of a detailed transcript set of one edited Alu sequence. We found that editing appears at many more sites than detected by earlier genomic screens. To a large extent, editing of different sites within the same transcript is only weakly correlated. Thus, rather than finding a few versions of each transcript, a large number of edited variants arise, resulting in immense transcript diversity that eclipses alternative splicing as mechanism of transcriptome diversity, although with less impact on the proteome.

  15. Profiling the RNA editomes of wild-type C. elegans and ADAR mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Han-Qing; Zhang, Pan; Gao, Hua; He, Xiandong; Dou, Yanmei; Huang, August Y; Liu, Xi-Ming; Ye, Adam Y; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wei, Liping

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing increases transcriptome diversity through post-transcriptional modifications of RNA. Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) conversion, the most common type of RNA editing in higher eukaryotes. Caenorhabditis elegans has two ADARs, ADR-1 and ADR-2, but their functions remain unclear. Here, we profiled the RNA editomes of C. elegans at different developmental stages of wild-type and ADAR mutants. We developed a new computational pipeline with a "bisulfite-seq-mapping-like" step and achieved a threefold increase in identification sensitivity. A total of 99.5% of the 47,660 A-to-I editing sites were found in clusters. Of the 3080 editing clusters, 65.7% overlapped with DNA transposons in noncoding regions and 73.7% could form hairpin structures. The numbers of editing sites and clusters were highest at the L1 and embryonic stages. The editing frequency of a cluster positively correlated with the number of editing sites within it. Intriguingly, for 80% of the clusters with 10 or more editing sites, almost all expressed transcripts were edited. Deletion of adr-1 reduced the editing frequency but not the number of editing clusters, whereas deletion of adr-2 nearly abolished RNA editing, indicating a modulating role of ADR-1 and an essential role of ADR-2 in A-to-I editing. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that adr-2 mutant worms altered the abundance of proteins involved in aging and lifespan regulation. Consistent with this finding, we observed that worms lacking RNA editing were short-lived. Taken together, our results reveal a sophisticated landscape of RNA editing and distinct modes of action of different ADARs.

  16. A-to-I RNA editing and cancer: from pathology to basic science.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Angela; Galardi, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes mRNA transcripts are extensively processed by different post-transcriptional events such as alternative splicing and RNA editing in order to generate many different mRNAs from the same gene, increasing the transcriptome and then the proteome. The most frequent RNA editing mechanism in mammals involves the conversion of specific adenosines into inosines by the ADAR family of enzymes. This editing event can change both the sequence and the secondary structure of RNA molecules, with important consequences on both the final proteins and regulatory RNAs. Alteration in RNA editing has been connected to numerous human pathologies and recent studies have demonstrated its importance in tumor progression.

  17. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome. PMID:26024316

  18. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome.

  19. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  20. Biological significance of RNA editing in cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Fei, Yongjun; Page, Michael

    2012-09-01

    RNA editing is one of the post-transcriptional RNA processes. RNA editing generates RNA and protein diversity in eukaryotes and results in specific amino acid substitutions, deletions, and changes in gene expression levels. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing represents the most important class of editing in human and affects function of many genes. The importance of balancing RNA modification levels across time and space is becoming increasingly evident. In this review, we overview the biological significance of RNA editing including RNA editing in tumorigenesis, RNA editing in neuronal tissues, RNA editing as a regulator of gene expression, and RNA editing in dsRNA-mediated gene silencing, which may increase our understanding of RNA biology.

  1. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  2. The majority of transcripts in the squid nervous system are extensively recoded by A-to-I RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Shahar; Garrett, Sandra C; Levanon, Erez Y; Olson, Sara; Graveley, Brenton R; Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Eisenberg, Eli

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deamination alters genetic information from the genomic blueprint. When it recodes mRNAs, it gives organisms the option to express diverse, functionally distinct, protein isoforms. All eumetazoans, from cnidarians to humans, express RNA editing enzymes. However, transcriptome-wide screens have only uncovered about 25 transcripts harboring conserved recoding RNA editing sites in mammals and several hundred recoding sites in Drosophila. These studies on few established models have led to the general assumption that recoding by RNA editing is extremely rare. Here we employ a novel bioinformatic approach with extensive validation to show that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii recodes proteins by RNA editing to an unprecedented extent. We identify 57,108 recoding sites in the nervous system, affecting the majority of the proteins studied. Recoding is tissue-dependent, and enriched in genes with neuronal and cytoskeletal functions, suggesting it plays an important role in brain physiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05198.001 PMID:25569156

  3. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    PubMed

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  4. Region-specific alterations of A-to-I RNA editing of serotonin 2c receptor in the cortex of suicides with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, D; van der Laan, S; Underwood, M D; Salvetat, N; Cavarec, L; Vincent, L; Molina, F; Mann, J J; Arango, V; Pujol, J F

    2016-01-01

    Brain region-specific abnormalities in serotonergic transmission appear to underlie suicidal behavior. Alterations of RNA editing on the serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C) pre-mRNA in the brain of suicides produce transcripts that attenuate 5-HT2CR signaling by impairing intracellular G-protein coupling and subsequent intracellular signal transduction. In brain, the distribution of RNA-editing enzymes catalyzing deamination (A-to-I modification) shows regional variation, including within the cerebral cortex. We tested the hypothesis that altered pre-mRNA 5-HT2CR receptor editing in suicide is region-specific. To this end, we investigated the complete 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile in two architectonically distinct cortical areas involved in mood regulation and decision-making in a clinically well-characterized cohort of age- and sex-matched non-psychiatric drug-free controls and depressed suicides. By using an original biochemical detection method, that is, capillary electrophoresis single-stranded conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP), we corroborated the 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile previously described in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9 (BA9)). Editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA displayed clear regional difference when comparing dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9) and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24). Compared with non-psychiatric control individuals, alterations of editing levels of 5-HT2CR mRNA were detected in both cortical areas of depressed suicides. A marked increase in editing on 5-HT2CR was especially observed in the anterior cingulate cortex in suicides, implicating this cortical area in suicide risk. The results suggest that region-specific changes in RNA editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA and deficient receptor function likely contribute to the etiology of major depressive disorder or suicide. PMID:27576167

  5. ADARs: allies or enemies? The importance of A-to-I RNA editing in human disease: from cancer to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Angela; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are enzymes that convert adenosine (A) to inosine (I) in nuclear-encoded RNAs and viral RNAs. The activity of ADARs has been demonstrated to be essential in mammals and serves to fine-tune different proteins and modulate many molecular pathways. Recent findings have shown that ADAR activity is altered in many pathological tissues. Moreover, it has been shown that modulation of RNA editing is important for cell proliferation and migration, and has a protective effect on ischaemic insults. This review summarises available recent knowledge on A-to-I RNA editing and ADAR enzymes, with particular attention given to the emerging role played by these enzymes in cancer, some infectious diseases and immune-mediated disorders.

  6. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: New targets and functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA [adenosine deaminase, RNA specific (ADAR)] catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene, and studies in mouse, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila suggest that its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses led us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR, including components of the actin cytoskeleton and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function. PMID:17018572

  7. Comparative analysis of A-to-I editing in human and non-human primate brains reveals conserved patterns and context-dependent regulation of RNA editing.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Richard T; Wang, Xiaojing; Morabito, Michael V; Emeson, Ronald B

    2017-04-06

    A-to-I RNA editing is an important process for generating molecular diversity in the brain through modification of transcripts encoding several proteins important for neuronal signaling. We investigated the relationships between the extent of editing at multiple substrate transcripts (5HT2C, MGLUR4, CADPS, GLUR2, GLUR4, and GABRA3) in brain tissue obtained from adult humans and rhesus macaques. Several patterns emerged from these studies revealing conservation of editing across primate species. Additionally, variability in the human population allows us to make novel inferences about the co-regulation of editing at different editing sites and even across different brain regions.

  8. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  9. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Niamh; Arieti, Fabiana; Gallo, Angela; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD) expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases. PMID:26437436

  10. RNA editing underlies temperature adaptation in K+ channels from polar octopuses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Sandra; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2012-02-17

    To operate in the extreme cold, ion channels from psychrophiles must have evolved structural changes to compensate for their thermal environment. A reasonable assumption would be that the underlying adaptations lie within the encoding genes. Here, we show that delayed rectifier K(+) channel genes from an Antarctic and a tropical octopus encode channels that differ at only four positions and display very similar behavior when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, the transcribed messenger RNAs are extensively edited, creating functional diversity. One editing site, which recodes an isoleucine to a valine in the channel's pore, greatly accelerates gating kinetics by destabilizing the open state. This site is extensively edited in both Antarctic and Arctic species, but mostly unedited in tropical species. Thus adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing can respond to the physical environment.

  11. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  12. DNA and RNA editing of retrotransposons accelerate mammalian genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Levanon, Erez Y

    2015-04-01

    Genome evolution is commonly viewed as a gradual process that is driven by random mutations that accumulate over time. However, DNA- and RNA-editing enzymes have been identified that can accelerate evolution by actively modifying the genomically encoded information. The apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzymes, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBECs) are potent restriction factors that can inhibit retroelements by cytosine-to-uridine editing of retroelement DNA after reverse transcription. In some cases, a retroelement may successfully integrate into the genome despite being hypermutated. Such events introduce unique sequences into the genome and are thus a source of genomic innovation. adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine-to-inosine editing in double-stranded RNA, commonly formed by oppositely oriented retroelements. The RNA editing confers plasticity to the transcriptome by generating many transcript variants from a single genomic locus. If the editing produces a beneficial variant, the genome may maintain the locus that produces the RNA-edited transcript for its novel function. Here, we discuss how these two powerful editing mechanisms, which both target inserted retroelements, facilitate expedited genome evolution.

  13. Molecular cloning of cDNA for double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase, a candidate enzyme for nuclear RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, U; Wang, Y; Sanford, T; Zeng, Y; Nishikura, K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned human cDNA encoding double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (DRADA). DRADA is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that converts multiple adenosines to inosines in double-helical RNA substrates without apparent sequence specificity. The A --> I conversion activity of the protein encoded by the cloned cDNA was confirmed by recombinant expression in insect cells. Use of the cloned DNA as a molecular probe documented sequence conservation across mammals and detected a single transcript of 7 kb in RNA of all human tissues analyzed. The deduced primary structure of human DRADA revealed a bipartite nuclear localization signal, three repeats of a double-stranded RNA binding motif, and the presence of sequences conserved in the catalytic center of other deaminases, including a cytidine deaminase involved in the RNA editing of apolipoprotein B. These structural properties are consistent with the enzymatic signature of DRADA, and strengthen the hypothesis that DRADA carries out the RNA editing of transcripts encoding glutamate-gated ion channels in brain. Images PMID:7972084

  14. Novel modes of RNA editing in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Sandrine; Valach, Matus; Aoulad-Aissa, Mohamed; Otto, Christian; Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Gene structure and expression in diplonemid mitochondria are unparalleled. Genes are fragmented in pieces (modules) that are separately transcribed, followed by the joining of module transcripts to contiguous RNAs. Some instances of unique uridine insertion RNA editing at module boundaries were noted, but the extent and potential occurrence of other editing types remained unknown. Comparative analysis of deep transcriptome and genome data from Diplonema papillatum mitochondria reveals ∼220 post-transcriptional insertions of uridines, but no insertions of other nucleotides nor deletions. In addition, we detect in total 114 substitutions of cytosine by uridine and adenosine by inosine, amassed into unusually compact clusters. Inosines in transcripts were confirmed experimentally. This is the first report of adenosine-to-inosine editing of mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs in mitochondria. In mRNAs, editing causes mostly amino-acid additions and non-synonymous substitutions; in ribosomal RNAs, it permits formation of canonical secondary structures. Two extensively edited transcripts were compared across four diplonemids. The pattern of uridine-insertion editing is strictly conserved, whereas substitution editing has diverged dramatically, but still rendering diplonemid proteins more similar to other eukaryotic orthologs. We posit that RNA editing not only compensates but also sustains, or even accelerates, ultra-rapid evolution of genome structure and sequence in diplonemid mitochondria. PMID:27001515

  15. Purification and characterization of a human RNA adenosine deaminase for glutamate receptor B pre-mRNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Sklar, P; Axel, R; Maniatis, T

    1997-04-29

    The glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) pre-mRNA is edited at two adenosine residues, resulting in amino acid changes that alter the electrophysiologic properties of the glutamate receptor. Previous studies showed that these amino acid changes are due to adenosine to inosine conversions in two codons resulting from adenosine deamination. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of an activity from human HeLa cells that efficiently and accurately edits GluR-B pre-mRNA at both of these sites. The purified activity contains a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1 (rRED1) protein, a member of the family of double-stranded RNA-dependent deaminase proteins. Recombinant human RED1 (hRED1), but not recombinant dsRAD, another member of the family, efficiently edits both the Q/R and R/G sites of GluR-B RNA. We conclude that the GluR-B editing activity present in HeLa cell extracts and the recombinant hRED1 protein are indistinguishable.

  16. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Deng, Patricia; Jacobson, Dionna; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3'UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3'UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions.

  17. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Dionna

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3’UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3’UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions. PMID:28166241

  18. Functional Impact of RNA editing and ADARs on regulation of gene expression: perspectives from deep sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsuan; Ma, Chung-Pei; Chen, Yi-Tung; Schuyler, Scott C; Chang, Kai-Ping; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cells regulate gene expression at multiple levels leading to a balance between robustness and complexity within their proteome. One core molecular step contributing to this important balance during metazoan gene expression is RNA editing, such as the co-transcriptional recoding of RNA transcripts catalyzed by the adenosine deaminse acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Understanding of the adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing process has been broadened considerably by the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, which allows for in-depth demarcation of an RNA editome at nucleotide resolution. However, critical issues remain unresolved with regard to how RNA editing cooperates with other transcript-associated events to underpin regulated gene expression. Here we review the growing body of evidence, provided by recent NGS-based studies, that links RNA editing to other mechanisms of post-transcriptional RNA processing and gene expression regulation including alternative splicing, transcript stability and localization, and the biogenesis and function of microRNAs (miRNAs). We also discuss the possibility that systematic integration of NGS data may be employed to establish the rules of an "RNA editing code", which may give us new insights into the functional consequences of RNA editing.

  19. TDP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of TDP-43, limits the accumulation of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa K; Ash, Peter Ea; Wilson, Gavin; Gonzales, Patrick; Garrido-Lecca, Alfonso; Roberts, Christine M; Dostal, Vishantie; Gendron, Tania F; Stein, Lincoln D; Blumenthal, Thomas; Petrucelli, Leonard; Link, Christopher D

    2014-12-17

    Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deleted for TDP-1, an ortholog of the neurodegeneration-associated RNA-binding protein TDP-43, display only mild phenotypes. Nevertheless, transcriptome sequencing revealed that many RNAs were altered in accumulation and/or processing in the mutant. Analysis of these transcriptional abnormalities demonstrates that a primary function of TDP-1 is to limit formation or stability of double-stranded RNA. Specifically, we found that deletion of tdp-1: (1) preferentially alters the accumulation of RNAs with inherent double-stranded structure (dsRNA); (2) increases the accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci; (3) enhances the frequency of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing; and (4) dramatically increases the amount of transcripts immunoprecipitable with a dsRNA-specific antibody, including intronic sequences, RNAs with antisense overlap to another transcript, and transposons. We also show that TDP-43 knockdown in human cells results in accumulation of dsRNA, indicating that suppression of dsRNA is a conserved function of TDP-43 in mammals. Altered accumulation of structured RNA may account for some of the previously described molecular phenotypes (e.g., altered splicing) resulting from reduction of TDP-43 function.

  20. Mutations underlying Episodic Ataxia type-1 antagonize Kv1.1 RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Ferrick-Kiddie, Elizabeth A; Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Ayers, Gregory D; Emeson, Ronald B

    2017-02-20

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in transcripts encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 converts an isoleucine to valine codon for amino acid 400, speeding channel recovery from inactivation. Numerous Kv1.1 mutations have been associated with the human disorder Episodic Ataxia Type-1 (EA1), characterized by stress-induced ataxia, myokymia, and increased prevalence of seizures. Three EA1 mutations, V404I, I407M, and V408A, are located within the RNA duplex structure required for RNA editing. Each mutation decreased RNA editing both in vitro and using an in vivo mouse model bearing the V408A allele. Editing of transcripts encoding mutant channels affects numerous biophysical properties including channel opening, closing, and inactivation. Thus EA1 symptoms could be influenced not only by the direct effects of the mutations on channel properties, but also by their influence on RNA editing. These studies provide the first evidence that mutations associated with human genetic disorders can affect cis-regulatory elements to alter RNA editing.

  1. Mutations underlying Episodic Ataxia type-1 antagonize Kv1.1 RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Ferrick-Kiddie, Elizabeth A.; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in transcripts encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 converts an isoleucine to valine codon for amino acid 400, speeding channel recovery from inactivation. Numerous Kv1.1 mutations have been associated with the human disorder Episodic Ataxia Type-1 (EA1), characterized by stress-induced ataxia, myokymia, and increased prevalence of seizures. Three EA1 mutations, V404I, I407M, and V408A, are located within the RNA duplex structure required for RNA editing. Each mutation decreased RNA editing both in vitro and using an in vivo mouse model bearing the V408A allele. Editing of transcripts encoding mutant channels affects numerous biophysical properties including channel opening, closing, and inactivation. Thus EA1 symptoms could be influenced not only by the direct effects of the mutations on channel properties, but also by their influence on RNA editing. These studies provide the first evidence that mutations associated with human genetic disorders can affect cis-regulatory elements to alter RNA editing. PMID:28216637

  2. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  3. Modulation of dADAR-dependent RNA editing by the Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Balpreet; Jepson, James E; Savva, Yiannis A; Pepper, Anita S-R; Reenan, Robert A; Jongens, Thomas A

    2011-10-30

    Loss of FMR1 gene function results in fragile X syndrome, the most common heritable form of intellectual disability. The protein encoded by this locus (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that is thought to primarily act as a translational regulator; however, recent studies have implicated FMRP in other mechanisms of gene regulation. We found that the Drosophila fragile X homolog (dFMR1) biochemically interacted with the adenosine-to-inosine RNA-editing enzyme dADAR. Adar and Fmr1 mutant larvae exhibited distinct morphological neuromuscular junction (NMJ) defects. Epistasis experiments based on these phenotypic differences revealed that Adar acts downstream of Fmr1 and that dFMR1 modulates dADAR activity. Furthermore, sequence analyses revealed that a loss or overexpression of dFMR1 affects editing efficiency on certain dADAR targets with defined roles in synaptic transmission. These results link dFMR1 with the RNA-editing pathway and suggest that proper NMJ synaptic architecture requires modulation of dADAR activity by dFMR1.

  4. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis.

  5. Adenosine Deaminase That Acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) Binding to Glutamate Receptor Subunit B Pre-mRNA Inhibits RNA Editing in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Eimile; Anderson, Ashley; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Hundley, Heather A

    2017-03-10

    RNA editing is a cellular process that precisely alters nucleotide sequences, thus regulating gene expression and generating protein diversity. Over 60% of human transcripts undergo adenosine to inosine RNA editing, and editing is required for normal development and proper neuronal function of animals. Editing of one adenosine in the transcript encoding the glutamate receptor subunit B, glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA 2 (GRIA2), modifies a codon, replacing the genomically encoded glutamine (Q) with arginine (R); thus this editing site is referred to as the Q/R site. Editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 is essential, and reduced editing of GRIA2 transcripts has been observed in patients suffering from glioblastoma. In glioblastoma, incorporation of unedited GRIA2 subunits leads to a calcium-permeable glutamate receptor, which can promote cell migration and tumor invasion. In this study, we identify adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) as an important regulator of Q/R site editing, investigate its mode of action, and detect elevated ADAR3 expression in glioblastoma tumors compared with adjacent brain tissue. Overexpression of ADAR3 in astrocyte and astrocytoma cell lines inhibits RNA editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 Furthermore, the double-stranded RNA binding domains of ADAR3 are required for repression of RNA editing. As the Q/R site of GRIA2 is specifically edited by ADAR2, we suggest that ADAR3 directly competes with ADAR2 for binding to GRIA2 transcript, inhibiting RNA editing, as evidenced by the direct binding of ADAR3 to the GRIA2 pre-mRNA. Finally, we provide evidence that both ADAR2 and ADAR3 expression contributes to the relative level of GRIA2 editing in tumors from patients suffering from glioblastoma.

  6. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the Wobble-Specific tRNA Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Malashkevich, V.; Roday, S.; Lisbin, M.; Schramm, V.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The essential tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase catalyzes the deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNAs. This modification allows for a single tRNA species to recognize multiple synonymous codons containing A, C, or U in the last (3'-most) position and ensures that all sense codons are appropriately decoded. We report the first combined structural and kinetic characterization of a wobble-specific deaminase. The structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme clearly defines the dimer interface and the coordination of the catalytically essential zinc ion. The structure also identifies the nucleophilic water and highlights residues near the catalytic zinc likely to be involved in recognition and catalysis of polymeric RNA substrates. A minimal 19 nucleotide RNA stem substrate has permitted the first steady-state kinetic characterization of this enzyme (k{sub cat} = 13 {+-} 1 min{sup -1} and K{sub M} = 0.83 {+-} 0.22 {micro}M). A continuous coupled assay was developed to follow the reaction at high concentrations of polynucleotide substrates (>10 {micro}M). This work begins to define the chemical and structural determinants responsible for catalysis and substrate recognition and lays the foundation for detailed mechanistic analysis of this essential enzyme.

  7. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  8. Genome-wide exonic small interference RNA-mediated gene silencing regulates sexual reproduction in the homothallic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ae Ran; Lim, Jae Yun; Shin, Chanseok

    2017-01-01

    Various ascomycete fungi possess sex-specific molecular mechanisms, such as repeat-induced point mutations, meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA, and unusual adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, for genome defense or gene regulation. Using a combined analysis of functional genetics and deep sequencing of small noncoding RNA (sRNA), mRNA, and the degradome, we found that the sex-specifically induced exonic small interference RNA (ex-siRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism has an important role in fine-tuning the transcriptome during ascospore formation in the head blight fungus Fusarium graminearum. Approximately one-third of the total sRNAs were produced from the gene region, and sRNAs with an antisense direction or 5′-U were involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation by reducing the stability of the corresponding gene transcripts. Although both Dicers and Argonautes partially share their functions, the sex-specific RNAi pathway is primarily mediated by FgDicer1 and FgAgo2, while the constitutively expressed RNAi components FgDicer2 and FgAgo1 are responsible for hairpin-induced RNAi. Based on our results, we concluded that F. graminearum primarily utilizes ex-siRNA-mediated RNAi for ascosporogenesis but not for genome defenses and other developmental stages. Each fungal species appears to have evolved RNAi-based gene regulation for specific developmental stages or stress responses. This study provides new insights into the regulatory role of sRNAs in fungi and other lower eukaryotes. PMID:28146558

  9. Characterization of a gene coding for a putative adenosine deaminase-related growth factor by RNA interference in the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Shuichi; Yamada, Masato; Shibata, Kou; Okuhara, Toru; Yoshida, Masumi; Inatomi, Satoshi; Taguchi, Goro; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    A full-length cDNA coding for a putative adenosine deaminase (Fv-ada) was isolated from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. Fv-ada encodes a polypeptide consisting of 537 amino acid residues, which has a consensus sequence conserved among adenosine deaminase-related growth factors (ADGF) found in several metazoa, including chordates and insects. Fv-ada transcript was detected at all stages of growth in dikaryotic F. velutipes cells, with a peak at the primordial stage. Heterologous expression of Fv-ada in the yeast Pichia pastoris produced recombinant Fv-ADA that catalyzed the conversion of adenosine to inosine. Dikaryotic mycelia from F. velutipes were transformed with the binary plasmid pFungiway-Fv-ada, which was designed to suppress the expression of Fv-ada through RNA interference. The growth rates of the resulting transformants were retarded in response to the degree of suppression, indicating that Fv-ada plays an important role in the mycelial growth of F. velutipes. These results suggested that ADGF could function as growth factors in fungi, as is seen in other eukaryotes.

  10. Sequencing and bioinformatics-based analyses of the microRNA transcriptome in hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Mishima, Takuya; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Arima, Yasuo; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Shigehara, Kengo; Kanda, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Eiji; Tajiri, Takashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2011-01-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in crucial biological processes, and it is now evident that miRNA alterations are involved in the progression of human cancers. Recent studies on miRNA profiling performed with cloning suggest that sequencing is useful for the detection of novel miRNAs, modifications, and precise compositions and that miRNA expression levels calculated by clone count are reproducible. Here we focus on sequencing of miRNA to obtain a comprehensive profile and characterization of these transcriptomes as they relate to human liver. Sequencing using 454 sequencing and conventional cloning from 22 pair of HCC and adjacent normal liver (ANL) and 3 HCC cell lines identified reliable reads of more than 314000 miRNAs from HCC and more than 268000 from ANL for registered human miRNAs. Computational bioinformatics identified 7 novel miRNAs with high conservation, 15 novel opposite miRNAs, and 3 novel antisense miRNAs. Moreover sequencing can detect miRNA modifications including adenosine-to-inosine editing in miR-376 families. Expression profiling using clone count analysis was used to identify miRNAs that are expressed aberrantly in liver cancer including miR-122, miR-21, and miR-34a. Furthermore, sequencing-based miRNA clustering, but not individual miRNA, detects high risk patients who have high potentials for early tumor recurrence after liver surgery (P = 0.006), and which is the only significant variable among pathological and clinical and variables (P = 0,022). We believe that the combination of sequencing and bioinformatics will accelerate the discovery of novel miRNAs and biomarkers involved in human liver cancer.

  11. Sequencing and Bioinformatics-Based Analyses of the microRNA Transcriptome in Hepatitis B–Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Mishima, Takuya; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Arima, Yasuo; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Shigehara, Kengo; Kanda, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Eiji; Tajiri, Takashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in crucial biological processes, and it is now evident that miRNA alterations are involved in the progression of human cancers. Recent studies on miRNA profiling performed with cloning suggest that sequencing is useful for the detection of novel miRNAs, modifications, and precise compositions and that miRNA expression levels calculated by clone count are reproducible. Here we focus on sequencing of miRNA to obtain a comprehensive profile and characterization of these transcriptomes as they relate to human liver. Sequencing using 454 sequencing and conventional cloning from 22 pair of HCC and adjacent normal liver (ANL) and 3 HCC cell lines identified reliable reads of more than 314000 miRNAs from HCC and more than 268000 from ANL for registered human miRNAs. Computational bioinformatics identified 7 novel miRNAs with high conservation, 15 novel opposite miRNAs, and 3 novel antisense miRNAs. Moreover sequencing can detect miRNA modifications including adenosine-to-inosine editing in miR-376 families. Expression profiling using clone count analysis was used to identify miRNAs that are expressed aberrantly in liver cancer including miR-122, miR-21, and miR-34a. Furthermore, sequencing-based miRNA clustering, but not individual miRNA, detects high risk patients who have high potentials for early tumor recurrence after liver surgery (P = 0.006), and which is the only significant variable among pathological and clinical and variables (P = 0,022). We believe that the combination of sequencing and bioinformatics will accelerate the discovery of novel miRNAs and biomarkers involved in human liver cancer. PMID:21283620

  12. Editing of glutamate receptor B subunit ion channel RNAs by four alternatively spliced DRADA2 double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, F; Chen, C X; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    1997-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and edits transcripts of certain cellular and viral genes such as glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and hepatitis delta antigen. The first member of this type of deaminase, DRADA1, has been recently cloned based on the amino acid sequence information derived from biochemically purified proteins. Our search for DRADA1-like genes through expressed sequence tag databases led to the cloning of the second member of this class of enzyme, DRADA2, which has a high degree of sequence homology to DRADA1 yet exhibits a distinctive RNA editing site selectivity. There are four differentially spliced isoforms of human DRADA2. These different isoforms of recombinant DRADA2 proteins, including one which is a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1, were analyzed in vitro for their GluR B subunit (GluR-B) RNA editing site selectivity. As originally reported for rat RED1, the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms edit GluR-B RNA efficiently at the so-called Q/R site, whereas DRADA1 barely edits this site. In contrast, the R/G site of GluR-B RNA was edited efficiently by the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms as well as DRADA1. Isoforms DRADA2c and -2d, which have a distinctive truncated shorter C-terminal structure, displayed weak adenosine-to-inosine conversion activity but no editing activity tested at three known sites of GluR-B RNA. The possible role of these DRADA2c and -2d isoforms in the regulatory mechanism of RNA editing is discussed. PMID:9111310

  13. Genesis of ancestral haplotypes: RNA modifications and reverse transcription-mediated polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J; Williamson, Joseph F; Lester, Susan; Stewart, Brent J; Millman, John A; Carnegie, Pat; Lindley, Robyn A; Pain, Geoff N; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the genesis of the block haplotype structure of the genome is a major challenge. With the completion of the sequencing of the Human Genome and the initiation of the HapMap project the concept that the chromosomes of the mammalian genome are a mosaic, or patchwork, of conserved extended block haplotype sequences is now accepted by the mainstream genomics research community. Ancestral Haplotypes (AHs) can be viewed as a recombined string of smaller Polymorphic Frozen Blocks (PFBs). How have such variant extended DNA sequence tracts emerged in evolution? Here the relevant literature on the problem is reviewed from various fields of molecular and cell biology particularly molecular immunology and comparative and functional genomics. Based on our synthesis we then advance a testable molecular and cellular model. A critical part of the analysis concerns the origin of the strand biased mutation signatures in the transcribed regions of the human and higher primate genome, A-to-G versus T-to-C (ratio ∼ 1.5 fold) and C-to-T versus G-to-A (≥ 1.5 fold). A comparison and evaluation of the current state of the fields of immunoglobulin Somatic Hypermutation (SHM) and Transcription-Coupled DNA Repair focused on how mutations in newly synthesized RNA might be copied back to DNA thus accounting for some of the genome-wide strand biases (e.g., the A-to-G vs T-to-C component of the strand biased spectrum). We hypothesize that the genesis of PFBs and extended AHs occurs during mutagenic episodes in evolution (e.g., retroviral infections) and that many of the critical DNA sequence diversifying events occur first at the RNA level, e.g., recombination between RNA strings resulting in tandem and dispersed RNA duplications (retroduplications), RNA mutations via adenosine-to-inosine pre-mRNA editing events as well as error prone RNA synthesis. These are then copied back into DNA by a cellular reverse transcription process (also likely to be error-prone) that we have called

  14. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  15. ADAR1 is vital for B cell lineage development in the mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Goldberg, Sanja; Vax, Einav; Amariglio, Ninette

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 is the master editor of the transcriptome, catalyzing the conversion of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I). RNA transcripts fold into a variety of secondary structures including long intramolecular RNA duplexes that are the major substrate of ADAR1. Most A-to-I editing sites occur within RNA duplexes formed by complementary pairing of inverted retrotransposable elements interspersed within noncoding regions of transcripts. This catalytic activity of ADAR1 most likely prevents the abnormal activation of cytosolic nucleic acid sensors by self-dsRNAs. Homozygous disruption of mouse Adar is embryonic lethal due to a toxic type-I interferons response and correspondingly biallelic missense mutations in human ADAR1 cause a severe congenital interferonopathy. Here, we report that Cd19-Cre-mediated Adar gene ablation in the mouse causes a significant defect in the final stages of B cell development with an almost complete absence of newly formed immature and CD23+ mature recirculating B cells in the BM. Adar ablation in pre-B cells induced upregulation of typical interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and apoptosis upon further maturation. ADAR1 deficiency also inhibited the in vitro, IL-7-mediated, differentiation of BM-derived B cell precursors. In summary, ADAR1 is required, non-redundantly, for normal B lymphopoiesis in the BM and peripheral maintenance. PMID:27494846

  16. Pathogenic mechanism of a human mitochondrial tRNAPhe mutation associated with myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé; Qin, Daoming; Rubio, Mary Anne T; Alfonzo, Juan D; Fredrick, Kurt; Ibba, Michael

    2007-09-25

    Human mitochondrial tRNA (hmt-tRNA) mutations are associated with a variety of diseases including mitochondrial myopathies, diabetes, encephalopathies, and deafness. Because the current understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms of these mutations is limited, there is no efficient method to treat their associated mitochondrial diseases. Here, we use a variety of known mutations in hmt-tRNA(Phe) to investigate the mechanisms that lead to malfunctions. We tested the impact of hmt-tRNA(Phe) mutations on aminoacylation, structure, and translation elongation-factor binding. The majority of the mutants were pleiotropic, exhibiting defects in aminoacylation, global structure, and elongation-factor binding. One notable exception was the G34A anticodon mutation of hmt-tRNA(Phe) (mitochondrial DNA mutation G611A), which is associated with MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers). In vitro, the G34A mutation decreases aminoacylation activity by 100-fold, but does not affect global folding or recognition by elongation factor. Furthermore, G34A hmt-tRNA(Phe) does not undergo adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing, ruling out miscoding as a possible mechanism for mitochondrial malfunction. To improve the aminoacylation state of the mutant tRNA, we modified the tRNA binding domain of the nucleus-encoded human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, which aminoacylates hmt-tRNA(Phe) with cognate phenylalanine. This variant enzyme displayed significantly improved aminoacylation efficiency for the G34A mutant, suggesting a general strategy to treat certain classes of mitochondrial diseases by modification of the corresponding nuclear gene.

  17. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G; Hansen, Peter J; Rivera, Rocío M

    2016-07-02

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects.

  18. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E.; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G.; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G.; Hansen, Peter J.; Rivera, Rocío M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7) transcript: A-to-I editing events in normal and cancerous human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Malka; Gilead, Leon; Markel, Gal; Nemlich, Yael; Feiler, Yulia; Enk, Claes David; Denichenko, Polina; Karni, Rotem; Ingber, Arieh

    2013-08-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common malignancies in caucasians worldwide. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7) was suggested to function as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancers, and to play a role in the proliferation of keratinocytes. A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional mechanism frequently used to expand and diversify transcriptome and proteome repertoire in eukaryotic cells. A-to-I RNA editing can alter codons, substitute amino acids and affect protein sequence, structure, and function. Two editing sites were identified within the IGFBP7 transcript. To evaluate the expression and editing of IGFBP7 mRNA in NMSC compared to normal epidermis. We examined the expression and mRNA editing level of IGFBP7 in 22 basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 15 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 18 normal epidermis samples that were surgically removed from patients by the Mohs Micrographic Surgery procedure. We studied the effect of IGFBP7 editing on an immortalized HaCaT keratinocyte cell model. IGFBP7 mRNA is over expressed in BCC and SCC compared to normal epidermis. Moreover, the IGFBP7 transcript is highly edited in normal epidermis, but its editing is significantly reduced in BCC and SCC. The edited form of IGFBP7 can inhibit proliferation and induce senescence in cultured keratinocytes. This study describes for the first time A-to-I editing in the coding sequence of a tumor suppressor gene in humans, and suggests that IGFBP7 editing serves as a fine-tuning mechanism to maintain the equilibrium between proliferation and senescence in normal skin.

