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Sample records for adenosine-to-inosine a-to-i rna

  1. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing and human disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional modification that converts adenosines to inosines in both coding and noncoding RNA transcripts. It is catalyzed by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which exist throughout the body but are most prevalent in the central nervous system. Inosines exhibit properties that are most similar to those of guanosines. As a result, ADAR-mediated editing can post-transcriptionally alter codons, introduce or remove splice sites, or affect the base pairing of the RNA molecule with itself or with other RNAs. A-to-I editing is a mechanism that regulates and diversifies the transcriptome, but the full biological significance of ADARs is not understood. ADARs are highly conserved across vertebrates and are essential for normal development in mammals. Aberrant ADAR activity has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, metabolic diseases, viral infections and autoimmune disorders. ADARs have been shown to contribute to disease pathologies by editing of glutamate receptors, editing of serotonin receptors, mutations in ADAR genes, and by other mechanisms, including recently identified regulatory roles in microRNA processing. Advances in research into many of these diseases may depend on an improved understanding of the biological functions of ADARs. Here, we review recent studies investigating connections between ADAR-mediated RNA editing and human diseases. PMID:24289319

  2. ADAR-related activation of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Witman, Nevin M; Behm, Mikaela; Ohman, Marie; Morrison, Jamie I

    2013-08-15

    Urodele amphibians possess an amazing regenerative capacity that requires the activation of cellular plasticity in differentiated cells and progenitor/stem cells. Many aspects of regeneration in Urodele amphibians recapitulate development, making it unlikely that gene regulatory pathways which are essential for development are mutually exclusive from those necessary for regeneration. One such post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathway, which has been previously shown to be essential for functional metazoan development, is RNA editing. RNA editing catalyses discrete nucleotide changes in RNA transcripts, creating a molecular diversity that could create an enticing connection to the activated cellular plasticity found in newts during regeneration. To assess whether RNA editing occurs during regeneration, we demonstrated that GABRA3 and ADAR2 mRNA transcripts are edited in uninjured and regenerating tissues. Full open-reading frame sequences for ADAR1 and ADAR2, two enzymes responsible for adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, were cloned from newt brain cDNA and exhibited a strong resemblance to ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific) enzymes discovered in mammals. We demonstrated that ADAR1 and ADAR2 mRNA expression levels are differentially expressed during different phases of regeneration in multiple tissues, whereas protein expression levels remain unaltered. In addition, we have characterized a fascinating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of ADAR1 in a variety of different cell types during regeneration, which could provide a mechanism for controlling RNA editing, without altering translational output of the editing enzyme. The link between RNA editing and regeneration provides further insights into how lower organisms, such as the newt, can activate essential molecular pathways via the discrete alteration of RNA sequences. PMID:23534823

  3. Adenosine-to-Inosine RNA Editing Affects Trafficking of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Chammiran; Wahlstedt, Helene; Ohlson, Johan; Björk, Petra; Öhman, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Recoding by adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing plays an important role in diversifying proteins involved in neurotransmission. We have previously shown that the Gabra-3 transcript, coding for the α3 subunit of the GABAA receptor is edited in mouse, causing an isoleucine to methionine (I/M) change. Here we show that this editing event is evolutionarily conserved from human to chicken. Analyzing recombinant GABAA receptor subunits expressed in HEK293 cells, our results suggest that editing at the I/M site in α3 has functional consequences on receptor expression. We demonstrate that I/M editing reduces the cell surface and the total number of α3 subunits. The reduction in cell surface levels is independent of the subunit combination as it is observed for α3 in combination with either the β2 or the β3 subunit. Further, an amino acid substitution at the corresponding I/M site in the α1 subunit has a similar effect on cell surface presentation, indicating the importance of this site for receptor trafficking. We show that the I/M editing during brain development is inversely related to the α3 protein abundance. Our results suggest that editing controls trafficking of α3-containing receptors and may therefore facilitate the switch of subunit compositions during development as well as the subcellular distribution of α subunits in the adult brain. PMID:21030585

  4. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing affects trafficking of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Wahlstedt, Helene; Ohlson, Johan; Björk, Petra; Ohman, Marie

    2011-01-21

    Recoding by adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing plays an important role in diversifying proteins involved in neurotransmission. We have previously shown that the Gabra-3 transcript, coding for the α3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor is edited in mouse, causing an isoleucine to methionine (I/M) change. Here we show that this editing event is evolutionarily conserved from human to chicken. Analyzing recombinant GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed in HEK293 cells, our results suggest that editing at the I/M site in α3 has functional consequences on receptor expression. We demonstrate that I/M editing reduces the cell surface and the total number of α3 subunits. The reduction in cell surface levels is independent of the subunit combination as it is observed for α3 in combination with either the β2 or the β3 subunit. Further, an amino acid substitution at the corresponding I/M site in the α1 subunit has a similar effect on cell surface presentation, indicating the importance of this site for receptor trafficking. We show that the I/M editing during brain development is inversely related to the α3 protein abundance. Our results suggest that editing controls trafficking of α3-containing receptors and may therefore facilitate the switch of subunit compositions during development as well as the subcellular distribution of α subunits in the adult brain. PMID:21030585

  5. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state–dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites. PMID:24448449

  6. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  7. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  8. Altered A-to-I RNA editing in human embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Germanguz, Igal; Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1-p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1-p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24-48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development. PMID:22859999

  9. Altered A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1–p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1–p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24–48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development. PMID:22859999

  10. Reduced levels of protein recoding by A-to-I RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khermesh, Khen; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Barak, Michal; Annese, Anita; Wachtel, Chaim; Levanon, Erez Y.; Picardi, Ernesto; Eisenberg, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR enzyme family, acts on dsRNA structures within pre-mRNA molecules. Editing of the coding part of the mRNA may lead to recoding, amino acid substitution in the resulting protein, possibly modifying its biochemical and biophysical properties. Altered RNA editing patterns have been observed in various neurological pathologies. Here, we present a comprehensive study of recoding by RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of irreversible dementia. We have used a targeted resequencing approach supplemented by a microfluidic-based high-throughput PCR coupled with next-generation sequencing to accurately quantify A-to-I RNA editing levels in a preselected set of target sites, mostly located within the coding sequence of synaptic genes. Overall, editing levels decreased in AD patients’ brain tissues, mainly in the hippocampus and to a lesser degree in the temporal and frontal lobes. Differential RNA editing levels were observed in 35 target sites within 22 genes. These results may shed light on a possible association between the neurodegenerative processes typical for AD and deficient RNA editing. PMID:26655226

  11. Reciprocal regulation of A-to-I RNA editing and the vertebrate nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Andrew C.; Balik, Ales; Greger, Ingo H.

    2013-01-01

    The fine control of molecules mediating communication in the nervous system is key to adjusting neuronal signaling during development and in maintaining the stability of established networks in the face of altered sensory input. To prevent the culmination of pathological recurrent network excitation or debilitating periods of quiescence, adaptive alterations occur in the signaling molecules and ion channels that control membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. However, rather than encoding (and thus “hardwiring”) modified gene copies, the nervous systems of metazoa have opted for expanding on post-transcriptional pre-mRNA splicing by altering key encoded amino acids using a conserved mechanism of A-to-I RNA editing: the enzymatic deamination of adenosine to inosine. Inosine exhibits similar base-pairing properties to guanosine with respect to tRNA codon recognition, replication by polymerases, and RNA secondary structure (i.e.,: forming-capacity). In addition to recoding within the open reading frame, adenosine deamination also occurs with high frequency throughout the non-coding transcriptome, where it affects multiple aspects of RNA metabolism and gene expression. Here, we describe the recoding function of key RNA editing targets in the mammalian central nervous system and their potential to be regulated. We will then discuss how interactions of A-to-I editing with gene expression and alternative splicing could play a wider role in regulating the neuronal transcriptome. Finally, we will highlight the increasing complexity of this multifaceted control hub by summarizing new findings from high-throughput studies. PMID:23616744