  20. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA, RNA Editing, and Interferon Action

    PubMed Central

    George, Cyril X.; Gan, Zhenji; Liu, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine (A) to inosine (I) editing of RNA that possesses double-stranded (ds) structure. A-to-I RNA editing results in nucleotide substitution, because I is recognized as G instead of A both by ribosomes and by RNA polymerases. A-to-I substitution can also cause dsRNA destabilization, as I:U mismatch base pairs are less stable than A:U base pairs. Three mammalian ADAR genes are known, of which two encode active deaminases (ADAR1 and ADAR2). Alternative promoters together with alternative splicing give rise to two protein size forms of ADAR1: an interferon-inducible ADAR1-p150 deaminase that binds dsRNA and Z-DNA, and a constitutively expressed ADAR1-p110 deaminase. ADAR2, like ADAR1-p110, is constitutively expressed and binds dsRNA. A-to-I editing occurs with both viral and cellular RNAs, and affects a broad range of biological processes. These include virus growth and persistence, apoptosis and embryogenesis, neurotransmitter receptor and ion channel function, pancreatic cell function, and post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs. Biochemical processes that provide a framework for understanding the physiologic changes following ADAR-catalyzed A-to-I ( = G) editing events include mRNA translation by changing codons and hence the amino acid sequence of proteins; pre-mRNA splicing by altering splice site recognition sequences; RNA stability by changing sequences involved in nuclease recognition; genetic stability in the case of RNA virus genomes by changing sequences during viral RNA replication; and RNA-structure-dependent activities such as microRNA production or targeting or protein–RNA interactions. PMID:21182352

  1. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  2. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  3. Omnipotent RNA.

    PubMed

    Spirin, Alexander S

    2002-10-23

    The capability of polyribonucleotide chains to form unique, compactly folded structures is considered the basis for diverse non-genetic functions of RNA, including the function of recognition of various ligands and the catalytic function. Together with well-known genetic functions of RNA - coding and complementary replication - this has led to the concept of the functional omnipotence of RNA and the hypothesis that an ancient RNA world supposedly preceded the contemporary DNA-RNA-protein life. It is proposed that the Woese universal precursor in the ancient RNA world could be a cell-free community of mixed RNA colonies growing and multiplying on solid surfaces.

  4. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  5. RNA helicases

    PubMed Central

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In addition, RNA helicase expression and/or activity are frequently altered during cellular response to abiotic stress, implying they perform defined roles during cellular adaptation to changes in the growth environment. Specifically, RNA helicases contribute to the formation of cold-adapted ribosomes and RNA degradosomes, implying a role in alleviation of RNA secondary structure stabilization at low temperature. A common emerging theme involves RNA helicases acting as scaffolds for protein-protein interaction and functioning as molecular clamps, holding RNA-protein complexes in specific conformations. This review highlights recent advances in DEAD-box RNA helicase association with cellular response to abiotic stress in prokaryotes. PMID:23093803

  6. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms.

  7. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA gentics: Variability of RNA genomes, Volume III. Topics covered include: High error rate, population equilibrium, and evolution of RNA replication systems; Influenza viruses; High rate of nutation and evolution; and Sequence space and quasi species distribution.

  8. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  9. RNA. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells.

  10. RNA Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. It is widely believed that this RNA World was extensive and therefore a sophisticated nucleic acid replication machinery would presumably predate the translation machinery which would not be needed until later stages in the development of life. This view of an extended RNA World is not necessarily correct. From the point of view of exobiology, the difference in these two views mainly affects the significance of studies of the extent of catalysis possible by RNA- In either case, the origin of the translation machinery and the principles of RNA evolution remain central problems in exobiology. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modem organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S RRNA sequence studies). Third, the RNAs that comprise the ribosome are themselves likely of very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.

  11. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA).

    PubMed

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A

    2017-03-28

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA "bait" sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA "trigger" sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch "ON" translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present.

  12. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E.; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA “bait” sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA “trigger” sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch “ON” translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present. PMID:28350000

  13. Alternative Splicing of STAT3 Is Affected by RNA Editing.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lior; Abutbul-Amitai, Mor; Paret, Gideon; Nevo-Caspi, Yael

    2017-03-09

    A-to-I RNA editing, carried out by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is an epigenetic phenomenon of posttranscriptional modifications on pre-mRNA. RNA editing in intronic sequences may influence alternative splicing of flanking exons. We have previously shown that conditions that induce editing result in elevated expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), preferentially the alternatively-spliced STAT3β isoform. Mechanisms regulating alternative splicing of STAT3 have not been elucidated. STAT3 undergoes A-to-I RNA editing in an intron residing in proximity to the alternatively spliced exon. We hypothesized that RNA editing plays a role in regulating alternative splicing toward STAT3β. In this study we extend our observation connecting RNA editing to the preferential induction of STAT3β expression. We study the involvement of ADAR1 in STAT3 editing and reveal the connection between editing and alternative splicing of STAT3. Deferoaxamine treatment caused the induction in STAT3 RNA editing and STAT3β expression. Silencing ADAR1 caused a decrease in STAT3 editing and expression with a preferential decrease in STAT3β. Cells transfected with a mutated minigene showed preferential splicing toward the STAT3β transcript. Editing in the STAT3 intron is performed by ADAR1 and affects STAT3 alternative splicing. These results suggest that RNA editing is one of the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of STAT3β.

  14. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs) are both Antiviral and Proviral Dependent upon the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing, the deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) that occurs in regions of RNA with double-stranded character, is catalyzed by a family of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs). In mammals there are three ADAR genes. Two encode proteins that possess demonstrated deaminase activity: ADAR1, which is interferon-inducible, and ADAR2 which is constitutively expressed. ADAR3, by contrast, has not yet been shown to bean active enzyme. The specificity of the ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminases ranges from highly site-selective to non-selective, dependent on the duplex structure of the substrate RNA. A-to-I editing is a form of nucleotide substitution editing, because I is decoded as guanosine (G) instead of A by ribosomes during translation and by polymerases during RNA-dependent RNA replication. Additionally, A-to-I editing can alter RNA structure stability as I:U mismatches are less stable than A:U base pairs. Both viral and cellular RNAs are edited by ADARs. A-to-I editing is of broad physiologic significance. Among the outcomes of A-to-I editing are biochemical changes that affect how viruses interact with their hosts, changes that can lead to either enhanced or reduced virus growth and persistence dependent upon the specific virus. PMID:21211811

  15. Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Variation in RNA Editing Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongjun; Gatti, Daniel M; Srivastava, Anuj; Snyder, Elizabeth M; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Simecek, Petr; Svenson, Karen L; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Braun, Robert E; Churchill, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    RNA editing refers to post-transcriptional processes that alter the base sequence of RNA. Recently, hundreds of new RNA editing targets have been reported. However, the mechanisms that determine the specificity and degree of editing are not well understood. We examined quantitative variation of site-specific editing in a genetically diverse multiparent population, Diversity Outbred mice, and mapped polymorphic loci that alter editing ratios globally for C-to-U editing and at specific sites for A-to-I editing. An allelic series in the C-to-U editing enzyme Apobec1 influences the editing efficiency of Apob and 58 additional C-to-U editing targets. We identified 49 A-to-I editing sites with polymorphisms in the edited transcript that alter editing efficiency. In contrast to the shared genetic control of C-to-U editing, most of the variable A-to-I editing sites were determined by local nucleotide polymorphisms in proximity to the editing site in the RNA secondary structure. Our results indicate that RNA editing is a quantitative trait subject to genetic variation and that evolutionary constraints have given rise to distinct genetic architectures in the two canonical types of RNA editing.

  16. RNA Editing, ADAR1, and the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingde; Li, Xiaoni; Qi, Ruofan; Billiar, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing, particularly A-to-I RNA editing, has been shown to play an essential role in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, and is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including skin pigmentation disorder, autoimmune and inflammatory tissue injury, neuron degeneration, and various malignancies. A-to-I RNA editing is carried out by a small group of enzymes, the adenosine deaminase acting on RNAs (ADARs). Only three members of this protein family, ADAR1–3, exist in mammalian cells. ADAR3 is a catalytically null enzyme and the most significant function of ADAR2 was found to be in editing on the neuron receptor GluR-B mRNA. ADAR1, however, has been shown to play more significant roles in biological and pathological conditions. Although there remains much that is not known about how ADAR1 regulates cellular function, recent findings point to regulation of the innate immune response as an important function of ADAR1. Without appropriate RNA editing by ADAR1, endogenous RNA transcripts stimulate cytosolic RNA sensing receptors and therefore activate the IFN-inducing signaling pathways. Overactivation of innate immune pathways can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction. However, obvious gaps in our knowledge persist as to how ADAR1 regulates innate immune responses through RNA editing. Here, we review critical findings from ADAR1 mechanistic studies focusing on its regulatory function in innate immune responses and identify some of the important unanswered questions in the field. PMID:28106799

  17. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network.

  18. RNA Editing During Sexual Development Occurs in Distantly Related Filamentous Ascomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Ines; Dahlmann, Tim A.; Kück, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that modifies RNA molecules leading to transcript sequences that differ from their template DNA. A-to-I editing was found to be widely distributed in nuclear transcripts of metazoa, but was detected in fungi only recently in a study of the filamentous ascomycete Fusarium graminearum that revealed extensive A-to-I editing of mRNAs in sexual structures (fruiting bodies). Here, we searched for putative RNA editing events in RNA-seq data from Sordaria macrospora and Pyronema confluens, two distantly related filamentous ascomycetes, and in data from the Taphrinomycete Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Like F. graminearum, S. macrospora is a member of the Sordariomycetes, whereas P. confluens belongs to the early-diverging group of Pezizomycetes. We found extensive A-to-I editing in RNA-seq data from sexual mycelium from both filamentous ascomycetes, but not in vegetative structures. A-to-I editing was not detected in different stages of meiosis of S. pombe. A comparison of A-to-I editing in S. macrospora with F. graminearum and P. confluens, respectively, revealed little conservation of individual editing sites. An analysis of RNA-seq data from two sterile developmental mutants of S. macrospora showed that A-to-I editing is strongly reduced in these strains. Sequencing of cDNA fragments containing more than one editing site from P. confluens showed that at the beginning of sexual development, transcripts were incompletely edited or unedited, whereas in later stages transcripts were more extensively edited. Taken together, these data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing is an evolutionary conserved feature during fruiting body development in filamentous ascomycetes. PMID:28338982

  19. RNA editing during sexual development occurs in distantly related filamentous ascomycetes.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Ines; Dahlmann, Tim; Kück, Ulrich; Nowrousian, Minou

    2017-03-09

    RNA editing is a posttranscriptional process that modifies RNA molecules leading to transcript sequences that differ from their template DNA. A-to-I editing was found to be widely distributed in nuclear transcripts of metazoa, but was detected in fungi only recently in a study of the filamentous ascomycete Fusarium graminearum that revealed extensive A-to-I editing of mRNAs in sexual structures (fruiting bodies). Here, we searched for putative RNA editing events in RNA-seq data from Sordaria macrospora and Pyronema confluens, two distantly related filamentous ascomycetes, and in data from the Taphrinomycete Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Like F. graminearum, S. macrospora is a member of the Sordariomycetes, whereas P. confluens belongs to the early-diverging group of Pezizomycetes. We found extensive A-to-I editing in RNA-seq data from sexual mycelium from both filamentous ascomycetes, but not in vegetative structures. A-to-I editing was not detected in different stages of meiosis of S. pombe. A comparison of A-to-I editing in S. macrospora with F. graminearum and P. confluens, respectively, revealed little conservation of individual editing sites. An analysis of RNA-seq data from two sterile developmental mutants of S. macrospora showed that A-to-I editing is strongly reduced in these strains. Sequencing of cDNA fragments containing more than one editing site from P. confluens showed that at the beginning of sexual development, transcripts were incompletely edited or unedited, whereas in later stages transcripts were more extensively edited. Taken together, these data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing is an evolutionary conserved feature during fruiting body development in filamentous ascomycetes.

  20. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  1. Single cell transcriptomics reveals specific RNA editing signatures in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Picardi, Ernesto; Horner, David Stephen; Pesole, Graziano

    2017-03-03

    While RNA editing by A-to-I deamination is a requisite for neuronal function in humans, it is under investigated in single cells. Here we fill this gap by analysing RNA editing profiles of single cells from the brain cortex of living human subjects. We show that RNA editing levels per cell are bimodally distributed and distinguish between major brain cell types thus providing new insights into neuronal dynamics.

  2. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  3. Altered RNA editing in 3′ UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired “normal” tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3′UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors. PMID:26980570

  4. Altered RNA editing in 3' UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-03-16

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired "normal" tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3'UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors.

  5. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-04

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems.

  6. Detection theory in identification of RNA-DNA sequence differences using RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Toung, Jonathan M; Lahens, Nicholas; Hogenesch, John B; Grant, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology have allowed for detailed analyses of the transcriptome at single-nucleotide resolution, facilitating the study of RNA editing or sequence differences between RNA and DNA genome-wide. In humans, two types of post-transcriptional RNA editing processes are known to occur: A-to-I deamination by ADAR and C-to-U deamination by APOBEC1. In addition to these sequence differences, researchers have reported the existence of all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs); however, the validity of these claims is debated, as many studies claim that technical artifacts account for the majority of these non-canonical sequence differences. In this study, we used a detection theory approach to evaluate the performance of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and associated aligners in accurately identifying RNA-DNA sequence differences. By generating simulated RNA-Seq datasets containing RDDs, we assessed the effect of alignment artifacts and sequencing error on the sensitivity and false discovery rate of RDD detection. Overall, we found that even in the presence of sequencing errors, false negative and false discovery rates of RDD detection can be contained below 10% with relatively lenient thresholds. We also assessed the ability of various filters to target false positive RDDs and found them to be effective in discriminating between true and false positives. Lastly, we used the optimal thresholds we identified from our simulated analyses to identify RDDs in a human lymphoblastoid cell line. We found approximately 6,000 RDDs, the majority of which are A-to-G edits and likely to be mediated by ADAR. Moreover, we found the majority of non A-to-G RDDs to be associated with poorer alignments and conclude from these results that the evidence for widespread non-canonical RDDs in humans is weak. Overall, we found RNA-Seq to be a powerful technique for surveying RDDs genome-wide when coupled with the appropriate thresholds and filters.

  7. Extracellular RNA in aging.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Douglas F; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Evans, Michele K

    2017-03-01

    Since the discovery of extracellular RNA (exRNA) in circulation and other bodily fluids, there has been considerable effort to catalog and assess whether exRNAs can be used as markers for health and disease. A variety of exRNA species have been identified including messenger RNA and noncoding RNA such as microRNA (miRNA), small nucleolar RNA, transfer RNA, and long noncoding RNA. Age-related changes in exRNA abundance have been observed, and it is likely that some of these transcripts play a role in aging. In this review, we summarize the current state of exRNA profiling in various body fluids and discuss age-related changes in exRNA abundance that have been identified in humans and other model organisms. miRNAs, in particular, are a major focus of current research and we will highlight and discuss the potential role that specific miRNAs might play in age-related phenotypes and disease. We will also review challenges facing this emerging field and various strategies that can be used for the validation and future use of exRNAs as markers of aging and age-related disease. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1385. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Antibodies against RNA hydrolyze RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Krasnorutskii, Michael A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2008-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA leads to the production of anti-DNA antibodies (Abs) demonstrating both DNase and RNase activities. It is currently not known whether anti-RNA Abs can possess nuclease activities. In an attempt to address this question, we have shown that immunization of three rabbits with complex of RNA with methylated BSA (mBSA) stimulates production of IgGs with RNase and DNase activities belonging to IgGs, while polyclonal Abs from three non-immunized rabbits and three animals immunized with mBSA are catalytically inactive. Affinity chromatography of IgGs from the sera of autoimmune (AI) patients on DNA-cellulose usually demonstrates a number of fractions, all of which effectively hydrolyze both DNA and RNA, while rabbit catalytic IgGs were separated into Ab subfractions, some of which demonstrated only DNase activity, while others hydrolyzed RNA faster than DNA. The enzymic properties of the RNase and DNase IgGs from rabbits immunized with RNA distinguish them from all known canonical RNases and DNases and DNA- and RNA-hydrolyzing abzymes (Abzs) from patients with different AI diseases. In contrast to RNases and AI RNA-hydrolyzing Abs, rabbit RNase IgGs catalyze only the first step of the hydrolysis reaction but cannot hydrolyze the formed terminal 2',3'-cyclophosphate. The data indicate that Abzs of AI patients hydrolyzing nucleic acids in part may be Abs against RNA and its complexes with proteins.

  9. RNA-Catalyzed RNA Ligation on an External RNA Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the hc ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes ligation of the 3' end of an RNA substrate to the 5' end of the ribozyme, were utilized to evolve a ribozyme that catalyzes ligation reactions on an external RNA template. The evolved ribozyme catalyzes the joining of an oligonucleotide 3'-hydroxyl to the 5'-triphosphate of an RNA hairpin molecule. The ribozyme can also utilize various substrate sequences, demonstrating a largely sequence-independent mechanism for substrate recognition. The ribozyme also carries out the ligation of two oligonucleotides that are bound at adjacent positions on a complementary template. Finally, it catalyzes addition of mononucleoside '5-triphosphates onto the '3 end of an oligonucleotide primer in a template-dependent manner. The development of ribozymes that catalyze polymerase-type reactions contributes to the notion that an RNA world could have existed during the early history of life on Earth.

  10. Differential Binding of Three Major Human ADAR Isoforms to Coding and Long Non-Coding Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Galipon, Josephine; Ishii, Rintaro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tomita, Masaru; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of adenosine to inosine is an evolutionarily conserved process involved in many cellular pathways, from alternative splicing to miRNA targeting. In humans, it is carried out by no less than three major adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs): ADAR1-p150, ADAR1-p110, and ADAR2. However, the first two derive from alternative splicing, so that it is currently impossible to delete ADAR1-p110 without also knocking out ADAR1-p150 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of ADARs varies wildly among cell types, and no study has systematically explored the effect of each of these isoforms on the cell transcriptome. In this study, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP)-sequencing on overexpressed ADAR isoforms tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) shows that each ADAR is associated with a specific set of differentially expressed genes, and that they each bind to distinct set of RNA targets. Our results show a good overlap with known edited transcripts, establishing RIP-seq as a valid method for the investigation of RNA editing biology. PMID:28208661

  11. Decoding the RNA structurome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhipeng; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    Structures of RNA molecules are essential for their architectural, regulatory, and catalytic functions. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing enabled the development of methods for probing RNA structures on a transcriptome-wide scale – termed the RNA structurome. Here we review the state-of-the-art technologies for probing the RNA structurome, and highlight insights gained from these studies. We also point out the limits of current methods and discuss potential directions for future improvements. PMID:26923056

  12. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  13. Repetitive RNA unwinding by RNA helicase A facilitates RNA annealing.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Xing, Li; Kleiman, Lawrence; Myong, Sua

    2014-07-01

    Helicases contribute to diverse biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Recent reports suggest that unwinding of some helicases display repetitive activity, yet the functional role of the repetitiveness requires further investigation. Using single-molecule fluorescence assays, we elucidated a unique unwinding mechanism of RNA helicase A (RHA) that entails discrete substeps consisting of binding, activation, unwinding, stalling and reactivation stages. This multi-step process is repeated many times by a single RHA molecule without dissociation, resulting in repetitive unwinding/rewinding cycles. Our kinetic and mutational analysis indicates that the two double stand RNA binding domains at the N-terminus of RHA are responsible for such repetitive unwinding behavior in addition to providing an increased binding affinity to RNA. Further, the repetitive unwinding induces an efficient annealing of a complementary RNA by making the unwound strand more accessible. The complex and unusual mechanism displayed by RHA may help in explaining how the repetitive unwinding of helicases contributes to their biological functions.

  14. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  15. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A.; Barrett, Christian L.; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C.; Isquith, Jane M.; Zipeto, Maria A.; Goff, Daniel J.; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M.; Dao, Kim-Hien T.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Marra, Marco A.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies. PMID:23275297

  16. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C; Isquith, Jane M; Zipeto, Maria A; Goff, Daniel J; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M; Dao, Kim-Hien T; Morris, Sheldon R; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Marra, Marco A; Frazer, Kelly A; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-01-15

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies.

  17. The eukaryotic RNA exosome.

    PubMed

    Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D

    2014-02-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is an essential multi-subunit ribonuclease complex that contributes to the degradation or processing of nearly every class of RNA in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Its nine-subunit core shares structural similarity to phosphorolytic exoribonucleases such as bacterial PNPase. PNPase and the RNA exosome core feature a central channel that can accommodate single stranded RNA although unlike PNPase, the RNA exosome core is devoid of ribonuclease activity. Instead, the core associates with Rrp44, an endoribonuclease and processive 3'→5' exoribonuclease, and Rrp6, a distributive 3'→5' exoribonuclease. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that the exosome core is essential because it coordinates Rrp44 and Rrp6 recruitment, RNA can pass through the central channel, and the association with the core modulates Rrp44 and Rrp6 activities.

  18. Single nucleotide RNA choreography.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Mohan, Srividya; Hershkovitz, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2006-01-01

    New structural analysis methods, and a tree formalism re-define and expand the RNA motif concept, unifying what previously appeared to be disparate groups of structures. We find RNA tetraloops at high frequencies, in new contexts, with unexpected lengths, and in novel topologies. The results, with broad implications for RNA structure in general, show that even at this most elementary level of organization, RNA tolerates astounding variation in conformation, length, sequence and context. However the variation is not random; it is well-described by four distinct modes, which are 3-2 switches (backbone topology variations), insertions, deletions and strand clips.

  19. Assessing integrity of insect RNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing total RNA integrity is important for the success of downstream RNA applications. The 2100 Bioanalyzer system with the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) provides a quantitative measure of RNA degradation. Although RINs may not be ascertained for RNA from all organisms, namely those with unusual or...

  20. RNA based evolutionary optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter

    1993-12-01

    The notion of an RNA world has been introduced for a prebiotic scenario that is dominated by RNA molecules and their properties, in particular their capabilities to act as templates for reproduction and as catalysts for several cleavage and ligation reactions of polynucleotides and polypeptides. This notion is used here also for simple experimental assays which are well suited to study evolution in the test tube. In molecular evolution experiments fitness is determined in essence by the molecular structures of RNA molecules. Evidence is presented for adaptation to environment in cell-free media. RNA based molecular evolution experiments have led to interesting spin-offs in biotechnology, commonly called ‘applied molecular evolution’, which make use of Darwinian trial-and-error strategies in order to synthesize new pharmacological compounds and other advanced materials on a biological basis. Error-propagation in RNA replication leads to formation of mutant spectra called ‘quasispecies’. An increase in the error rate broadens the mutant spectrum. There exists a sharply defined threshold beyond which heredity breaks down and evolutionary adaptation becomes impossible. Almost all RNA viruses studied so far operate at conditions close to this error threshold. Quasispecies and error thresholds are important for an understanding of RNA virus evolution, and they may help to develop novel antiviral strategies. Evolution of RNA molecules can be studied and interpreted by considering secondary structures. The notion of sequence space introduces a distance between pairs of RNA sequences which is tantamount to counting the minimal number of point mutations required to convert the sequences into each other. The mean sensitivity of RNA secondary structures to mutation depends strongly on the base pairing alphabet: structures from sequences which contain only one base pair (GC or AU are much less stable against mutation than those derived from the natural (AUGC) sequences

  1. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  2. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  3. Who discovered messenger RNA?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Matthew

    2015-06-29

    The announcement of the discovery of messenger RNA (mRNA) and the cracking of the genetic code took place within weeks of each other in a climax of scientific excitement during the summer of 1961. Although mRNA is of decisive importance to our understanding of gene function, no Nobel Prize was awarded for its discovery. The large number of people involved, the complex nature of the results, and the tortuous path that was taken over half a century ago, all show that simple claims of priority may not reflect how science works.

  4. Does RNA editing compensate for Alu invasion of the primate genome?

    PubMed

    Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli

    2015-02-01

    One of the distinctive features of the primate genome is the Alu element, a repetitive short interspersed element, over a million highly similar copies of which account for >10% of the genome. A direct consequence of this feature is that primates' transcriptome is highly enriched in long stable dsRNA structures, the preferred target of adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs), which are the enzymes catalyzing A-to-I RNA editing. Indeed, A-to-I editing by ADARs is extremely abundant in primates: over a hundred million editing sites exist in their genomes. However, there are few essential editing sites conserved across mammals that have maintained their editing level despite the radical change in ADAR target landscape. Here, we review and discuss the cost of having an unusual amount of dsRNA and editing in the transcriptome, as well as the opportunities it presents, which might have contributed to the accelerated evolution of the primates.

  5. CircRNA expression pattern and circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xi; Feng, Chun-yan; Xiang, Zun; Chen, Yi-peng; Li, You-ming

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is still unclear, where involvement of circRNA is considered for its active role as “miRNA sponge”. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the circRNA expression pattern in NASH and further construct the circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network for in-depth mechanism exploration. Briefly, NASH mice model was established by Methionine and choline deficiency (MCD) diet feeding. Liver circRNA and mRNA profile was initially screened by microarray and ensuing qRT-PCR verification was carried out. The overlapped predicted miRNAs as downstream targets of circRNAs and upstream regulators of mRNAs were verified by qRT-PCR and final circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network was constructed. Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway analysis were further applied to enrich the huge mRNA microarray data. To sum up, there were 69 up and 63 down regulated circRNAs as well as 2760 up and 2465 down regulated mRNAs in NASH group, comparing with control group. Randomly selected 13 of 14 mRNAs and 2 of 8 circRNAs were successfully verified by qRT-PCR. Through predicted overlapped miRNA verification, four circRNA-miRNA-mRNA pathways were constructed, including circRNA_002581-miR-122-Slc1a5, circRNA_002581- miR-122-Plp2, circRNA_002581-miR-122-Cpeb1 and circRNA_007585-miR-326- UCP2. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also enriched specific mRNAs. Therefore, circRNA profile may serve as candidate for NASH diagnosis and circRNA-miRNA -mRNA pathway may provide novel mechanism for NASH. PMID:27677588

  6. lncRNA/MicroRNA interactions in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, MD; McDonald, RA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) have gained widespread attention for their role in diverse vascular processes including angiogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation, and migration. Despite great understanding of miRNA expression and function, knowledge of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecular mechanisms still remains limited. The influence of miRNA on lncRNA function, and the converse, is now beginning to emerge. lncRNA may regulate miRNA function by acting as endogenous sponges to regulate gene expression and miRNA have been shown to bind and regulate lncRNA stability. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular effects of lncRNA‐miRNA‐mediated interactions in vascular pathophysiology could pave the way for new diagnostic markers and therapeutic approaches, but first there is a requirement for a more detailed understanding of the impact of such regulatory networks. PMID:26910520

  7. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  8. ADAR1 restricts LINE-1 retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Orecchini, Elisa; Doria, Margherita; Antonioni, Ambra; Galardi, Silvia; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Frassinelli, Loredana; Mancone, Carmine; Montaldo, Claudia; Tripodi, Marco; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are involved in RNA editing that converts adenosines to inosines in double-stranded RNAs. ADAR1 was demonstrated to be functional on different viruses exerting either antiviral or proviral effects. Concerning HIV-1, several studies showed that ADAR1 favors viral replication. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of the ADAR1 ribonucleoprotein complex during HIV-1 expression. By using a dual-tag affinity purification procedure in cells expressing HIV-1 followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 14 non-ribosomal ADAR1-interacting proteins, most of which are novel. A significant fraction of these proteins were previously demonstrated to be associated to the Long INterspersed Element 1 (LINE1 or L1) ribonucleoparticles and to regulate the life cycle of L1 retrotransposons that continuously re-enter host-genome. Hence, we investigated the function of ADAR1 in the regulation of L1 activity. By using different cell-culture based retrotransposition assays in HeLa cells, we demonstrated a novel function of ADAR1 as suppressor of L1 retrotransposition. Apparently, this inhibitory mechanism does not occur through ADAR1 editing activity. Furthermore, we showed that ADAR1 binds the basal L1 RNP complex. Overall, these data support the role of ADAR1 as regulator of L1 life cycle. PMID:27658966

  9. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity in Influenza Virions

    PubMed Central

    Penhoet, Edward; Miller, Henry; Doyle, Michael; Blatti, Stanley

    1971-01-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been detected in purified preparations of influenza virus. In contrast to the replicase activity induced in influenza-infected cells, the virion-associated enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mn++. Most of the RNA synthesized in vitro is complementary to virion RNA. PMID:5288388

  10. Aminoacyl-RNA synthesis catalyzed by an RNA.

    PubMed

    Illangasekare, M; Sanchez, G; Nickles, T; Yarus, M

    1995-02-03

    An RNA has been selected that rapidly aminoacylates its 2'(3') terminus when provided with phenylalanyl-adenosine monophosphate. That is, the RNA accelerates the same aminoacyl group transfer catalyzed by protein aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases. The best characterized RNA reaction requires both Mg2+ and Ca2+. These results confirm a necessary prediction of the RNA world hypothesis and represent efficient RNA reaction (> or = 10(5) times accelerated) at a carbonyl carbon, exemplifying a little explored type of RNA catalysis.

  11. The RNA infrastructure: an introduction to ncRNA networks.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lesley J

    2011-01-01

    The RNA infrastructure connects RNA-based functions. With transcription-to-translation processing forming the core of the network, we can visualise how RNA-based regulation, cleavage and modification are the backbone of cellular function. The key to interpreting the RNA-infrastructure is in understanding how core RNAs (tRNA, mRNA and rRNA) and other ncRNAs operate in a spatial-temporal manner, moving around the nucleus, cytoplasm and organelles during processing, or in response to environmental cues. This chapter summarises the concept of the RNA-infrastructure, and highlights examples of RNA-based networking within prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It describes how transcription-to-translation processes are tightly connected, and explores some similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA networking.

  12. Effects of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome mutations predicted from ADAR-RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew J; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing is important for life in metazoan organisms. Dysregulation or mutations that compromise the efficacy of A to I editing results in neurological disorders and a shorten life span. These reactions are catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), which hydrolytically deaminate adenosines in regions of duplex RNA. Because inosine mimics guanosine in hydrogen bonding, this prolific RNA editing alters the sequence and structural information in the RNA landscape. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood autoimmune disease that is one of a broader set of inherited disorders characterized by constitutive upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) referred to as type I interferonopathies. AGS is caused by mutations in multiple genes whose protein products, including ADAR1, are all involved in nucleic acid metabolism or sensing. The recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain complexed with duplex RNA substrates enabled modeling of how AGS causing mutations may influence RNA binding and catalysis. The mutations can be broadly characterized into three groups; mutations on RNA-binding loops that directly affect RNA binding, "second-layer" mutations that can alter the disposition of RNA-binding loops, and mutations that can alter the position of an α-helix bearing an essential catalytic residue.

  13. Biology Today: Respect for RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The high points of the story of RNA are presented. The functions of RNA within the cell, how these functions are carried out, and how they evolved are described. The topics of splicing, self-splicing, RNA editing, transcription and translation, and antisense RNA are discussed. (KR)

  14. Stochastic Kinetics of Nascent RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Heng; Skinner, Samuel O.; Sokac, Anna Marie; Golding, Ido

    2016-09-01

    The stochastic kinetics of transcription is typically inferred from the distribution of RNA numbers in individual cells. However, cellular RNA reflects additional processes downstream of transcription, hampering this analysis. In contrast, nascent (actively transcribed) RNA closely reflects the kinetics of transcription. We present a theoretical model for the stochastic kinetics of nascent RNA, which we solve to obtain the probability distribution of nascent RNA per gene. The model allows us to evaluate the kinetic parameters of transcription from single-cell measurements of nascent RNA. The model also predicts surprising discontinuities in the distribution of nascent RNA, a feature which we verify experimentally.

  15. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Schlatterer, Joerg C.; Wieder, Matthew S.; Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois; Brenowitz, Michael

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High {sup {center_dot}}OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels-Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ({sup {center_dot}}OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) can produce sufficient {sup {center_dot}}OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels-Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C-C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme's active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels-Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to {sup {center_dot}}OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop's flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  16. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Bereg, Vera; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at . PMID:18700982

  17. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  18. Shaping tRNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  19. The RNA Worlds in Context

    PubMed Central

    Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    There are two RNA worlds. The first is the primordial RNA world, a hypothetical era when RNA served as both information and function, both genotype and phenotype. The second RNA world is that of today's biological systems, where RNA plays active roles in catalyzing biochemical reactions, in translating mRNA into proteins, in regulating gene expression, and in the constant battle between infectious agents trying to subvert host defense systems and host cells protecting themselves from infection. This second RNA world is not at all hypothetical, and although we do not have all the answers about how it works, we have the tools to continue our interrogation of this world and refine our understanding. The fun comes when we try to use our secure knowledge of the modern RNA world to infer what the primordial RNA world might have looked like. PMID:21441585

  20. Mapping RNA-RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tri C; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-06-24

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA-RNA interactions have to rely on an 'anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA-RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA-RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA-FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA-RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures.

  1. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  2. RNA-catalysed synthesis of complementary-strand RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doudna, Jennifer A.; Szostak, Jack W.

    1989-06-01

    The Tetrahymena ribozyme can splice together multiple oligonucleotides aligned on a template strand to yield a fully complementary product strand. This reaction demonstrates the feasibility of RNA-catalysed RNA replications.

  3. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2012-01-01

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (1H–15N 2D HMQC) and proton–proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1H–1H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino resonances for a majority

  4. RNA tectonics (tectoRNA) for RNA nanostructure design and its application in synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Junya; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are versatile biomaterials that act not only as DNA-like genetic materials but also have diverse functions in regulation of cellular biosystems. RNA is capable of regulating gene expression by sequence-specific hybridization. This feature allows the design of RNA-based artificial gene regulators (riboregulators). RNA can also build complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D nanostructures, which afford protein-like functions and make RNA an attractive material for nanobiotechnology. RNA tectonics is a methodology in RNA nanobiotechnology for the design and construction of RNA nanostructures/nanoobjects through controlled self-assembly of modular RNA units (tectoRNAs). RNA nanostructures designed according to the concept of RNA tectonics are also attractive as tools in synthetic biology, but in vivo RNA tectonics is still in the early stages. This review presents a summary of the achievements of RNA tectonics and its related researches in vitro, and also introduces recent developments that facilitated the use of RNA nanostructures in bacterial cells.

  5. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  6. Quantitative Model of microRNA-mRNA interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Lang, Alex; Mehta, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs are short RNA sequences that regulate gene expression and protein translation by binding to mRNA. Experimental data reveals the existence of a threshold linear output of protein based on the expression level of microRNA. To understand this behavior, we propose a mathematical model of the chemical kinetics of the interaction between mRNA and microRNA. Using this model we have been able to quantify the threshold linear behavior. Furthermore, we have studied the effect of internal noise, showing the existence of an intermediary regime where the expression level of mRNA and microRNA has the same order of magnitude. In this crossover regime the mRNA translation becomes sensitive to small changes in the level of microRNA, resulting in large fluctuations in protein levels. Our work shows that chemical kinetics parameters can be quantified by studying protein fluctuations. In the future, studying protein levels and their fluctuations can provide a powerful tool to study the competing endogenous RNA hypothesis (ceRNA), in which mRNA crosstalk occurs due to competition over a limited pool of microRNAs.