  12. The Landscape of A-to-I RNA Editome Is Shaped by Both Positive and Purifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Pan, Bohu; Chen, Longxian; Wang, Hongbing; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) in precursor mRNA induces variable gene products at the post-transcription level. How and to what extent A-to-I RNA editing diversifies transcriptome is not fully characterized in the evolution, and very little is known about the selective constraints that drive the evolution of RNA editing events. Here we present a study on A-to-I RNA editing, by generating a global profile of A-to-I editing for a phylogeny of seven Drosophila species, a model system spanning an evolutionary timeframe of approximately 45 million years. Of totally 9281 editing events identified, 5150 (55.5%) are located in the coding sequences (CDS) of 2734 genes. Phylogenetic analysis places these genes into 1,526 homologous families, about 5% of total gene families in the fly lineages. Based on conservation of the editing sites, the editing events in CDS are categorized into three distinct types, representing events on singleton genes (type I), and events not conserved (type II) or conserved (type III) within multi-gene families. While both type I and II events are subject to purifying selection, notably type III events are positively selected, and highly enriched in the components and functions of the nervous system. The tissue profiles are documented for three editing types, and their critical roles are further implicated by their shifting patterns during holometabolous development and in post-mating response. In conclusion, three A-to-I RNA editing types are found to have distinct evolutionary dynamics. It appears that nervous system functions are mainly tested to determine if an A-to-I editing is beneficial for an organism. The coding plasticity enabled by A-to-I editing creates a new class of binary variations, which is a superior alternative to maintain heterozygosity of expressed genes in a diploid mating system. PMID:27467689

  13. Small RNA and A-to-I Editing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eran, Alal

    One in every 88 children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), a set of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social impairments, communication deficits, and repetitive behavior. ASDs have a substantial genetic component, but the specific cause of most cases remains unknown. Understanding gene-environment interactions underlying ASD is essential for improving early diagnosis and identifying critical targets for intervention and prevention. Towards this goal, we surveyed adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing in autistic brains. A-to-I editing is an epigenetic mechanism that fine-tunes synaptic function in response to environmental stimuli, shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. We used ultradeep sequencing to quantify A-to-I receding of candidate synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from individuals with ASD and neurotypical controls. We found unexpectedly wide distributions of human A-to-I editing levels, whose extremes were consistently populated by individuals with ASD. We correlated A-to-I editing with isoform usage, identified clusters of correlated sites, and examined differential editing patterns. Importantly, we found that individuals with ASD commonly use a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme ADARB1. We next profiled small RNAs thought to regulate A-to-I editing, which originate from one of the most commonly altered loci in ASD, 15q11. Deep targeted sequencing of SNORD115 and SNORD116 transcripts enabled their high-resolution detection in human brains, and revealed a strong gender bias underlying their expression. The consistent 2-fold upregulation of 15q11 small RNAs in male vs. female cerebella could be important in delineating the role of this locus in ASD, a male dominant disorder. Overall, these studies provide an accurate population-level view of small RNA and A-to-I editing in human cerebella, and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism

  14. A-to-I pre-mRNA editing of the serotonin 2C receptor: comparisons among inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunzhi; Davisson, Muriel T; Kafadar, Karen; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2006-11-01

    The serotonin receptor 5HT2CR pre-mRNA is subject to adenosine deamination (RNA editing) at five residues located within a 15 nucleotide stretch of the coding region. Such changes of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) can produce 32 mRNA variants, encoding 24 different protein isoforms, some of which vary in biochemical and pharmacological properties. Because serotonin mediates diverse neurological processes relevant to behavior and because inbred mouse strains vary in their responses to tests of learning and behavior, we have examined the A-to-I editing patterns of the 5HT2CR mRNA in whole brains from eight mouse strains. By sequencing approximately 100 clones from individual mice, we generated detailed information on levels of editing at each site and patterns of editing that identify a total of 28 mRNA and 20 protein isoforms. Significant differences between individuals from different strains were found in total editing frequency, in the proportion of transcripts with 1 and 4 edited sites, in editing frequency at the A, B, E and D sites, in amino acid frequencies at positions 157 and 161, and in subsets of major protein isoforms. Primer extension assays were used to show that individuals within strains (six C3H.B-+rd1 and four 129SvImrJ) displayed no significant differences in any feature. These findings suggest that genetic background contributes to subtle variation in 5HT2CR mRNA editing patterns which may have consequences for pharmacological treatments and behavioral testing. PMID:16904273

  15. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  16. A-to-I RNA editing is induced upon hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nevo-Caspi, Yael; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Paret, Gideon

    2011-06-01

    Regulating gene expression is part of a cell's response to hypoxia. A-to-I RNA editing is an epigenetic phenomenon that can contribute to RNA and protein levels and to isoform diversity. In this study, we identified alterations in the levels of RNA editing following hypoxic stress in three genes: MED13, STAT3, and F11R. Changes in editing levels were associated with changes in RNA levels. These results suggest that A-to-I RNA editing may be one of the mechanisms used by cells to regulate changes in gene expression after hypoxia. These findings could lead to a novel therapeutic approach and better health care for children with hypoxemia. PMID:21330951

  17. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  18. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with thePUK1(FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction inFusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA(1831)GUA(1834)G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing ofPUK1transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia.PUK1was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites inF. graminearumoccur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs.PUK1orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing inNeurospora crassaandF. verticillioides Furthermore,F. graminearumdiffers from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing inF. graminearumpreferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  19. A strategy for developing a hammerhead ribozyme for selective RNA cleavage depending on substitutional RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Tanaka, Yasuyoshi; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Substitutional RNA editing plays a crucial role in the regulation of biological processes. Cleavage of target RNA that depends on the specific site of substitutional RNA editing is a useful tool for analyzing and regulating intracellular processes related to RNA editing. Hammerhead ribozymes have been utilized as small catalytic RNAs for cleaving target RNA at a specific site and may be used for RNA-editing-specific RNA cleavage. Here we reveal a design strategy for a hammerhead ribozyme that specifically recognizes adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and cytosine to uracil (C-to-U) substitutional RNA-editing sites and cleaves target RNA. Because the hammerhead ribozyme cleaves one base upstream of the target-editing site, the base that pairs with the target-editing site was utilized for recognition. RNA-editing-specific ribozymes were designed such that the recognition base paired only with the edited base. These ribozymes showed A-to-I and C-to-U editing-specific cleavage activity against synthetic serotonin receptor 2C and apolipoprotein B mRNA fragments in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the ribozyme designed for recognizing A-to-I RNA editing at the Q/R site on filamin A (FLNA) showed editing-specific cleavage activity against physiologically edited FLNA mRNA extracted from cells. We demonstrated that our strategy is effective for cleaving target RNA in an editing-dependent manner. The data in this study provided an experimental basis for the RNA-editing-dependent degradation of specific target RNA in vivo. PMID:22798264

  20. Splicing variants of ADAR2 and ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yao; Zhao, Xingli; Li, Zhaohui; Wei, Jun; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The roles of alternative splicing and RNA editing in gene regulation and transcriptome diversity are well documented. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are responsible for adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing and exemplify the complex association between RNA editing and alternative splicing. The self-editing activity of ADAR2, which acts on its own pre-mRNA, leads to its alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs independently at nine splicing sites on ADAR2 pre-mRNA, generating numerous alternative splicing variants with various catalytic activities. A-to-I RNA editing is important in a range of physiological processes in humans and is associated with several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mood disorders, epilepsy and glioma. Reduced editing at the glutamine/arginine site of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in glioma, without any alteration in ADAR2 expression, is a notable phenomenon. Several studies have tried to explain this alteration in the catalytic activity of ADAR2; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present review summarizes the relevant literature and shares experimental results concerning ADAR2 alternative splicing. In particular, the present review demonstrates that shifts in the relative abundance of the active and inactive splicing variants of ADAR2 may reduce the ADAR2 editing activity in glioma. Dominant expression of ADAR2 splicing variant with low enzyme activity causes reduced RNA editing of GluA2 subunit at the glutamine/arginine site in glioma. PMID:27446352

  1. Reovirus-mediated induction of ADAR1 (p150) minimally alters RNA editing patterns in discrete brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer L.; Morabito, Michael V.; Martinez, Charles R.; Gilbert, James A.; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Transcripts encoding ADAR1, a double-stranded, RNA-specific adenosine deaminase involved in the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of mammalian RNAs, can be alternatively spliced to produce an interferon-inducible protein isoform (p150) that is up-regulated in both cell culture and in vivo model systems in response to pathogen or interferon stimulation. In contrast to other tissues, p150 is expressed at extremely low levels in the brain and it is unclear what role, if any, this isoform may play in the innate immune response of the central nervous system (CNS) or whether the extent of editing for RNA substrates critical for CNS function is affected by its induction. To investigate the expression of ADAR1 isoforms in response to viral infection and subsequent alterations in A-to-I editing profiles for endogenous ADAR targets, we used a neuro-tropic strain of reovirus to infect neonatal mice and quantify A-to-I editing in discrete brain regions using a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing strategy. While intracranial injection of reovirus resulted in a widespread increase in the expression of ADAR1 (p150) in multiple brain regions and peripheral organs, significant changes in site-specific A-to-I conversion were quite limited, suggesting that steady-state levels of p150 expression are not a primary determinant for modulating the extent of editing for numerous ADAR targets in vivo. PMID:24906008