  7. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  8. siRNA vs. shRNA: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Rao, Donald D; Vorhies, John S; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John

    2009-07-25

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process through which expression of a targeted gene can be knocked down with high specificity and selectivity. Using available technology and bioinformatics investigators will soon be able to identify relevant bio molecular tumor network hubs as potential key targets for knockdown approaches. Methods of mediating the RNAi effect involve small interfering RNA (siRNA), short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and bi-functional shRNA. The simplicity of siRNA manufacturing and transient nature of the effect per dose are optimally suited for certain medical disorders (i.e. viral injections). However, using the endogenous processing machinery, optimized shRNA constructs allow for high potency and sustainable effects using low copy numbers resulting in less off-target effects, particularly if embedded in a miRNA scaffold. Bi-functional design may further enhance potency and safety of RNAi-based therapeutics. Remaining challenges include tumor selective delivery vehicles and more complete evaluation of the scope and scale of off-target effects. This review will compare siRNA, shRNA and bi-functional shRNA.

  9. RNA editing of androgen receptor gene transcripts in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Harryl D; Jasavala, Rohini J; Hinkson, Izumi; Fitzgerald, Latricia D; Trimmer, James S; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wright, Michael E

    2008-10-31

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway represents a critical step in the growth and survival of androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer (CaP). In this study we show the DU145 and PC3 AI human CaP cell lines respond to androgens and require AR expression for optimal proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, AR gene transcripts in DU145 and PC3 cells harbored a large number of single base pair nucleotide transitions that resulted in missense mutations in selected AR codons. The most notable lesion detected in AR gene transcripts included the oncogenic codon 877T-->A gain-of-function mutation. Surprisingly, AR gene transcript nucleotide transitions were not genome-encoded substitutions, but instead the mutations co-localized to putative A-to-I, U-to-C, C-to-U, and G-to-A RNA editing sites, suggesting the lesions were mediated through RNA editing mechanisms. Higher levels of mRNA encoding the A-to-I RNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADARB1 were observed in DU145 and PC3 cells relative to the androgen-responsive LNCaP and 22Rv1 human CaP cell lines, which correlated with higher levels of AR gene transcript A-to-I editing detected in DU145 and PC3 cells. Our results suggest that AR gene transcripts are targeted by different RNA editing enzymes in DU145 and PC3 cells. Thus RNA editing of AR gene transcripts may contribute to the etiology of hormone-refractory phenotypes in advanced stage AI CaP.

  10. Bifunctional transfer-messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Nitya S.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is a bifunctional RNA that has properties of a tRNA and an mRNA. tmRNA uses these two functions to release ribosomes stalled during translation and target the nascent polypeptides for degradation. This concerted reaction, known as trans-translation, contributes to translational quality control and regulation of gene expression in bacteria. tmRNA is conserved throughout bacteria, and is one of the most abundant RNAs in the cell, suggesting that trans-translation is of fundamental importance for bacterial fitness. Mutants lacking tmRNA activity typically have severe phenotypes, including defects in viability, virulence, and responses to environmental stresses. PMID:21664408

  11. Structural insights into RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2010-02-01

    Virtually all animals and plants utilize small RNA molecules to control protein expression during different developmental stages and in response to viral infection. Structural and mechanistic studies have begun to illuminate three fundamental aspects of these pathways: small RNA biogenesis, formation of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs), and targeting of complementary mRNAs. Here we review exciting recent progress in understanding how regulatory RNAs are produced and how they trigger specific destruction of mRNAs during RNA interference (RNAi).

  12. Elevated RNA Editing Activity Is a Major Contributor to Transcriptomic Diversity in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Paz-Yaacov, Nurit; Bazak, Lily; Buchumenski, Ilana; Porath, Hagit T; Danan-Gotthold, Miri; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2015-10-13

    Genomic mutations in key genes are known to drive tumorigenesis and have been the focus of much attention in recent years. However, genetic content also may change farther downstream. RNA editing alters the mRNA sequence from its genomic blueprint in a dynamic and flexible way. A few isolated cases of editing alterations in cancer have been reported previously. Here, we provide a transcriptome-wide characterization of RNA editing across hundreds of cancer samples from multiple cancer tissues, and we show that A-to-I editing and the enzymes mediating this modification are significantly altered, usually elevated, in most cancer types. Increased editing activity is found to be associated with patient survival. As is the case with somatic mutations in DNA, most of these newly introduced RNA mutations are likely passengers, but a few may serve as drivers that may be novel candidates for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

  13. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing.

  14. iRNA-PseU: Identifying RNA pseudouridine sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Tang, Hua; Ye, Jing; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant RNA modification, pseudouridine plays important roles in many biological processes. Occurring at the uridine site and catalyzed by pseudouridine synthase, the modification has been observed in nearly all kinds of RNA, including transfer RNA, messenger RNA, small nuclear or nucleolar RNA, and ribosomal RNA. Accordingly, its importance to basic research and drug development is self-evident. Despite some experimental technologies have been developed to detect the pseudouridine sites, they are both time-consuming and expensive. Facing the explosive growth of RNA sequences in the postgenomic age, we are challenged to address the problem by computational approaches: For an uncharacterized RNA sequence, can we predict which of its uridine sites can be modified as pseudouridine and which ones cannot? Here a predictor called “iRNA-PseU” was proposed by incorporating the chemical properties of nucleotides and their occurrence frequency density distributions into the general form of pseudo nucleotide composition (PseKNC). It has been demonstrated via the rigorous jackknife test, independent dataset test, and practical genome-wide analysis that the proposed predictor remarkably outperforms its counterpart. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, the web-server for iRNA-PseU was established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iRNA-PseU, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to go through the mathematical details.

  15. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to {sup 32}P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K{sub a} for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1}. The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3{prime} end of the genome with a K{sub a} similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3{prime} noncoding region.

  16. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Horning, David P.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2016-01-01

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life—the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules—can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  17. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  18. Cis-Active RNA Elements (CREs) and Picornavirus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Barton, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of picornavirus RNA replication has improved over the past 10 years, due in large part to the discovery of cis-active RNA elements (CREs) within picornavirus RNA genomes. CREs function as templates for the conversion of VPg, the Viral Protein of the genome, into VPgpUpUOH. These so called CREs are different from the previously recognized cis-active RNA sequences and structures within the 5′ and 3′ NTRs of picornavirus genomes. Two adenosine residues in the loop of the CRE RNA structures allow the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 3DPol to add two uridine residues to the tyrosine residue of VPg. Because VPg and/or VPgpUpUOH prime the initiation of viral RNA replication, the asymmetric replication of viral RNA could not be explained without an understanding of the viral RNA template involved in the conversion of VPg into VPgpUpUOH primers. We review the growing body of knowledge regarding picornavirus CREs and discuss how CRE RNAs work coordinately with viral replication proteins and other cis-active RNAs in the 5′ and 3′ NTRs during RNA replication. PMID:18773930

  19. The impact of mRNA structure on guide RNA targeting in kinetoplastid RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Reifur, Larissa; Yu, Laura E; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; Vanhartesvelt, Michelle; Koslowsky, Donna J

    2010-08-17

    Mitochondrial mRNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei requires the specific interaction of a guide RNA with its cognate mRNA. Hundreds of gRNAs are involved in the editing process, each needing to target their specific editing domain within the target message. We hypothesized that the structure surrounding the mRNA target may be a limiting factor and involved in the regulation process. In this study, we selected four mRNAs with distinct target structures and investigated how sequence and structure affected efficient gRNA targeting. Two of the mRNAs, including the ATPase subunit 6 and ND7-550 (5' end of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 7) that have open, accessible anchor binding sites show very efficient gRNA targeting. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that the cognate gRNA for ND7-550 had 10-fold higher affinity for its mRNA than the A6 pair. Surface plasmon resonance studies indicate that the difference in affinity was due to a four-fold faster association rate. As expected, mRNAs with considerable structure surrounding the anchor binding sites were less accessible and had very low affinity for their cognate gRNAs. In vitro editing assays indicate that efficient pairing is crucial for gRNA directed cleavage. However, only the A6 substrate showed gRNA-directed cleavage at the correct editing site. This suggests that different gRNA/mRNA pairs may require different "sets" of accessory factors for efficient editing. By characterizing a number of different gRNA/mRNA interactions, we may be able to define a "bank" of RNA editing substrates with different putative chaperone and other co-factor requirements. This will allow the more efficient identification and characterization of transcript specific RNA editing accessory proteins.

  20. RNA editing of the Drosophila para Na(+) channel transcript. Evolutionary conservation and developmental regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, C J; Palladino, M J; Ganetzky, B; Reenan, R A

    2000-01-01

    Post-transcriptional editing of pre-mRNAs through the action of dsRNA adenosine deaminases results in the modification of particular adenosine (A) residues to inosine (I), which can alter the coding potential of the modified transcripts. We describe here three sites in the para transcript, which encodes the major voltage-activated Na(+) channel polypeptide in Drosophila, where RNA editing occurs. The occurrence of RNA editing at the three sites was found to be developmentally regulated. Editing at two of these sites was also conserved across species between the D. melanogaster and D. virilis. In each case, a highly conserved region was found in the intron downstream of the editing site and this region was shown to be complementary to the region of the exonic editing site. Thus, editing at these sites would appear to involve a mechanism whereby the edited exon forms a base-paired secondary structure with the distant conserved noncoding sequences located in adjacent downstream introns, similar to the mechanism shown for A-to-I RNA editing of mammalian glutamate receptor subunits (GluRs). For the third site, neither RNA editing nor the predicted RNA secondary structures were evolutionarily conserved. Transcripts from transgenic Drosophila expressing a minimal editing site construct for this site were shown to faithfully undergo RNA editing. These results demonstrate that Na(+) channel diversity in Drosophila is increased by RNA editing via a mechanism analogous to that described for transcripts encoding mammalian GluRs. PMID:10880477

  1. Generation of infectious RNA complexes in orbiviruses: RNA-RNA interactions of genomic segments

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Teodoro; AlShaikhahmed, Kinda; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    Viruses with segmented RNA genomes must package the correct number of segments for synthesis of infectious virus particles. Recent studies suggest that the members of the Reoviridae family with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes achieve this challenging task by forming RNA networks of segments prior to their recruitment into the assembling capsid albeit direct evidence is still lacking. Here, we investigated the capability of virus recovery by preformed complexes of ten RNA segments of H Virus (EHDV), a Reoviridae member, by transcribing exact T7 cDNA copies of genomic RNA segments in a single in vitro reaction followed by transfection of mammalian cells. The data obtained was further confirmed by RNA complexes generated from Bluetongue virus, another family member. Formation of RNA complexes was demonstrated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, and RNA-RNA interactions inherent to the formation of the RNA complexes were demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Further, we showed that disruption of RNA complex formation inhibits virus recovery, confirming that recruitment of complete RNA networks is essential for packaging and consequently, virus recovery. This efficient reverse genetics system will allow further understanding of evolutionary relationships of Reoviridae members and may also contribute to development of antiviral molecules. PMID:27736800

  2. Synthesizing topological structures containing RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Shao, Yaming; Chen, Gang; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Weizmann, Yossi

    2017-03-31

    Though knotting and entanglement have been observed in DNA and proteins, their existence in RNA remains an enigma. Synthetic RNA topological structures are significant for understanding the physical and biological properties pertaining to RNA topology, and these properties in turn could facilitate identifying naturally occurring topologically nontrivial RNA molecules. Here we show that topological structures containing single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) free of strong base pairing interactions can be created either by configuring RNA-DNA hybrid four-way junctions or by template-directed synthesis with a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) topological structure. By using a constructed ssRNA knot as a highly sensitive topological probe, we find that Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I has low RNA topoisomerase activity and that the R173A point mutation abolishes the unknotting activity for ssRNA, but not for ssDNA. Furthermore, we discover the topological inhibition of reverse transcription (RT) and obtain different RT-PCR patterns for an ssRNA knot and circle of the same sequence.

  3. The tmRNA website

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  4. The tmRNA website

    DOE PAGES

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from themore » same organism.« less

  5. The tmRNA website

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism. PMID:25378311

  6. Flavivirus RNA Synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Takhampunya, Ratree; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Choi, Kyung H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishment of in vitro systems to study mechanisms of RNA synthesis for positive strand RNA viruses have been very useful in the past and have shed light on the composition of protein and RNA components, optimum conditions, the nature of the products formed, cis-acting RNA elements and trans-acting protein factors required for efficient synthesis. In this review, we summarize our current understanding regarding the requirements for flavivirus RNA synthesis in vitro. We describe details of reaction conditions, the specificity of template used by either the multi-component membrane-bound viral replicase complex or by purified, recombinant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. We also discuss future perspectives to extend the boundaries of our knowledge. PMID:26272247

  7. The tmRNA website.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey M; Williams, Kelly P

    2015-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  8. Global Mapping of Human RNA-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Eesha; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; O'Hanlon, Dave; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2016-05-19

    The majority of the human genome is transcribed into non-coding (nc)RNAs that lack known biological functions or else are only partially characterized. Numerous characterized ncRNAs function via base pairing with target RNA sequences to direct their biological activities, which include critical roles in RNA processing, modification, turnover, and translation. To define roles for ncRNAs, we have developed a method enabling the global-scale mapping of RNA-RNA duplexes crosslinked in vivo, "LIGation of interacting RNA followed by high-throughput sequencing" (LIGR-seq). Applying this method in human cells reveals a remarkable landscape of RNA-RNA interactions involving all major classes of ncRNA and mRNA. LIGR-seq data reveal unexpected interactions between small nucleolar (sno)RNAs and mRNAs, including those involving the orphan C/D box snoRNA, SNORD83B, that control steady-state levels of its target mRNAs. LIGR-seq thus represents a powerful approach for illuminating the functions of the myriad of uncharacterized RNAs that act via base-pairing interactions.

  9. Traversing the RNA World.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Witold

    2017-04-05

    An invitation to write a ″Reflections″ type of article creates a certain ambivalence: it is a great honor but it also infers the end of your professional career. Before you vanish for good, your colleagues look forward to an interesting but entertaining account of the ups-and-downs of your past research and your views on science in general, peppered with indiscrete anecdotes about your former competitors and collaborators. What follows will disappoint those who await complaint and criticism, for example about the difficulties of doing research in the 1960s and 1970s in Eastern Europe, or those seeking very personal revelations. My scientific life has in fact seen many happy coincidences, much good fortune, and several lucky escapes from situations that at the time were quite scary. I have also been fortunate with regard to competitors and collaborators. Particularly because, whenever possible, I tried to ″neutralize″ my rivals by collaborating with them - to the benefit of all. I recommend this strategy to young researchers to dispel the nightmares when competing against powerful contenders. I have been blessed with the selection of my research topic: RNA biology. Over the last five decades, new and unexpected RNA-related phenomena emerged almost yearly. I experienced them very personally while studying transcription, translation, RNA splicing, ribosome biogenesis, and more recently different classes of regulatory non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs. Some selected research and para-research stories, also covering many wonderful people I had a privilege to work with, are summarized below.

  10. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  11. Long noncoding RNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Most RNAs transcribed in mammalian cells lack protein-coding sequences. Among them is a vast family of long (>200 nt) noncoding (lnc)RNAs. LncRNAs can modulate cellular protein expression patterns by influencing the transcription of many genes, the post-transcriptional fate of mRNAs and ncRNAs, and the turnover and localization of proteins. Given the broad impact of lncRNAs on gene regulation, there is escalating interest in elucidating the mechanisms that govern the steady-state levels of lncRNAs. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the factors and mechanisms that modulate mammalian lncRNA stability. PMID:25769416

  12. RNA:RNA interaction can enhance RNA localization in Drosophila oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartswood, Eve; Brodie, Jim; Vendra, Georgia; Davis, Ilan; Finnegan, David J

    2012-04-01

    RNA localization is a key mechanism for targeting proteins to particular subcellular domains. Sequences necessary and sufficient for localization have been identified, but little is known about factors that affect its kinetics. Transcripts of gurken and the I factor, a non-LTR retrotransposon, colocalize at the nucleus in the dorso-antero corner of the Drosophila oocyte directed by localization signals, the GLS and ILS. I factor RNA localizes faster than gurken after injection into oocytes, due to a difference in the intrinsic localization ability of the GLS and ILS. The kinetics of localization of RNA containing the ILS are enhanced by the presence of a stem-loop, the A loop. This acts as an RNA:RNA interaction element in vivo and in vitro, and stimulates localization of RNA containing other localization signals. RNA:RNA interaction may be a general mechanism for modulating RNA localization and could allow an mRNA that lacks a localization signal to hitchhike on another RNA that has one.

  13. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-12-26

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets.

  14. MicroRNA-9

    PubMed Central

    Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Simkin, Alfred; Gascon, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The functional significance of microRNA-9 (miR-9) during evolution is evidenced by its conservation at the nucleotide level from flies to humans but not its diverse expression patterns. Recent studies in several model systems reveal that miR-9 can regulate neurogenesis through its actions in neural or non-neural cell lineages. In vertebrates, miR-9 exerts diverse cell-autonomous effects on the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells by modulating different mRNA targets. In some developmental contexts, miR-9 suppresses apoptosis and is misregulated in several types of cancer cells, influencing proliferation or metastasis formation. Moreover, downregulation of miR-9 in postmitotic neurons is also implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, miR-9 is emerging as an important regulator in development and disease through its ability to modulate different targets in a manner dependent on the developmental stage and the cellular context. PMID:21697652

  15. Mitochondrial RNA processing in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Aphasizhev, Ruslan; Aphasizheva, Inna

    2011-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome of trypanosomes is composed of ∼50 maxicircles and thousands of minicircles. Maxi-(∼25 kb) and mini-(∼1 kb)circles are catenated and packed into a dense structure called a kinetoplast. Both types of circular DNA are transcribed by a phage-like RNA polymerase: maxicircles yield multicistronic rRNA and mRNA precursors, while guide RNA (gRNA) precursors are produced from minicircles. To function in mitochondrial translation, pre-mRNAs must undergo a nucleolytic processing and 3' modifications, and often uridine insertion/deletion editing. gRNAs, which represent short (50-60 nt) RNAs directing editing reactions, are produced by 3' nucleolytic processing of a much longer precursor followed by 3' uridylation. Ribosomal RNAs are excised from precursors and their 3' ends are also trimmed and uridylated. All tRNAs are imported from the cytoplasm and some are further modified and edited in the mitochondrial matrix. Historically, the fascinating phenomenon of RNA editing has been extensively studied as an isolated pathway in which nuclear-encoded proteins mediate interactions of maxi- and minicircle transcripts to create open reading frames. However, recent studies unraveled a highly integrated network of mitochondrial genome expression including critical pre- and post-editing 3' mRNA processing, and gRNA and rRNA maturation steps. Here we focus on RNA 3' adenylation and uridylation as processes essential for biogenesis, stability and functioning of mitochondrial RNAs.

  16. Quantification of miRNA-mRNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muniategui, Ander; Nogales-Cadenas, Rubén; Vázquez, Miguél; L. Aranguren, Xabier; Agirre, Xabier; Luttun, Aernout; Prosper, Felipe; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs are small RNA molecules (′ 22nt) that interact with their corresponding target mRNAs inhibiting the translation of the mRNA into proteins and cleaving the target mRNA. This second effect diminishes the overall expression of the target mRNA. Several miRNA-mRNA relationship databases have been deployed, most of them based on sequence complementarities. However, the number of false positives in these databases is large and they do not overlap completely. Recently, it has been proposed to combine expression measurement from both miRNA and mRNA and sequence based predictions to achieve more accurate relationships. In our work, we use LASSO regression with non-positive constraints to integrate both sources of information. LASSO enforces the sparseness of the solution and the non-positive constraints restrict the search of miRNA targets to those with down-regulation effects on the mRNA expression. We named this method TaLasso (miRNA-Target LASSO). We used TaLasso on two public datasets that have paired expression levels of human miRNAs and mRNAs. The top ranked interactions recovered by TaLasso are especially enriched (more than using any other algorithm) in experimentally validated targets. The functions of the genes with mRNA transcripts in the top-ranked interactions are meaningful. This is not the case using other algorithms. TaLasso is available as Matlab or R code. There is also a web-based tool for human miRNAs at http://talasso.cnb.csic.es/. PMID:22348024

  17. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  18. microRNA Decay: Refining microRNA Regulatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Genevieve; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short 19-25 nucleotide RNA molecules that impact on most biological processes by regulating the efficiency of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. To date, most research activities have been focused on the control of miRNA expression and its functional consequences. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about the mechanisms affecting the level of specific miRNAs in the cell, a critical feature impacting their regulatory activity. This review focuses on the factors that regulate the abundance of miRNAs, including synthesis, post-transcriptional modifications, nucleases, target binding, and secretion.

  19. Nuclear RNA Isolation and Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Navroop K; Mitchell, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Most transcriptome studies involve sequencing and quantification of steady-state mRNA by isolating and sequencing poly (A) RNA. Although this type of sequencing data is informative to determine steady-state mRNA levels it does not provide information on transcriptional output and thus may not always reflect changes in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Furthermore, sequencing poly (A) RNA may miss transcribed regions of the genome not usually modified by polyadenylation which includes many long noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe nuclear-RNA sequencing (nucRNA-seq) which investigates the transcriptional landscape through sequencing and quantification of nuclear RNAs which are both unspliced and spliced transcripts for protein-coding genes and nuclear-retained long noncoding RNAs.

  20. RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamel; Giegé, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the eukaryotic cell and are derived from the endosymbiosis of an α-proteobacterial ancestor. Compared to other eukaryotes, RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria is complex and combines bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. These complex RNA processes are regulated by families of nucleus-encoded RNA-binding proteins. Transcription is particularly relaxed and is initiated from multiple promoters covering the entire genome. The variety of RNA precursors accumulating in mitochondria highlights the importance of post-transcriptional processes to determine the size and abundance of transcripts. Here we review RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria, from RNA transcription to translation, with a special focus on their unique features that are controlled by trans-factors.

  1. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition.

    PubMed

    Madina, Bhaskara R; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3'-to-5' in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3' ends and strain-specific alternative 3' editing within 3' UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs.

  2. Geminiviruses and RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Vanitharani, Ramachandran; Chellappan, Padmanabhan; Fauquet, Claude M

    2005-03-01

    Geminiviruses are single-stranded circular DNA viruses that cause economically significant diseases in a wide range of crop plants worldwide. In plants, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) acts as a natural anti-viral defense system and plays a role in genome maintenance and development. During the past decade there has been considerable evidence of PTGS suppression by viruses, which is often required to establish infection in plants. In particular, nuclear-replicating geminiviruses, which have no double-stranded RNA phase in their replication cycle, can induce and suppress the PTGS and become targets for PTGS. Here, we summarize recent developments in determining how these viruses trigger PTGS and how they suppress the induced PTGS, as well as how we can use the system to control these viruses in plants better and manipulate the system to study functional genomics in crop plants.

  3. RNA helicases in splicing.

    PubMed

    Cordin, Olivier; Beggs, Jean D

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, introns are spliced from pre-mRNAs by the spliceosome. Both the composition and the structure of the spliceosome are highly dynamic, and eight DExD/H RNA helicases play essential roles in controlling conformational rearrangements. There is evidence that the various helicases are functionally and physically connected with each other and with many other factors in the spliceosome. Understanding the dynamics of those interactions is essential to comprehend the mechanism and regulation of normal as well as of pathological splicing. This review focuses on recent advances in the characterization of the splicing helicases and their interactions, and highlights the deep integration of splicing helicases in global mRNP biogenesis pathways.

  4. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  5. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  6. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  7. Bringing RNA into View: RNA and Its Roles in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, John F.; Ellington, Andrew; Friedman, B. Ellen; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Noller, Harry F.; Pasquale, Stephen M.; Storey, Richard D.; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.; Weiner, Alan M.

    This guide presents a module for college students on ribonucleic acid (RNA) and its role in biology. The module aims to integrate the latest research and its findings into college-level biology and provide an opportunity for students to understand biological processes. Four activities are presented: (1) "RNA Structure: Tapes to Shapes"; (2) "RNA…

  8. RNA mediated assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, Jessica Lynn

    The first chapter of this work presents a comprehensive look at RNA mediated nanoparticle formation. The overall goal of this research is to gain a deeper understanding of the RNA-particle formation mechanism and the basic properties of the materials selected by modified RNA molecules. Understanding such RNA-substrate interactions and how they translate into the physical and chemical characteristics of the nanoparticles they create are important fundamental concepts when considering these biotemplated materials as potential chemical catalysts. The RNA sequences discussed in the first chapter (referred to as Pdases) were discovered using RNA in vitro selection techniques. These Pdases were found to be capable of forming inorganic palladium (Pd) containing nanoparticles with impressive control over an individual particle's size and shape, despite incubation with the same organometallic precursor. This discovery held exciting implications for inorganic nanoparticle design while also generating numerous questions regarding the mechanism of RNA mediated particle growth. The central question that arose after this initial discovery was how could a biomolecule be used to tailor the physical size and shape of inorganic materials? Starting with a chemical proof designed to uncover the composition of the nanoparticles formed by RNA mediation, this chapter investigates the basic material properties of the nanoparticles while also introducing surprising results regarding the effect of multiple sequences on nanoparticle growth outcomes. In the second chapter, the experiments shift to developing methods to investigate nanoparticle growth mechanisms by fluorescence spectroscopy. A fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) assay is presented in which the strengths of the technique are adapted for studying the formation of RNA mediated Pd nanoparticles in real time. This is a unique application of FPA, as it has been adapted to encompass both the biochemical and materials analysis

  9. RNA immunoprecipitation for determining RNA-protein associations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Chris; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2006-08-01

    Similar to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) can be used to detect the association of individual proteins with specific nucleic acid regions, in this case on RNA. Live cells are treated with formaldehyde to generate protein-RNA cross-links between molecules that are in close proximity in vivo. RNA sequences that cross-link with a given protein are isolated by immunoprecipitation of the protein, and reversal of the formaldehyde cross-linking permits recovery and quantitative analysis of the immunoprecipitated RNA by reverse transcription PCR. The basics of RIP are very similar to those of ChIP, but with some important caveats. This unit describes the RIP procedure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the corresponding steps for metazoan cells have not yet been worked out, it is likely that the yeast procedure can easily be adapted for use in other organisms.

  10. Substrate recognition by ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S K; Sato, S; Lazinski, D W

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR1 and ADAR2 involves the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine within imperfectly duplexed RNA. ADAR1- and ADAR2-mediated editing occurs within transcripts of glutamate receptors (GluR) in the brain and in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA in the liver. Although the Q/R site within the GluR-B premessage is edited more efficiently by ADAR2 than it is by ADAR1, the converse is true for the +60 site within this same transcript. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are homologs having two common functional regions, an N-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal deaminase domain. It is neither understood why only certain adenosines within a substrate molecule serve as targets for ADARs, nor is it known which domain of an ADAR confers its specificity for particular editing sites. To assess the importance of several aspects of RNA sequence and structure on editing, we evaluated 20 different mutated substrates, derived from four editing sites, for their ability to be edited by either ADAR1 or ADAR2. We found that when these derivatives contained an A:C mismatch at the editing site, editing by both ADARs was enhanced compared to when A:A or A:G mismatches or A:U base pairs occurred at the same site. Hence substrate recognition and/or catalysis by ADARs could involve the base that opposes the edited adenosine. In addition, by using protein chimeras in which the deaminase domains were exchanged between ADAR1 and ADAR2, we found that this domain played a dominant role in defining the substrate specificity of the resulting enzyme. PMID:11421361

  11. RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions in coronavirus replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Isabel; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A; Almazan, Fernando; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Coronavirus (CoV) RNA synthesis includes the replication of the viral genome, and the transcription of sgRNAs by a discontinuous mechanism. Both processes are regulated by RNA sequences such as the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), and the transcription regulating sequences (TRSs) of the leader (TRS-L) and those preceding each gene (TRS-Bs). These distant RNA regulatory sequences interact with each other directly and probably through protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions involving viral and cellular proteins.1 By analogy to other plus-stranded RNA viruses, such as polioviruses, in which translation and replication switch involves a cellular factor (PCBP) and a viral protein (3CD),2 it is conceivable that in CoVs the switch between replication and transcription is also associated with the binding of proteins that are specifically recruited by the replication or transcription complexes. Complexes between RNA motifs such as TRS-L and the TRS-Bs located along the CoV genome are probably formed previously to the transcription start, and most likely promote template-switch of the nascent minus RNA to the TRS-L region.3 Many cellular proteins interacting with regulatory CoV RNA sequences4 are members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of RNA-binding proteins, involved in mRNA processing and transport, which shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In the context of CoV RNA synthesis, these cellular ribonucleoproteins might also participate in RNA-protein complexes to bring into physical proximity TRS-L and distant TRS-B, as proposed for CoV discontinuous transcription.5–7 In this review, we summarize RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions that represent modest examples of complex quaternary RNA-protein structures required for the fine-tuning of virus replication. Design of chemically defined replication and transcription systems will help to clarify the nature and activity of these structures. PMID:21378501

  12. Viral RNA-directed RNA polymerases use diverse mechanisms to promote recombination between RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Chetverin, Alexander B; Kopein, Damir S; Chetverina, Helena V; Demidenko, Alexander A; Ugarov, Victor I

    2005-03-11

    An earlier developed purified cell-free system was used to explore the potential of two RNA-directed RNA polymerases (RdRps), Qbeta phage replicase and the poliovirus 3Dpol protein, to promote RNA recombination through a primer extension mechanism. The substrates of recombination were fragments of complementary strands of a Qbeta phage-derived RNA, such that if aligned at complementary 3'-termini and extended using one another as a template, they would produce replicable molecules detectable as RNA colonies grown in a Qbeta replicase-containing agarose. The results show that while 3Dpol efficiently extends the aligned fragments to produce the expected homologous recombinant sequences, only nonhomologous recombinants are generated by Qbeta replicase at a much lower yield and through a mechanism not involving the extension of RNA primers. It follows that the mechanisms of RNA recombination by poliovirus and Qbeta RdRps are quite different. The data favor an RNA transesterification reaction catalyzed by a conformation acquired by Qbeta replicase during RNA synthesis and provide a likely explanation for the very low frequency of homologous recombination in Qbeta phage.

  13. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  14. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  15. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  16. Exploration of RNA structure spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    In order to understand the structure of real structure spaces, we are studying the 5S rRNA structure space experimentally. A plasmid containing a synthetic 5S rRNA gene, two rRNA promoters, and transcription terminators has been assembled. Assays are conducted to determine if the foreign 5S rRNA is expressed, and to see whether or not it is incorporated into ribosomes. Evolutionary competition is used to determine the relative fitness of strains containing the foreign 5S rRNA and a control 5S rRNA. By using site directed mutagenesis, a number of mutants can be made in order to study the boundaries of the structure space and how sharply defined they are. By making similar studies in the vicinity of structure space, it will be possible to determine how homogeneous the 5S rRNA structure space is. Useable experimental protocols have been developed, and a number of mutants have already been studied. Initial results suggest an explanation of why single stranded regions of the RNA are less subject to mutation than double stranded regions.

  17. [Capping strategies in RNA viruses].

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Ferron, François; Imbert, Isabelle; Gluais, Laure; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-04-01

    Most viruses use the mRNA-cap dependent cellular translation machinery to translate their mRNAs into proteins. The addition of a cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is therefore an essential step for the replication of many virus families. Additionally, the cap protects the viral RNA from degradation by cellular nucleases and prevents viral RNA recognition by innate immunity mechanisms. Viral RNAs acquire their cap structure either by using cellular capping enzymes, by stealing the cap of cellular mRNA in a process named "cap snatching", or using virus-encoded capping enzymes. Many viral enzymes involved in this process have recently been structurally and functionally characterized. These studies have revealed original cap synthesis mechanisms and pave the way towards the development of specific inhibitors bearing antiviral drug potential.

  18. Statistical Analysis of RNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Eli; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-01-01

    Local conformation is an important determinant of RNA catalysis and binding. The analysis of RNA conformation is particularly difficult due to the large number of degrees of freedom (torsion angles) per residue. Proteins, by comparison, have many fewer degrees of freedom per residue. In this work, we use and extend classical tools from statistics and signal processing to search for clusters in RNA conformational space. Results are reported both for scalar analysis, where each torsion angle is separately studied, and for vectorial analysis, where several angles are simultaneously clustered. Adapting techniques from vector quantization and clustering to the RNA structure, we find torsion angle clusters and RNA conformational motifs. We validate the technique using well-known conformational motifs, showing that the simultaneous study of the total torsion angle space leads to results consistent with known motifs reported in the literature and also to the finding of new ones. PMID:17048391

  19. RNA splicing: disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Andrew G L; Wood, Matthew J A

    2011-05-01

    The majority of human genes that encode proteins undergo alternative pre-mRNA splicing and mutations that affect splicing are more prevalent than previously thought. The mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing is highly complex, requiring multiple interactions between pre-mRNA, small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and splicing factor proteins. Regulation of this process is even more complicated, relying on loosely defined cis-acting regulatory sequence elements, trans-acting protein factors and cellular responses to varying environmental conditions. Many different human diseases can be caused by errors in RNA splicing or its regulation. Targeting aberrant RNA provides an opportunity to correct faulty splicing and potentially treat numerous genetic disorders. Antisense oligonucleotide therapies show particular promise in this area and, if coupled with improved delivery strategies, could open the door to a multitude of novel personalized therapies.

  20. Functional oligomerization of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Pata, J D; Schultz, S C; Kirkegaard, K

    1995-01-01

    Using a hairpin primer/template RNA derived from sequences present at the 3' end of the poliovirus genome, we investigated the RNA-binding and elongation activities of highly purified poliovirus 3D polymerase. We found that surprisingly high polymerase concentrations were required for efficient template utilization. Binding of template RNAs appeared to be the primary determinant of efficient utilization because binding and elongation activities correlated closely. Using a three-filter binding assay, polymerase binding to RNA was found to be highly cooperative with respect to polymerase concentration. At pH 5.5, where binding was most cooperative, a Hill coefficient of 5 was obtained, indicating that several polymerase molecules interact to retain the 110-nt RNA in a filter-bound complex. Chemical crosslinking with glutaraldehyde demonstrated physical polymerase-polymerase interactions, supporting the cooperative binding data. We propose a model in which poliovirus 3D polymerase functions both as a catalytic polymerase and as a cooperative single-stranded RNA-binding protein during RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:7489508

  1. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  2. RNA splicing and debranching viewed through analysis of RNA lariats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi; Menees, Thomas M

    2011-12-01

    Intron lariat RNAs, created by pre-mRNA splicing, are sources of information on gene expression and structure. Although produced equivalently to their corresponding mRNAs, the vast majority of intron lariat RNAs are rapidly degraded. However, their levels are enhanced in cells deficient for RNA debranching enzyme, which catalyzes linearization of these RNAs, the rate-limiting step in their degradation. Furthermore, RNA lariats are resistant to degradation by the 3' exonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), providing a means to enrich for lariat RNAs. Working with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, our goal was to develop novel combinations of methods to enhance the use of intron lariat RNAs as objects of study. Using RT-PCR assays developed for detecting and quantifying specific lariat RNAs, we demonstrate the resistance of RNA lariats to degradation by PNPase and their sensitivity to cleavage by RNA debranching enzyme. We also employ sequential treatments with these two enzymes to produce characteristic effects on linear and lariat RNAs. We establish the utility of the methods for analyzing RNA debranching enzyme variants and in vitro debranching reactions and discuss several possible applications, including measuring relative rates of transcription and combining these methods with non-gene-specific RNA sequencing as a novel approach for genome annotation. In summary, enzymatic treatments that produce characteristic effects on linear and lariat RNAs, combined with RT-PCR or RNA sequencing, can be powerful tools to advance studies on gene expression, alternative splicing, and any process that depends on the RNA debranching enzyme.

  3. RNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, B; Czichos, J; Overath, P

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) mRNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei was studied in bloodstream forms, in procyclic cells, and during in vitro transformation of bloodstream forms to procyclic cells by approach-to-equilibrium labeling and pulse-chase experiments. Upon initiation of transformation at 27 degrees C in the presence of citrate-cis-aconitate, the half-life of VSG mRNA was reduced from 4.5 h in bloodstream forms to 1.2 h in transforming cells. Concomitantly, an approximately 25-fold decrease in the rate of transcription was observed, resulting in a 100-fold reduction in the steady-state level of de novo-synthesized VSG mRNA. This low level of expression was maintained for at least 7 h, finally decreasing to an undetectable level after 24 h. Transcription of the VSG gene in established procyclic cells was undetectable. For comparison, the turnover of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA, beta-tubulin mRNA, and mini-exon-derived RNA (medRNA) was studied. For medRNA, no significant changes in the rate of transcription or stability were observed during differentiation. In contrast, while the rate of transcription of beta-tubulin mRNA in in vitro-cultured bloodstream forms, transforming cells, and established procyclic cells was similar, the half life was four to five times longer in procyclic cells (t1/2, 7 h) than in cultured bloodstream forms (t1/2, 1.4 h) or transforming cells (t1/2, 1.7 h). Inhibition of protein synthesis in bloodstream forms at 37 degrees Celsius caused a dramatic 20-fold decrease in the rate of VSG mRNA synthesis and a 6-fold decrease in half-life to 45 min, while beta-tubulin mRNA was stabilized 2- to 3-fold and mRNA stability remained unaffected. It is postulated that triggering transformation or inhibiting protein synthesis induces changes in the abundance of the same regulatory molecules which effect the shutoff of VSG gene transcription in addition to shortening the half-life of VSG mRNA. Images PMID:2436040

  4. Evolution in an RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    2009-01-01

    A longstanding research goal has been to develop a self-sustained chemical system that is capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. The notion of primitive RNA-based life suggests this goal might be achieved by constructing an RNA enzyme that catalyzes the replication of RNA molecules, including the RNA enzyme itself. This reaction recently was demonstrated in a cross-catalytic system involving two RNA enzymes that catalyze each other’s synthesis from a total of four component substrates. The cross-replicating RNA enzymes undergo self-sustained exponential amplification at a constant temperature in the absence of proteins or other biological materials. Amplification occurs with a doubling time of 30–60 min, and can be continued indefinitely. Small populations of cross-replicating RNA enzymes can be made to compete for limited resources within a common environment. The molecules reproduce with high fidelity, but occasionally give rise to recombinants that also can replicate. Over the course of many “generations” of selective amplification, novel variants arise and grow to dominate the population based on their relative fitness under the chosen reaction conditions. This is the first example, outside of biology, of evolutionary adaptation in a molecular genetic system. PMID:19667013

  5. Tagetitoxin inhibits chloroplast RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, D.E.; Durbin, R.D.

    1987-04-01

    Tagetitoxin is a non-host specific phytotoxin which inhibits chloroplast development. Chloroplast encoded gene products as well as their transcripts are conspicuously depleted in toxin-treated tissue. Intact chloroplasts from 8-9 day old peas were incubated for 60 min. in the presence of tagetitoxin. This treatment reduced RNA synthesis but did not affect protein synthesis as measured by the incorporation of radiolabeled uridine or methionine, respectively. Tagetitoxin also inhibited chloroplast RNA synthesis in vitro. Total UTP incorporation was reduced 50% by 0.5..mu..M tagetitoxin in transcriptionally active chloroplast extracts containing 5mg/ml protein. In vitro transcription with purified E. coli RNA polymerase was also inhibited by tagetitoxin, yet wheat germ RNA polymerase II and several bacteriophage RNA polymerase enzymes were unaffected. Recent evidence suggests that RNA polymerase from chloroplasts and prokaryotes may share extensive homology. In light of this evidence and the authors own data, they propose that tagetitoxin directly inhibits chloroplast RNA polymerase.

  6. Cofactors in the RNA World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ditzler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA world theories figure prominently in many scenarios for the origin and early evolution of life. These theories posit that RNA molecules played a much larger role in ancient biology than they do now, acting both as the dominant biocatalysts and as the repository of genetic information. Many features of modern RNA biology are potential examples of molecular fossils from an RNA world, such as the pervasive involvement of nucleotides in coenzymes, the existence of natural aptamers that bind these coenzymes, the existence of natural ribozymes, a biosynthetic pathway in which deoxynucleotides are produced from ribonucleotides, and the central role of ribosomal RNA in protein synthesis in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. Here, we uses both a top-down approach that evaluates RNA function in modern biology and a bottom-up approach that examines the capacities of RNA independent of modern biology. These complementary approaches exploit multiple in vitro evolution techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Together these complementary approaches advance our understanding of the most primitive organisms, their early evolution, and their eventual transition to modern biochemistry.

  7. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-06-25

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro.

  8. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-01-01

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8692828

  9. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional) needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives. PMID:25426799

  10. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  11. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells.

  12. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  13. Detection Methods for Archaeal RNA Virus Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, B.; Roberto, F.; Young, M.

    2010-04-01

    We have a poor understanding in the relationship between cellular and viral evolution. We have successfully amplified archaeal, viral-enriched samples shown to be RNA-rich showing similarity to reverse transcriptases and RNA-directed RNA polymerases.

  14. RNA interference: unraveling a mystery.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Mary K

    2006-12-01

    Andrew Fire and Craig Mello have won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of RNA interference. Mary K. Montgomery, then a postdoc in the Fire laboratory, participated in some of the key experiments.

  15. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  16. RNA pseudoknots: folding and finding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biao; Mathews, David H

    2010-01-01

    RNA pseudoknots are important for function. Three-dimensional structural information is available, insights into factors affecting pseudoknot stability are being reported, and computer programs are available for predicting pseudoknots. PMID:20495679

  17. Molecular mechanisms of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ross C; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Small RNA molecules regulate eukaryotic gene expression during development and in response to stresses including viral infection. Specialized ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins govern the production and action of small regulatory RNAs. After initial processing in the nucleus by Drosha, precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) are transported to the cytoplasm, where Dicer cleavage generates mature microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). These double-stranded products assemble with Argonaute proteins such that one strand is preferentially selected and used to guide sequence-specific silencing of complementary target mRNAs by endonucleolytic cleavage or translational repression. Molecular structures of Dicer and Argonaute proteins, and of RNA-bound complexes, have offered exciting insights into the mechanisms operating at the heart of RNA-silencing pathways.

  18. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Kasper WJ; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam CGN; Kockx, Christel EM; Payan Gomez, Cesar; Brouwer, Rutger WW; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan HJ; van IJcken, Wilfred FJ; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  19. Inosine in DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2014-06-01

    Deamination of the nucleobases in DNA and RNA is a result of spontaneous hydrolysis, endogenous or environmental factors as well as deaminase enzymes. Adenosine is deaminated to inosine which is miscoding and preferentially base pairs with cytosine. In the case of DNA, this is a premutagenic event that is counteracted by DNA repair enzymes specifically engaged in recognition and removal of inosine. However, in RNA, inosine is an essential modification introduced by specialized enzymes in a highly regulated manner to generate transcriptome diversity. Defect editing is seen in various human disease including cancer, viral infections and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Enzymes catalyzing the deaminase reaction are well characterized and recently an unexpected function of Endonuclease V in RNA processing was revealed. Whereas bacterial Endonuclease V enzymes are classified as DNA repair enzymes, it appears that the mammalian enzymes are involved in processing of inosine in RNA. This yields an interesting yet unexplored, link between DNA and RNA processing. Further work is needed to gain understanding of the impact of inosine in DNA and RNA under normal physiology and disease progression.

  20. Nidovirus RNA polymerases: Complex enzymes handling exceptional RNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Posthuma, Clara C; Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Snijder, Eric J

    2017-02-06

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses are distantly related human and animal pathogens that belong to the order Nidovirales. Nidoviruses are characterized by their polycistronic plus-stranded RNA genome, the production of subgenomic mRNAs and the conservation of a specific array of replicase domains, including key RNA-synthesizing enzymes. Coronaviruses (26-34 kilobases) have the largest known RNA genomes and their replication presumably requires a processive RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and enzymatic functions that suppress the consequences of the typically high error rate of viral RdRps. The arteriviruses have significantly smaller genomes and form an intriguing package with the coronaviruses to analyse viral RdRp evolution and function. The RdRp domain of nidoviruses resides in a cleavage product of the replicase polyprotein named non-structural protein (nsp) 12 in coronaviruses and nsp9 in arteriviruses. In all nidoviruses, the C-terminal RdRp domain is linked to a conserved N-terminal domain, which has been coined NiRAN (nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyl transferase). Although no structural information is available, the functional characterization of the nidovirus RdRp and the larger enzyme complex of which it is part, has progressed significantly over the past decade. In coronaviruses several smaller, non-enzymatic nsps were characterized that direct RdRp function, while a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity in nsp14 was implicated in fidelity. In arteriviruses, the nsp1 subunit was found to maintain the balance between genome replication and subgenomic mRNA production. Understanding RdRp behaviour and interactions during RNA synthesis and subsequent processing will be key to rationalising the evolutionary success of nidoviruses and the development of antiviral strategies.

  1. Interstitial contacts in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase lattice

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Andres B.; Wang, Jing; Tanner, Elizabeth J.; Spagnolo, Jeannie F.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic activities can be facilitated by ordered enzymatic arrays that co-localize and orient enzymes and their substrates. The purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from poliovirus self-assembles to form two-dimensional lattices, possibly facilitating the assembly of viral RNA replication complexes on the cytoplasmic face of intracellular membranes. Creation of a two-dimensional lattice requires at least two different molecular contacts between polymerase molecules. One set of polymerase contacts, between the ‘thumb’ domain of one polymerase and the back of the ‘palm’ domain of another, has been previously defined. To identify the second interface needed for lattice formation and to test its function in viral RNA synthesis, a hybrid approach of both electron microscopic and biochemical evaluation of wild-type and mutant viral polymerases was used to evaluate computationally generated models of this second interface. A unique solution satisfied all constraints and predicted a two-dimensional structure formed from antiparallel arrays of polymerase fibers that use contacts from the flexible amino-terminal region of the protein. Enzymes that contained mutations in this newly defined interface did not form lattices and altered the structure of wild-type lattices. When reconstructed into virus, mutations that disrupt lattice assembly exhibited growth defects, synthetic lethality, or both, supporting the function of the oligomeric lattice in infected cells. Understanding the structure of polymerase lattices within the multimeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex should faciliate antiviral drug design and provide a precedent for other positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:21839092

  2. miSolRNA: A tomato micro RNA relational database

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The economic importance of Solanaceae plant species is well documented and tomato has become a model for functional genomics studies. In plants, important processes are regulated by microRNAs (miRNA). Description We describe here a data base integrating genetic map positions of miRNA-targeted genes, their expression profiles and their relations with quantitative fruit metabolic loci and yield associated traits. miSolRNA provides a metadata source to facilitate the construction of hypothesis aimed at defining physiological modes of action of regulatory process underlying the metabolism of the tomato fruit. Conclusions The MiSolRNA database allows the simple extraction of metadata for the proposal of new hypothesis concerning possible roles of miRNAs in the regulation of tomato fruit metabolism. It permits i) to map miRNAs and their predicted target sites both on expressed (SGN-UNIGENES) and newly annotated sequences (BAC sequences released), ii) to co-locate any predicted miRNA-target interaction with metabolic QTL found in tomato fruits, iii) to retrieve expression data of target genes in tomato fruit along their developmental period and iv) to design further experiments for unresolved questions in complex trait biology based on the use of genetic materials that have been proven to be a useful tools for map-based cloning experiments in Solanaceae plant species. PMID:21059227

  3. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  4. Using RNA interference to identify genes required for RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Nathaniel R.; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Goldstein, Bob

    2002-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a phenomenon in which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silences endogenous gene expression. By injecting pools of dsRNAs into Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a dsRNA that acts as a potent suppressor of the RNAi mechanism. We have used coinjection of dsRNAs to identify four additional candidates for genes involved in the RNAi mechanism in C. elegans. Three of the genes are C. elegans mes genes, some of which encode homologs of the Drosophila chromatin-binding Polycomb-group proteins. We have used loss-of-function mutants to confirm a role for mes-3, -4, and -6 in RNAi. Interestingly, introducing very low levels of dsRNA can bypass a requirement for these genes in RNAi. The finding that genes predicted to encode proteins that associate with chromatin are involved in RNAi in C. elegans raises the possibility that chromatin may play a role in RNAi in animals, as it does in plants. PMID:11904378

  5. A new RNA-RNA crosslinking reagent and its application to ribosomal 5S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R; Garrett, R A

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of a new RNA specific bifunctional crosslinking reagent, 1.4-phenyl-diglyoxal, is described which reacts exclusively with guanosines. The properties of the crosslinked products enabled us to develop a straightforward method for identifying the reacted nucleotides. Results obtained with ribosomal 5S RNA of Escherichia coli demonstrate the formation of an intramolecular crosslink between guanosine-2 and guanosine-112 in the stem region. Images PMID:724507

  6. RNA Editing by Adenosine Deaminases That Act on RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    ADARs are RNA editing enzymes that target double-stranded regions of nuclear-encoded RNA and viral RNA. These enzymes are particularly abundant in the nervous system, where they diversify the information encoded in the genome, for example, by altering codons in mRNAs. The functions of ADARs in known substrates suggest that the enzymes serve to fine-tune and optimize many biological pathways, in ways that we are only starting to imagine. ADARs are also interesting in regard to the remarkable double-stranded structures of their substrates and how enzyme specificity is achieved with little regard to sequence. This review summarizes ongoing investigations of the enzyme family and their substrates, focusing on biological function as well as biochemical mechanism. PMID:12045112

  7. RNA Splicing Factors and RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Feng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-03-26

    RNA-directed histone and/or DNA modification is a conserved mechanism for the establishment of epigenetic marks from yeasts and plants to mammals. The heterochromation formation in yeast is mediated by RNAi-directed silencing mechanism, while the establishment of DNA methylation in plants is through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recently, splicing factors are reported to be involved in both RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation in yeast and the RdDM pathway in plants. In yeast, splicing factors may provide a platform for facilitating the siRNA generation through an interaction with RDRC and thereby affect the heterochromatin formation, whereas in plants, various splicing factors seem to act at different steps in the RdDM pathway.

  8. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  9. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  10. Transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Paule, Marvin R.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The task of transcribing nuclear genes is shared between three RNA polymerases in eukaryotes: RNA polymerase (pol) I synthesises the large rRNA, pol II synthesises mRNA and pol III synthesises tRNA and 5S rRNA. Although pol II has received most attention, pol I and pol III are together responsible for the bulk of transcriptional activity. This survey will summarise what is known about the process of transcription by pol I and pol III, how it happens and the proteins involved. Attention will be drawn to the similarities between the three nuclear RNA polymerase systems and also to their differences. PMID:10684922

  11. Lipid nanoparticles for short interfering RNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alex K K; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Cullis, Pieter R

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) in mammalian cells has created a new class of therapeutics based on the reversible silencing of specific disease-causing genes. This therapeutic potential depends on the ability to deliver inducers of RNAi, such as short-interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA), to cells of target tissues. This chapter reviews various challenges and delivery strategies for siRNA, with a particular focus on the development of lipid nanoparticle (LNP) delivery technologies. Currently, LNP delivery systems are the most advanced technology for systemic delivery of siRNA, with numerous formulations under various stages of clinical trials. We also discuss methods to improve gene silencing potency of LNP-siRNA, as well as application of LNP technologies beyond siRNA to the encapsulation of other nucleic acids such as mRNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR).

  12. Adenosine deaminase 1 and concentrative nucleoside transporters 2 and 3 regulate adenosine on the apical surface of human airway epithelia: implications for inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Andrew J; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; van Heusden, Catja A; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Picher, Maryse

    2007-09-11

    Adenosine is a multifaceted signaling molecule mediating key aspects of innate and immune lung defenses. However, abnormally high airway adenosine levels exacerbate inflammatory lung diseases. This study identifies the mechanisms regulating adenosine elimination from the apical surface of human airway epithelia. Experiments conducted on polarized primary cultures of nasal and bronchial epithelial cells showed that extracellular adenosine is eliminated by surface metabolism and cellular uptake. The conversion of adenosine to inosine was completely inhibited by the adenosine deaminase 1 (ADA1) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA). The reaction exhibited Km and Vmax values of 24 microM and 0.14 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2). ADA1 (not ADA2) mRNA was detected in human airway epithelia. The adenosine/mannitol permeability coefficient ratio (18/1) indicated a minor contribution of paracellular absorption. Adenosine uptake was Na+-dependent and was inhibited by the concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) blocker phloridzin but not by the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) blocker dipyridamole. Apparent Km and Vmax values were 17 microM and 7.2 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2), and transport selectivity was adenosine = inosine = uridine > guanosine = cytidine > thymidine. CNT3 mRNA was detected throughout the airways, while CNT2 was restricted to nasal epithelia. Inhibition of adenosine elimination by EHNA or phloridzin raised apical adenosine levels by >3-fold and stimulated IL-13 and MCP-1 secretion by 6-fold. These responses were reproduced by the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) and blocked by the adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (8-SPT). This study shows that adenosine elimination on human airway epithelia is mediated by ADA1, CNT2, and CNT3, which constitute important regulators of adenosine-mediated inflammation.

  13. High sensitivity RNA pseudoknot prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolu; Ali, Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Most ab initio pseudoknot predicting methods provide very few folding scenarios for a given RNA sequence and have low sensitivities. RNA researchers, in many cases, would rather sacrifice the specificity for a much higher sensitivity for pseudoknot detection. In this study, we introduce the Pseudoknot Local Motif Model and Dynamic Partner Sequence Stacking (PLMM_DPSS) algorithm which predicts all PLM model pseudoknots within an RNA sequence in a neighboring-region-interference-free fashion. The PLM model is derived from the existing Pseudobase entries. The innovative DPSS approach calculates the optimally lowest stacking energy between two partner sequences. Combined with the Mfold, PLMM_DPSS can also be used in predicting complicated pseudoknots. The test results of PLMM_DPSS, PKNOTS, iterated loop matching, pknotsRG and HotKnots with Pseudobase sequences have shown that PLMM_DPSS is the most sensitive among the five methods. PLMM_DPSS also provides manageable pseudoknot folding scenarios for further structure determination.

  14. Shapes of RNA pseudoknot structures.

    PubMed

    Reidys, Christian M; Wang, Rita R

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we study abstract shapes of k-noncrossing, σ-canonical RNA pseudoknot structures. We consider lv1k- and lv5k-shapes, which represent a generalization of the abstract π'- and π-shapes of RNA secondary structures introduced by Giegerich et al. Using a novel approach, we compute the generating functions of lv1k- and lv5k-shapes as well as the generating functions of all lv1k- and lv5k-shapes induced by all k-noncrossing, σ-canonical RNA structures for fixed n. By means of singularity analysis of the generating functions, we derive explicit asymptotic expressions For online Supplementary Material, see www.liebertonline.com.

  15. Cellular stress and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Biamonti, Giuseppe; Caceres, Javier F

    2009-03-01

    In response to physical and chemical stresses that affect protein folding and, thus, the execution of normal metabolic processes, cells activate gene-expression strategies aimed at increasing their chance of survival. One target of several stressing agents is pre-mRNA splicing, which is inhibited upon heat shock. Recently, the molecular basis of this splicing inhibition has begun to emerge. Interestingly, different mechanisms seem to be in place to block constitutive pre-mRNA splicing and to affect alternative splicing regulation. This could be important to modulate gene expression during recovery from stress. Thus, pre-mRNA splicing emerges as a central mechanism to integrate cellular and metabolic stresses into gene-expression profiles.

  16. Hairpins under tension: RNA versus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bercy, Mathilde; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to control the folding and unfolding of individual DNA and RNA hairpins by force. Four hairpin molecules are studied in comparison: two DNA and two RNA ones. We observe that the conformational dynamics is slower for the RNA hairpins than for their DNA counterparts. Our results indicate that structures made of RNA are dynamically more stable. This difference might contribute to the fact that DNA and RNA play fundamentally different biological roles in spite of chemical similarity. PMID:26323319

  17. [Immunoregulation by interference RNA (iRNA) - mechanisms, role, perspective].

    PubMed

    Sikora, Emilia; Ptak, Włodzimierz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2011-08-05

    The functioning of an organism depends on the precise control mechanisms, constantly adjusted to the actual state. Therefore, there is a need for efficient communication between both adjacent and distant cells, which may be executed by proteins such as hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokines. Recently another means of regulation has emerged - short regulatory RNAs (srRNAs). Although discovered only a couple of years ago, the mechanism of RNA interference has already become a topic of thousands of publications, defining its roles in both physiological and pathological processes, such as cancerogenesis and autoimmunization. RNAs regulating cell function may be coded in its genome (both exons and introns) or be introduced from the external environment. In mammals microRNAs (miRNAs) cooperate with proteins from the Ago/PIWI family to form effector ribonucleoprotein complexes, and owing to their complementarity to the target mRNA, control genes' expression at the posttranscriptional level, either through the suppression of mRNA translation or through mRNA degradation. SrRNAs are crucial regulators throughout the development of immune cells, starting from hematopoietic stem cells, up to the effector cells of the adaptive immune response. Moreover, some of the regulatory cells perform their function by releasing miRNAs, which are then transported to the target cells, possibly enclosed in the exosomes.

  18. RNA Study Using DNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Masubuchi, Takeya; Ueda, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is one of the fundamental steps of gene expression, where RNA polymerases (RNAPs) bind to their template genes and make RNAs. In addition to RNAP and the template gene, many molecules such as transcription factors are involved. The interaction and the effect of these factors depend on the geometry. Molecular layout of these factors, RNAP and gene is thus important. DNA nanotechnology is a promising technology that allows controlling of the molecular layout in the range of nanometer to micrometer scale with nanometer resolution; thus, it is expected to expand the RNA study beyond the current limit.

  19. RNA Challenges for Computational Chemists†

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Turner, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    Some experimental results for the thermodynamics of RNA folding cannot be explained by simple pairwise hydrogen-bonding models. Such effects include the stabilities of isoguanosine–isocytidine (iG–iC) base pairs and of various 2 × 2 nucleotide internal loops. Presumably, these results can be explained by base stacking effects, which can be partitioned into Coulombic and overlap effects. We review experimental measurements that provide benchmarks for testing the approximations and theories used for modeling nucleic acids. Quantitative agreement between experiment and theory will indicate understanding of the interactions determining RNA stability and structure. PMID:16201748

  20. The rise of regulatory RNA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K.V.; Mattick, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries over the last decade portend a paradigm shift in molecular biology. Evidence suggests that RNA is not only functional as a messenger between DNA and protein but also in the regulation of genome organization and gene expression, which is increasingly elaborated in complex organisms. Regulatory RNAs appear to operate at many levels, but in particular to play an important role in the epigenetic processes that control differentiation and development. These discoveries suggest a central role for RNA in human evolution and ontogeny. Here we survey the emergence of the previously unsuspected world of regulatory RNAs from an historical perspective. PMID:24776770

  1. RNA research in the rustbelt.

    PubMed

    Coller, Jeff; Rueda, David

    2009-01-01

    Deep in the heart of Ohio, scientists from across the Midwest gathered in October to share their latest findings and highlight the strength of RNA research in the heartland. Represented were researchers from Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. With over 220 participants, the 2008 annual Rustbelt RNA Meeting (RRM) was the largest gathering of this group in its 10-year history. The success of this year's RRM lies on the extraordinary efforts of organizers Dawn Chandler (Ohio State University) and Girish Shukla (Cleveland State University).

  2. Evaluation of ribosomal RNA removal protocols for Salmonella RNA-Seq projects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful technology and its application to sequencing entire RNA populations of food-borne pathogens will provide valuable insights. A problem unique to prokaryotic RNA-Seq is the massive abundance of ribosomal RNA. Unlike eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), bacterial ...

  3. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable.

  4. Early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs due to saturation of microRNA pathways.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhen; Wu, Rong; Zhao, Yi-cheng; Wang, Kan-kan; Huang, Yong-ye; Yang, Xin; Xie, Zi-cong; Tu, Chang-chun; Ouyang, Hong-sheng; Wang, Tie-dong; Pang, Da-xin

    2014-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is considered as a potential modality for clinical treatment and anti-virus animal breeding. Here, we investigate the feasibility of inhibiting classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replication by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in vitro and in vivo. We generate four different shRNA-positive clonal cells and two types of shRNA-transgenic pigs. CSFV could be effectively inhibited in shRNA-positive clonal cells and tail tip fibroblasts of shRNA-transgenic pigs. Unexpectedly, an early lethality due to shRNA is observed in these shRNA-transgenic pigs. With further research on shRNA-positive clonal cells and transgenic pigs, we report a great induction of interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in shRNA-positive clonal cells, altered levels of endogenous microRNAs (miRNA), and their processing enzymes in shRNA-positive cells. What is more, abnormal expressions of miRNAs and their processing enzymes are also observed in the livers of shRNA-transgenic pigs, indicating saturation of miRNA/shRNA pathways induced by shRNA. In addition, we investigate the effects of shRNAs on the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. These results show that shRNA causes adverse effects in vitro and in vivo and shRNA-induced disruption of the endogenous miRNA pathway may lead to the early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs. We firstly report abnormalities of the miRNA pathway in shRNA-transgenic animals, which may explain the early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs and has important implications for shRNA-transgenic animal preparation.

  5. RNA editing in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hiesel, R; Wissinger, B; Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1989-12-22

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  6. RNA Editing in Plant Mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Wissinger, Bernd; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1989-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  7. RNA Methylation Clears the Way.

    PubMed

    Kontur, Cassandra; Giraldez, Antonio

    2017-03-13

    During the maternal-to-zygotic transition, maternal mRNAs are cleared by multiple distinct but interrelated pathways. A recent study in Nature by Zhao et al. (2017) finds that YTHDF2, a reader of N(6)- methylation, facilitates maternal mRNA decay, introducing an additional facet of control over transcript fate and developmental reprogramming.

  8. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  9. Engineered microRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gibson, N W

    2014-01-01

    Targeting of microRNAs that are overexpressed or replacement of microRNAs whose expression is lost are two distinct and novel approaches to treat disease(s) driven by microRNA dysregulation. This can be achieved by chemical modification of either a single stranded oligonucleotide called an antimiR or a double stranded nucleic acid molecule termed a microRNA mimic.With hundreds of microRNAs identified and knowledge of their role in disease becoming clearer there is the prospect, over the coming years, to harness engineered microRNA therapeutics to revolutionise the way diseases are treated.Both types of engineered microRNA therapeutics have advanced into clinical development with human proof of concept achieved with an anti-miR targeting miR-122 (one of the most abundant microRNAs in human hepatocytes that is utilised by the hepatitis C virus to enable its function and replication). Rather than targeting individual proteins or enzymes involved in human disease, an opportunity now exists to modulate multiple different proteins/enzymes which act in concert in the progression of disease.

  10. Network Theory Tools for RNA Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Petingi, Louis; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    An introduction into the usage of graph or network theory tools for the study of RNA molecules is presented. By using vertices and edges to define RNA secondary structures as tree and dual graphs, we can enumerate, predict, and design RNA topologies. Graph connectivity and associated Laplacian eigenvalues relate to biological properties of RNA and help understand RNA motifs as well as build, by computational design, various RNA target structures. Importantly, graph theoretical representations of RNAs reduce drastically the conformational space size and therefore simplify modeling and prediction tasks. Ongoing challenges remain regarding general RNA design, representation of RNA pseudoknots, and tertiary structure prediction. Thus, developments in network theory may help advance RNA biology. PMID:25414570

  11. Network Theory Tools for RNA Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Petingi, Louis; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    An introduction into the usage of graph or network theory tools for the study of RNA molecules is presented. By using vertices and edges to define RNA secondary structures as tree and dual graphs, we can enumerate, predict, and design RNA topologies. Graph connectivity and associated Laplacian eigenvalues relate to biological properties of RNA and help understand RNA motifs as well as build, by computational design, various RNA target structures. Importantly, graph theoretical representations of RNAs reduce drastically the conformational space size and therefore simplify modeling and prediction tasks. Ongoing challenges remain regarding general RNA design, representation of RNA pseudoknots, and tertiary structure prediction. Thus, developments in network theory may help advance RNA biology.

  12. RNA isolation and fractionation with compaction agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. C.; Fox, G. E.; Willson, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to the isolation of RNA from bacterial lysates employs selective precipitation by compaction agents, such as hexammine cobalt and spermidine. Using 3.5 mM hexammine cobalt, total RNA can be selectively precipitated from a cell lysate. At a concentration of 2 mM hexammine cobalt, rRNA can be fractionated from low molecular weight RNA. The resulting RNA mixture is readily resolved to pure 5S and mixed 16S/23S rRNA by nondenaturing anion-exchange chromatography. Using a second stage of precipitation at 8 mM hexammine cobalt, the low molecular weight RNA fraction can be isolated by precipitation. Compaction precipitation was also applied to the purification of an artificial stable RNA derived from Escherichia coli 5S rRNA and to the isolation of an Escherichia coli-expressed ribozyme. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  14. RNA cleavage and chain elongation by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a binary enzyme.RNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, C R; Solow-Cordero, D E; Chamberlin, M J

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of DNA, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) can bind RNA to form an equimolar binary complex with the concomitant release of the sigma factor. We show now that E. coli RNA polymerase binds at a region near the 3' terminus of the RNA and that an RNA in such RNA.RNA polymerase complexes undergoes reactions previously thought to be unique to nascent RNA in ternary complexes with DNA. These include GreA/GreB-dependent cleavage of the RNA and elongation by 3'-terminal addition of NMP from NTP. Both of these reactions are inhibited by rifampicin. Hence, by several criteria, the RNA in binary complexes is bound to the polymerase in a manner quite similar to that in ternary complexes. These findings can be explained by a model for the RNA polymerase ternary complex in which the RNA is bound at the 3' terminus through two protein binding sites located up to 10 nt apart. In this model, the stability of RNA binding to the polymerase in the ternary complex is due primarily to its interaction with the protein. Images PMID:7513426

  15. RNA-based drugs and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    RNA-based approaches have provided novel alternatives for modern drug discovery. The application of RNA as therapeutic agents has, until recently, been hampered by issues related to poor delivery and stability, but chemical modifications and new delivery approaches have increased progress. Moreover, the discovery of the importance of RNA in gene regulation and gene silencing has revealed new drug targets, especially related to treatment of cancer and other diseases. Recent engineering of small molecules designed from RNA sequences to target miRNAs opens up new possibilities in drug development. Furthermore, RNA-based vaccines have been engineered applying RNA virus vectors and non-viral delivery for vaccine development.

  16. Modular arrangement of regulatory RNA elements

    PubMed Central

    Roßmanith, Johanna; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to their simple architecture and control mechanism, regulatory RNA modules are attractive building blocks in synthetic biology. This is especially true for riboswitches, which are natural ligand-binding regulators of gene expression. The discovery of various tandem riboswitches inspired the design of combined RNA modules with activities not yet found in nature. Riboswitches were placed in tandem or in combination with a ribozyme or temperature-responsive RNA thermometer resulting in new functionalities. Here, we compare natural examples of tandem riboswitches with recently designed artificial RNA regulators suggesting substantial modularity of regulatory RNA elements. Challenges associated with modular RNA design are discussed. PMID:28010165

  17. Modular arrangement of regulatory RNA elements.

    PubMed

    Roßmanith, Johanna; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-03-04

    Due to their simple architecture and control mechanism, regulatory RNA modules are attractive building blocks in synthetic biology. This is especially true for riboswitches, which are natural ligand-binding regulators of gene expression. The discovery of various tandem riboswitches inspired the design of combined RNA modules with activities not yet found in nature. Riboswitches were placed in tandem or in combination with a ribozyme or temperature-responsive RNA thermometer resulting in new functionalities. Here, we compare natural examples of tandem riboswitches with recently designed artificial RNA regulators suggesting substantial modularity of regulatory RNA elements. Challenges associated with modular RNA design are discussed.

  18. [Posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Laptev, I G; Golovina, A Ya; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Genomewide mapping of posttranscriptional modification in eukaryotic RNA allowed to reveal tens of thousands modification sites. Among modified nucleotides of eukaryotic RNA 6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytidine, pseudouridine, inosine, and others. Many modification sites are conserved, many are regulated. Function is known for a small subset of modified nucleotides, while the role of majority of them is still obscure. Global character of mRNA modifications allowed scientists to coin a new term, RNA epigenetics. The review is about posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes. Main modifications, their role in cell, their mapping techniques and proteins, that are responsible for such RNA modifications are observed.

  19. Structure-Function Relationships Among RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in viral transcription and genome replication, as well as epigenetic and post-transcriptional control of cellular gene expression. In this article, we review the crystallographic, biochemical, and molecular genetic data available for viral RdRPs that have led to a detailed description of substrate and cofactor binding, fidelity of nucleotide selection and incorporation, and catalysis. It is likely that the cellular RdRPs will share some of the basic structural and mechanistic principles gleaned from studies of viral RdRPs. Therefore, studies of the viral RdRP establish a framework for the study of cellular RdRPs, an important yet understudied class of nucleic acid polymerases. PMID:18268843

  20. Extra double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) in a squid RNA editing enzyme confers resistance to high salt environment.

    PubMed

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2012-05-18

    A-to-I RNA editing is particularly common in coding regions of squid mRNAs. Previously, we isolated a squid editing enzyme (sqADAR2) that shows a unique structural feature when compared with other ADAR2 family members: an additional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain (dsRBD). Alternative splicing includes or excludes this motif, generating a novel or a conventional variant termed sqADAR2a and sqADAR2b, respectively. The extra dsRBD of sqADAR2a increases its editing activity in vitro. We hypothesized that the high activity is due to an increase in the affinity of the enzyme for dsRNA. This may be important because protein-RNA interactions can be influenced by physical factors. We became particularly interested in analyzing the effects of salt on interactions between sqADAR2 and RNA because squid cells have a ∼3-fold higher ionic strength and proportionally more Cl(-) than vertebrate cells. To date, in vitro biochemical analyses of adenosine deamination have been conducted using vertebrate-like ionic strength buffers containing chloride as the major anion, although the vast majority of cellular anions are known to be organic. We found that squid-like salt conditions severely impair the binding affinity of conventional ADAR2s for dsRNA, leading to a decrease in nonspecific and site-specific editing activity. Inhibition of editing was mostly due to high Cl(-) levels and not to the high concentrations of K(+), Na(+), and organic anions like glutamate. Interestingly, the extra dsRBD in sqADAR2a conferred resistance to the high Cl(-) levels found in squid neurons. It does so by increasing the affinity of sqADAR2 for dsRNA by 30- or 100-fold in vertebrate-like or squid-like conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis of squid ADAR2a showed that its increased affinity and editing activity are directly attributable to the RNA binding activity of the extra dsRBD.

  1. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs.