  2. A distant cis acting intronic element induces site-selective RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Venø, Morten T; Ekdahl, Ylva; Kjems, Jørgen; Öhman, Marie

    2012-10-01

    Transcripts have been found to be site selectively edited from adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in the mammalian brain, mostly in genes involved in neurotransmission. While A-to-I editing occurs at double-stranded structures, other structural requirements are largely unknown. We have investigated the requirements for editing at the I/M site in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) receptor. We identify an evolutionarily conserved intronic duplex, 150 nt downstream of the exonic hairpin where the I/M site resides, which is required for its editing. This is the first time a distant RNA structure has been shown to be important for A-to-I editing. We demonstrate that the element also can induce editing in related but normally not edited RNA sequences. In human, thousands of genes are edited in duplexes formed by inverted repeats in non-coding regions. It is likely that numerous such duplexes can induce editing of coding regions throughout the transcriptome. PMID:22848101

  3. A distant cis acting intronic element induces site-selective RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Chammiran; Venø, Morten T.; Ekdahl, Ylva; Kjems, Jørgen; Öhman, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts have been found to be site selectively edited from adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in the mammalian brain, mostly in genes involved in neurotransmission. While A-to-I editing occurs at double-stranded structures, other structural requirements are largely unknown. We have investigated the requirements for editing at the I/M site in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABAA receptor. We identify an evolutionarily conserved intronic duplex, 150 nt downstream of the exonic hairpin where the I/M site resides, which is required for its editing. This is the first time a distant RNA structure has been shown to be important for A-to-I editing. We demonstrate that the element also can induce editing in related but normally not edited RNA sequences. In human, thousands of genes are edited in duplexes formed by inverted repeats in non-coding regions. It is likely that numerous such duplexes can induce editing of coding regions throughout the transcriptome. PMID:22848101

  4. Inosine-Mediated Modulation of RNA Sensing by Toll-Like Receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR8

    PubMed Central

    Sarvestani, Soroush T.; Tate, Michelle D.; Moffat, Jessica M.; Jacobi, Ashley M.; Behlke, Mark A.; Miller, Alistair R.; Beckham, Simone A.; McCoy, Claire E.; Chen, Weisan; Mintern, Justine D.; O'Keeffe, Meredith; John, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR)-mediated adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is a critical arm of the antiviral response. However, mechanistic insights into how A-to-I RNA editing affects viral infection are lacking. We posited that inosine incorporation into RNA facilitates sensing of nonself RNA by innate immune sensors and accordingly investigated the impact of inosine-modified RNA on Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 (TLR7/8) sensing. Inosine incorporation into synthetic single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) potentiated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or alpha interferon (IFN-α) production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a sequence-dependent manner, indicative of TLR7/8 recruitment. The effect of inosine incorporation on TLR7/8 sensing was restricted to immunostimulatory ssRNAs and was not seen with inosine-containing short double-stranded RNAs or with a deoxy-inosine-modified ssRNA. Inosine-mediated increase of self-secondary structure of an ssRNA resulted in potentiated IFN-α production in human PBMCs through TLR7 recruitment, as established through the use of a TLR7 antagonist and Tlr7-deficient cells. There was a correlation between hyperediting of influenza A viral ssRNA and its ability to stimulate TNF-α, independent of 5′-triphosphate residues, and involving Adar-1. Furthermore, A-to-I editing of viral ssRNA directly enhanced mouse Tlr7 sensing, when present in proportions reproducing biologically relevant levels of RNA editing. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that inosine incorporation into immunostimulatory ssRNA can potentiate TLR7/8 activation. Our results suggest a novel function of A-to-I RNA editing, which is to facilitate TLR7/8 sensing of phagocytosed viral RNA. PMID:24227841

  5. Evidence for large diversity in the human transcriptome created by Alu RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Barak, Michal; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Paz, Nurit; Rechavi, Gideon; Church, George M; Mehr, Ramit

    2009-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters the original genomic content of the human transcriptome and is essential for maintenance of normal life in mammals. A-to-I editing in Alu repeats is abundant in the human genome, with many thousands of expressed Alu sequences undergoing editing. Little is known so far about the contribution of Alu editing to transcriptome complexity. Transcripts derived from a single edited Alu sequence can be edited in multiple sites, and thus could theoretically generate a large number of different transcripts. Here we explored whether the combinatorial potential nature of edited Alu sequences is actually fulfilled in the human transcriptome. We analyzed datasets of editing sites and performed an analysis of a detailed transcript set of one edited Alu sequence. We found that editing appears at many more sites than detected by earlier genomic screens. To a large extent, editing of different sites within the same transcript is only weakly correlated. Thus, rather than finding a few versions of each transcript, a large number of edited variants arise, resulting in immense transcript diversity that eclipses alternative splicing as mechanism of transcriptome diversity, although with less impact on the proteome. PMID:19740767

  6. Profiling the RNA editomes of wild-type C. elegans and ADAR mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Han-Qing; Zhang, Pan; Gao, Hua; He, Xiandong; Dou, Yanmei; Huang, August Y; Liu, Xi-Ming; Ye, Adam Y; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wei, Liping

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing increases transcriptome diversity through post-transcriptional modifications of RNA. Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) conversion, the most common type of RNA editing in higher eukaryotes. Caenorhabditis elegans has two ADARs, ADR-1 and ADR-2, but their functions remain unclear. Here, we profiled the RNA editomes of C. elegans at different developmental stages of wild-type and ADAR mutants. We developed a new computational pipeline with a "bisulfite-seq-mapping-like" step and achieved a threefold increase in identification sensitivity. A total of 99.5% of the 47,660 A-to-I editing sites were found in clusters. Of the 3080 editing clusters, 65.7% overlapped with DNA transposons in noncoding regions and 73.7% could form hairpin structures. The numbers of editing sites and clusters were highest at the L1 and embryonic stages. The editing frequency of a cluster positively correlated with the number of editing sites within it. Intriguingly, for 80% of the clusters with 10 or more editing sites, almost all expressed transcripts were edited. Deletion of adr-1 reduced the editing frequency but not the number of editing clusters, whereas deletion of adr-2 nearly abolished RNA editing, indicating a modulating role of ADR-1 and an essential role of ADR-2 in A-to-I editing. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that adr-2 mutant worms altered the abundance of proteins involved in aging and lifespan regulation. Consistent with this finding, we observed that worms lacking RNA editing were short-lived. Taken together, our results reveal a sophisticated landscape of RNA editing and distinct modes of action of different ADARs. PMID:25373143

  7. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome. PMID:26024316

  8. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome. PMID:26024316

  9. ADAR Proteins: Double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H.-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We are reviewing here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains. PMID:21728134

  10. Editor meets silencer: crosstalk between RNA editing and RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    The most prevalent type of RNA editing is mediated by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which convert adenosines to inosines (a process known as A→I RNA editing) in double-stranded (ds)RNA substrates. A→I RNA editing was long thought to affect only selected transcripts by altering the proteins they encode. However, genome-wide screening has revealed numerous editing sites within inverted Alu repeats in introns and untranslated regions. Also, recent evidence indicates that A→I RNA editing crosstalks with RNA-interference pathways, which, like A→I RNA editing, involve dsRNAs. A→I RNA editing therefore seems to have additional functions, including the regulation of retrotransposons and gene silencing, which adds a new urgency to the challenges of fully understanding ADAR functions. PMID:17139332

  11. A Novel Computational Strategy to Identify A-to-I RNA Editing Sites by RNA-Seq Data: De Novo Detection in Human Spinal Cord Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Gallo, Angela; Galeano, Federica; Tomaselli, Sara; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process occurring in a wide range of organisms. In human brain, the A-to-I RNA editing, in which individual adenosine (A) bases in pre-mRNA are modified to yield inosine (I), is the most frequent event. Modulating gene expression, RNA editing is essential for cellular homeostasis. Indeed, its deregulation has been linked to several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, many RNA editing sites have been identified by next generation sequencing technologies employing massive transcriptome sequencing together with whole genome or exome sequencing. While genome and transcriptome reads are not always available for single individuals, RNA-Seq data are widespread through public databases and represent a relevant source of yet unexplored RNA editing sites. In this context, we propose a simple computational strategy to identify genomic positions enriched in novel hypothetical RNA editing events by means of a new two-steps mapping procedure requiring only RNA-Seq data and no a priori knowledge of RNA editing characteristics and genomic reads. We assessed the suitability of our procedure by confirming A-to-I candidates using conventional Sanger sequencing and performing RNA-Seq as well as whole exome sequencing of human spinal cord tissue from a single individual. PMID:22957051

  12. Comparative analysis of the DRADA A-to-I RNA editing gene from mammals, pufferfish and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Crnogorac-Jurcević, T; Clark, M; Gardiner, K