  2. [The multifunctional RNA polymerase L protein of non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses catalyzes unique mRNA capping].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    Non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses belonging to the Mononegavirales order possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L proteins within viral particles. The L protein is a multifunctional enzyme catalyzing viral RNA synthesis and processing (i.e., mRNA capping, cap methylation, and polyadenylation). Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a prototypic model virus, we have shown that the L protein catalyzes the unconventional mRNA capping reaction, which is strikingly different from the eukaryotic reaction. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA capping with the VSV L protein was found to be required for accurate stop?start transcription to synthesize full-length mRNAs in vitro and virus propagation in host cells. This article provides a review of historical and present studies leading to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of VSV mRNA capping.

  3. crRNA and tracrRNA guide Cas9-mediated DNA interference in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Miksys, Algirdas; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-05-01

    The Cas9-crRNA complex of the Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 CRISPR3-Cas system functions as an RNA-guided endonuclease with crRNA-directed target sequence recognition and protein-mediated DNA cleavage. We show here that an additional RNA molecule, tracrRNA (trans-activating CRISPR RNA), co-purifies with the Cas9 protein isolated from the heterologous E. coli strain carrying the S. thermophilus DGCC7710 CRISPR3-Cas system. We provide experimental evidence that tracrRNA is required for Cas9-mediated DNA interference both in vitro and in vivo. We show that Cas9 specifically promotes duplex formation between the precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) transcript and tracrRNA, in vitro. Furthermore, the housekeeping RNase III contributes to primary pre-crRNA-tracrRNA duplex cleavage for mature crRNA biogenesis. RNase III, however, is not required in the processing of a short pre-crRNA transcribed from a minimal CRISPR array containing a single spacer. Finally, we show that an in vitro-assembled ternary Cas9-crRNA-tracrRNA complex cleaves DNA. This study further specifies the molecular basis for crRNA-based re-programming of Cas9 to specifically cleave any target DNA sequence for precise genome surgery. The processes for crRNA maturation and effector complex assembly established here will contribute to the further development of the Cas9 re-programmable system for genome editing applications.

  4. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  5. Depletion of Ribosomal RNA Sequences from Single-Cell RNA-Sequencing Library.

    PubMed

    Fang, Nan; Akinci-Tolun, Rumeysa

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in single-cell RNA sequencing technologies have revealed high heterogeneity of gene expression profiles in individual cells. However, most current single-cell RNA-seq methods use oligo-dT priming in the reverse transcription steps and detect only polyA-positive for more accuracy, since there are also polyA-positive non-coding RNAs transcripts, not other important RNA species, such as polyA-negative noncoding RNA. Reverse transcription using random oligos enables detection of not only the noncoding RNA species without polyA tails, but also ribosomal RNA (rRNA). rRNA comprises more than 90% of the total RNA and should be depleted from the RNA-seq library to ensure efficient usage of the sequencing capacity. Commonly used hybridization-based rRNA depletion methods can preserve noncoding RNA in the standard RNA-seq library. However, such rRNA depletion methods require high input amounts of total RNA and do not work at the single-cell level or with limited input DNA. This unit describes a novel procedure for RNA-seq library construction from single cells or a minimal amount of RNA. A thermostable duplex-specific nuclease is used in this method to effectively remove ribosomal RNA sequences following whole-transcriptome amplification and sequencing library construction. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Comprehensive characterization of lncRNA-mRNA related ceRNA network across 12 major cancers

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Li, Feng; Sun, Zeguo; Wu, Tan; Shi, Xinrui; Li, Jing; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to indirectly regulate mRNAs through shared microRNAs, which represents a novel layer of RNA crosstalk and plays critical roles in the development of tumor. However, the global regulation landscape and characterization of these lncRNA related ceRNA crosstalk in cancers is still largely unknown. Here, we systematically characterized the lncRNA related ceRNA interactions across 12 major cancers and the normal physiological states by integrating multidimensional molecule profiles of more than 5000 samples. Our study suggest the large difference of ceRNA regulation between normal and tumor states and the higher similarity across similar tissue origin of tumors. The ceRNA related molecules have more conserved features in tumor networks and they play critical roles in both the normal and tumorigenesis processes. Besides, lncRNAs in the pan-cancer ceRNA network may be potential biomarkers of tumor. By exploring hub lncRNAs, we found that these conserved key lncRNAs dominate variable tumor hallmark processes across pan-cancers. Network dynamic analysis highlights the critical roles of ceRNA regulation in tumorigenesis. By analyzing conserved ceRNA interactions, we found that miRNA mediate ceRNA regulation showed different patterns across pan-cancer; while analyzing the cancer specific ceRNA interactions reveal that lncRNAs synergistically regulated tumor driver genes of cancer hallmarks. Finally, we found that ceRNA modules have the potential to predict patient survival. Overall, our study systematically dissected the lncRNA related ceRNA networks in pan-cancer that shed new light on understanding the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis. PMID:27580177

  7. How a chemist looks at RNA.

    PubMed

    Cech, Thomas R

    2013-01-02

    RNA, just another starting material? Nobel Laureate Tom Cech shows that with an education steeped in kinetics, thermodynamics, and molecular structure, and armed with the ability to synthesize molecules, the chemist is ideally suited to investigate RNA.

  8. RNALocate: a resource for RNA subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Tan, Puwen; Wang, Liqiang; Jin, Nana; Li, Yana; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Huan; Hu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lining; Hu, Chunyu; Li, Chunhua; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Changjian; Huang, Yan; Li, Kongning; Lin, Hao; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-04

    Increasing evidence has revealed that RNA subcellular localization is a very important feature for deeply understanding RNA's biological functions after being transported into intra- or extra-cellular regions. RNALocate is a web-accessible database that aims to provide a high-quality RNA subcellular localization resource and facilitate future researches on RNA function or structure. The current version of RNALocate documents more than 37 700 manually curated RNA subcellular localization entries with experimental evidence, involving more than 21 800 RNAs with 42 subcellular localizations in 65 species, mainly including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae etc. Besides, RNA homology, sequence and interaction data have also been integrated into RNALocate. Users can access these data through online search, browse, blast and visualization tools. In conclusion, RNALocate will be of help in elucidating the entirety of RNA subcellular localization, and developing new prediction methods. The database is available at http://www.rna-society.org/rnalocate/.

  9. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  10. RNALocate: a resource for RNA subcellular localizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Tan, Puwen; Wang, Liqiang; Jin, Nana; Li, Yana; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Huan; Hu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lining; Hu, Chunyu; Li, Chunhua; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Changjian; Huang, Yan; Li, Kongning; Lin, Hao; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that RNA subcellular localization is a very important feature for deeply understanding RNA's biological functions after being transported into intra- or extra-cellular regions. RNALocate is a web-accessible database that aims to provide a high-quality RNA subcellular localization resource and facilitate future researches on RNA function or structure. The current version of RNALocate documents more than 37 700 manually curated RNA subcellular localization entries with experimental evidence, involving more than 21 800 RNAs with 42 subcellular localizations in 65 species, mainly including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae etc. Besides, RNA homology, sequence and interaction data have also been integrated into RNALocate. Users can access these data through online search, browse, blast and visualization tools. In conclusion, RNALocate will be of help in elucidating the entirety of RNA subcellular localization, and developing new prediction methods. The database is available at http://www.rna-society.org/rnalocate/. PMID:27543076

  11. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica; Lee, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from experimentally infected birds. Samples can generally be divided into two types; enriched (e.g. virus stocks) and clinical. Clinical type samples, which may be tissues or swab material, are the most difficult to process due to the complex sample composition and possibly low virus titers. In this chapter two well established procedures for the isolation of AI virus RNA from common clinical specimen types and enriched virus stocks for further molecular applications will be presented.

  12. Toward all RNA structures, concisely

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Profound insights regarding nucleic acid structure and function can be gleaned from very simple, direct, and chemistry-based strategies. Our approach strives to incorporate the elegant physical insights that Don Crothers instilled in those who trained in his laboratory. Don emphasized the advantages of focusing on direct and concise experiments, even when the final objective was to understand something complex – potentially including the large-scale architectures of the genomes of RNA viruses and the transcriptomes of cells. Here, I review the intellectual path, plus a few detours, that led to development of the SHAPE-MaP and RING-MaP technologies for interrogating RNA structure and function at large scales. I also argue that greater attention to creating direct, less inferential experiments will convert 'omics investigations into lasting and definitive contributions to our understanding of biological function. PMID:25546503

  13. Henipavirus RNA in African Bats

    PubMed Central

    Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Seebens, Antje; Annan, Augustina; Ipsen, Anne; Kruppa, Thomas; Müller, Marcel A.; Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Henipaviruses (Hendra and Nipah virus) are highly pathogenic members of the family Paramyxoviridae. Fruit-eating bats of the Pteropus genus have been suggested as their natural reservoir. Human Henipavirus infections have been reported in a region extending from Australia via Malaysia into Bangladesh, compatible with the geographic range of Pteropus. These bats do not occur in continental Africa, but a whole range of other fruit bats is encountered. One of the most abundant is Eidolon helvum, the African Straw-coloured fruit bat. Methodology/Principal Findings Feces from E. helvum roosting in an urban setting in Kumasi/Ghana were tested for Henipavirus RNA. Sequences of three novel viruses in phylogenetic relationship to known Henipaviruses were detected. Virus RNA concentrations in feces were low. Conclusions/Significance The finding of novel putative Henipaviruses outside Australia and Asia contributes a significant extension of the region of potential endemicity of one of the most pathogenic virus genera known in humans. PMID:19636378

  14. RNA and Proteins: Mutual Respect

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathleen B.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins and RNA are often found in ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs), where they function in cellular processes to synthesize proteins (the ribosome), chemically modify RNAs (small nucleolar RNPs), splice pre-mRNAs (the spliceosome), and, on a larger scale, sequester RNAs, degrade them, or process them (P bodies, Cajal bodies, and nucleoli). Each RNA–protein interaction is a story in itself, as both molecules can change conformation, compete for binding sites, and regulate cellular functions. Recent studies of Xist long non-coding RNP, the U4/5/6 tri-small nuclear RNP complex, and an activated state of a spliceosome reveal new features of RNA interactions with proteins, and, although their stories are incomplete, they are already fascinating.

  15. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  16. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  17. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  18. RNA Structure Analysis of Viruses Using SHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Selective 2'hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) provides a means to investigate RNA structure with better resolution and higher throughput than has been possible with traditional methods. We present several protocols, which are based on a variety of previously published methods and were adapted and optimized for the analysis of poliovirus RNA in the Andino laboratory. These include methods for non-denaturing RNA extraction, RNA modification and primer extension, and data processing in ShapeFinder. PMID:24510890

  19. Messenger RNA Methylation Regulates Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Xie, Qi; Rich, Jeremy N; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2017-04-10

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) modification provides an additional layer of gene regulation in cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Zhang et al. report that ALKBH5, a demethylase of the mRNA modification N(6)-methyladenosine, regulates proliferation and self-renewal of glioblastoma stem-like cells by modulating pre-mRNA stability and expression of the FOXM1 gene.

  20. Current techniques for visualizing RNA in cells

    PubMed Central

    Mannack, Lilith V.J.C.; Eising, Sebastian; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Labeling RNA is of utmost interest, particularly in living cells, and thus RNA imaging is an emerging field. There are numerous methods relying on different concepts ranging from hybridization-based probes, over RNA-binding proteins to chemo-enzymatic modification of RNA. These methods have different benefits and limitations. This review aims to outline the current state-of-the-art techniques and point out their benefits and limitations. PMID:27158473

  1. Riboswitches and the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Breaker, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches are structured noncoding RNA domains that selectively bind metabolites and control gene expression (Mandal and Breaker 2004a; Coppins et al. 2007; Roth and Breaker 2009). Nearly all examples of the known riboswitches reside in noncoding regions of messenger RNAs where they control transcription or translation. Newfound classes of riboswitches are being reported at a rate of about three per year (Ames and Breaker 2009), and these have been shown to selectively respond to fundamental metabolites including coenzymes, nucleobases or their derivatives, amino acids, and other small molecule ligands. The characteristics of some riboswitches suggest they could be modern descendents of an ancient sensory and regulatory system that likely functioned before the emergence of enzymes and genetic factors made of protein (Nahvi et al. 2002; Vitreschak et al. 2004; Breaker 2006). If true, then some of the riboswitch structures and functions that serve modern cells so well may accurately reflect the capabilities of RNA sensors and switches that existed in the RNA World. This article will address some of the characteristics of modern riboswitches that may be relevant to ancient versions of these metabolite-sensing RNAs. PMID:21106649

  2. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below.

  3. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    On August 9–11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  4. Characterizing of functional human coding RNA editing from evolutionary, structural, and dynamic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Bazak, Lily; Levanon, Erez Y; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2014-11-01

    A-to-I RNA editing has been recently shown to be a widespread phenomenon with millions of sites spread in the human transcriptome. However, only few are known to be located in coding sequences and modify the amino acid sequence of the protein product. Here, we used high-throughput data, variant prediction tools, and protein structural information in order to find structural and functional preferences for coding RNA editing. We show that RNA editing has a unique pattern of amino acid changes characterized by enriched stop-to-tryptophan changes, positive-to-neutral and neutral-to-positive charge changes. RNA editing tends to have stronger structural effect than equivalent A-to-G SNPs but weaker effect than random A-to-G mutagenesis events. Sites edited at low level tend to be located at conserved positions with stronger predicted deleterious effect on proteins comparing to sites edited at high frequencies. Lowly edited sites tend to destabilize the protein structure and affect amino acids with larger number of intra-molecular contacts. Still, some highly edited sites are predicted also to prominently affect structure and tend to be located at critical positions of the protein matrix and are likely to be functionally important. Using our pipeline, we identify and discuss several novel putative functional coding changing editing sites in the genes COPA (I164V), GIPC1 (T62A), ZN358 (K382R), and CCNI (R75G).

  5. RNA Chaperones Step Out of Hfq's Shadow.

    PubMed

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Glover, J N Mark; Charpentier, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    The stability and function of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) often require a specialized RNA-binding protein called an RNA chaperone. Recent findings show that proteins containing a ProQ/FinO domain constitute a new class of RNA chaperones that could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species.

  6. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  7. Dissemination of 6S RNA among Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Damm, Katrin; Hartmann, Roland K; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    6S RNA is a highly abundant small non-coding RNA widely spread among diverse bacterial groups. By competing with DNA promoters for binding to RNA polymerase (RNAP), the RNA regulates transcription on a global scale. RNAP produces small product RNAs derived from 6S RNA as template, which rearranges the 6S RNA structure leading to dissociation of 6S RNA:RNAP complexes. Although 6S RNA has been experimentally analysed in detail for some species, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, and was computationally predicted in many diverse bacteria, a complete and up-to-date overview of the distribution among all bacteria is missing. In this study we searched with new methods for 6S RNA genes in all currently available bacterial genomes. We ended up with a set of 1,750 6S RNA genes, of which 1,367 are novel and bona fide, distributed among 1,610 bacteria, and had a few tentative candidates among the remaining 510 assembled bacterial genomes accessible. We were able to confirm two tentative candidates by Northern blot analysis. We extended 6S RNA genes of the Flavobacteriia significantly in length compared to the present Rfam entry. We describe multiple homologs of 6S RNAs (including split 6S RNA genes) and performed a detailed synteny analysis. PMID:25483037

  8. RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aufsatz, Werner; Mette, M. Florian; van der Winden, Johannes; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2002-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA that is processed to short RNAs ≈21–24 nt in length can trigger two types of epigenetic gene silencing. Posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is related to RNA interference in animals and quelling in fungi, involves targeted elimination of homologous mRNA in the cytoplasm. RNA-directed DNA methylation involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues within a region of RNA–DNA sequence identity. RNA-directed DNA methylation is presumed to be responsible for the methylation observed in protein coding regions of posttranscriptionally silenced genes. Moreover, a type of transcriptional gene silencing and de novo methylation of homologous promoters in trans can occur if a double-stranded RNA contains promoter sequences. Although RNA-directed DNA methylation has been described so far only in plants, there is increasing evidence that RNA can also target genome modifications in other organisms. To understand how RNA directs methylation to identical DNA sequences and how changes in chromatin configuration contribute to initiating or maintaining DNA methylation induced by RNA, a promoter double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing system has been established in Arabidopsis. A genetic analysis of this system is helping to unravel the relationships among RNA signals, DNA methylation, and chromatin structure. PMID:12169664

  9. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    SciTech Connect

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  10. De Novo Initiation of RNA Synthesis by the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (NS5B) of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guangxiang; Hamatake, Robert K.; Mathis, Danielle M.; Racela, Jason; Rigat, Karen L.; Lemm, Julie; Colonno, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B protein possesses an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity, a major function responsible for replication of the viral RNA genome. To further characterize the RdRp activity, NS5B proteins were expressed from recombinant baculoviruses, purified to near homogeneity, and examined for their ability to synthesize RNA in vitro. As a result, a highly active NS5B RdRp (1b-42), which contains an 18-amino acid C-terminal truncation resulting from a newly created stop codon, was identified among a number of independent isolates. The RdRp activity of the truncated NS5B is comparable to the activity of the full-length protein and is 20 times higher in the presence of Mn2+ than in the presence of Mg2+. When a 384-nucleotide RNA was used as the template, two major RNA products were synthesized by 1b-42. One is a complementary RNA identical in size to the input RNA template (monomer), while the other is a hairpin dimer RNA synthesized by a “copy-back” mechanism. Substantial evidence derived from several experiments demonstrated that the RNA monomer was synthesized through de novo initiation by NS5B rather than by a terminal transferase activity. Synthesis of the RNA monomer requires all four ribonucleotides. The RNA monomer product was verified to be the result of de novo RNA synthesis, as two expected RNA products were generated from monomer RNA by RNase H digestion. In addition, modification of the RNA template by the addition of the chain terminator cordycepin at the 3′ end did not affect synthesis of the RNA monomer but eliminated synthesis of the self-priming hairpin dimer RNA. Moreover, synthesis of RNA on poly(C) and poly(U) homopolymer templates by 1b-42 NS5B did not require the oligonucleotide primer at high concentrations (≥50 μM) of GTP and ATP, further supporting a de novo initiation mechanism. These findings suggest that HCV NS5B is able to initiate RNA synthesis de novo. PMID:10623748

  11. The RNA helicase MOV10L1 binds piRNA precursors to initiate piRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Vourekas, Anastassios; Fu, Qi; Maragkakis, Manolis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Ma, Jing; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Piwi–piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA) ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) enforce retrotransposon silencing, a function critical for preserving the genome integrity of germ cells. The molecular functions of most of the factors that have been genetically implicated in primary piRNA biogenesis are still elusive. Here we show that MOV10L1 exhibits 5′-to-3′ directional RNA-unwinding activity in vitro and that a point mutation that abolishes this activity causes a failure in primary piRNA biogenesis in vivo. We demonstrate that MOV10L1 selectively binds piRNA precursor transcripts and is essential for the generation of intermediate piRNA processing fragments that are subsequently loaded to Piwi proteins. Multiple analyses suggest an intimate coupling of piRNA precursor processing with elements of local secondary structures such as G quadruplexes. Our results support a model in which MOV10L1 RNA helicase activity promotes unwinding and funneling of the single-stranded piRNA precursor transcripts to the endonuclease that catalyzes the first cleavage step of piRNA processing. PMID:25762440

  12. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis.

  13. Detection of dsRNA-binding domains in RNA helicase A and Drosophila maleless: implications for monomeric RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, T J; Thompson, J D

    1994-01-01

    Searches with dsRNA-binding domain profiles detected two copies of the domain in each of RNA helicase A, Drosophila maleless and C. elegans ORF T20G5-11 (of unknown function). RNA helicase A is unusual in being one of the few characterised DEAD/DExH helicases that are active as monomers. Other monomeric DEAD/DExH RNA helicases (p68, NPH-II) have domains that match another RNA-binding motif, the RGG repeat. The DEAD/DExH domain appears to be insufficient on its own to promote helicase activity and additional RNA-binding capacity must be supplied either as domains adjacent to the DEAD/DExH-box or by bound partners as in the eIF-4AB dimer. The presence or absence of extra RNA-binding domains should allow classification of DEAD/DExH proteins as monomeric or multimeric helicases. Images PMID:8041617

  14. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation.

  15. ADAR1 regulates ARHGAP26 gene expression through RNA editing by disrupting miR-30b-3p and miR-573 binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Hui, Haipeng; Guo, Zhendong; Zhang, Weina; Hu, Yaou; He, Tao; Tai, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Wang, Li

    2013-11-01

    Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26) is a negative regulator of the Rho family that converts the small G proteins RhoA and Cdc42 to their inactive GDP-bound forms. It is essential for the CLIC/GEEC endocytic pathway, cell spreading, and muscle development. The present study shows that ARHGAP26 mRNA undergoes extensive A-to-I RNA editing in the 3' UTR that is specifically catalyzed by ADAR1. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of ARHGAP26 were decreased in cells in which ADAR1 was knocked down. Conversely, ADAR1 overexpression increased the abundance of ARHGAP26 mRNA and protein. In addition, we found that both miR-30b-3p and miR-573 target the ARHGAP26 gene and that RNA editing of ARHGAP26 mediated by ADAR1 abolished the repression of its expression by miR-30b-3p or miR-573. When ADAR1 was overexpressed, the reduced abundance of ARHGAP26 protein mediated by miR-30b-3p or miR-573 was rescued. Importantly, we also found that knocking down ADAR1 elevated RhoA activity, which was consistent with the reduced level of ARHGAP26. Conversely, when ADAR1 was overexpressed, the amount of RhoA-GTP decreased. The similar expression patterns of ARHGAP26 and ADAR1 in human tissue samples further confirmed our findings. Taken together, our results suggest that ADAR1 regulates the expression of ARHGAP26 through A-to-I RNA editing by disrupting the binding of miR-30b-3p and miR-573 within the 3' UTR of ARHGAP26. This study provides a novel insight into the mechanism by which ADAR1 and its RNA editing function regulate microRNA-mediated modulation of target genes.

  16. ADAR2-mediated editing of miR-214 and miR-122 precursor and antisense RNA transcripts in liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Li, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Yi-Jinn; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei

    2013-01-01

    A growing list of microRNAs (miRNAs) show aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the regulatory mechanisms largely remain unclear. RNA editing catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) family could target the miRNA precursors and affect the biogenesis process. Therefore, we investigate whether RNA editing could be one mechanism contributing to the deregulation of specific miRNAs in HCC. By overexpression of individual ADARs in hepatoma cells, RNA editing on the precursors of 16 miRNAs frequently deregulated in HCC was screened by a sensitive high-resolution melting platform. The results identified RNA precursors of miR-214 and miR-122 as potential targets edited by ADAR2. A subset of HCC showing elevated ADAR2 verified the major editings identified in ARAR2 overexpressed hepatoma cells, either with A-to-I or U-to-C changes. The unusual U-to-C editing at specific residues was demonstrated as being attributed to the A-to-I editing on the RNA transcripts complementary to the pri-miRNAs. The editing event caused a decrease of the RNA transcript complementary to pri-miR-214, which led to the decrease of pri-miR-214 and miR-214 and resulted in the increased protein level of its novel target gene Rab15. In conclusion, the current study discovered ADAR2-mediated editing of the complementary antisense transcripts as a novel mechanism for regulating the biogenesis of specific miRNAs during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  17. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  18. A structural and primary sequence comparison of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Bruenn, Jeremy A.

    2003-01-01

    A systematic bioinformatic approach to identifying the evolutionarily conserved regions of proteins has verified the universality of a newly described conserved motif in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (motif F). In combination with structural comparisons, this approach has defined two regions that may be involved in unwinding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for transcription. One of these is the N-terminal portion of motif F and the second is a large insertion in motif F present in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of some dsRNA viruses. PMID:12654997

  19. Predicting RNA structure: advances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hofacker, Ivo L; Lorenz, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures can be predicted using efficient algorithms. A widely used software package implementing a large number of computational methods is the ViennaRNA Package. This chapter describes how to use programs from the ViennaRNA Package to perform common tasks such as prediction of minimum free-energy structures, suboptimal structures, or base pairing probabilities, and generating secondary structure plots with reliability annotation. Moreover, we present recent methods to assess the folding kinetics of an RNA via 2D projections of the energy landscape, identification of local minima and energy barriers, or simulation of RNA folding as a Markov process.

  20. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  1. 5' termini of poliovirus RNA: difference between virion and nonencapsidated 35S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Muñoz, R; Lavi, U

    1977-01-01

    Poliovirus cytoplasmic, nonencapsidated 35S RNA yields approximately one pUp per molecule upon T2 RNase digestion, indicating that this RNA has the same 5' end as the polyribosome-associated viral RNA fraction. Double-stranded, replicative form RNA after the same treatment yielded approximately four pNp structures per molecule, 65% of which was pUp. In contrast, the 35S RNA from mature virions contained no detectable pNp, indicating that the 5' end of the virion RNA is different from that of the nonencapsidated RNA. None of the above molecules contained pppNp, ppNp, or GpppNp structures present in host mRNA. The virion RNA molecules, as we have shown previously for thenonencapsidated 35S viral RNA (Fernandez-Muñoz and Darnell, 1976), is not labeled with [methyl-3H]methionine. PMID:189096

  2. Concentrations of individual RNA sequences in polyadenylated nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA populations of Drosophila cells.

    PubMed Central

    Biessmann, H

    1980-01-01

    Steady state concentrations of individual RNA sequences in poly(A) nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA populations of Drosophila Kc cells were determined using cloned cDNA fragments. These cDNAs represent poly(A) RNA sequences of different abundance in the cytoplasm of Kc cells, but their steady state concentrations in poly(A) hnRNA was always lower. Of ten different sequences analysed, eight showed some four-fold lower concentration in hnRNA mRNA, two were underrepresented in hnRNA relative to the others. The obvious clustering of mRNA/hnRNA ratios is discussed in relation to sequence complexity and turnover rates of these RNA populations. Images PMID:6162158

  3. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  4. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  5. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daming; Zhang, Caiming; Han, Huijian; Crandall, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding. PMID:25110687

  6. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Cancer.gov

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  7. Optimal alphabets for an RNA world.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul P; Holland, Barbara R; Moulton, Vincent; Hendy, Mike; Penny, David

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the canonical AUCG genetic alphabet is not the only possible nucleotide alphabet. In this work we address the question 'is the canonical alphabet optimal?' We make the assumption that the genetic alphabet was determined in the RNA world. Computational tools are used to infer the RNA secondary structure (shape) from a given RNA sequence, and statistics from RNA shapes are gathered with respect to alphabet size. Then, simulations based upon the replication and selection of fixed-sized RNA populations are used to investigate the effect of alternative alphabets upon RNA's ability to step through a fitness landscape. These results show that for a low copy fidelity the canonical alphabet is fitter than two-, six- and eight-letter alphabets. In higher copy-fidelity experiments, six-letter alphabets outperform the four-letter alphabets, suggesting that the canonical alphabet is indeed a relic of the RNA world. PMID:12816657

  8. Crystal structure of a plectonemic RNA supercoil

    SciTech Connect

    Stagno, Jason R.; Ma, Buyong; Li, Jess; Altieri, Amanda S.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-12-14

    Genome packaging is an essential housekeeping process in virtually all organisms for proper storage and maintenance of genetic information. Although the extent and mechanisms of packaging vary, the process involves the formation of nucleic-acid superstructures. Crystal structures of DNA coiled coils indicate that their geometries can vary according to sequence and/or the presence of stabilizers such as proteins or small molecules. However, such superstructures have not been revealed for RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of an RNA supercoil, which displays one level higher molecular organization than previously reported structures of DNA coiled coils. In the presence of an RNA-binding protein, two interlocking RNA coiled coils of double-stranded RNA, a 'coil of coiled coils', form a plectonemic supercoil. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that protein-RNA interaction is required for the stability of the supercoiled RNA. This study provides structural insight into higher order packaging mechanisms of nucleic acids.

  9. The Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peixuan

    2011-01-01

    RNA can be designed and manipulated just like DNA while having different rules for base-pairing and displaying functions similar to proteins. The large variety of loops and motifs in RNA allow them to fold into numerous complicated structures. This diversity provides a platform for identifying viable building blocks for particle assemblies, substrate binding and manufacture engineering. RNA thermal stability allows production of multivalent nanostructures with defined stoichiometry. Here we review the unique qualities of RNA nanotechnology and their distinct properties inside the body. We describe techniques for constructing RNA nanoparticles from different building blocks and their applications in nanomedicine. Finally, we discuss challenges in predicting and synthesizing RNA and offer some perspectives on the yield and cost of RNA production. PMID:21102465

  10. In vitro translation of plant viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Browning, Karen S; Mayberry, Laura

    2006-06-01

    This unit describes the preparation of a wheat germ extract that provides all the soluble components of the plant translational machinery. Many RNA plant viruses have positive-strand genomes and the viral RNA serves as messenger RNA (mRNA). The preparation of mRNA by in vitro transcription is also described. The translation assay requires optimization of the amount of wheat germ extract, level of mRNA, and the concentration of Mg(2+) and K(+) for each mRNA. The translational efficiency of RNAs or mutants may be compared (e.g., capped versus uncapped RNAs to measure cap-independent translation) or the amount/size of the protein product may be determined.

  11. Understanding the transcriptome through RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yue; Kertesz, Michael; Spitale, Robert C.; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard

    2013-01-01

    RNA structure is critical for gene regulation and function. In the past, transcriptomes have been largely parsed by primary sequences and expression levels, but it is now becoming feasible to annotate and compare transcriptomes based on RNA structure. In addition to computational prediction methods, the recent advent of experimental techniques to probe RNA structure by deep sequencing has enabled genome-wide measurements of RNA structure, and provided the first picture of the structural organization of an eukaryotic transcriptome—the “RNA structurome”. With additional advances in method refinement and interpretation, structural views of the transcriptome should help to identify and validate regulatory RNA motifs that are involved in diverse cellular processes, and thereby increase understanding of RNA function. PMID:21850044

  12. RNA sequence analysis using covariance models.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, S R; Durbin, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe a general approach to several RNA sequence analysis problems using probabilistic models that flexibly describe the secondary structure and primary sequence consensus of an RNA sequence family. We call these models 'covariance models'. A covariance model of tRNA sequences is an extremely sensitive and discriminative tool for searching for additional tRNAs and tRNA-related sequences in sequence databases. A model can be built automatically from an existing sequence alignment. We also describe an algorithm for learning a model and hence a consensus secondary structure from initially unaligned example sequences and no prior structural information. Models trained on unaligned tRNA examples correctly predict tRNA secondary structure and produce high-quality multiple alignments. The approach may be applied to any family of small RNA sequences. Images PMID:8029015

  13. RNA families in Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells.

  14. RNA families in Epstein–Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells. PMID:24441309

  15. DNA repair investigations using siRNA.

    PubMed

    Miller, Holly; Grollman, Arthur P

    2003-06-11

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a revolutionary tool for the experimental modulation of gene expression, in many cases making redundant the need for specific gene mutations and allowing examination of the effect of modulating essential genes. It has now been shown that siRNA phenotypes resulting from stable transfection with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) can be transmitted through the mouse germ line and Rosenquist and his colleagues have used shRNA, which is processed in vivo to siRNA, to create germline transgenic mice in which a target DNA repair gene has been silenced. Here, Holly Miller and Arthur P. Grollman give the background of these discoveries, provide an overview of current uses, and look at future applications of this research.

  16. Investigating RNA editing factors from trypanosome mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Zhang, Liye; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial U-insertion/deletion mRNA editing is carried out by two principal multiprotein assemblies, enzymatic RNA editing core (RECC) and RNA editing substrate binding (RESC) complexes, and a plethora of auxiliary factors. An integral part of mitochondrial gene expression, editing receives inputs from primary mRNA and gRNA precursor processing pathways, and generates substrates for mRNA polyadenylation and translation. Although nearly all RECC-embedded enzymes have been implicated in specific editing reactions, the majority of proteins that populate the RESC are also essential for generating edited mRNAs. However, lack of recognizable motifs in RESC subunits limits the prowess of bioinformatics in guiding biochemical experiments and elucidating their specific biological functions. In this chapter, we describe a generic workflow for investigating mitochondrial mRNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei and focus on several methods that proved instrumental is assigning definitive functions to editing factors lacking known signature sequences. PMID:27020893

  17. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  18. RNA Dimerization Promotes PKR Dimerization and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Wong, C. Jason; Lary, Jeffrey; Nallagatla, Subba Rao; Diegelman-Parente, Amy; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Cole, James L.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) plays a major role in the innate immune response in humans. PKR binds dsRNA non-sequence specifically and requires a minimum of 15 bp dsRNA for one protein to bind and 30 bp dsRNA to induce protein dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation. PKR phosphorylates eIF2α, a translation initiation factor, resulting in the inhibition of protein synthesis. We investigated the mechanism of PKR activation by an RNA hairpin with a number of base pairs intermediate between these 15 to 30 bp limits: HIV-I TAR RNA, a 23 bp hairpin with three bulges that is known to dimerize. To test whether RNA dimerization affects PKR dimerization and activation, TAR monomers and dimers were isolated from native gels and assayed for RNA and protein dimerization. To modulate the extent of dimerization, we included TAR mutants with different secondary features. Native gel mixing experiments and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that TAR monomers bind one PKR monomer and that TAR dimers bind two or three PKRs, demonstrating that RNA dimerization drives the binding of multiple PKR molecules. Consistent with functional dimerization of PKR, TAR dimers activated PKR while TAR monomers did not, and RNA dimers with fewer asymmetrical secondary structure defects, as determined by enzymatic structure mapping, were more potent activators. Thus, the secondary structure defects in the TAR RNA stem function as antideterminants to PKR binding and activation. Our studies support that dimerization of a 15–30 bp hairpin RNA, which effectively doubles its length, is a key step in driving activation of PKR and provide a model for how RNA folding can be related to human disease. PMID:19445956

  19. C-terminal domain of the RNA chaperone Hfq drives sRNA competition and release of target RNA

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Kavita, Kumari; Schu, Daniel J.; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Sm protein and RNA chaperone Hfq stabilizes small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and facilitates their annealing to mRNA targets involved in stress tolerance and virulence. Although an arginine patch on the Sm core is needed for Hfq’s RNA chaperone activity, the function of Hfq’s intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) has remained unclear. Here, we use stopped flow spectroscopy to show that the CTD of Escherichia coli Hfq is not needed to accelerate RNA base pairing but is required for the release of dsRNA. The Hfq CTD also mediates competition between sRNAs, offering a kinetic advantage to sRNAs that contact both the proximal and distal faces of the Hfq hexamer. The change in sRNA hierarchy caused by deletion of the Hfq CTD in E. coli alters the sRNA accumulation and the kinetics of sRNA regulation in vivo. We propose that the Hfq CTD displaces sRNAs and annealed sRNA⋅mRNA complexes from the Sm core, enabling Hfq to chaperone sRNA–mRNA interactions and rapidly cycle between competing targets in the cell. PMID:27681631

  20. RNA-DNA Chimeras in the Context of an RNA World Transition to an RNA/DNA World.

    PubMed

    Gavette, Jesse V; Stoop, Matthias; Hud, Nicholas V; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan

    2016-10-10

    The RNA world hypothesis posits that DNA and proteins were later inventions of early life, or the chemistry that gave rise to life. Most scenarios put forth for the emergence of DNA assume a clean separation of RNA and DNA polymer, and a smooth transition between RNA and DNA. However, based on the reality of "clutter" and lack of sophisticated separation/discrimination mechanisms in a protobiological (and/or prebiological) world, heterogeneous RNA-DNA backbone containing chimeric sequences could have been common-and have not been fully considered in models transitioning from an RNA world to an RNA-DNA world. Herein we show that there is a significant decrease in Watson-Crick duplex stability of the heterogeneous backbone chimeric duplexes that would impede base-pair mediated interactions (and functions). These results point to the difficulties for the transition from one homogeneous system (RNA) to another (RNA/DNA) in an RNA world with a heterogeneous mixture of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides and sequences, while suggesting an alternative scenario of prebiological accumulation and co-evolution of homogeneous systems (RNA and DNA).

  1. RNAi: Mammalian oocytes do it without RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    STEIN, PAULA; SVOBODA, PETR; ANGER, MARTIN; SCHULTZ, RICHARD M.

    2003-01-01

    Studies in mutant organisms deficient in RNA interference (RNAi) and related post-transcriptional gene silencing implicated a role for a single class of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Nevertheless, sequence homologs to these RdRps have not been found in coelomate organisms such as Drosophila or mammals. This lack of homologous sequences does not exclude that an RdRp functions in RNAi in these organisms because an RdRp could be acquired by horizontal transfer from an RNA virus. In fact, such a sequence is found in mice (Aquarius) and we observe that it is expressed in mouse oocytes and early embryos, which exhibit RNAi. We report here that cordycepin, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, does not prevent Mos double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to target endogenous Mos mRNA in mouse oocytes and that targeting a chimeric Mos–EGFP mRNA with dsRNA to EGFP does not reduce the endogenous Mos mRNA, but does target the chimeric mRNA. These results indicate that an RdRp is not involved in dsRNA-mediated mRNA degradation in mammalian oocytes, and possibly in mammals in general, and therefore that only homologous sequences to the dsRNA are targeted for degradation. PMID:12554861

  2. c-Myc co-ordinates mRNA cap methylation and ribosomal RNA production

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sianadh; Lombardi, Olivia; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2017-01-01

    The mRNA cap is a structure added to RNA pol II transcripts in eukaryotes, which recruits factors involved in RNA processing, nuclear export and translation initiation. RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT)–RNA-activating miniprotein (RAM), the mRNA cap methyltransferase complex, completes the basic functional mRNA cap structure, cap 0, by methylating the cap guanosine. Here, we report that RNMT–RAM co-ordinates mRNA processing with ribosome production. Suppression of RNMT–RAM reduces synthesis of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor. RNMT–RAM is required for c-Myc expression, a major regulator of RNA pol I, which synthesises 45S rRNA. Constitutive expression of c-Myc restores rRNA synthesis when RNMT–RAM is suppressed, indicating that RNMT–RAM controls rRNA production predominantly by controlling c-Myc expression. We report that RNMT–RAM is recruited to the ribosomal DNA locus, which may contribute to rRNA synthesis in certain contexts. PMID:27934633

  3. The cellular factor TRP-185 regulates RNA polymerase II binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Baer, F; Lane, W S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the transactivator Tat is dependent on an RNA regulatory element located downstream of the transcription initiation site known as TAR. To characterize cellular factors that bind to TAR RNA and are involved in the regulation of HIV-1 transcription, HeLa nuclear extract was fractionated and RNA gel-retardation analysis was performed. This analysis indicated that only two cellular factors, RNA polymerase II and the previously characterized TAR RNA loop binding protein TRP-185, were capable of binding specifically to TAR RNA. To elucidate the function of TRP-185, it was purified from HeLa nuclear extract, amino acid microsequence analysis was performed and a cDNA encoding TRP-185 was isolated. TRP-185 is a novel protein of 1621 amino acids which contains a leucine zipper and potentially a novel RNA binding motif. In gel-retardation assays, the binding of both recombinant TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II was dependent on the presence of an additional group of proteins designated cellular cofactors. Both the TAR RNA loop and bulge sequences were critical for RNA polymerase II binding, while TRP-185 binding was dependent only on TAR RNA loop sequences. Since binding of TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II to TAR RNA was found to be mutually exclusive, our results suggest that TRP-185 may function either alone or in conjunction with Tat to disengage RNA polymerase II which is stalled upon binding to nascently synthesized TAR RNA during transcriptional elongation. Images PMID:8846792

  4. c-Myc co-ordinates mRNA cap methylation and ribosomal RNA production.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Lombardi, Olivia; Cowling, Victoria H

    2017-02-01

    The mRNA cap is a structure added to RNA pol II transcripts in eukaryotes, which recruits factors involved in RNA processing, nuclear export and translation initiation. RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT)-RNA-activating miniprotein (RAM), the mRNA cap methyltransferase complex, completes the basic functional mRNA cap structure, cap 0, by methylating the cap guanosine. Here, we report that RNMT-RAM co-ordinates mRNA processing with ribosome production. Suppression of RNMT-RAM reduces synthesis of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor. RNMT-RAM is required for c-Myc expression, a major regulator of RNA pol I, which synthesises 45S rRNA. Constitutive expression of c-Myc restores rRNA synthesis when RNMT-RAM is suppressed, indicating that RNMT-RAM controls rRNA production predominantly by controlling c-Myc expression. We report that RNMT-RAM is recruited to the ribosomal DNA locus, which may contribute to rRNA synthesis in certain contexts.

  5. Evaluation of commercially available RNA amplification kits for RNA sequencing using very low input amounts of total RNA.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Savita; Paulson, Ariel; Edenberg, Howard J; Peak, Allison; Perera, Anoja; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Beckloff, Nicholas; Bivens, Nathan J; Donnelly, Robert; Gillaspy, Allison F; Grove, Deborah; Gu, Weikuan; Jafari, Nadereh; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S; Lyons, Robert H; Tepper, Clifford; Nicolet, Charles M

    2015-04-01

    This article includes supplemental data. Please visit http://www.fasebj.org to obtain this information.Multiple recent publications on RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) have demonstrated the power of next-generation sequencing technologies in whole-transcriptome analysis. Vendor-specific protocols used for RNA library construction often require at least 100 ng total RNA. However, under certain conditions, much less RNA is available for library construction. In these cases, effective transcriptome profiling requires amplification of subnanogram amounts of RNA. Several commercial RNA amplification kits are available for amplification prior to library construction for next-generation sequencing, but these kits have not been comprehensively field evaluated for accuracy and performance of RNA-seq for picogram amounts of RNA. To address this, 4 types of amplification kits were tested with 3 different concentrations, from 5 ng to 50 pg, of a commercially available RNA. Kits were tested at multiple sites to assess reproducibility and ease of use. The human total reference RNA used was spiked with a control pool of RNA molecules in order to further evaluate quantitative recovery of input material. Additional control data sets were generated from libraries constructed following polyA selection or ribosomal depletion using established kits and protocols. cDNA was collected from the different sites, and libraries were synthesized at a single site using established protocols. Sequencing runs were carried out on the Illumina platform. Numerous metrics were compared among the kits and dilutions used. Overall, no single kit appeared to meet all the challenges of small input material. However, it is encouraging that excellent data can be recovered with even the 50 pg input total RNA.

  6. An all RNA hypercycle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Nilesh; Lehman, Niles

    The RNA world hypothesis suggests RNA-based catalysis and information storage as the first step in the evolution of life on the Earth. The central process of the RNA world was the replica-tion of RNA, which may have involved the joining of oligonucleotides, perhaps by recombination rather than organization along a linear template. To assist this build-up of information, a hy-percycle may have played a significant role by allowing cooperation between autocatalytic units in a cyclic linkage in such a way that there is a mutual survival and regulated growth of all the units involved (1). Compared to non-coupled self-replicating units, which can only sustain a limited amount of genetic information, the hypercycle allows the maintenance of large amounts of information through cooperation among otherwise competitive units. However, hypercycles have never been empirically demonstrated in the absence of cell-like compartmentalization. In the current work, hypercyclic behavior is demonstrated in the autocatalytic assembly of Azoar-cus group I ribozyme (2). Three different constructs of the Azoarcus ribozyme with different internal guide sequences (IGS) -GUG (canonical), GAG, and GCG -are capable of a min-imal amount of self-assembly when broken into two fragments. Here, self-assembly depends on a mismatch with non-complementary sequences, CGU, CAU and CUU, respectively, to be recognized by IGS via autocatalysis. Yet when all three constructs are present in the same reaction vessel, concomitant assembly of all three is enhanced through an interdependent hy-percyclic reaction network. Analysis of these reactions indicates that each system is capable of guiding its own reproduction weakly, along with providing enhanced catalytic support for the reproduction of one other construct system through matched IGS-tag interactions. Also, when co-incubated with non-interacting (i.e., selfish) yet efficient self-assembly systems, the hypercyclic assembly outcompetes the selfish self

  7. REDIdb: the RNA editing database.

    PubMed

    Picardi, Ernesto; Regina, Teresa Maria Rosaria; Brennicke, Axel; Quagliariello, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The RNA Editing Database (REDIdb) is an interactive, web-based database created and designed with the aim to allocate RNA editing events such as substitutions, insertions and deletions occurring in a wide range of organisms. The database contains both fully and partially sequenced DNA molecules for which editing information is available either by experimental inspection (in vitro) or by computational detection (in silico). Each record of REDIdb is organized in a specific flat-file containing a description of the main characteristics of the entry, a feature table with the editing events and related details and a sequence zone with both the genomic sequence and the corresponding edited transcript. REDIdb is a relational database in which the browsing and identification of editing sites has been simplified by means of two facilities to either graphically display genomic or cDNA sequences or to show the corresponding alignment. In both cases, all editing sites are highlighted in colour and their relative positions are detailed by mousing over. New editing positions can be directly submitted to REDIdb after a user-specific registration to obtain authorized secure access. This first version of REDIdb database stores 9964 editing events and can be freely queried at http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/search.html.

  8. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided transposon cleavage initiates Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA production.

    PubMed

    Han, Bo W; Wang, Wei; Li, Chengjian; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D

    2015-05-15

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) protect the animal germ line by silencing transposons. Primary piRNAs, generated from transcripts of genomic transposon "junkyards" (piRNA clusters), are amplified by the "ping-pong" pathway, yielding secondary piRNAs. We report that secondary piRNAs, bound to the PIWI protein Ago3, can initiate primary piRNA production from cleaved transposon RNAs. The first ~26 nucleotides (nt) of each cleaved RNA becomes a secondary piRNA, but the subsequent ~26 nt become the first in a series of phased primary piRNAs that bind Piwi, allowing piRNAs to spread beyond the site of RNA cleavage. The ping-pong pathway increases only the abundance of piRNAs, whereas production of phased primary piRNAs from cleaved transposon RNAs adds sequence diversity to the piRNA pool, allowing adaptation to changes in transposon sequence.

  9. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  10. Modeling sRNA-Regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin’s mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, a short half-life of the protein toxin is also beneficial to the function of the toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we study a therapeutic scenario in which a competitor mRNA is introduced to sequester the sRNA antitoxin, causing the toxic protein to be expressed. PMID:28085919

  11. The evolution of chloroplast RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Lehwark, Pascal; Morton, Brian R; Maier, Uwe G

    2006-10-01

    RNA editing alters the nucleotide sequence of an RNA molecule so that it deviates from the sequence of its DNA template. Different RNA-editing systems are found in the major eukaryotic lineages, and these systems are thought to have evolved independently. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of data on C-to-U editing sites in land plant chloroplasts and propose a model for the evolution of RNA editing in land plants. First, our data suggest that the limited RNA-editing system of seed plants and the much more extensive systems found in hornworts and ferns are of monophyletic origin. Further, although some eukaryotic editing systems appear to have evolved to regulate gene expression, or at least are now involved in gene regulation, there is no evidence that RNA editing plays a role in gene regulation in land plant chloroplasts. Instead, our results suggest that land plant chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing originated as a mechanism to generate variation at the RNA level, which could complement variation at the DNA level. Under this model, many of the original sites, particularly in seed plants, have been subsequently lost due to mutation at the DNA level, and the function of extant sites is merely to conserve certain codons. This is the first comprehensive model for the evolution of the chloroplast RNA-editing system of land plants and may also be applicable to the evolution of RNA editing in plant mitochondria.

  12. Computational approaches for RNA energy parameter estimation

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Condon, Anne; Hoos, Holger H.; Mathews, David H.; Murphy, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for efficient and accurate prediction of RNA structure are increasingly valuable, given the current rapid advances in understanding the diverse functions of RNA molecules in the cell. To enhance the accuracy of secondary structure predictions, we developed and refined optimization techniques for the estimation of energy parameters. We build on two previous approaches to RNA free-energy parameter estimation: (1) the Constraint Generation (CG) method, which iteratively generates constraints that enforce known structures to have energies lower than other structures for the same molecule; and (2) the Boltzmann Likelihood (BL) method, which infers a set of RNA free-energy parameters that maximize the conditional likelihood of a set of reference RNA structures. Here, we extend these approaches in two main ways: We propose (1) a max-margin extension of CG, and (2) a novel linear Gaussian Bayesian network that models feature relationships, which effectively makes use of sparse data by sharing statistical strength between parameters. We obtain significant improvements in the accuracy of RNA minimum free-energy pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction when measured on a comprehensive set of 2518 RNA molecules with reference structures. Our parameters can be used in conjunction with software that predicts RNA secondary structures, RNA hybridization, or ensembles of structures. Our data, software, results, and parameter sets in various formats are freely available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/labs/beta/Projects/RNA-Params. PMID:20940338

  13. Computational Prediction of RNA Tertiary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Gong, Zhou; Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2012-02-01

    RNAs have been found to be involved in the biological processes. The large RNA usually consists of two basic elements: RNA hairpins and duplex. Due to the experimental determination difficulties, the few RNA tertiary structures limit our understanding of the specific regulation mechanisms and functions. Therefore, RNA tertiary structure prediction is very important for understanding RNA biological functions. Since RNA often folds hierarchically, one of the possible RNA structure prediction approaches is through the hierarchical steps. Here, we focus on the prediction method of RNA tertiary hairpin and duplex structures in which assembles the small tertiary structure fragments from well-defined RNA structural motifs. In a benchmark test with known experiment structures, more than half of the cases agree with the experimental structure better than 3 å RMSD over all the heavy atoms. The prediction results also reproduce the native like complementary base pairs of the secondary structures. Most importantly, the method performs the atomic accuracy of tertiary structures by about several minutes. We expect that the method will be a useful resource for RNA tertiary structure prediction and helpful to the biological research community.

  14. Coronavirus cis-Acting RNA Elements.

    PubMed

    Madhugiri, R; Fricke, M; Marz, M; Ziebuhr, J

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses have exceptionally large RNA genomes of approximately 30 kilobases. Genome replication and transcription is mediated by a multisubunit protein complex comprised of more than a dozen virus-encoded proteins. The protein complex is thought to bind specific cis-acting RNA elements primarily located in the 5'- and 3'-terminal genome regions and upstream of the open reading frames located in the 3'-proximal one-third of the genome. Here, we review our current understanding of coronavirus cis-acting RNA elements, focusing on elements required for genome replication and packaging. Recent bioinformatic, biochemical, and genetic studies suggest a previously unknown level of conservation of cis-acting RNA structures among different coronavirus genera and, in some cases, even beyond genus boundaries. Also, there is increasing evidence to suggest that individual cis-acting elements may be part of higher-order RNA structures involving long-range and dynamic RNA-RNA interactions between RNA structural elements separated by thousands of nucleotides in the viral genome. We discuss the structural and functional features of these cis-acting RNA elements and their specific functions in coronavirus RNA synthesis.

  15. Chloroplast DNA codes for transfer RNA.

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, J M; Hershberger, C L

    1976-01-01

    Transfer RNA's were isolated from Euglena gracilis. Chloroplast cistrons for tRNA were quantitated by hybridizing tRNA to ct DNA. Species of tRNA hybridizing to ct DNA were partially purified by hybridization-chromatography. The tRNA's hybridizing to ct DNA and nuclear DNA appear to be different. Total cellular tRNA was hybridized to ct DNA to an equivalent of approximately 25 cistrons. The total cellular tRNA was also separated into 2 fractions by chromatography on dihydroxyboryl substituted amino ethyl cellulose. Fraction I hybridized to both nuclear and ct DNA. Hybridizations to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-tRNA hybridized only to ct DNA, saturating at a level of approximately 7 cistrons. The tRNA from isolated chloroplasts hybridized to both chloroplast and nuclear DNA. The level of hybridization to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-type tRNA could not be detected in the isolated chloroplasts. PMID:823529

  16. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  17. Controlled evolution of an RNA enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    It is generally thought that prior to the origin of protein synthesis, life on earth was based on self-replicating RNA molecules. This idea has become especially popular recently due to the discovery of catalytic RNA (ribozymes). RNA has both genotypic and phenotypic properties, suggesting that it is capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. RNA evolution is likely to have played a critical role in the early history of life on earth, and thus is important in considering the possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system. We have constructed an RNA-based evolving system in the laboratory, combining amplification and mutation of an RNA genotype with selection of a corresponding RNA phenotype. This system serves as a functional model of a primitive organism. It can also be used as a tool to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. By altering the selection constraints, we are attempting to modify the substrate specificity of an existing ribozyme in order to develop ribozymes with novel catalytic function. In this way, we hope to gain a better understanding of RNA's catalytic versatility and to assess its suitability for the role of primordial catalyst. All of the RNA enzymes that are known to exist in contemporary biology carry out cleavage/ligation reactions involving RNA substrates. The Tetrahymena ribozyme, for example, catalyzes phosphoester transfer between a guanosine containing and an oligopyrimidine containing substrate. We tested the ability of mutant forms of the Tetrahymena ribozyme to carry out a comparable reaction using DNA, rather than RNA substrate. An ensemble of structural variants of the ribozyme was prepared and tested for their ability to specifically cleave d(GGCCCTCT-A3TA3TA) at the phosphodiester bond following the sequence CCCTCT. We recovered a mutant form of the enzyme that cleaves DNA more efficiently than does the wild-type. Beginning with this selected mutant we have now scattered random mutations throughout the ribozyme and have begun

  18. Implementation of RNA profiling in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Lindenbergh, Alexander; Maaskant, Petra; Sijen, Titia

    2013-01-01

    An essential aspect for forensic methods is the prevention of cognitive (confirmation, expectation or motivational) bias. While implementing RNA profiling in casework, we developed a stepwise procedure for unbiased assessment in which: (1) the RNA researcher who generates DNA/RNA fractions and performs RNA profiling, remains uninformed about the context of the case and (2) presents RNA profiling results that are derived by clear guidelines in a results table that uses six different scoring categories, (3) the DNA fractions are processed and analysed by DNA analysts following the standard routine after which (4) reporting officers interpret the DNA profiles and establish the relation to the RNA results which is succeeded by (5) collating all generated results in the case and formulating conclusions in expert reports. The scoring guidelines and results table have a general purpose and can apply to any RNA multiplex. This procedure was applied in a comparative study encompassing seven mock cases designed to be especially interesting for body fluid identification by RNA profiling. Samples were prepared in duplicates and subjected to either presumptive testing combined with standard DNA typing or RNA/DNA co-extraction followed by RNA and DNA profiling. For all cases, the results from presumptive testing and RNA profiling agreed to the level of details the tests can give and concordant DNA results were obtained. RNA profiling was especially useful when (1) menstrual secretion and peripheral blood needed to be distinguished, (2) presence of vaginal mucosa was questioned or (3) presence of skin cells was informative. For forensic reports, we propose to use sets of hypotheses evaluated by the conclusions obtained with DNA and RNA analyses.

  19. Construction of RNA nanocages by re-engineering the packaging RNA of Phi29 bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chenhui; Li, Xiang; Tian, Cheng; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2014-05-01

    RNA nanotechnology promises rational design of RNA nanostructures with wide array of structural diversities and functionalities. Such nanostructures could be used in applications such as small interfering RNA delivery and organization of in vivo chemical reactions. Though having impressive development in recent years, RNA nanotechnology is still quite limited and its programmability and complexity could not rival the degree of its closely related cousin: DNA nanotechnology. Novel strategies are needed for programmed RNA self-assembly. Here, we have assembled RNA nanocages by re-engineering a natural, biological RNA motif: the packaging RNA of phi29 bacteriophage. The resulting RNA nanostructures have been thoroughly characterized by gel electrophoresis, cryogenic electron microscopy imaging and dynamic light scattering.

  20. Fragment-based modelling of single stranded RNA bound to RNA recognition motif containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Beauchene, Isaure Chauvot; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes are important for many biological processes. However, structural modeling of such complexes is hampered by the high flexibility of RNA. Particularly challenging is the docking of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). We have developed a fragment-based approach to model the structure of ssRNA bound to a protein, based on only the protein structure, the RNA sequence and conserved contacts. The conformational diversity of each RNA fragment is sampled by an exhaustive library of trinucleotides extracted from all known experimental protein–RNA complexes. The method was applied to ssRNA with up to 12 nucleotides which bind to dimers of the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), a highly abundant eukaryotic RNA-binding domain. The fragment based docking allows a precise de novo atomic modeling of protein-bound ssRNA chains. On a benchmark of seven experimental ssRNA–RRM complexes, near-native models (with a mean heavy-atom deviation of <3 Å from experiment) were generated for six out of seven bound RNA chains, and even more precise models (deviation < 2 Å) were obtained for five out of seven cases, a significant improvement compared to the state of the art. The method is not restricted to RRMs but was also successfully applied to Pumilio RNA binding proteins. PMID:27131381

  1. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Alyssa C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29‐like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29‐like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self‐assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428–437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  2. Role of RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Jaag, Hannah M; Lu, Qiasheng; Schmitt, Mark E; Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA degradation, together with RNA synthesis, controls the steady-state level of viral RNAs in infected cells. The endoribonucleolytic cleavage of viral RNA is important not only for viral RNA degradation but for RNA recombination as well, due to the participation of some RNA degradation products in the RNA recombination process. To identify host endoribonucleases involved in degradation of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model host, we tested eight known endoribonucleases. Here we report that downregulation of SNM1, encoding a component of the RNase MRP, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in the NME1 gene, coding for the RNA component of RNase MRP, lead to reduced production of the endoribonucleolytically cleaved TBSV RNA in yeast. We also show that the highly purified yeast RNase MRP cleaves the TBSV RNA in vitro, resulting in TBSV RNA degradation products similar in size to those observed in yeast cells. Knocking down the NME1 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana also led to decreased production of the cleaved TBSV RNA, suggesting that in plants, RNase MRP is involved in TBSV RNA degradation. Altogether, this work suggests a role for the host endoribonuclease RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and recombination.

  3. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Syun-ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  4. Small RNA zippers lock miRNA molecules and block miRNA function in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyu; Liu, Cuicui; Lü, Jinhui; Zhao, Qian; Deng, Shengqiong; Wang, Guangxue; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Chuyi; Zhen, Lixiao; Lu, Ying; Li, Wenshu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Pestell, Richard G.; Fan, Huiming; Chen, Yi-Han; Liu, Zhongmin; Yu, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) loss-of-function phenotypes are mainly induced by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides. Here we develop an alternative inhibitor for miRNAs, termed ‘small RNA zipper'. It is designed to connect miRNA molecules end to end, forming a DNA–RNA duplex through a complementary interaction with high affinity, high specificity and high stability. Two miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-17, are tested in human breast cancer cell lines, demonstrating the 70∼90% knockdown of miRNA levels by 30–50 nM small RNA zippers. The miR-221 zipper shows capability in rescuing the expression of target genes of miR-221 and reversing the oncogenic function of miR-221 in breast cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the miR-221 zipper attenuates doxorubicin resistance with higher efficiency than anti-miR-221 in human breast cancer cells. Taken together, small RNA zippers are a miRNA inhibitor, which can be used to induce miRNA loss-of-function phenotypes and validate miRNA target genes. PMID:28045030

  5. Cymbidium ringspot virus harnesses RNA silencing to control the accumulation of virus parasite satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Burgyán, József

    2008-12-01

    Cymbidium ringspot virus (CymRSV) satellite RNA (satRNA) is a parasitic subviral RNA replicon that replicates and accumulates at the cost of its helper virus. This 621-nucleotide (nt) satRNA species has no sequence similarity to the helper virus, except for a 51-nt-long region termed the helper-satellite homology (HSH) region, which is essential for satRNA replication. We show that the accumulation of satRNA strongly depends on temperature and on the presence of the helper virus p19 silencing suppressor protein, suggesting that RNA silencing plays a crucial role in satRNA accumulation. We also demonstrate that another member of the Tombusvirus genus, Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), supports satRNA accumulation at a higher level than CymRSV. Our results suggest that short interfering RNA (siRNA) derived from CymRSV targets satRNA more efficiently than siRNA from CIRV, possibly because of the higher sequence similarity between the HSH regions of the helper and CIRV satRNAs. RNA silencing sensor RNA carrying the putative satRNA target site in the HSH region was efficiently cleaved when transiently expressed in CymRSV-infected plants but not in CIRV-infected plants. Strikingly, replacing the CymRSV HSH box2 sequence with that of CIRV restores satRNA accumulation both at 24 degrees C and in the absence of the p19 suppressor protein. These findings demonstrate the extraordinary adaptation of this virus to its host in terms of harnessing the antiviral silencing response of the plant to control the virus parasite satRNA.

  6. DNA display of folded RNA libraries enabling RNA-SELEX without reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, I S; Temme, J S; Krauss, I J

    2017-03-02

    A method for the physical attachment of folded RNA libraries to their encoding DNA is presented as a way to circumvent the reverse transcription step during systematic evolution of RNA ligands by exponential enrichment (RNA-SELEX). A DNA library is modified with one isodC base to stall T7 polymerase and a 5' "capture strand" which anneals to the nascent RNA transcript. This method is validated in a selection of RNA aptamers against human α-thrombin with dissociation constants in the low nanomolar range. This method will be useful in the discovery of RNA aptamers and ribozymes containing base modifications that make them resistant to accurate reverse transcription.

  7. Rapid RNA analysis of individual Caenorhabditis elegans☆

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kien; Reid, Suzanne J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional RNA extraction methods rely on the use of hazardous chemicals such as phenol, chloroform, guanidinium thiocyanate to disrupt cells and inactivate RNAse simultaneously. RNA isolation from Caenorhabditis elegans presents another challenge due to its tough cuticle, therefore several repeated freeze–thaw cycles may be needed to disrupt the cuticle before the cell contents are released. In addition, a large number of animals are required for successful RNA isolation. To overcome these issues, we have developed a simple and efficient method using proteinase K and a brief heat treatment to release RNA of quality suitable for quantitative PCR analysis.The benefits of the method are: • Faster and safer compared to conventional RNA extraction methods • Released RNA can be used directly for cDNA synthesis without purification • As little as a single worm is sufficient PMID:26150972

  8. Messenger RNA degradation in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Monica P; Foley, Patricia L; Belasco, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    mRNA degradation is an important mechanism for controlling gene expression in bacterial cells. This process involves the orderly action of a battery of cellular endonucleases and exonucleases, some universal and others present only in certain species. These ribonucleases function with the assistance of ancillary enzymes that covalently modify the 5' or 3' end of RNA or unwind base-paired regions. Triggered by initiating events at either the 5' terminus or an internal site, mRNA decay occurs at diverse rates that are transcript specific and governed by RNA sequence and structure, translating ribosomes, and bound sRNAs or proteins. In response to environmental cues, bacteria are able to orchestrate widespread changes in mRNA lifetimes by modulating the concentration or specific activity of cellular ribonucleases or by unmasking the mRNA-degrading activity of cellular toxins.

  9. Therapeutic RNA Manipulation in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression is increasingly recognized as a model for inherited and acquired disease. Recent work has expanded understanding of the range of mechanisms that regulate several of these distinct steps including mRNA splicing, trafficking, and/or stability. Each of these pathways is implicated in disease pathogenesis and each represent important avenues for therapeutic intervention. This review will summarize important mechanisms controlling mRNA processing and the regulation of mRNA degradation, including the role of miRNAs and RNA binding proteins. These pathways provide important opportunities for therapeutic targeting directed at splicing and degradation in order to attenuate genetic defects in RNA metabolism. We will highlight developments in vector development and validation for therapeutic manipulation of mRNA expression with a focus on potential applications in metabolic and immune-mediated liver disease. PMID:19918970

  10. Designing synthetic RNA for delivery by nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejczyk, Dominika; Gendaszewska-Darmach, Edyta; Pawlowska, Roza; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of synthetic biology and nanobiotechnology has led to the construction of various synthetic RNA nanoparticles of different functionalities and potential applications. As they occur naturally, nucleic acids are an attractive construction material for biocompatible nanoscaffold and nanomachine design. In this review, we provide an overview of the types of RNA and nucleic acid’s nanoparticle design, with the focus on relevant nanostructures utilized for gene-expression regulation in cellular models. Structural analysis and modeling is addressed along with the tools available for RNA structural prediction. The functionalization of RNA-based nanoparticles leading to prospective applications of such constructs in potential therapies is shown. The route from the nanoparticle design and modeling through synthesis and functionalization to cellular application is also described. For a better understanding of the fate of targeted RNA after delivery, an overview of RNA processing inside the cell is also provided.

  11. Autocatalytic Sets and RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Wim

    2017-04-04

    The dominant paradigm in origin of life research is that of an RNA world. However, despite experimental progress towards the spontaneous formation of RNA, the RNA world hypothesis still has its problems. Here, we introduce a novel computational model of chemical reaction networks based on RNA secondary structure and analyze the existence of autocatalytic sub-networks in random instances of this model, by combining two well-established computational tools. Our main results are that (i) autocatalytic sets are highly likely to exist, even for very small reaction networks and short RNA sequences, and (ii) sequence diversity seems to be a more important factor in the formation of autocatalytic sets than sequence length. These findings could shed new light on the probability of the spontaneous emergence of an RNA world as a network of mutually collaborative ribozymes.

  12. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  13. Mitochondria: mitochondrial RNA metabolism and human disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Thomas J; Rorbach, Joanna; Minczuk, Michal

    2013-04-01

    Post-transcriptional control of RNA stability, processing, modification, and degradation is key to the regulation of gene expression in all living cells. In mitochondria, these post-transcriptional processes are also vital for proper expression of the thirteen proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome, as well as mitochondrial tRNAs and rRNAs. Our knowledge on mitochondrial RNA (mt-RNA) metabolic pathways, however, is far from complete. All the proteins involved in mt-RNA metabolism are encoded by the nucleus, and must be imported into the organelle. Mutations in these nuclear genes can lead to perturbations in mitochondrial RNA processing, modification, stability and decay and thus are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. This review summarises the current knowledge on mt-RNA metabolism and its links with human mitochondrial pathologies.

  14. Rna catalysis and the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Norman R.; Marsh, Terry L.

    1985-06-01

    Until the discovery of catalytic RNAs, first the self-splicing intron inTetrahymena and then the bacterial RNAse P, cellular enzymes had always seemed to be protein in nature. The recognition that RNA can catalytically make and break phosphodiester bonds simplifies some of the assumptions required of a rudimentary self-replicating entity. Available information on the chemistry of RNA-catalyzed reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to self-splicing introns and tRNA processing by RNase P. An explicit model for a self-replicating RNA is described. The model postulates a nucleotide binding/polymerization site in the RNA, and takes advantage of intrinsic fluidity in RNA higher order structure to dissociate parent and progeny complementary strands.

  15. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism.

  16. Jpx RNA Activates Xist by Evicting CTCF

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sha; Del Rosario, Brian C.; Szanto, Attila; Ogawa, Yuya; Jeon, Yesu; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In mammals, dosage compensation between XX and XY individuals occurs through X chromosome inactivation (XCI). The noncoding Xist RNA is expressed and initiates XCI only when more than one X chromosome is present. Current models invoke a dependency on the X-to-autosome ratio (X:A), but molecular factors remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that molecular titration between an X-encoded RNA and an autosomally encoded protein dictates Xist induction. In pre-XCI cells, CTCF protein represses Xist transcription. At the onset of XCI, Jpx RNA is upregulated, binds CTCF, and extricates CTCF from one Xist allele. We demonstrate that CTCF is an RNA-binding protein and is titrated away from the Xist promoter by Jpx RNA. Thus, Jpx activates Xist by evicting CTCF. The functional antagonism via molecular titration reveals a role for long noncoding RNA in epigenetic regulation. PMID:23791181

  17. RNA degradation in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Rachel E.; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control determines the fate of cellular RNA molecules. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) provides quality control of mRNA, targeting faulty cellular transcripts for degradation by multiple nucleases including the RNA exosome. Recent findings have revealed a role for NMD in targeting viral RNA molecules, thereby restricting virus infection. Interestingly, NMD is also linked to immune responses at another level: mutations affecting the NMD or RNA exosome machineries cause chronic activation of defence programmes, resulting in autoimmune phenotypes. Here we place these observations in the context of other links between innate antiviral immunity and type I interferon mediated disease and examine two models: one in which expression or function of pathogen sensors is perturbed and one wherein host-derived RNA molecules with a propensity to activate such sensors accumulate. PMID:25709093

  18. Analysis of the miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA networks in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Guo, Li; Jiang, Fei; Li, Lei; Li, Zhong; Chen, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Recently, rapid advances in bioinformatics analysis have expanded our understanding of the transcriptome to a genome-wide level. miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA interactions have been shown to play critical regulatory role in cancer biology. In this study, we discussed the use of an integrated systematic approach to explore new facets of the oestrogen receptor (ER)-regulated transcriptome. The identification of RNAs that are related to the expression status of the ER may be useful in clinical therapy and prognosis. We used a network modelling strategy. First, microarray expression profiling of mRNA, lncRNA and miRNA was performed in MCF-7 (ER-positive) and MDA-MB-231 cells (ER- negative). A co-expression network was then built using co-expression relationships of the differentially expressed mRNAs and lncRNAs. Finally, the selected miRNA-mRNA network was added to the network. The key miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA interaction can be inferred from the network. The mRNA and non-coding RNA expression profiles of the cells with different ER phenotypes were distinct. Among the aberrantly expressed miRNAs, the expression levels of miR-19a-3p, miR-19b-3p and miR-130a-3p were much lower in the MCF-7 cells, whereas that of miR-148b-3p was much higher. In a cluster of miR-17-92, the expression levels of six of seven miRNAs were lower in the MCF-7 cells, in addition to miR-20b in the miR-106a-363 cluster. However, the levels of all the miRNAs in the miR-106a-25 cluster were higher in the MCF-7 cells. In the co-expression networking, CD74 and FMNL2 gene which is involved in the immune response and metastasis, respectively, had a stronger correlation with ER. Among the aberrantly expressed lncRNAs, lncRNA-DLEU1 was highly expressed in the MCF-7 cells. A statistical analysis revealed that there was a co-expression relationship between ESR1 and lncRNA-DLEU1. In addition, miR-19a and lncRNA-DLEU1 are both located on the human chromosome 13q. We speculate that miR-19a might be co-expressed with lncRNA-DLEU1

  19. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  20. DNA and RNA technology in soil biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    DNA technology has come a long way and state of the art techniques are currently used in the analysis of soil biodiversity. Current methods will be presented and their strengths and limitations discussed. RNA technology, for the study of gene expression and potential activity of functional groups in the soil, is lagging behind, mostly due to the difficulties of extracting stable RNA from the soil. The potentials and challenges of adopting RNA technology for soil analysis will be discussed.