    2000-05-30

    The DRADA gene in mammals encodes an A-to-I RNA editase, an adenosine deaminase that acts on pre-mRNAs to produce site specific inosines. DRADA has been shown to deaminate specific adenosine residues in a subset of glutamate and serotonin receptors, and this editing results in proteins of altered sequences and functional properties. DRADA thus plays a role in creating protein diversity. To study the evolutionary significance of this gene, we have characterized the genomic structure of DRADA from Fugu rubripes, and compared the protein sequences of DRADA from mammals, pufferfish and zebrafish. The DRADA gene from Fugu is three-fold compacted with respect to the human gene, and contains a novel intron within the large second coding exon. DRADA cDNAs were isolated from zebrafish and a second pufferfish, Tetraodon fluviatilis. Comparisons among fish, and between fish and mammals, of the protein sequences show that the catalytic domains are highly conserved for each gene, while the RNA binding domains vary within a single protein in their levels of conservation. Conservation within the Z DNA binding domain has also been assessed. Different levels of conservation among domains of different functional roles may reflect differences in editase substrate specificity and/or substrate sequence conservation. PMID:10854778

  13. Endonuclease V cleaves at inosines in RNA.

    PubMed

    Vik, Erik Sebastian; Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Strøm Andersen, Pernille; Fladeby, Cathrine; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2013-01-01

    Endonuclease V orthologues are highly conserved proteins found in all kingdoms of life. While the prokaryotic enzymes are DNA repair proteins for removal of deaminated adenosine (inosine) from the genome, no clear role for the eukaryotic counterparts has hitherto been described. Here we report that human endonuclease V (ENDOV) and also Escherichia coli endonuclease V are highly active ribonucleases specific for inosine in RNA. Inosines are normal residues in certain RNAs introduced by specific deaminases. Adenosine-to-inosine editing is essential for proper function of these transcripts and defects are linked to various human disease. Here we show that human ENDOV cleaves an RNA substrate containing inosine in a position corresponding to a biologically important site for deamination in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) neurotransmitter. Further, human ENDOV specifically incises transfer RNAs with inosine in the wobble position. This previously unknown RNA incision activity may suggest a role for endonuclease V in normal RNA metabolism. PMID:23912683

  14. Endonuclease V cleaves at inosines in RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian Vik, Erik; Sameen Nawaz, Meh; Strøm Andersen, Pernille; Fladeby, Cathrine; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2013-01-01

    Endonuclease V orthologues are highly conserved proteins found in all kingdoms of life. While the prokaryotic enzymes are DNA repair proteins for removal of deaminated adenosine (inosine) from the genome, no clear role for the eukaryotic counterparts has hitherto been described. Here we report that human endonuclease V (ENDOV) and also Escherichia coli endonuclease V are highly active ribonucleases specific for inosine in RNA. Inosines are normal residues in certain RNAs introduced by specific deaminases. Adenosine-to-inosine editing is essential for proper function of these transcripts and defects are linked to various human disease. Here we show that human ENDOV cleaves an RNA substrate containing inosine in a position corresponding to a biologically important site for deamination in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABAA neurotransmitter. Further, human ENDOV specifically incises transfer RNAs with inosine in the wobble position. This previously unknown RNA incision activity may suggest a role for endonuclease V in normal RNA metabolism. PMID:23912683

  15. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  16. The majority of transcripts in the squid nervous system are extensively recoded by A-to-I RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Shahar; Garrett, Sandra C; Levanon, Erez Y; Olson, Sara; Graveley, Brenton R; Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Eisenberg, Eli

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deamination alters genetic information from the genomic blueprint. When it recodes mRNAs, it gives organisms the option to express diverse, functionally distinct, protein isoforms. All eumetazoans, from cnidarians to humans, express RNA editing enzymes. However, transcriptome-wide screens have only uncovered about 25 transcripts harboring conserved recoding RNA editing sites in mammals and several hundred recoding sites in Drosophila. These studies on few established models have led to the general assumption that recoding by RNA editing is extremely rare. Here we employ a novel bioinformatic approach with extensive validation to show that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii recodes proteins by RNA editing to an unprecedented extent. We identify 57,108 recoding sites in the nervous system, affecting the majority of the proteins studied. Recoding is tissue-dependent, and enriched in genes with neuronal and cytoskeletal functions, suggesting it plays an important role in brain physiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05198.001 PMID:25569156

  17. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  18. APOBEC3A is implicated in a novel class of G-to-A mRNA editing in WT1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Niavarani, Ahmadreza; Currie, Erin; Reyal, Yasmin; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Horswell, Stuart; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Luis Sardina, Jose; Bonnet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Classic deamination mRNA changes, including cytidine to uridine (C-to-U) and adenosine to inosine (A-to-I), are important exceptions to the central dogma and lead to significant alterations in gene transcripts and products. Although there are a few reports of non-classic mRNA alterations, as yet there is no molecular explanation for these alternative changes. Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) mutations and variants are implicated in several diseases, including Wilms tumor and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We observed two alternative G-to-A changes, namely c.1303G>A and c.1586G>A in cDNA clones and found them to be recurrent in a series of 21 umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC) samples studied. Two less conserved U-to-C changes were also observed. These alternative changes were found to be significantly higher in non-progenitor as compared to progenitor CBMCs, while they were found to be absent in a series of AML samples studied, indicating they are targeted, cell type-specific mRNA editing modifications. Since APOBEC/ADAR family members are implicated in RNA/DNA editing, we screened them by RNA-interference (RNAi) for WT1-mRNA changes and observed near complete reversal of WT1 c.1303G>A alteration upon APOBEC3A (A3A) knockdown. The role of A3A in mediating this change was confirmed by A3A overexpression in Fujioka cells, which led to a significant increase in WT1 c.1303G>A mRNA editing. Non-progenitor CBMCs showed correspondingly higher levels of A3A-mRNA and protein as compared to the progenitor ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mRNA modifying activity for an APOBEC3 protein and implicates A3A in a novel G-to-A form of editing. These findings open the way to further investigations into the mechanisms of other potential mRNA changes, which will help to redefine the RNA editing paradigm in both health and disease. PMID:25807502

  19. APOBEC3A Is Implicated in a Novel Class of G-to-A mRNA Editing in WT1 Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Niavarani, Ahmadreza; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Horswell, Stuart; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Luis Sardina, Jose; Bonnet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Classic deamination mRNA changes, including cytidine to uridine (C-to-U) and adenosine to inosine (A-to-I), are important exceptions to the central dogma and lead to significant alterations in gene transcripts and products. Although there are a few reports of non-classic mRNA alterations, as yet there is no molecular explanation for these alternative changes. Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) mutations and variants are implicated in several diseases, including Wilms tumor and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We observed two alternative G-to-A changes, namely c.1303G>A and c.1586G>A in cDNA clones and found them to be recurrent in a series of 21 umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC) samples studied. Two less conserved U-to-C changes were also observed. These alternative changes were found to be significantly higher in non-progenitor as compared to progenitor CBMCs, while they were found to be absent in a series of AML samples studied, indicating they are targeted, cell type-specific mRNA editing modifications. Since APOBEC/ADAR family members are implicated in RNA/DNA editing, we screened them by RNA-interference (RNAi) for WT1-mRNA changes and observed near complete reversal of WT1 c.1303G>A alteration upon APOBEC3A (A3A) knockdown. The role of A3A in mediating this change was confirmed by A3A overexpression in Fujioka cells, which led to a significant increase in WT1 c.1303G>A mRNA editing. Non-progenitor CBMCs showed correspondingly higher levels of A3A-mRNA and protein as compared to the progenitor ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mRNA modifying activity for an APOBEC3 protein and implicates A3A in a novel G-to-A form of editing. These findings open the way to further investigations into the mechanisms of other potential mRNA changes, which will help to redefine the RNA editing paradigm in both health and disease. PMID:25807502

  20. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Niamh; Arieti, Fabiana; Gallo, Angela; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD) expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases. PMID:26437436

  1. Region-specific alterations of A-to-I RNA editing of serotonin 2c receptor in the cortex of suicides with major depression.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, D; van der Laan, S; Underwood, M D; Salvetat, N; Cavarec, L; Vincent, L; Molina, F; Mann, J J; Arango, V; Pujol, J F

    2016-01-01

    Brain region-specific abnormalities in serotonergic transmission appear to underlie suicidal behavior. Alterations of RNA editing on the serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C) pre-mRNA in the brain of suicides produce transcripts that attenuate 5-HT2CR signaling by impairing intracellular G-protein coupling and subsequent intracellular signal transduction. In brain, the distribution of RNA-editing enzymes catalyzing deamination (A-to-I modification) shows regional variation, including within the cerebral cortex. We tested the hypothesis that altered pre-mRNA 5-HT2CR receptor editing in suicide is region-specific. To this end, we investigated the complete 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile in two architectonically distinct cortical areas involved in mood regulation and decision-making in a clinically well-characterized cohort of age- and sex-matched non-psychiatric drug-free controls and depressed suicides. By using an original biochemical detection method, that is, capillary electrophoresis single-stranded conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP), we corroborated the 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile previously described in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9 (BA9)). Editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA displayed clear regional difference when comparing dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9) and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24). Compared with non-psychiatric control individuals, alterations of editing levels of 5-HT2CR mRNA were detected in both cortical areas of depressed suicides. A marked increase in editing on 5-HT2CR was especially observed in the anterior cingulate cortex in suicides, implicating this cortical area in suicide risk. The results suggest that region-specific changes in RNA editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA and deficient receptor function likely contribute to the etiology of major depressive disorder or suicide. PMID:27576167

  2. FRET analysis of in vivo dimerization by RNA-editing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chilibeck, Kaari A; Wu, Tao; Liang, Chao; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Gesner, Emily M; Lynch, Jeffrey M; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2006-06-16

    Members of the ADAR (adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA) enzyme family catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine within double-stranded RNAs, a poorly understood process that is critical to mammalian development. We have performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments in mammalian cells transfected with fluorophore-bearing ADAR1 and ADAR2 fusion proteins to investigate the relationship between these proteins. These studies conclusively demonstrate the homodimerization of ADAR1 and ADAR2 and also show that ADAR1 and ADAR2 form heterodimers in human cells. RNase treatment of cells expressing these fusion proteins changes their localization but does not affect dimerization. Taken together these results suggest that homo- and heterodimerization are important for the activity of ADAR family members in vivo and that these associations are RNA independent. PMID:16618704

  3. Functional characterizations and expression profiles of ADAR2 gene, responsible for RNA editing, in response to GCRV challenge in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Su, Juanjuan; Han, Baoquan; Rao, Youliang; Feng, Xiaoli; Su, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    ADAR (adenosine deaminases acting on RNA)-mediated adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a critical arm of the antiviral response. The present study focused on the structural and functional characterizations of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ADAR2 (CiADAR2) gene. The complete genomic sequence of CiADAR2 is 150,458 bp in length, containing 12 exons and 11 introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of 2100 bp encodes a polypeptide of 699 amino acids (aa) which contains three highly conservative domains - two N-terminal dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs) and one C-terminal deaminase domain. The predicted crystal structure of CiADAR2 deaminase domain suggested a catalytic center form in the enzyme active site. CiADAR2 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in the fifteen tested tissues, and was induced post GCRV challenge in spleen and head kidney and C. idella kidney (CIK) cells. The ex vivo expression of CiADAR2 protein was verified by the Flag (tag)-based western blot assay. Antiviral activity assay of CiADAR2 was manifested by the delayed appearance of cytopathic effect (CPE) and inhibition of GCRV yield at 48 h post infection. Furthermore, in CiADAR2 overexpression cells, mRNA expression levels of CiIFN1, CiTLR7 and CiTLR8 were facilitated at different time points after GCRV infection, comparing to those in control group. Taken together, it was indicated that ADAR2 was an antiviral cytokine against GCRV and anti-GCRV function mechanism might involve in the TLR7/8-regulated IFN-signaling. These findings suggested that CiADAR2 was a novel member engaging in antiviral innate immune defense in C. idella, which laid a foundation for the further mechanism research of ADAR2 in fishes. PMID:27514783

  4. Comparative analysis of the RED1 and RED2 A-to-I RNA editing genes from mammals, pufferfish and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Clark, M; Gardiner, K

    2000-05-30

    One type of RNA editing involves the deamination of adenosine (A) residues to inosines (I) at specific sites in specific pre-mRNAs. These inosines are subsequently read as guanosines by the ribosome, with potentially significant consequences for protein sequence. In mammals, two such A-to-I RNA editases are RED1, which edits some serotonin and glutamate receptors, and RED2, with unidentified substrates. To study the evolutionary conservation among these editases, we have isolated homologous genes from the Japanese pufferfish, Fugu rubripes. Fugu has two genes homologous to Red1 that are similar in size and organization and that show a fivefold compaction relative to the human gene; they differ, however, in their base compositional features. The Fugu gene for RED2 is unusually large, spanning more than 50kb; within the largest intron, there is evidence for a novel gene on the opposite strand. Because of these unusual features, the partial genomic structure was determined for the mouse RED2 gene. A partial cDNA for RED1 was also isolated from zebrafish. Comparisons between fish and between fish and mammals of the protein sequences show that the catalytic domains are highly conserved for each gene, while the RNA-binding domains vary within a single protein in their levels of conservation. Different levels of conservation among domains of different functional roles may reflect differences in editase substrate specificity and/or substrate sequence conservation. PMID:10854777

  5. ADAR2 affects mRNA coding sequence edits with only modest effects on gene expression or splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Allissa A; Cookson, Mark R; Galter, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases bind double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine. Editing creates multiple isoforms of neurotransmitter receptors, such as with Gria2. Adar2 KO mice die of seizures shortly after birth, but if the Gria2 Q/R editing site is mutated to mimic the edited version then the animals are viable. We performed RNA-Seq on frontal cortices of Adar2(-/-) Gria2(R/R) mice and littermates. We found 56 editing sites with significantly diminished editing levels in Adar2 deficient animals with the majority in coding regions. Only two genes and 3 exons showed statistically significant differences in expression levels. This work illustrates that ADAR2 is important in site-specific changes of protein coding sequences but has relatively modest effects on gene expression and splicing in the adult mouse frontal cortex. PMID:26669816

  6. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  7. RNA Binding-independent Dimerization of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA and Dominant Negative Effects of Nonfunctional Subunits on Dimer Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Louis; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing that converts adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is mediated by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR). ADAR1 and ADAR2 form respective homodimers, and this association is essential for their enzymatic activities. In this investigation, we set out experiments aiming to determine whether formation of the homodimer complex is mediated by an amino acid interface made through protein-protein interactions of two monomers or via binding of the two subunits to a dsRNA substrate. Point mutations were created in the dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs) that abolished all RNA binding, as tested for two classes of ADAR ligands, long and short dsRNA. The mutant ADAR dimer complexes were intact, as demonstrated by their ability to co-purify in a sequential affinity-tagged purification and also by their elution at the dimeric fraction position on a size fractionation column. Our results demonstrated ADAR dimerization independent of their binding to dsRNA, establishing the importance of protein-protein interactions for dimer formation. As expected, these mutant ADARs could no longer perform their catalytic function due to the loss in substrate binding. Surprisingly, a chimeric dimer consisting of one RNA binding mutant monomer and a wild type partner still abolished its ability to bind and edit its substrate, indicating that ADAR dimers require two subunits with functional dsRBDs for binding to a dsRNA substrate and then for editing activity to occur. PMID:17428802

  8. Novel modes of RNA editing in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Sandrine; Valach, Matus; Aoulad-Aissa, Mohamed; Otto, Christian; Burger, Gertraud

    2016-06-01

    Gene structure and expression in diplonemid mitochondria are unparalleled. Genes are fragmented in pieces (modules) that are separately transcribed, followed by the joining of module transcripts to contiguous RNAs. Some instances of unique uridine insertion RNA editing at module boundaries were noted, but the extent and potential occurrence of other editing types remained unknown. Comparative analysis of deep transcriptome and genome data from Diplonema papillatum mitochondria reveals ∼220 post-transcriptional insertions of uridines, but no insertions of other nucleotides nor deletions. In addition, we detect in total 114 substitutions of cytosine by uridine and adenosine by inosine, amassed into unusually compact clusters. Inosines in transcripts were confirmed experimentally. This is the first report of adenosine-to-inosine editing of mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs in mitochondria. In mRNAs, editing causes mostly amino-acid additions and non-synonymous substitutions; in ribosomal RNAs, it permits formation of canonical secondary structures. Two extensively edited transcripts were compared across four diplonemids. The pattern of uridine-insertion editing is strictly conserved, whereas substitution editing has diverged dramatically, but still rendering diplonemid proteins more similar to other eukaryotic orthologs. We posit that RNA editing not only compensates but also sustains, or even accelerates, ultra-rapid evolution of genome structure and sequence in diplonemid mitochondria. PMID:27001515