  1. Computational Biology in microRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of small endogenous noncoding RNA species, which regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by forming imperfect base-pair at the 3' untranslated regions of the messenger RNAs. Since the 1993 discovery of the first miRNA let-7 in worms, a vast number of studies have been dedicated to functionally characterizing miRNAs with a special emphasis on their roles in cancer. A single miRNA can potentially target ∼ 400 distinct genes, and there are over a 1000 distinct endogenous miRNAs in the human genome. Thus, miRNAs are likely involved in virtually all biological processes and pathways including carcinogenesis. However, functionally characterizing miRNAs hinges on the accurate identification of their mRNA targets, which has been a challenging problem due to imperfect base-pairing and condition-specific miRNA regulatory dynamics. In this review, we will survey the current state-of-the-art computational methods to predict miRNA targets, which are divided into three main categories: (1) sequence-based methods that primarily utilizes the canonical seed-match model, evolutionary conservation, and binding energy; (2) expression-based target prediction methods using the increasingly available miRNA and mRNA expression data measured for the same sample; and (3) network-based method that aims identify miRNA regulatory modules, which reflect their synergism in conferring a global impact to the biological system of interest. We hope that the review will serve as a good reference to the new comers to the ever-growing miRNA research field as well as veterans, who would appreciate the detailed review on the technicalities, strength, and limitations of each representative computational method.

  2. RNA virus reverse genetics and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Stobart, Christopher C; Moore, Martin L

    2014-06-25

    RNA viruses are capable of rapid spread and severe or potentially lethal disease in both animals and humans. The development of reverse genetics systems for manipulation and study of RNA virus genomes has provided platforms for designing and optimizing viral mutants for vaccine development. Here, we review the impact of RNA virus reverse genetics systems on past and current efforts to design effective and safe viral therapeutics and vaccines.

  3. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  4. MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0428 TITLE: MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 JUL 2005 - 14 JUL 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression 5b...We hypothesized that certain miRNA species are differentially expressed in the normal breast epithelium and breast cancer cells. Our concept was that

  5. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    SciTech Connect

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  6. Mechanical unfolding of RNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2005-05-10

    Mechanical unfolding trajectories, generated by applying constant force in optical-tweezer experiments, show that RNA hairpins and the P5abc subdomain of the group I intron unfold reversibly. We use coarse-grained Go-like models for RNA hairpins to explore forced unfolding over a broad range of temperatures. A number of predictions that are amenable to experimental tests are made. At the critical force, the hairpin jumps between folded and unfolded conformations without populating any discernible intermediates. The phase diagram in the force-temperature (f, T) plane shows that the hairpin unfolds by an all-or-none process. The cooperativity of the unfolding transition increases dramatically at low temperatures. Free energy of stability, obtained from time averages of mechanical unfolding trajectories, coincides with ensemble averages, which establishes ergodicity. The hopping time between the native basin of attraction (NBA) and the unfolded basin increases dramatically along the phase boundary. Thermal unfolding is stochastic, whereas mechanical unfolding occurs in "quantized steps" with great variations in the step lengths. Refolding times, upon force quench, from stretched states to the NBA are at least an order of magnitude greater than folding times by temperature quench. Upon force quench from stretched states, the NBA is reached in at least three stages. In the initial stages, the mean end-to-end distance decreases nearly continuously, and there is a sudden transition to the NBA only in the last stage. Because of the generality of the results, we propose that similar behavior should be observed in force quench refolding of proteins.

  7. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D.

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  8. Functional characterization of the Drosophila MRP (mitochondrial RNA processing) RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Mary D; Bains, Anupinder K; Rajendra, T K; Dominski, Zbigniew; Matera, A Gregory; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    MRP RNA is a noncoding RNA component of RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP), a multi-protein eukaryotic endoribonuclease reported to function in multiple cellular processes, including ribosomal RNA processing, mitochondrial DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. A recent study predicted a potential Drosophila ortholog of MRP RNA (CR33682) by computer-based genome analysis. We have confirmed the expression of this gene and characterized the phenotype associated with this locus. Flies with mutations that specifically affect MRP RNA show defects in growth and development that begin in the early larval period and end in larval death during the second instar stage. We present several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for Drosophila MRP RNA in rRNA processing. The nuclear fraction of Drosophila MRP RNA localizes to the nucleolus. Further, a mutant strain shows defects in rRNA processing that include a defect in 5.8S rRNA processing, typical of MRP RNA mutants in other species, as well as defects in early stages of rRNA processing.

  9. VfoldCPX Server: Predicting RNA-RNA Complex Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA-RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization, mRNA splicing, and many RNA-related gene expression and regulation processes. The prediction of the structure and folding stability of RNA-RNA complexes is a problem of significant biological importance and receives substantial interest in the biological community. The VfoldCPX server provides a new web interface to predict the two-dimensional (2D) structures of RNA-RNA complexes from the nucleotide sequences. The VfoldCPX server has several novel advantages including the ability to treat RNAs with tertiary contacts (crossing base pairs) such as loop-loop kissing interactions and the use of physical loop entropy parameters. Based on a partition function-based algorithm, the server enables prediction for structure with and without tertiary contacts. Furthermore, the server outputs a set of energetically stable structures, ranked by their stabilities. The results allow users to gain extensive physical insights into RNA-RNA interactions and their roles in RNA function. The web server is freely accessible at “http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/vfoldCPX”. PMID:27657918

  10. dsRNA with 5' overhangs contributes to endogenous and antiviral RNA silencing pathways in plants.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Ryuya; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-03-04

    In plants, SGS3 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) are required to convert single- to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the innate RNAi-based antiviral response and to produce both exogenous and endogenous short-interfering RNAs. Although a role for RDR6-catalysed RNA-dependent RNA polymerisation in these processes seems clear, the function of SGS3 is unknown. Here, we show that SGS3 is a dsRNA-binding protein with unexpected substrate selectivity favouring 5'-overhang-containing dsRNA. The conserved XS and coiled-coil domains are responsible for RNA-binding activity. Furthermore, we find that the V2 protein from tomato yellow leaf curl virus, which suppresses the RNAi-based host immune response, is a dsRNA-binding protein with similar specificity to SGS3. In competition-binding experiments, V2 outcompetes SGS3 for substrate dsRNA recognition, whereas a V2 point mutant lacking the suppressor function in vivo cannot efficiently overcome SGS3 binding. These findings suggest that SGS3 recognition of dsRNA containing a 5' overhang is required for subsequent steps in RNA-mediated gene silencing in plants, and that V2 functions as a viral suppressor by preventing SGS3 from accessing substrate RNAs.

  11. The Origins of the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michael P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2012-01-01

    The general notion of an “RNA World” is that, in the early development of life on the Earth, genetic continuity was assured by the replication of RNA and genetically encoded proteins were not involved as catalysts. There is now strong evidence indicating that an RNA World did indeed exist before DNA- and protein-based life. However, arguments regarding whether life on Earth began with RNA are more tenuous. It might be imagined that all of the components of RNA were available in some prebiotic pool, and that these components assembled into replicating, evolving polynucleotides without the prior existence of any evolved macromolecules. A thorough consideration of this “RNA-first” view of the origin of life must reconcile concerns regarding the intractable mixtures that are obtained in experiments designed to simulate the chemistry of the primitive Earth. Perhaps these concerns will eventually be resolved, and recent experimental findings provide some reason for optimism. However, the problem of the origin of the RNA World is far from being solved, and it is fruitful to consider the alternative possibility that RNA was preceded by some other replicating, evolving molecule, just as DNA and proteins were preceded by RNA. PMID:20739415

  12. MicroRNA biogenesis pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuibin; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression. Amplification and overexpression of individual ‘oncomiRs’ or genetic loss of tumour suppressor miRNAs are associated with human cancer and are sufficient to drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. Furthermore, global miRNA depletion caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery is oncogenic. This, together with the recent identification of novel miRNA regulatory factors and pathways, highlights the importance of miRNA dysregulation in cancer. PMID:25998712

  13. RNA interference spreading in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    May, Robin C; Plasterk, Ronald H A

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) occurs in eukaryotic organisms from across the boundaries of taxonomic kingdoms. In all cases, the basic mechanism of RNAi appears to be conserved--an initial trigger [double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) containing perfect homology over at least 19-21/bp with an endogenous gene] is processed into short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules and these siRNAs stimulate degradation of the homologous mRNA. In the vast majority of species, RNAi can only be initiated following the deliberate introduction of dsRNA into a cell by microinjection, electroporation, or transfection. However, in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi can be simply initiated by supplying dsRNA in the surrounding medium or in the diet. Following uptake, this dsRNA triggers a systemic effect, initiating RNAi against the corresponding target gene in tissues that are not in direct contact with the external milieu. This phenomenon of systemic RNAi, or RNAi spreading, is notably absent from mammalian species, a fact that is likely to prove a substantial barrier to the wider use of RNAi as a clinical therapy. An understanding of the mechanism of systemic RNAi is therefore of considerable importance, and several advances of the last few years have begun to shed light on this process. Here we review our current understanding of systemic RNAi in C. elegans and draw comparisons with systemic RNAi pathways in other organisms.

  14. The RNA World and its origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, A. W.

    1995-01-01

    The theory of the "RNA World" states that the first molecular systems to display the properties of self-replication and evolution were RNA molecules. The origin of life not only depended crucially upon this event, but RNA molecules can even be viewed as the first "living" things. In recent years this theory has gained ascendancy over competing ideas and is now largely accepted by biologists as the most satisfactory explanation for the origin of life. The reasons for this development will be reviewed and the problem of the origin of the first RNA molecules will be discussed.

  15. RNA-Seq Experiment and Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hanquan; Zeng, Erliang

    2016-01-01

    With the ability to obtain tens of millions of reads, high-throughput messenger RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data offers the possibility of estimating abundance of isoforms and finding novel transcripts. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to construct an RNA-Seq library for sequencing on Illumina NGS platforms, and a computational pipeline to perform RNA-Seq data analysis. The protocols described in this chapter can be applied to the analysis of differential gene expression in control versus 17β-estradiol treatment of in vivo or in vitro systems.

  16. A new way to see RNA.

    PubMed

    Keating, Kevin S; Humphris, Elisabeth L; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2011-11-01

    Unlike proteins, the RNA backbone has numerous degrees of freedom (eight, if one counts the sugar pucker), making RNA modeling, structure building and prediction a multidimensional problem of exceptionally high complexity. And yet RNA tertiary structures are not infinite in their structural morphology; rather, they are built from a limited set of discrete units. In order to reduce the dimensionality of the RNA backbone in a physically reasonable way, a shorthand notation was created that reduced the RNA backbone torsion angles to two (η and θ, analogous to φ and ψ in proteins). When these torsion angles are calculated for nucleotides in a crystallographic database and plotted against one another, one obtains a plot analogous to a Ramachandran plot (the η/θ plot), with highly populated and unpopulated regions. Nucleotides that occupy proximal positions on the plot have identical structures and are found in the same units of tertiary structure. In this review, we describe the statistical validation of the η/θ formalism and the exploration of features within the η/θ plot. We also describe the application of the η/θ formalism in RNA motif discovery, structural comparison, RNA structure building and tertiary structure prediction. More than a tool, however, the η/θ formalism has provided new insights into RNA structure itself, revealing its fundamental components and the factors underlying RNA architectural form.

  17. Molecular organization of Leishmania RNA virus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, K D; Weeks, R; Guilbride, L; Myler, P J

    1992-01-01

    The complete 5284-nucleotide sequence of the double-stranded RNA genome of Leishmania RNA virus 1 (LRV1) was determined and contains three open reading frames (ORFs) on the plus (+) (mRNA) strand. The predicted amino acid sequence of ORF3 has motifs characteristic of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. ORF2, which may encode the major viral coat protein, overlaps ORF3 by 71 nucleotides, suggesting a +1 translational frameshift to produce a gag-pol type of fusion protein. Two alternative models for the frameshift are presented. The 5' splice leader sequence of kinetoplastid mRNAs is not in LRV1 RNA. This suggests that the 450-base region at the 5' end of the LRV1 (+)-strand, which contains ORF1 and is highly conserved among viral strains, does not encode protein but has a role in initiation of translation and/or RNA stability. The similarity of LRV1 genomic organization, replication cycle, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence to those of the yeast virus ScV L-A suggests a common ancestral origin. The possibility that LRV1 affects pathogenesis in leishmaniasis is intriguing. Images PMID:1382295

  18. The relationship between RNA catalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedergren, Robert; Lang, B. Franz; Gravel, Denis

    1988-09-01

    Proposals that an RNA-based genetic system preceeded DNA, stem from the ability of RNA to store genetic information and to promote simple catalysis. However, to be a valid basis for the RNA world, RNA catalysis must demonstrate or be related to intrinsic chemical properties which could have existed in primordial times. We analyze this question by first classifying RNA catalysis and related processes according to their mechanism. We define: (A) thedisjunct nucleophile class which leads to 5'-phosphates. These include Group I and II intron splicing, nuclear mRNA splicing and RNase P reactions. Although Group I introns and its excision mechanism is likely to have existed in primordial times, present-day examples have arisen independently in different phyla much more recently. Comparative methodology indicates that RNase P catalysis originated before the divergence of the major kingdoms. In addition, alldisjunct nucleophile reactions can be interrelated by a proposed mechanism involving a distant 2-OH nucleophile. (B) theconjunct nucleophile class leading to 3'-phosphates. This class is composed of self-cleaving RNAs found in plant viruses and the newt. We propose that tRNA splicing is related to this mechanism rather than the previous one. The presence of introns in tRNA genes of eukaryotes and archaebacteria supports the idea that tRNA splicing predates the divergence of these cell types.

  19. RNA Structure Determination Using SAXS Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sichun; Parisien, Marc; Major, François; Roux, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting the experimental information from small-angle x-ray solution scattering (SAXS) in conjunction with structure prediction algorithms can be advantageous in the case of ribonucleic acids (RNA), where global restraints on the 3D fold are often lacking. Traditional usage of SAXS data often starts by attempting to reconstruct the molecular shape ab initio, which is subsequently used to assess the quality of model Here, an alternative strategy is explored whereby the models from a very large decoy set are directly sorted according to their fit to the SAXS data is developed. For rapid computation of SAXS patterns, the method developed here makes use of a coarse-grained representation of RNA. It also accounts for the explicit treatment of the contribution to the scattering of water molecules and ions surrounding the RNA. The method, called Fast-SAXS-RNA, is first calibrated using a transfer RNA (tRNA-val) and then tested on the P4-P6 fragment of group I intron (P4-P6). Fast-SAXS-RNA is then used as a filter for decoy models generated by the MC-Fold and MC-Sym pipeline, a suite of RNA 3D all-atoms structure algorithms that encode and exploit RNA 3D architectural principles. The ability of Fast-SAXS-RNA to discriminate native folds is tested against three widely used RNA molecules in molecular modeling benchmarks: the tRNA, the P4-P6, and a synthetic hairpin suspected to assemble into a homodimer. For each molecule, a large pool of decoys are generated, scored, and ranked using Fast-SAXS-RNA. The method is able to identify low-RMSD models among top ranking structures, for both tRNA and P4-P6. For the hairpin, the approach correctly identifies the dimeric state as the solution structure over the monomeric state and alternative secondary structures. The method offers a powerful strategy for recognizing native RNA conformations as well as multimeric assemblies and alternative secondary structures, thus enabling high-throughput RNA structure determination using SAXS

  20. Continuous and Discontinuous RNA Synthesis in Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sola, Isabel; Almazán, Fernando; Zúñiga, Sonia; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Replication of the coronavirus genome requires continuous RNA synthesis, whereas transcription is a discontinuous process unique among RNA viruses. Transcription includes a template switch during the synthesis of subgenomic negative-strand RNAs to add a copy of the leader sequence. Coronavirus transcription is regulated by multiple factors, including the extent of base-pairing between transcription-regulating sequences of positive and negative polarity, viral and cell protein-RNA binding, and high-order RNA-RNA interactions. Coronavirus RNA synthesis is performed by a replication-transcription complex that includes viral and cell proteins that recognize cis-acting RNA elements mainly located in the highly structured 5' and 3' untranslated regions. In addition to many viral nonstructural proteins, the presence of cell nuclear proteins and the viral nucleocapsid protein increases virus amplification efficacy. Coronavirus RNA synthesis is connected with the formation of double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes. Coronaviruses encode proofreading machinery, unique in the RNA virus world, to ensure the maintenance of their large genome size.

  1. Large Variations in Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyungtaek; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, essential to all forms of life, have been viewed as highly conserved and evolutionarily stable, partly because very little is known about their natural variations. Here, we explored large-scale variations of rRNA genes through bioinformatic analyses of available complete bacterial genomic sequences with an emphasis on formation mechanisms and biological significance. Interestingly, we found bacterial genomes in which no 16S rRNA genes harbor the conserved core of the anti–Shine-Dalgarno sequence (5′-CCTCC-3′). This loss was accompanied by elimination of Shine-Dalgarno–like sequences upstream of their protein-coding genes. Those genomes belong to 1 or 2 of the following categories: primary symbionts, hemotropic Mycoplasma, and Flavobacteria. We also found many rearranged rRNA genes and reconstructed their history. Conjecturing the underlying mechanisms, such as inversion, partial duplication, transposon insertion, deletion, and substitution, we were able to infer their biological significance, such as co-orientation of rRNA transcription and chromosomal replication, lateral transfer of rRNA gene segments, and spread of rRNA genes with an apparent structural defect through gene conversion. These results open the way to understanding dynamic evolutionary changes of rRNA genes and the translational machinery. PMID:22446745

  2. Mutations in the yeast RNA14 and RNA15 genes result in an abnormal mRNA decay rate; sequence analysis reveals an RNA-binding domain in the RNA15 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Minvielle-Sebastia, L; Winsor, B; Bonneaud, N; Lacroute, F

    1991-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, temperature-sensitive mutations in the genes RNA14 and RNA15 correlate with a reduction of mRNA stability and poly(A) tail length. Although mRNA transcription is not abolished in these mutants, the transcripts are rapidly deadenylated as in a strain carrying an RNA polymerase B(II) temperature-sensitive mutation. This suggests that the primary defect could be in the control of the poly(A) status of the mRNAs and that the fast decay rate may be due to the loss of this control. By complementation of their temperature-sensitive phenotype, we have cloned the wild-type genes. They are essential for cell viability and are unique in the haploid genome. The RNA14 gene, located on chromosome H, is transcribed as three mRNAs, one major and two minor, which are 2.2, 1.5, and 1.1 kb in length. The RNA15 gene gives rise to a single 1.2-kb transcript and maps to chromosome XVI. Sequence analysis indicates that RNA14 encodes a 636-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 75,295. No homology was found between RNA14 and RNA15 or between RNA14 and other proteins contained in data banks. The RNA15 DNA sequence predicts a protein of 296 amino acids with a molecular weight of 32,770. Sequence comparison reveals an N-terminal putative RNA-binding domain in the RNA15-encoded protein, followed by a glutamine and asparagine stretch similar to the opa sequences. Both RNA14 and RNA15 wild-type genes, when cloned on a multicopy plasmid, are able to suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of strains bearing either the rna14 or the rna15 mutation, suggesting that the encoded proteins could interact with each other. Images PMID:1674817

  3. Extraction of high-quality RNA from human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Le Bleu, Heather K; Kamal, Fadia A; Kelly, Meghan; Ketz, John P; Zuscik, Michael J; Elbarbary, Reyad A

    2017-02-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from articular cartilage is challenging due to low cellularity and high proteoglycan content. This problem hinders efficient application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis in studying cartilage homeostasis. Here we developed a method that purifies high-quality RNA directly from cartilage. Our method optimized the collection and homogenization steps so as to minimize RNA degradation, and modified the conventional TRIzol protocol to enhance RNA purity. Cartilage RNA purified using our method has appropriate quality for RNA-seq experiments including an RNA integrity number of ∼8. Our method also proved efficient in extracting high-quality RNA from subchondral bone.

  4. Identification and characterization of two novel genomic RNA segments of fig mosaic virus, RNA5 and RNA6.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Kitazawa, Yugo; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Takata, Daisuke; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2012-07-01

    Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is recognized as a causal agent of fig mosaic disease. We performed RT-PCR for 14 FMV isolates collected from symptomatic fig plants in Japan and Serbia using primers corresponding to the conserved 13 nt stretches found at the termini of FMV genomic segments. The resulting simultaneous amplification of all FMV genomic segments yielded four previously identified segments of FMV and two novel segments. These novel FMV genomic RNA segments were found in each of the 14 FMV isolates analysed. In Northern blot studies, both the sense and antisense strands of these novel RNA molecules accumulated in FMV-infected fig leaves but not in uninfected fig leaves, confirming that they replicate as FMV genomic segments. Sequence analysis showed that the novel RNA segments are similar, in their structural organization and molecular evolutionary patterns, to those of known FMV genomic RNA segments. Our findings thus indicate that these newly discovered RNA segments are previously unidentified FMV genomic segments, which we have designated RNA5 and RNA6.

  5. siRNA and miRNA processing: new functions for Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S

    2008-04-01

    In diverse eukaryotes, micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) regulate important processes that include mRNA inactivation, viral defense, chromatin modification, and transposon silencing. Recently, nucleolus-associated Cajal bodies in plants have been implicated as sites of siRNA and miRNA biogenesis, whereas in animals siRNA and miRNA dicing occurs in the cytoplasm. The plant nucleolus also contains proteins of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway that in animals are found associated with cytoplasmic processing bodies (P-bodies). P-bodies also function in the degradation of mRNAs subjected to miRNA and siRNA targeting. Collectively, these observations suggest interesting variations in the way siRNAs and miRNAs can accomplish their similar functions in plants and animals.

  6. Single-molecule tracking of mRNA exiting from RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Lewis, Robert; Brückner, Florian; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2008-01-08

    Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to track RNA exiting from RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in elongation complexes. Measuring the distance between the RNA 5' end and three known locations within the elongation complex allows us determine its position by means of triangulation. RNA leaves the polymerase active center cleft via the previously proposed exit tunnel and then disengages from the enzyme surface. When the RNA reaches lengths of 26 and 29 nt, its 5' end associates with Pol II at the base of the dock domain. Because the initiation factor TFIIB binds to the dock domain and exit tunnel, exiting RNA may prevent TFIIB reassociation during elongation. RNA further extends toward the linker connecting to the polymerase C-terminal repeat domain (CTD), which binds the 5'-capping enzyme and other RNA processing factors.

  7. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends.

  8. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  9. RNA recognition by a human antibody against brain cytoplasmic 200 RNA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Euihan; Lee, Jungmin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Park, Insoo; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-06-01

    Diverse functional RNAs participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The RNA structure is critical for function, either on its own or as a complex form with proteins and other ligands. Therefore, analysis of the RNA conformation in cells is essential for understanding their functional mechanisms. However, no appropriate methods have been established as yet. Here, we developed an efficient strategy for panning and affinity maturation of anti-RNA human monoclonal antibodies from a naïve antigen binding fragment (Fab) combinatorial phage library. Brain cytoplasmic 200 (BC200) RNA, which is also highly expressed in some tumors, was used as an RNA antigen. We identified MabBC200-A3 as the optimal binding antibody. Mutagenesis and SELEX experiments showed that the antibody recognized a domain of BC200 in a structure- and sequence-dependent manner. Various breast cancer cell lines were further examined for BC200 RNA expression using conventional hybridization and immunoanalysis with MabBC200-A3 to see whether the antibody specifically recognizes BC200 RNA among the total purified RNAs. The amounts of antibody-recognizable BC200 RNA were consistent with hybridization signals among the cell lines. Furthermore, the antibody was able to discriminate BC200 RNA from other RNAs, supporting the utility of this antibody as a specific RNA structure-recognizing probe. Intriguingly, however, when permeabilized cells were subjected to immunoanalysis instead of purified total RNA, the amount of antibody-recognizable RNA was not correlated with the cellular level of BC200 RNA, indicating that BC200 RNA exists as two distinct forms (antibody-recognizable and nonrecognizable) in breast cancer cells and that their distribution depends on the cell type. Our results clearly demonstrate that anti-RNA antibodies provide an effective novel tool for detecting and analyzing RNA conformation.

  10. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses.

  11. Spectrophotometric assays for monitoring tRNA aminoacylation and aminoacyl-tRNA hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A; Richardson, Charles J

    2017-01-15

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a central role in protein synthesis, catalyzing the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. Here, we describe a spectrophotometric assay for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in which the Tyr-tRNA product is cleaved, regenerating the tRNA substrate. As tRNA is the limiting substrate in the assay, recycling it substantially increases the sensitivity of the assay while simultaneously reducing its cost. The tRNA aminoacylation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by coupling the production of AMP to the conversion of NAD(+) to NADH. We have adapted the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay to monitor: (1) aminoacylation of tRNA by l- or d-tyrosine, (2) cyclodipeptide formation by cyclodipeptide synthases, (3) hydrolysis of d-aminoacyl-tRNAs by d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and (4) post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. All of these assays are continuous and homogenous, making them amenable for use in high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. In the case of the cyclodipeptide synthase, d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and post-transfer editing assays, the aminoacyl-tRNAs are generated in situ, avoiding the need to synthesize and purify aminoacyl-tRNA substrates prior to performing the assays. Lastly, we describe how the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay can be adapted to monitor the activity of other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and how the approach to regenerating the tRNA substrate can be used to increase the sensitivity and decrease the cost of commercially available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase assays.

  12. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5-3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson-Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/.

  13. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-01-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  14. BS-RNA: An efficient mapping and annotation tool for RNA bisulfite sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Hao, Lili; Wang, Jinyue; Shi, Shuo; Xiao, Jingfa; Li, Rujiao

    2016-12-01

    Cytosine methylation is one of the most important RNA epigenetic modifications. With the development of experimental technology, scientists attach more importance to RNA cytosine methylation and find bisulfite sequencing is an effective experimental method for RNA cytosine methylation study. However, there are only a few tools can directly deal with RNA bisulfite sequencing data efficiently. Herein, we developed a specialized tool BS-RNA, which can analyze cytosine methylation of RNA based on bisulfite sequencing data and support both paired-end and single-end sequencing reads from directional bisulfite libraries. For paired-end reads, simply removing the biased positions from the 5' end may result in "dovetailing" reads, where one or both reads seem to extend past the start of the mate read. BS-RNA could map "dovetailing" reads successfully. The annotation result of BS-RNA is exported in BED (.bed) format, including locations, sequence context types (CG/CHG/CHH, H=A,T, or C), reference sequencing depths, cytosine sequencing depths, and methylation levels of covered cytosine sites on both Watson and Crick strands. BS-RNA is an efficient, specialized and highly automated mapping and annotation tool for RNA bisulfite sequencing data. It performs better than the existing program in terms of accuracy and efficiency. BS-RNA is developed by Perl language and the source code of this tool is freely available from the website: http://bs-rna.big.ac.cn.

  15. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  16. From Protein-RNA Predictions toward a Peptide-RNA Code.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-11-03

    The RNA field is undergoing a renaissance, with a deluge of proteins being identified to bind RNA. Two reports now introduce proteome-wide approaches that identify the peptides that are crosslinked to RNA (Castello et al., 2016; He et al., 2016).

  17. Overview of methods in RNA nanotechnology: synthesis, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology encompasses the use of RNA as a construction material to build homogeneous nanostructures by bottom-up self-assembly with defined size, structure, and stoichiometry; this pioneering concept demonstrated in 1998 (Guo et al., Molecular Cell 2:149-155, 1998; featured in Cell) has emerged as a new field that also involves materials engineering and synthetic structural biology (Guo, Nature Nanotechnology 5:833-842, 2010). The field of RNA nanotechnology has skyrocketed over the last few years, as evidenced by the burst of publications in prominent journals on RNA nanostructures and their applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Rapid advances in RNA chemistry, RNA biophysics, and RNA biology have created new opportunities for translating basic science into clinical practice. RNA nanotechnology holds considerable promise in this regard. Increased evidence also suggests that substantial part of the 98.5 % of human genome (Lander et al. Nature 409:860-921, 2001) that used to be called "junk DNA" actually codes for noncoding RNA. As we understand more on how RNA structures are related to function, we can fabricate synthetic RNA nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. This chapter provides a brief overview of the field regarding the design, construction, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles for diverse applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicince.

  18. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  19. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon-anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed. PMID:24904644

  20. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-28

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ∼29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  1. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  2. RNA Bricks—a database of RNA 3D motifs and their interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The RNA Bricks database (http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/rnabricks), stores information about recurrent RNA 3D motifs and their interactions, found in experimentally determined RNA structures and in RNA–protein complexes. In contrast to other similar tools (RNA 3D Motif Atlas, RNA Frabase, Rloom) RNA motifs, i.e. ‘RNA bricks’ are presented in the molecular environment, in which they were determined, including RNA, protein, metal ions, water molecules and ligands. All nucleotide residues in RNA bricks are annotated with structural quality scores that describe real-space correlation coefficients with the electron density data (if available), backbone geometry and possible steric conflicts, which can be used to identify poorly modeled residues. The database is also equipped with an algorithm for 3D motif search and comparison. The algorithm compares spatial positions of backbone atoms of the user-provided query structure and of stored RNA motifs, without relying on sequence or secondary structure information. This enables the identification of local structural similarities among evolutionarily related and unrelated RNA molecules. Besides, the search utility enables searching ‘RNA bricks’ according to sequence similarity, and makes it possible to identify motifs with modified ribonucleotide residues at specific positions. PMID:24220091

  3. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-06

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways.

  4. Covalent small-molecule-RNA complex formation enables cellular profiling of small-molecule-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-09-16

    Won't let you go! A strategy is described to design small molecules that react with their cellular RNA targets. This approach not only improves the activity of compounds targeting RNA in cell culture by a factor of about 2500 but also enables cell-wide profiling of its RNA targets.

  5. ACTH Action on Messenger RNA Stability Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Cherradi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA stability has emerged as a critical control step in dynamic gene expression. This process occurs in response to modifications of the cellular environment, including hormonal variations, and regulates the expression of subsets of proteins whose levels need to be rapidly adjusted. Modulation of messenger RNA stability is usually mediated by stabilizing or destabilizing RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BP) that bind to the 3′-untranslated region regulatory motifs, such as AU-rich elements (AREs). Destabilizing ARE-binding proteins enhance the decay of their target transcripts by recruiting the mRNA decay machineries. Failure of such mechanisms, in particular misexpression of RNA-BP, has been linked to several human diseases. In the adrenal cortex, the expression and activity of mRNA stability regulatory proteins are still understudied. However, ACTH- or cAMP-elicited changes in the expression/phosphorylation status of the major mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11b/BRF1 or in the subcellular localization of the stabilizing protein Human antigen R have been reported. They suggest that this level of regulation of gene expression is also important in endocrinology. PMID:28163695

  6. Automated modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Skiba, Pawel; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview over the current methods for automated modeling of RNA structures, with emphasis on template-based methods. The currently used approaches to RNA modeling are presented with a side view on the protein world, where many similar ideas have been used. Two main programs for automated template-based modeling are presented: ModeRNA assembling structures from fragments and MacroMoleculeBuilder performing a simulation to satisfy spatial restraints. Both approaches have in common that they require an alignment of the target sequence to a known RNA structure that is used as a modeling template. As a way to find promising template structures and to align the target and template sequences, we propose a pipeline combining the ParAlign and Infernal programs on RNA family data from Rfam. We also briefly summarize template-free methods for RNA 3D structure prediction. Typically, RNA structures generated by automated modeling methods require local or global optimization. Thus, we also discuss methods that can be used for local or global refinement of RNA structures.

  7. The ribosome challenge to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-04-01

    An RNA World that predated the modern world of polypeptide and polynucleotide is one of the most widely accepted models in origin of life research. In this model, the translation system shepherded the RNA World into the extant biology of DNA, RNA, and protein. Here, we examine the RNA World Hypothesis in the context of increasingly detailed information available about the origins, evolution, functions, and mechanisms of the translation system. We conclude that the translation system presents critical challenges to RNA World Hypotheses. Firstly, a timeline of the RNA World is problematic when the ribosome is incorporated. The mechanism of peptidyl transfer of the ribosome appears distinct from evolved enzymes, signaling origins in a chemical rather than biological milieu. Secondly, we have no evidence that the basic biochemical toolset of life is subject to substantive change by Darwinian evolution, as required for the transition from the RNA world to extant biology. Thirdly, we do not see specific evidence for biological takeover of ribozyme function by protein enzymes. Finally, we can find no basis for preservation of the ribosome as ribozyme or the universality of translation, if it were the case that other information transducing ribozymes, such as ribozyme polymerases, were replaced by protein analogs and erased from the phylogenetic record. We suggest that an updated model of the RNA World should address the current state of knowledge of the translation system.

  8. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  9. Changing genetic information through RNA editing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, S.; Rich, A.

    2000-01-01

    RNA editing, the post-transcriptional alteration of a gene-encoded sequence, is a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes. As a consequence of RNA editing, functionally distinct proteins can be produced from a single gene. The molecular mechanisms involved include single or multiple base insertions or deletions as well as base substitutions. In mammals, one type of substitutional RNA editing, characterized by site-specific base-modification, was shown to modulate important physiological processes. The underlying reaction mechanism of substitutional RNA editing involves hydrolytic deamination of cytosine or adenosine bases to uracil or inosine, respectively. Protein factors have been characterized that are able to induce RNA editing in vitro. A supergene family of RNA-dependent deaminases has emerged with the recent addition of adenosine deaminases specific for tRNA. Here we review the developments that have substantially increased our understanding of base-modification RNA editing over the past few years, with an emphasis on mechanistic differences, evolutionary aspects and the first insights into the regulation of editing activity.

  10. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hornak, Katherine E.; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5–7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA) are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses. PMID:27428993

  11. Geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Zou, Jianwei; Tian, Feifei; Shang, Zhicai

    2009-12-01

    A new method is described to measure the geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces quantitatively. The method is based on a procedure that dissects the interface geometry in terms of the spatial relationships between individual amino acid nucleotide pairs. Using this technique, we performed an all-on-all comparison of 586 protein-RNA interfaces deposited in the current Protein Data Bank, as the result, an interface-interface similarity score matrix was obtained. Based upon this matrix, hierarchical clustering was carried out which yielded a complete clustering tree for the 586 protein-RNA interfaces. By investigating the organizing behavior of the clustering tree and the SCOP classification of protein partners in complexes, a geometrically nonredundant, diverse data set (representative data set) consisting of 45 distinct protein-RNA interfaces was extracted for the purpose of studying protein-RNA interactions, RNA regulations, and drug design. We classified protein-RNA interfaces into three types. In type I, the families and interface structural classes of the protein partners, as well as the interface geometries are all similar. In type II, the interface geometries and the interface structural classes are similar, whereas the protein families are different. In type III, only the interface geometries are similar but the protein families and the interface structural classes are distinct. Furthermore, we also show two new RNA recognition themes derived from the representative data set.