  9. Novel modes of RNA editing in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Sandrine; Valach, Matus; Aoulad-Aissa, Mohamed; Otto, Christian; Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Gene structure and expression in diplonemid mitochondria are unparalleled. Genes are fragmented in pieces (modules) that are separately transcribed, followed by the joining of module transcripts to contiguous RNAs. Some instances of unique uridine insertion RNA editing at module boundaries were noted, but the extent and potential occurrence of other editing types remained unknown. Comparative analysis of deep transcriptome and genome data from Diplonema papillatum mitochondria reveals ∼220 post-transcriptional insertions of uridines, but no insertions of other nucleotides nor deletions. In addition, we detect in total 114 substitutions of cytosine by uridine and adenosine by inosine, amassed into unusually compact clusters. Inosines in transcripts were confirmed experimentally. This is the first report of adenosine-to-inosine editing of mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs in mitochondria. In mRNAs, editing causes mostly amino-acid additions and non-synonymous substitutions; in ribosomal RNAs, it permits formation of canonical secondary structures. Two extensively edited transcripts were compared across four diplonemids. The pattern of uridine-insertion editing is strictly conserved, whereas substitution editing has diverged dramatically, but still rendering diplonemid proteins more similar to other eukaryotic orthologs. We posit that RNA editing not only compensates but also sustains, or even accelerates, ultra-rapid evolution of genome structure and sequence in diplonemid mitochondria. PMID:27001515

  10. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  11. Involvement of serotonin 2C receptor RNA editing in accumbal neuropeptide Y expression and behavioural despair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Miku; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2 C Rs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system, and are associated with various neurological disorders. 5-HT2 C R mRNA undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing at five sites within its coding sequence, resulting in expression of 24 different isoforms. Several edited isoforms show reduced activity, suggesting that RNA editing modulates serotonergic systems in the brain with causative relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic mice solely expressing the non-edited 5-HT2 C R INI-isoform (INI) or the fully edited VGV-isoform exhibit various phenotypes including metabolic abnormalities, aggressive behaviour, anxiety-like behaviour, and depression-like behaviour. Here, we examined the behavioural phenotype and molecular changes of INI mice on a C57BL/6J background. INI mice showed an enhanced behavioural despair in the forced swimming test, elevated sensitivity to the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine, and significantly decreased serotonin in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala, and striatum. They also showed reduced expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA in the NAc. In addition, by stereotactic injection of adeno-associated virus encoding NPY into the NAc, we demonstrated that accumbal NPY overexpression relieved behavioural despair. Our results suggest that accumbal NPY expression may be regulated by 5-HT2 C R RNA editing, and its impairment may be linked to mood disorders. PMID:26950265

  12. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3′ untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. PMID:26712564

  13. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-02-29

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. PMID:26712564

  14. PRUNE2 is a human prostate cancer suppressor regulated by the intronic long noncoding RNA PCA3.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Ahmad; Lee, Alessandro K; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Nunes, Diana N; Efstathiou, Eleni; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Dobroff, Andrey S; Marchiò, Serena; Navone, Nora M; Hosoya, Hitomi; Lauer, Richard C; Wen, Sijin; Salmeron, Carolina C; Hoang, Anh; Newsham, Irene; Lima, Leandro A; Carraro, Dirce M; Oliviero, Salvatore; Kolonin, Mikhail G; Sidman, Richard L; Do, Kim-Anh; Troncoso, Patricia; Logothetis, Christopher J; Brentani, Ricardo R; Calin, George A; Cavenee, Webster K; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) is the most specific prostate cancer biomarker but its function remains unknown. Here we identify PRUNE2, a target protein-coding gene variant, which harbors the PCA3 locus, thereby classifying PCA3 as an antisense intronic long noncoding (lnc)RNA. We show that PCA3 controls PRUNE2 levels via a unique regulatory mechanism involving formation of a PRUNE2/PCA3 double-stranded RNA that undergoes adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)-dependent adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing. PRUNE2 expression or silencing in prostate cancer cells decreased and increased cell proliferation, respectively. Moreover, PRUNE2 and PCA3 elicited opposite effects on tumor growth in immunodeficient tumor-bearing mice. Coregulation and RNA editing of PRUNE2 and PCA3 were confirmed in human prostate cancer specimens, supporting the medical relevance of our findings. These results establish PCA3 as a dominant-negative oncogene and PRUNE2 as an unrecognized tumor suppressor gene in human prostate cancer, and their regulatory axis represents a unique molecular target for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26080435

  15. Gene Amplification-Associated Overexpression of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR1 Enhances Human Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, Carmen; Guil, Sonia; Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Moutinho, Catia; Setien, Fernando; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Moran, Sebastian; Villanueva, Alberto; Calaf, Monica; Vidal, August; Lazo, Pedro A.; Zondervan, Ilse; Savola, Suvi; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís; Esteller, Manel

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  16. A genome-wide map of hyper-edited RNA reveals numerous new sites.

    PubMed

    Porath, Hagit T; Carmi, Shai; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine editing is one of the most frequent post-transcriptional modifications, manifested as A-to-G mismatches when comparing RNA sequences with their source DNA. Recently, a number of RNA-seq data sets have been screened for the presence of A-to-G editing, and hundreds of thousands of editing sites identified. Here we show that existing screens missed the majority of sites by ignoring reads with excessive ('hyper') editing that do not easily align to the genome. We show that careful alignment and examination of the unmapped reads in RNA-seq studies reveal numerous new sites, usually many more than originally discovered, and in precisely those regions that are most heavily edited. Specifically, we discover 327,096 new editing sites in the heavily studied Illumina Human BodyMap data and more than double the number of detected sites in several published screens. We also identify thousands of new sites in mouse, rat, opossum and fly. Our results establish that hyper-editing events account for the majority of editing sites. PMID:25158696

  17. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  18. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the Wobble-Specific tRNA Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Malashkevich, V.; Roday, S.; Lisbin, M.; Schramm, V.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The essential tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase catalyzes the deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNAs. This modification allows for a single tRNA species to recognize multiple synonymous codons containing A, C, or U in the last (3'-most) position and ensures that all sense codons are appropriately decoded. We report the first combined structural and kinetic characterization of a wobble-specific deaminase. The structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme clearly defines the dimer interface and the coordination of the catalytically essential zinc ion. The structure also identifies the nucleophilic water and highlights residues near the catalytic zinc likely to be involved in recognition and catalysis of polymeric RNA substrates. A minimal 19 nucleotide RNA stem substrate has permitted the first steady-state kinetic characterization of this enzyme (k{sub cat} = 13 {+-} 1 min{sup -1} and K{sub M} = 0.83 {+-} 0.22 {micro}M). A continuous coupled assay was developed to follow the reaction at high concentrations of polynucleotide substrates (>10 {micro}M). This work begins to define the chemical and structural determinants responsible for catalysis and substrate recognition and lays the foundation for detailed mechanistic analysis of this essential enzyme.

  19. Frequency and fate of microRNA editing in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Yukio; Megraw, Molly; Kreider, Edward; Iizasa, Hisashi; Valente, Louis; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2008-01-01

    Primary transcripts of certain microRNA (miRNA) genes (pri-miRNAs) are subject to RNA editing that converts adenosine to inosine (A→I RNA editing). However, the frequency of the pri-miRNA editing and the fate of edited pri-miRNAs remain largely to be determined. Examination of already known pri-miRNA editing sites indicated that adenosine residues of the UAG triplet sequence might be edited more frequently. In the present study, therefore, we conducted a large-scale survey of human pri-miRNAs containing the UAG triplet sequence. By direct sequencing of RT–PCR products corresponding to pri-miRNAs, we examined 209 pri-miRNAs and identified 43 UAG and also 43 non-UAG editing sites in 47 pri-miRNAs, which were highly edited in human brain. In vitro miRNA processing assay using recombinant Drosha-DGCR8 and Dicer-TRBP (the human immuno deficiency virus transactivating response RNA-binding protein) complexes revealed that a majority of pri-miRNA editing is likely to interfere with the miRNA processing steps. In addition, four new edited miRNAs with altered seed sequences were identified by targeted cloning and sequencing of the miRNAs that would be processed from edited pri-miRNAs. Our studies predict that ∼16% of human pri-miRNAs are subject to A→I editing and, thus, miRNA editing could have a large impact on the miRNA-mediated gene silencing. PMID:18684997

  20. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    MACBETH, MARK R.; LINGAM, ARUNTH T.; BASS, BRENDA L.