  12. Staufen-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eonyoung; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) is an mRNA degradation process in mammalian cells that is mediated by the binding of STAU1 to a STAU1-binding site (SBS) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. During SMD, STAU1, a double-stranded (ds) RNA-binding protein, recognizes dsRNA structures formed either by intramolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences or by intermolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences with a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) via partially complementary Alu elements. Recently, STAU2, a paralog of STAU1, has also been reported to mediate SMD. Both STAU1 and STAU2 interact directly with the ATP-dependent RNA helicase UPF1, a key SMD factor, enhancing its helicase activity to promote effective SMD. Moreover, STAU1 and STAU2 form homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions via domain-swapping. Since both SMD and the mechanistically related nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) employ UPF1, SMD and NMD are competitive pathways. Competition contributes to cellular differentiation processes, such as myogenesis and adipogenesis, placing SMD at the heart of various physiologically important mechanisms. PMID:23681777

  13. RNA self-splicing and energy localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-02-01

    We establish a mechanism for energy localization in regions of the sugar-phosphate RNA backbone which leads to the formation of transesterification or hydrolysis hot spots. In particular, our results account for the site specificity of the covalent cyclization and cycle reopening in the catalytic intervening sequence (IVS) of a ribosomal RNA.

  14. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  15. Coenzymes, viruses and the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Prieto, Fabián; Hernández-Morales, Ricardo; Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The results of a detailed bioinformatic search for ribonucleotidyl coenzyme biosynthetic sequences in DNA- and RNA viral genomes are presented. No RNA viral genome sequence available as of April 2011 appears to encode for sequences involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In both single- and double-stranded DNA viruses a diverse array of coenzyme biosynthetic genes has been identified, but none of the viral genomes examined here encodes for a complete pathway. Although our conclusions may be constrained by the unexplored diversity of viral genomes and the biases in the construction of viral genome databases, our results do not support the possibility that RNA viruses are direct holdovers from an ancient RNA/protein world. Extrapolation of our results to evolutionary epochs prior to the emergence of DNA genomes suggest that during those early stages living entities may have depended on discontinuous genetic systems consisting of multiple small-size RNA sequences.

  16. Evidence for RNA template-directed elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Y.; Fujinuma, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    In vitro cryptic transcription product is often observed when using T7 RNA polymerase. We obtained a ca. 35 mer of cryptic RNA by-product, which was originally designed to be 23 mer by in vitro run-off transcription. Biochemical research and structural analysis indicated that the cryptic by-product was synthesized through the process of aberrant extension by the T7 RNA polymerase. This extension could have occurred through two pathways. One pathway could have been an aberrant termination of transcription, which met a conventional prolonged extension without precise transcription termination, and the other could have been a re-extension of nascent RNA by binding with T7 RNA polymerase.

  17. Genome recoding by tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Tuorto, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    RNA modifications are emerging as an additional regulatory layer on top of the primary RNA sequence. These modifications are particularly enriched in tRNAs where they can regulate not only global protein translation, but also protein translation at the codon level. Modifications located in or in the vicinity of tRNA anticodons are highly conserved in eukaryotes and have been identified as potential regulators of mRNA decoding. Recent studies have provided novel insights into how these modifications orchestrate the speed and fidelity of translation to ensure proper protein homeostasis. This review highlights the prominent modifications in the tRNA anticodon loop: queuosine, inosine, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine, wybutosine, threonyl–carbamoyl–adenosine and 5-methylcytosine. We discuss the functional relevance of these modifications in protein translation and their emerging role in eukaryotic genome recoding during cellular adaptation and disease. PMID:27974624

  18. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  19. MicroRNA profiling: approaches and considerations

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Cheng, Heather H.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (~22 nt long) that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of thousands of genes in a broad range of organisms, in both normal physiologic and disease contexts. MiRNA expression profiling is gaining popularity because miRNAs, as key regulators in gene expression networks, can influence many biological processes and have also shown promise as biomarkers for disease. Technological advances have enabled the development of various platforms for miRNA profiling, and an understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of different approaches can aid in the effective use of miRNA profiling for diverse applications. We review here the major considerations for carrying out and interpreting results of miRNA profiling studies, as well as current and emerging applications of miRNA profiling. PMID:22510765

  20. Molecular scissors: RNA enzymes go commercial

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.

    1991-02-01

    When Thomas Cech of the University of Colorado discovered in 1982 that RNA can act as an enzyme, catalyzing specific biological reactions, the result surprised molecular biologists. Only proteins, they thought, could act as enzymes. The work not only led to a Nobel Prize for Cech, it prompted prophecies of a new kind of genetic engineering - one based on RNA instead of the conventional DNA. Foreign governments launched research efforts, and researchers scrambled to file patents. The stakes were so high that American and Australian researchers became embroiled in a dispute over patent rights for catalytic RNA. Last week the US Patent Office awarded Cech and the University of Colorado an unusually broad patent for the use and synthesis of enzymatic RNA - also known as ribozymes. The significance of the patent stems from Cech's unexpected observation that preribosomal RNA can cut and splice itself, removing sequences not needed for biological function.

  1. Aging - RNA in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Given that RNA is involved in virtually all biological processes, it is perhaps not surprising that several RNA binding proteins are associated with aging and with different age related disorders. Other chapters in this volume will discuss some specific examples of diseases where RNA plays a role that are also associated with aging, such as cancer and inflammation, so here I will discuss some general aspects of how RNA changes with the aging process. I will also discuss some specific examples of RNA binding proteins that are associated with age-dependent neurological diseases as these provide an interesting framework to examine how lifetime mutations might lead to a late onset disease, although the answers to these questions are still not well understood. PMID:21898829

  2. Plant RNA silencing in viral defence.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio

    2011-01-01

    RNA silencing is described in plants and insects as a defence mechanism against foreign nucleic acids, such as invading viruses. The RNA silencing-based antiviral defence involves the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs and their association to effector proteins, which together drive the sequence specific inactivation of viruses. The entire process of antiviral defence 'borrows' several plant factors involved in other specialized RNA silencing endogenous pathways. Different viruses use variable strategies to infect different host plants, which render the antiviral RNA silencing a complex phenomenon far to be completely clarified. This chapter reports current advances in understanding the main steps of the plant's RNA-silencing response to viral invasion and discusses some of the key questions still to be answered.

  3. Neurodegeneration and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    De Conti, Laura; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    In the eukaryotic nucleus, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a very important role in the life cycle of both coding and noncoding RNAs. As soon as they are transcribed, in fact, all RNA molecules within a cell are bound by distinct sets of RBPs that have the task of regulating its correct processing, transport, stability, and function/translation up to its final degradation. These tasks are particularly important in cells that have a complex RNA metabolism, such as neurons. Not surprisingly, therefore, recent findings have shown that the misregulation of genes involved in RNA metabolism or the autophagy/proteasome pathway plays an important role in the onset and progression of several neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we aim to review the recent advances that link neurodegenerative processes and RBP proteins. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1394. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1394 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Origins and evolution of eukaryotic RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2009-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and genome-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) silence genes via complementary interactions with mRNAs. With thousands of miRNA genes identified and genome sequences of diverse eukaryotes available for comparison, the opportunity emerges for insights into origin and evolution of RNA interference (RNAi). The miRNA repertoires of plants and animals appear to have evolved independently. However, conservation of the key proteins involved in RNAi suggests that the last common ancestor of modern eukaryotes possessed siRNA-based mechanisms. Prokaryotes have a RNAi-like defense system that is functionally analogous but not homologous to eukaryotic RNAi. The protein machinery of eukaryotic RNAi seems to have been pieced together from ancestral proteins of archaeal, bacterial and phage origins that are involved in DNA repair and RNA-processing pathways. PMID:18715673

  5. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  6. Building programmable jigsaw puzzles with RNA.

    PubMed

    Chworos, Arkadiusz; Severcan, Isil; Koyfman, Alexey Y; Weinkam, Patrick; Oroudjev, Emin; Hansma, Helen G; Jaeger, Luc

    2004-12-17

    One challenge in supramolecular chemistry is the design of versatile, self-assembling building blocks to attain total control of arrangement of matter at a molecular level. We have achieved reliable prediction and design of the three-dimensional structure of artificial RNA building blocks to generate molecular jigsaw puzzle units called tectosquares. They can be programmed with control over their geometry, topology, directionality, and addressability to algorithmically self-assemble into a variety of complex nanoscopic fabrics with predefined periodic and aperiodic patterns and finite dimensions. This work emphasizes the modular and hierarchical characteristics of RNA by showing that small RNA structural motifs can code the precise topology of large molecular architectures. It demonstrates that fully addressable materials based on RNA can be synthesized and provides insights into self-assembly processes involving large populations of RNA molecules.

  7. Long noncoding RNA in hematopoiesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Ansuman T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-05-19

    Dynamic gene expression during cellular differentiation is tightly coordinated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. An emerging theme is the central role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of this specificity. Recent advances demonstrate that lncRNAs are expressed in a lineage-specific manner and control the development of several cell types in the hematopoietic system. Moreover, specific lncRNAs are induced to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. lncRNAs can function via RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA, and RNA-protein target interactions. As a result, they affect several stages of gene regulation, including chromatin modification, mRNA biogenesis, and protein signaling. We discuss recent advances, future prospects, and challenges in understanding the roles of lncRNAs in immunity and immune-mediated diseases.

  8. Oomycete pathogens encode RNA silencing suppressors.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yongli; Liu, Lin; Xiong, Qin; Flores, Cristina; Wong, James; Shi, Jinxia; Wang, Xianbing; Liu, Xigang; Xiang, Qijun; Jiang, Shushu; Zhang, Fuchun; Wang, Yuanchao; Judelson, Howard S; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-03-01

    Effectors are essential virulence proteins produced by a broad range of parasites, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, protozoa, insects and nematodes. Upon entry into host cells, pathogen effectors manipulate specific physiological processes or signaling pathways to subvert host immunity. Most effectors, especially those of eukaryotic pathogens, remain functionally uncharacterized. Here, we show that two effectors from the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae suppress RNA silencing in plants by inhibiting the biogenesis of small RNAs. Ectopic expression of these Phytophthora suppressors of RNA silencing enhances plant susceptibility to both a virus and Phytophthora, showing that some eukaryotic pathogens have evolved virulence proteins that target host RNA silencing processes to promote infection. These findings identify RNA silencing suppression as a common strategy used by pathogens across kingdoms to cause disease and are consistent with RNA silencing having key roles in host defense.

  9. RNA-splicing endonuclease structure and function.

    PubMed

    Calvin, K; Li, H

    2008-04-01

    The RNA-splicing endonuclease is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme responsible for the excision of introns from nuclear transfer RNA (tRNA) and all archaeal RNAs. Since its first identification from yeast in the late 1970s, significant progress has been made toward understanding the biochemical mechanisms of this enzyme. Four families of the splicing endonucleases possessing the same active sites and overall architecture but with different subunit compositions have been identified. Two related consensus structures of the precursor RNA splice sites and the critical elements required for intron excision have been established. More recently, a glimpse was obtained of the structural mechanism by which the endonuclease recognizes the consensus RNA structures and cleaves at the splice sites. This review summarizes these findings and discusses their implications in the evolution of intron removal processes.

  10. RNA editing in human cancer: review.

    PubMed

    Skarda, Jozef; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon

    2009-08-01

    In eukaryotes mRNA transcripts are extensively processed by different post-transcriptional events such as alternative splicing and RNA editing in order to generate many different mRNAs from the same gene, increasing the transcriptome and then the proteome diversity. The most frequent RNA editing mechanism in mammals involves the conversion of specific adenosines into inosines by the ADAR family of enzymes. This editing event can alter the sequence and the secondary structure of RNA molecules, with consequences for final proteins and regulatory RNAs. Alteration in RNA editing has been connected to tumor progression and many other important human diseases. Analysis of many editing sites in various cancer types is expected to provide new diagnostic and prognostic markers and might contribute to early detection of cancer, the monitoring of response to therapy, and to the detection of minimal residual disease.

  11. Four RNA families with functional transient structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5′ flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5′ UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM

  12. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  13. miRNA and mRNA expression analysis reveals potential sex-biased miRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tingming

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mRNAs may be differentially expressed between males and females. This study aimed to perform expression analysis of mRNA and its main regulatory molecule, microRNA (miRNA), to discuss the potential sex-specific expression patterns using abnormal expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Generally, deregulated miRNAs and mRNAs had consistent expression between males and females, but some miRNAs may be oppositely expressed in specific diseases: up-regulated in one group and down-regulated in another. Studies of miRNA gene families and clusters further confirmed that these sequence or location related miRNAs might have opposing expression between sexes. The specific miRNA might have greater expression divergence across different groups, suggesting flexible expression across different individuals, especially in tumor samples. The typical analysis regardless of the sex will ignore or balance these sex-specific deregulated miRNAs. Compared with flexible miRNAs, their targets of mRNAs showed relative stable expression between males and females. These relevant results provide new insights into miRNA-mRNA interaction and sex difference. PMID:28045090

  14. RNA biochemistry. Transcriptome-wide distribution and function of RNA hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Delatte, Benjamin; Wang, Fei; Ngoc, Long Vo; Collignon, Evelyne; Bonvin, Elise; Deplus, Rachel; Calonne, Emilie; Hassabi, Bouchra; Putmans, Pascale; Awe, Stephan; Wetzel, Collin; Kreher, Judith; Soin, Romuald; Creppe, Catherine; Limbach, Patrick A; Gueydan, Cyril; Kruys, Véronique; Brehm, Alexander; Minakhina, Svetlana; Defrance, Matthieu; Steward, Ruth; Fuks, François

    2016-01-15

    Hydroxymethylcytosine, well described in DNA, occurs also in RNA. Here, we show that hydroxymethylcytosine preferentially marks polyadenylated RNAs and is deposited by Tet in Drosophila. We map the transcriptome-wide hydroxymethylation landscape, revealing hydroxymethylcytosine in the transcripts of many genes, notably in coding sequences, and identify consensus sites for hydroxymethylation. We found that RNA hydroxymethylation can favor mRNA translation. Tet and hydroxymethylated RNA are found to be most abundant in the Drosophila brain, and Tet-deficient fruitflies suffer impaired brain development, accompanied by decreased RNA hydroxymethylation. This study highlights the distribution, localization, and function of cytosine hydroxymethylation and identifies central roles for this modification in Drosophila.

  15. RNA editing and drug discovery for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Tang, Jen-Yang; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  16. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  17. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-08-21

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246-401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95-G96 and containing 5'-phosphomonoester and 3'-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively.

  18. FASTKD2 is an RNA-binding protein required for mitochondrial RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Popow, Johannes; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Curk, Tomaz; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sauer, Sven; Hentze, Matthias W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial RNA processing is an essential step for the synthesis of the components of the electron transport chain in all eukaryotic organisms, yet several aspects of mitochondrial RNA biogenesis and regulation are not sufficiently understood. RNA interactome capture identified several disease-relevant RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with noncanonical RNA-binding architectures, including all six members of the FASTK (FAS-activated serine/threonine kinase) family of proteins. A mutation within one of these newly assigned FASTK RBPs, FASTKD2, causes a rare form of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. To investigate whether RNA binding of FASTKD2 contributes to the disease phenotype, we identified the RNA targets of FASTKD2 by iCLIP. FASTKD2 interacts with a defined set of mitochondrial transcripts including 16S ribosomal RNA (RNR2) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) messenger RNA. CRISPR-mediated deletion of FASTKD2 leads to aberrant processing and expression of RNR2 and ND6 mRNA that encodes a subunit of the respiratory complex I. Metabolic phenotyping of FASTKD2-deficient cells reveals impaired cellular respiration with reduced activities of all respiratory complexes. This work identifies key aspects of the molecular network of a previously uncharacterized, disease-relevant RNA-binding protein, FASTKD2, by a combination of genomic, molecular, and metabolic analyses.

  19. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html.

  20. Coupling of double-stranded RNA synthesis and siRNA generation in fission yeast RNAi.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, Serafin U; Buker, Shane M; Buhler, Marc; Dlakić, Mensur; Moazed, Danesh

    2007-08-03

    The fission yeast centromeric repeats are transcribed and ultimately processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that are required for heterochromatin formation. siRNA generation requires dsRNA synthesis by the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex (RDRC) and processing by the Dicer ribonuclease. Here we show that Dcr1, the fission yeast Dicer, is physically associated with RDRC. Dcr1 generates siRNAs in an ATP-dependent manner that requires its conserved N-terminal helicase domain. Furthermore, C-terminal truncations of Dcr1 that abolish its interaction with RDRC, but can generate siRNA in vitro, abolish siRNA generation and heterochromatic gene silencing in vivo. Finally, reconstitution experiments show that the association of Dcr1 with RDRC strongly stimulates the dsRNA synthesis activity of RDRC. Our results suggest that heterochromatic dsRNA synthesis and siRNA generation are physically coupled processes. This coupling has implications for cis-restriction of siRNA-mediated heterochromatin assembly and for mechanisms that give rise to siRNA strand polarity.

  1. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  2. Polycistronic RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNA interference based on BIC/miR-155

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwan-Ho; Hart, Christopher C.; Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Avery, Adam; Taylor, Jennifer; Patel, Paresh D.; Vojtek, Anne B.; Turner, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a valuable tool for analysis of gene function. We have developed new RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNAi, designated SIBR vectors, based upon the non-coding RNA BIC. BIC contains the miR-155 microRNA (miRNA) precursor, and we find that expression of a short region of the third exon of mouse BIC is sufficient to produce miR-155 in mammalian cells. The SIBR vectors use a modified miR-155 precursor stem–loop and flanking BIC sequences to express synthetic miRNAs complementary to target RNAs. Like RNA polymerase III driven short hairpin RNA vectors, the SIBR vectors efficiently reduce target mRNA and protein expression. The synthetic miRNAs can be expressed from an intron, allowing coexpression of a marker or other protein with the miRNAs. In addition, intronic expression of a synthetic miRNA from a two intron vector enhances RNAi. A SIBR vector can express two different miRNAs from a single transcript for effective inhibition of two different target mRNAs. Furthermore, at least eight tandem copies of a synthetic miRNA can be expressed in a polycistronic transcript to increase the inhibition of a target RNA. The SIBR vectors are flexible tools for a variety of RNAi applications. PMID:16614444

  3. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K48-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  4. Super-Enhancer-Mediated RNA Processing Revealed by Integrative MicroRNA Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Young, Richard A; Sharp, Phillip A

    2017-03-09

    Super-enhancers are an emerging subclass of regulatory regions controlling cell identity and disease genes. However, their biological function and impact on miRNA networks are unclear. Here, we report that super-enhancers drive the biogenesis of master miRNAs crucial for cell identity by enhancing both transcription and Drosha/DGCR8-mediated primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) processing. Super-enhancers, together with broad H3K4me3 domains, shape a tissue-specific and evolutionarily conserved atlas of miRNA expression and function. CRISPR/Cas9 genomics revealed that super-enhancer constituents act cooperatively and facilitate Drosha/DGCR8 recruitment and pri-miRNA processing to boost cell-specific miRNA production. The BET-bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 preferentially inhibits super-enhancer-directed cotranscriptional pri-miRNA processing. Furthermore, super-enhancers are characterized by pervasive interaction with DGCR8/Drosha and DGCR8/Drosha-regulated mRNA stability control, suggesting unique RNA regulation at super-enhancers. Finally, super-enhancers mark multiple miRNAs associated with cancer hallmarks. This study presents principles underlying miRNA biology in health and disease and an unrecognized higher-order property of super-enhancers in RNA processing beyond transcription.

  5. MicroRNA expression analysis using the Affymetrix Platform.

    PubMed

    Dee, Suzanne; Getts, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have been used extensively for messenger RNA expression monitoring. Recently, microarrays have been designed to interrogate expression levels of noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe methods for RNA labeling and the use of a miRNA array to identify and measure microRNA present in RNA samples.

  6. RNA Synthesis by in Vitro Selected Ribozymes for Recreating an RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lyssa L.; Unrau, Peter J.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis states that during an early stage of life, RNA molecules functioned as genome and as the only genome-encoded catalyst. This hypothesis is supported by several lines of evidence, one of which is the in vitro selection of catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) in the laboratory for a wide range of reactions that might have been used by RNA world organisms. This review focuses on three types of ribozymes that could have been involved in the synthesis of RNA, the core activity in the self-replication of RNA world organisms. These ribozyme classes catalyze nucleoside synthesis, triphosphorylation, and the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphates. The strengths and weaknesses regarding each ribozyme’s possible function in a self-replicating RNA network are described, together with the obstacles that need to be overcome before an RNA world organism can be generated in the laboratory. PMID:25610978

  7. Influenza virion RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: stimulation by guanosine and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D; Kitron, N

    1975-01-01

    The activity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of several influenza viruses is stimulated by guanosine. Depending upon the virus strain used, the stimulation of initial reaction rate is up to 10-fold. 5'-GMP, 3',5'-cyclic GMP, and 5'-GDP show lesser stimulation effects. No other nucleosides of 5'-NMPs stimulate, but the dinucleoside monophosphates GpG and GpC show large stimulations. We present evidence that the stimulation represents preferential initiation of genome complementary RNA chains with guanosine: (i) [3-H] guanosine is incorporated specifically at the 5'terminus of RNA in polymerase reaction mixes in vitro. (ii) This incorporation reaction has several properties similar to those of the virion polymerase elongation reaction. (iii) RNA made in the stimulated reaction behaves as complementary RNA in annealing kinetic studies, as does RNA labeled with [3-H]guanosine. PMID:163915

  8. Biochemical characterization of G4 quadruplex telomerase RNA unwinding by the RNA helicase RHAU.

    PubMed

    Booy, Evan P; McRae, Ewan K S; McKenna, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    G4 quadruplexes are stable secondary structures prevalent in DNA and RNA that exhibit diverse regulatory functions. Herein, we describe an in vitro technique using the purified RNA helicase RHAU to unwind a G4 quadruplex identified near the 5' end of the human telomerase RNA (hTR). A synthetic RNA corresponding to the quadruplex forming region of hTR (hTR10-43), as well as a predicted complementary strand (25P1), are combined in a reaction containing the purified helicase and ATP. Reaction products and appropriate controls are resolved by native gel electrophoresis. Gels can be stained using a combination of total RNA and quadruplex-specific dyes to observe the expected quadruplex to duplex conversion. This straightforward method can be extended to study structural changes in other inter- or intramolecular quadruplex containing DNA/RNA molecules with the RHAU helicase or other RNA/DNA remodeling enzymes.

  9. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression. PMID:23392244

  10. Inducible Control of mRNA transport using reprogrammable RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Abil, Zhanar; Gumy, Laura F; Zhao, Huimin; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2017-03-06

    Localization of mRNA is important in a number of cellular processes such as embryogenesis, cellular motility, polarity, and a variety of neurological processes. A synthetic device that controls cellular mRNA localization would facilitate investigations on the significance of mRNA localization in cellular function and allow an additional level of controlling gene expression. In this work, we developed the PUF (Puilio and FBF homology domain) -assisted Localization of RNA (PULR) system, which utilizes a eukaryotic cell's cytoskeletal transport machinery to re-position mRNA within a cell. Depending on the cellular motor used, we show ligand-dependent transport of mRNA towards either pole of the microtubular network of cultured cells. In addition, implementation of the re-programmable PUF domain allowed the transport of untagged endogenous mRNA in primary neurons.

  11. The mRNA-edited form of GABRA3 suppresses GABRA3-mediated Akt activation and breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Sakurai, Masayuki; Yan, Jinchun; Li, Yan; Xu, Hua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Paul J; Zhang, Lin; Showe, Louise C; Nishikura, Kazuko; Huang, Qihong

    2016-02-12

    Metastasis is a critical event affecting breast cancer patient survival. To identify molecules contributing to the metastatic process, we analysed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer data and identified 41 genes whose expression is inversely correlated with survival. Here we show that GABAA receptor alpha3 (Gabra3), normally exclusively expressed in adult brain, is also expressed in breast cancer, with high expression of Gabra3 being inversely correlated with breast cancer survival. We demonstrate that Gabra3 activates the AKT pathway to promote breast cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, we find an A-to-I RNA-edited form of Gabra3 only in non-invasive breast cancers and show that edited Gabra3 suppresses breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. A-to-I-edited Gabra3 has reduced cell surface expression and suppresses the activation of AKT required for cell migration and invasion. Our study demonstrates a significant role for mRNA-edited Gabra3 in breast cancer metastasis.

  12. The mRNA-edited form of GABRA3 suppresses GABRA3-mediated Akt activation and breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Sakurai, Masayuki; Yan, Jinchun; Li, Yan; Xu, Hua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Paul J.; Zhang, Lin; Showe, Louise C.; Nishikura, Kazuko; Huang, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a critical event affecting breast cancer patient survival. To identify molecules contributing to the metastatic process, we analysed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer data and identified 41 genes whose expression is inversely correlated with survival. Here we show that GABAA receptor alpha3 (Gabra3), normally exclusively expressed in adult brain, is also expressed in breast cancer, with high expression of Gabra3 being inversely correlated with breast cancer survival. We demonstrate that Gabra3 activates the AKT pathway to promote breast cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, we find an A-to-I RNA-edited form of Gabra3 only in non-invasive breast cancers and show that edited Gabra3 suppresses breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. A-to-I-edited Gabra3 has reduced cell surface expression and suppresses the activation of AKT required for cell migration and invasion. Our study demonstrates a significant role for mRNA-edited Gabra3 in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26869349

  13. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  14. The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase homolog of Geobacter sulfurreducens specifically methylates tRNA-Glu.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Aklujkar, Muktak; Schäfer, Matthias; Reinhardt, Richard; Nickel, Olaf; Reuter, Gunter; Lovley, Derek R; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann; Nellen, Wolfgang; Ankri, Serge; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Dnmt2 enzymes are conserved in eukaryotes, where they methylate C38 of tRNA-Asp with high activity. Here, the activity of one of the very few prokaryotic Dnmt2 homologs from Geobacter species (GsDnmt2) was investigated. GsDnmt2 was observed to methylate tRNA-Asp from flies and mice. Unexpectedly, it had only a weak activity toward its matching Geobacter tRNA-Asp, but methylated Geobacter tRNA-Glu with good activity. In agreement with this result, we show that tRNA-Glu is methylated in Geobacter while the methylation is absent in tRNA-Asp. The activities of Dnmt2 enzymes from Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Dictyostelium discoideum for methylation of the Geobacter tRNA-Asp and tRNA-Glu were determined showing that all these Dnmt2s preferentially methylate tRNA-Asp. Hence, the GsDnmt2 enzyme has a swapped transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) specificity. By comparing the different tRNAs, a characteristic sequence pattern was identified in the variable loop of all preferred tRNA substrates. An exchange of two nucleotides in the variable loop of murine tRNA-Asp converted it to the corresponding variable loop of tRNA-Glu and led to a strong reduction of GsDnmt2 activity. Interestingly, the same loss of activity was observed with human DNMT2, indicating that the variable loop functions as a specificity determinant in tRNA recognition of Dnmt2 enzymes.

  15. Molecular breeding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high RNA content by harnessing essential ribosomal RNA transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Kariya, Takahiro; Usugi, Shogo; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    As yeast is commonly used for RNA production, it is industrially important to breed strains with high RNA contents. The upstream activating factor (UAF) plays an important role in transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a major constituent of intracellular RNA species. Here, we targeted the essential rRNA transcription regulator Rrn5 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a component of the UAF complex, and disrupted the genomic RRN5 gene using a helper plasmid carrying an RRN5 gene. Then we isolated nine suppressor mutants (Sup mutants) of RRN5 gene disruption, causing deficiency in rRNA transcription. The Sup mutants had RNA contents of approximately 40% of the wild type level and expansion of rDNA repeats to ca. 400-700 copies. Reintroduction of a functional RRN5 gene into Sup mutants caused a reduction in the number of rDNA repeats to close to the wild type level but did not change RNA content. However, we found that reintroduction of RRN5 into the Sup16 mutant (in which the FOB1 gene encoding the rDNA replication fork barrier site binding protein was disrupted) resulted in a significant increase (17%) in RNA content compared with wild type, although the rDNA repeat copy number was almost identical to the wild type strain. In this case, upregulated transcription of non-transcribed spacers (NTS) occurred, especially in the NTS2 region; this was likely mediated by RNA polymerase II and accounted for the increased RNA content. Thus, we propose a novel breeding strategy for developing high RNA content yeast by harnessing the essential rRNA transcription regulator.

  16. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries. PMID:27886048

  17. MicroRNA-directed siRNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Régis L; Steiner, Florian A; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F

    2010-04-08

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional silencing process, triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), leading to the destabilization of homologous mRNAs. A distinction has been made between endogenous RNAi-related pathways and the exogenous RNAi pathway, the latter being essential for the experimental use of RNAi. Previous studies have shown that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex containing the enzymes Dicer and the Argonaute RDE-1 process dsRNA. Dicer is responsible for cleaving dsRNA into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) while RDE-1 acts as the siRNA acceptor. RDE-1 then guides a multi-protein complex to homologous targets to trigger mRNA destabilization. However, endogenous role(s) for RDE-1, if any, have remained unexplored. We here show that RDE-1 functions as a scavenger protein, taking up small RNA molecules from many different sources, including the microRNA (miRNA) pathway. This is in striking contrast to Argonaute proteins functioning directly in the miRNA pathway, ALG-1 and ALG-2: these proteins exclusively bind miRNAs. While playing no significant role in the biogenesis of the main pool of miRNAs, RDE-1 binds endogenous miRNAs and triggers RdRP activity on at least one perfectly matching, endogenous miRNA target. The resulting secondary siRNAs are taken up by a set of Argonaute proteins known to act as siRNA acceptors in exogenous RNAi, resulting in strong mRNA destabilization. Our results show that RDE-1 in an endogenous setting is actively screening the transcriptome using many different small RNAs, including miRNAs, as a guide, with implications for the evolution of transcripts with a potential to be recognized by Dicer.

  18. Artificial small RNA for sequence specific cleavage of target RNA through RNase III endonuclease Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Liu, Li; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Lin, Junhao; Chen, Mingwei; Li, Jianfa; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 system uses a guide RNA which functions in conjunction with Cas9 proteins to target a DNA and cleaves double-strand DNA. This phenomenon raises a question whether an artificial small RNA (asRNA), composed of a Dicer–binding RNA element and an antisense RNA, could also be used to induce Dicer to process and degrade a specific RNA. If so, we could develop a new method which is named DICERi for gene silencing or RNA editing. To prove the feasibility of asRNA, we selected MALAT-1 as target and used Hela and MDA-MB-231 cells as experimental models. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the introduction of asRNA decreased the relative expression level of target gene significantly. Next, we analyzed cell proliferation using CCK-8 and EdU staining assays, and then cell migration using wound scratch and Transwell invasion assays. We found that cell proliferation and cell migration were both suppressed remarkably after asRNA was expressed in Hela and MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell apoptosis was also detected through Hoechst staining and ELISA assays and the data indicated that he numbers of apoptotic cell in experimental groups significantly increased compared with negative controls. In order to prove that the gene silencing effects were caused by Dicer, we co-transfected shRNA silencing Dicer and asRNA. The relative expression levels of Dicer and MALAT-1 were both detected and the results indicated that when the cleavage role of Dicer was silenced, the relative expression level of MALAT-1 was not affected after the introduction of asRNA. All the above results demonstrated that these devices directed by Dicer effectively excised target RNA and repressed the target genes, thus causing phenotypic changes. Our works adds a new dimension to gene regulating technologies and may have broad applications in construction of gene circuits. PMID:27231846

  19. In situ dissection of RNA functional subunits by domain-specific chromatin isolation by RNA purification (dChIRP).

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jeffrey J; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe domain-specific chromatin isolation by RNA purification (dChIRP), a technique for dissecting the functional domains of a target RNA in situ. For an RNA of interest, dChIRP can identify domain-level intramolecular and intermolecular RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and RNA-DNA interactions and maps the RNA's genomic binding sites with higher precision than domain-agnostic methods. We illustrate how this technique has been applied to the roX1 lncRNA to resolve its domain-level architecture, discover its protein- and chromatin-interacting domains, and map its occupancy on the X chromosome.

  20. Use of DNA, RNA, and Chimeric Templates by a Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase: Evolutionary Implications for the Transition from the RNA to the DNA World

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Robert W.; Bellon, Laurent; Beigelman, Leonid; Kao, C. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position −11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes. PMID:10400735

  1. Structure of yeast Argonaute with guide RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Kotaro; Weinberg, David E.; Bartel, David P.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-06-26

    The RNA-induced silencing complex, comprising Argonaute and guide RNA, mediates RNA interference. Here we report the 3.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of Kluyveromyces polysporus Argonaute (KpAGO) fortuitously complexed with guide RNA originating from small-RNA duplexes autonomously loaded and processed by recombinant KpAGO. Despite their diverse sequences, guide-RNA nucleotides 1-8 are positioned similarly, with sequence-independent contacts to bases, phosphates and 2{prime}-hydroxyl groups pre-organizing the backbone of nucleotides 2-8 in a near-A-form conformation. Compared with prokaryotic Argonautes, KpAGO has numerous surface-exposed insertion segments, with a cluster of conserved insertions repositioning the N domain to enable full propagation of guide-target pairing. Compared with Argonautes in inactive conformations, KpAGO has a hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes an expanded and repositioned loop, which inserts an invariant glutamate into the catalytic pocket. Mutation analyses and analogies to ribonuclease H indicate that insertion of this glutamate finger completes a universally conserved catalytic tetrad, thereby activating Argonaute for RNA cleavage.

  2. Stacking interactions in PUF-RNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-07-02

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

  3. Progress in MicroRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zaijie; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding endogenous RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by several mechanisms. Activity is primarily through binding to the 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs (mRNA) resulting in degradation and translation repression. Unlike other small-RNAs, miRNAs do not require perfect base pairing, and thus, can regulate a network of broad, yet specific, genes. Although we have only just begun to gain insights into the full range of biologic functions of miRNA, their involvement in the onset and progression of disease has generated significant interest for therapeutic development. Mounting evidence suggests that miRNA-based therapies, either restoring or repressing miRNAs expression and activity, hold great promise. However, despite the early promise and exciting potential, critical hurdles often involving delivery of miRNA-targeting agents remain to be overcome before transition to clinical applications. Limitations that may be overcome by delivery include, but are not limited to, poor in vivo stability, inappropriate biodistribution, disruption and saturation of endogenous RNA machinery, and untoward side effects. Both viral vectors and nonviral delivery systems can be developed to circumvent these challenges. Viral vectors are efficient delivery agents but toxicity and immunogenicity limit their clinical usage. Herein, we review the recent advances in the mechanisms and strategies of nonviral miRNA delivery systems and provide a perspective on the future of miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:24075926

  4. Bioengineered nanoparticles for siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Green, Jordan J

    2013-01-01

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been an important laboratory tool in the last two decades and has allowed researchers to better understand the functions of nonprotein-coding genes through RNA interference (RNAi). Although RNAi holds great promise for this purpose as well as for treatment of many diseases, efforts at using siRNA have been hampered by the difficulty of safely and effectively introducing it into cells of interest, both in vitro and in vivo. To overcome this challenge, many biomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed and optimized for siRNA delivery, often taking cues from the DNA delivery field, although different barriers exist for these two types of molecules. In this review, we discuss general properties of biomaterials and nanoparticles that are necessary for effective nucleic acid delivery. We also discuss specific examples of bioengineered materials, including lipid-based NPs, polymeric NPs, inorganic NPs, and RNA-based NPs, which clearly illustrate the problems and successes in siRNA delivery.

  5. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  6. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M; Yang, Gillian R; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-08-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer.

  7. The microRNA toolkit of insects

    PubMed Central

    Ylla, Guillem; Fromm, Bastian; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Belles, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Is there a correlation between miRNA