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs. PMID:15383678

  1. RNA editing of the human serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor delays agonist-stimulated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Price, R D; Sanders-Bush, E

    2000-10-01

    RNA encoding the human 5-HT(2C) receptor undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events at five positions in the putative second intracellular loop, with a corresponding reduction in receptor/G-protein coupling. Agonist-stimulated calcium release was examined in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts stably expressing the nonedited human INI (hINI) or the edited hVSV or hVGV variants. We hypothesized that different receptor isoforms would show altered dynamics of agonist-induced calcium release. The three isoforms showed a rightward shift in agonist concentration-response curves for eliciting calcium release (EC(50) values: hINI, 2.2 nM; hVSV, 15 nM; hVGV, 49 nM). Additionally, the hVGV receptor showed a blunted and delayed [Ca(2+)](i) peak compared with the hINI or hVSV receptor isoforms. These distinctions in agonist-induced [Ca(2+)](i) release imply that edited 5-HT(2C) receptors may produce distinct physiological responses within the central nervous system. PMID:10999958

  2. The Epitranscriptome and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Mary A.; Mannion, Niamh M.; Keegan, Liam P.

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of the variety and abundances of RNA base modifications is rapidly increasing. Modified bases have critical roles in tRNAs, rRNAs, translation, splicing, RNA interference, and other RNA processes, and are now increasingly detected in all types of transcripts. Can new biological principles associated with this diversity of RNA modifications, particularly in mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, be identified? This review will explore this question by focusing primarily on adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing by the adenine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that have been intensively studied for the past 20 years and have a wide range of effects. Over 100 million adenosine to inosine editing sites have been identified in the human transcriptome, mostly in embedded Alu sequences that form potentially innate immune-stimulating dsRNA hairpins in transcripts. Recent research has demonstrated that inosine in the epitranscriptome and ADAR1 protein establish innate immune tolerance for host dsRNA formed by endogenous sequences. Innate immune sensors that detect viral nucleic acids are among the readers of epitranscriptome RNA modifications, though this does preclude a wide range of other modification effects. PMID:26658668

  3. How stress and fluoxetine modulate serotonin 2C receptor pre-mRNA editing.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Dulawa, Stephanie C; Bhansali, Punita; Schmauss, Claudia

    2005-01-19

    In two inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and 129Sv, the majority of forebrain neocortical pre-mRNA encoding the serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) receptor is altered by adenosine-to-inosine editing. As a result, >60% of all mRNAs encode receptors with reduced constitutive and agonist-stimulated activity. However, in the BALB/c strain, a genetically distinct inbred strain with lower forebrain serotonin levels, spontaneously elevated anxiety, and increased stress reactivity, the majority of 5-HT2C mRNA is nonedited and encodes receptors with the highest constitutive activity and the highest agonist affinity and potency. Neither acute stress (the forced swim test) nor chronic treatment with the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine elicit significant changes in 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, exposure of BALB/c mice to acute stress and chronic treatment of nonstressed BALB/c mice with fluoxetine elicit significant, site-specific increases in 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing that increase the pool of mRNA encoding receptors with reduced function. These changes in 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing resemble those detected previously in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depression. However, when chronic fluoxetine treatment is combined with stress exposure of BALB/c mice, these changes in 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing are no longer detected. These findings illustrate that 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing responses to stress and chronic fluoxetine are modulated by the genetic background, as well as the behavioral state of the animal. They suggest further that the changes in 5-HT2C pre-mRNA editing found in major depression reflect a previously unrecognized molecular response to stress that can be prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment. PMID:15659601

  4. Nuclease Tudor-SN Is Involved in Tick dsRNA-Mediated RNA Interference and Feeding but Not in Defense against Flaviviral or Anaplasma phagocytophilum Rickettsial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Nieves; Naranjo, Victoria; Hajdušek, Ondrej; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Alberdi, Pilar; Šíma, Radek; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Kazimírová, Mária; Havlíková, Sabína; Klempa, Boris; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) and Argonaute (Ago) are conserved components of the basic RNA interference (RNAi) machinery with a variety of functions including immune response and gene regulation. The RNAi machinery has been characterized in tick vectors of human and animal diseases but information is not available on the role of Tudor-SN in tick RNAi and other cellular processes. Our hypothesis is that tick Tudor-SN is part of the RNAi machinery and may be involved in innate immune response and other cellular processes. To address this hypothesis, Ixodes scapularis and I. ricinus ticks and/or cell lines were used to annotate and characterize the role of Tudor-SN in dsRNA-mediated RNAi, immune response to infection with the rickettsia Anaplasma phagocytophilum and the flaviviruses TBEV or LGTV and tick feeding. The results showed that Tudor-SN is conserved in ticks and involved in dsRNA-mediated RNAi and tick feeding but not in defense against infection with the examined viral and rickettsial pathogens. The effect of Tudor-SN gene knockdown on tick feeding could be due to down-regulation of genes that are required for protein processing and blood digestion through a mechanism that may involve selective degradation of dsRNAs enriched in G:U pairs that form as a result of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing. These results demonstrated that Tudor-SN plays a role in tick RNAi pathway and feeding but no strong evidence for a role in innate immune responses to pathogen infection was found. PMID:26186700

  5. Alu elements shape the primate transcriptome by cis-regulation of RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA editing by adenosine to inosine deamination is a widespread phenomenon, particularly frequent in the human transcriptome, largely due to the presence of inverted Alu repeats and their ability to form double-stranded structures – a requisite for ADAR editing. While several hundred thousand editing sites have been identified within these primate-specific repeats, the function of Alu-editing has yet to be elucidated. Results We show that inverted Alu repeats, expressed in the primate brain, can induce site-selective editing in cis on sites located several hundred nucleotides from the Alu elements. Furthermore, a computational analysis, based on available RNA-seq data, finds that site-selective editing occurs significantly closer to edited Alu elements than expected. These targets are poorly edited upon deletion of the editing inducers, as well as in homologous transcripts from organisms lacking Alus. Sequences surrounding sites near edited Alus in UTRs, have been subjected to a lesser extent of evolutionary selection than those far from edited Alus, indicating that their editing generally depends on cis-acting Alus. Interestingly, we find an enrichment of primate-specific editing within encoded sequence or the UTRs of zinc finger-containing transcription factors. Conclusions We propose a model whereby primate-specific editing is induced by adjacent Alu elements that function as recruitment elements for the ADAR editing enzymes. The enrichment of site-selective editing with potentially functional consequences on the expression of transcription factors indicates that editing contributes more profoundly to the transcriptomic regulation and repertoire in primates than previously thought. PMID:24485196

  6. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  7. ADAR2 induces reproducible changes in sequence and abundance of mature microRNAs in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Vesely, Cornelia; Tauber, Stefanie; Sedlazeck, Fritz J; Tajaddod, Mansoureh; von Haeseler, Arndt; Jantsch, Michael F

    2014-10-29

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) deaminate adenosines to inosines in double-stranded RNAs including miRNA precursors. A to I editing is widespread and required for normal life. By comparing deep sequencing data of brain miRNAs from wild-type and ADAR2 deficient mouse strains, we detect editing sites and altered miRNA processing at high sensitivity. We detect 48 novel editing events in miRNAs. Some editing events reach frequencies of up to 80%. About half of all editing events depend on ADAR2 while some miRNAs are preferentially edited by ADAR1. Sixty-four percent of all editing events are located within the seed region of mature miRNAs. For the highly edited miR-3099, we experimentally prove retargeting of the edited miRNA to novel 3' UTRs. We show further that an abundant editing event in miR-497 promotes processing by Drosha of the corresponding pri-miRNA. We also detect reproducible changes in the abundance of specific miRNAs in ADAR2-deficient mice that occur independent of adjacent A to I editing events. This indicates that ADAR2 binding but not editing of miRNA precursors may influence their processing. Correlating with changes in miRNA abundance we find misregulation of putative targets of these miRNAs in the presence or absence of ADAR2. PMID:25260591

  8. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E.; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G.; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G.; Hansen, Peter J.; Rivera, Rocío M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  9. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G; Hansen, Peter J; Rivera, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  10. A-to-I editing of the 5HT2C receptor and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Du, Yunzhi

    2006-03-01

    Site-specific deamination of five adenosine residues in the pre-mRNA of the serotonin 2C receptor, 5HT2CR, alters the amino acid sequence of the encoded protein. Such RNA editing can produce 32 mRNA variants, encoding 24 protein isoforms that vary in biochemical and pharmacological properties. Because serotonin functions in the regulation of mood and behaviour, modulation of serotonin signalling by RNA editing may be relevant to such psychiatric disorders as anxiety and depression. Several recent human studies have reported changes in 5HT2CR editing in schizophrenia, major depression or suicide, but results are variable and not conclusive. Rodent studies have begun to examine effects of drug treatments and stress. Understanding the importance of 5HT2CR editing in mood and behaviour will be assisted by experiments designed to analyse multiple strains of mice, in different behavioural tests, with optimal evaluation of the time course of molecular changes. PMID:16769676

  11. RNA editing of microRNA prevents RNA-induced silencing complex recognition of target mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yalei; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) integrate with Argonaut (Ago) to create the RNA-induced silencing complex, and regulate gene expression by silencing target mRNAs. RNA editing of miRNA may affect miRNA processing, assembly of the Ago complex and target mRNA binding. However, the function of edited miRNA, assembled within the Ago complex, has not been extensively investigated. In this study, sequence analysis of the Ago complex of Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) revealed that host ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) catalysed A-to-I RNA editing of a viral miRNA (WSSV-miR-N12) at the +16 site. This editing of the non-seed sequence did not affect association of the edited miRNA with the Ago protein, but inhibited interaction between the miRNA and its target gene (wsv399). The WSSV early gene wsv399 inhibited WSSV infection. As a result, the RNA editing of miRNA caused virus latency. Our results highlight a novel example of miRNA editing in the miRNA-induced silencing complex. PMID:26674414

  12. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  13. RNA topology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases. PMID:23603781

  14. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  15. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  16. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E.; Holland, J.J.; Ahlquist, P.

    1988-01-01

    These three volumes comprise reference on RNA genomes. The replication, mutation, recombination-assortment, and extreme evolutionary variability of RNA viruses and related RNA replicons is emphasized. The replication mechanisms of positive, negative, and double-stranded RNA viruses of animals and plants are featured.

  17. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  18. RNA helicases

    PubMed Central

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In addition, RNA helicase expression and/or activity are frequently altered during cellular response to abiotic stress, implying they perform defined roles during cellular adaptation to changes in the growth environment. Specifically, RNA helicases contribute to the formation of cold-adapted ribosomes and RNA degradosomes, implying a role in alleviation of RNA secondary structure stabilization at low temperature. A common emerging theme involves RNA helicases acting as scaffolds for protein-protein interaction and functioning as molecular clamps, holding RNA-protein complexes in specific conformations. This review highlights recent advances in DEAD-box RNA helicase association with cellular response to abiotic stress in prokaryotes. PMID:23093803

  19. Moving RNA moves RNA forward.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lina; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Wenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Cell communication affects all aspects of cell structure and behavior, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, division, and coordination of various physiological functions. The moving RNA in plants and mammalian cells indicates that nucleic acid could be one of the various types of messengers for cell communication. The microvesicle is a critical pathway that mediates RNA moving and keeps moving RNA stable in body fluids. When moving miRNA enters the target cell, it functions by altering the gene expression profile and significantly inhibiting mRNA translation in recipient cells. Thus, moving RNA may act as a long-range modulator during development, organogenesis, and tumor metastasis. PMID:24008386

  20. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. PMID:26912865

  1. RNA epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modification. PMID:24768686

  2. Exploring the RNA editing potential of RNA-Seq data by ExpEdit.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Mattia; Picardi, Ernesto; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Revealing the impact of A-to-I RNA editing in RNA-Seq experiments is relevant in humans because RNA editing can influence gene expression. In addition, its deregulation has been linked to a variety of human diseases. Exploiting the RNA editing potential in complete RNA-Seq datasets, however, is a challenging task. Indeed, no dedicated software is available, and sometimes deep computational skills and appropriate hardware resources are required. To explore the impact of known RNA editing events in massive transcriptome sequencing experiments, we developed the ExpEdit web service application. In the present work, we provide an overview of ExpEdit as well as methodologies to investigate known RNA editing in human RNA-Seq datasets. PMID:25577388

  3. ADAR1 and ADAR2 Expression and Editing Activity during Forebrain Development

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michelle M.; Fogg, Rachel L.; Emeson, Ronald B.; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2009-01-01

    The conversion of adenosine-to-inosine within RNA transcripts is regulated by the ADAR family of enzymes. Little is known regarding the developmental expression of ADAR family members or the mechanisms responsible for the specific patterns of editing observed for ADAR substrates. We have examined the spatiotemporal expression patterns for ADAR1 and ADAR2 in mouse forebrain. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are broadly distributed in most regions of the mouse forebrain by P0, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and diencephalon. High expression levels were maintained into adulthood. Co-localization studies demonstrated ADAR1 and ADAR2 expression in neurons but not astrocytes. Editing for specific ADAR mRNA targets precedes high expression of ADAR proteins, suggesting that region-specific differences in editing patterns may not be mediated solely by ADAR expression levels. PMID:19325227

  4. ADAR2 editing enzyme is a novel human immunodeficiency virus-1 proviral factor.

    PubMed

    Doria, Margherita; Tomaselli, Sara; Neri, Francesca; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro; Gallo, Angela

    2011-05-01

    The adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes catalyse conversion of adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. A positive effect of ADAR1 on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication has recently been reported. Here, we show that another ADAR enzyme, ADAR2, positively affects the replication process of HIV-1. We found that, analogously to ADAR1, ADAR2 enhances the release of progeny virions by an editing-dependent mechanism. However, differently from the ADAR1 enzyme, ADAR2 does not increase the infectious potential of the virus. Importantly, downregulation of ADAR2 in Jurkat cells significantly impairs viral replication. Therefore, ADAR2 shares some but not all proviral functions of ADAR1. These results suggest a novel role of ADAR2 as a viral regulator. PMID:21289159

  5. RNA helicases

    PubMed Central

    Ranji, Arnaz

    2010-01-01

    RNA helicases serve multiple roles at the virus-host interface. In some situations, RNA helicases are essential host factors to promote viral replication; however, in other cases they serve as a cellular sensor to trigger the antiviral state in response to viral infection. All family members share the conserved ATP-dependent catalytic core linked to different substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction domains. These flanking domains can be shuffled between different helicases to achieve functional diversity. This review summarizes recent studies, This review summarizes recent studies of RNA helicases in virus biology. First, RNA helicases are catalysts of progressive RNA-protein rearrangements that begin at gene transcription and culminate in release of infectious virus. Second, RNA helicases can act as a scaffold for alternative protein-protein interactions that can defeat the antiviral state. The mounting fundamental understanding of RNA helicases is being used to develop selective and efficacious drugs against human and animal pathogens. The analysis of RNA helicases in virus model systems continues to provide insights into virology, cell biology and immunology and has provided fresh perspective to continue unraveling the complexity of virus-host interactions. PMID:21173576

  6. RNA. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells. PMID:19263588

  7. RNA Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. It is widely believed that this RNA World was extensive and therefore a sophisticated nucleic acid replication machinery would presumably predate the translation machinery which would not be needed until later stages in the development of life. This view of an extended RNA World is not necessarily correct. From the point of view of exobiology, the difference in these two views mainly affects the significance of studies of the extent of catalysis possible by RNA- In either case, the origin of the translation machinery and the principles of RNA evolution remain central problems in exobiology. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modem organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S RRNA sequence studies). Third, the RNAs that comprise the ribosome are themselves likely of very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.

  8. Uncovering RNA Editing Sites in Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Angela; Montalvo, Antonio; Pesole, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing is an important co/post-transcriptional molecular process able to modify RNAs by nucleotide insertions/deletions or substitutions. In human, the most common RNA editing event involves the deamination of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) through the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA proteins. Although A-to-I editing can occur in both coding and non-coding RNAs, recent findings, based on RNA-seq experiments, have clearly demonstrated that a large fraction of RNA editing events alter non-coding RNAs sequences including untranslated regions of mRNAs, introns, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and low molecular weight RNAs (tRNA, miRNAs, and others). An accurate detection of A-to-I events occurring in non-coding RNAs is of utmost importance to clarify yet unknown functional roles of RNA editing in the context of gene expression regulation and maintenance of cell homeostasis. In the last few years, massive transcriptome sequencing has been employed to identify putative RNA editing changes at genome scale. Despite several efforts, the computational prediction of A-to-I sites in complete eukaryotic genomes is yet a challenging task. We have recently developed a software package, called REDItools, in order to simplify the detection of RNA editing events from deep sequencing data. In the present work, we show the potential of our tools in recovering A-to-I candidates from RNA-Seq experiments as well as guidelines to improve the RNA editing detection in non-coding RNAs, with specific attention to the lncRNAs. PMID:25538940

  9. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. PMID:24803509

  10. Dynamic regulation of RNA editing in human brain development and disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Taeyoung; Park, Chul-Kee; Leung, Anthony K L; Gao, Yuan; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Tao, Ran; Shin, Joo Heon; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    RNA editing is increasingly recognized as a molecular mechanism regulating RNA activity and recoding proteins. Here we surveyed the global landscape of RNA editing in human brain tissues and identified three unique patterns of A-to-I RNA editing rates during cortical development: stable high, stable low and increasing. RNA secondary structure and the temporal expression of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) contribute to cis- and trans-regulatory mechanisms of these RNA editing patterns, respectively. Interestingly, the increasing pattern was associated with neuronal maturation, correlated with mRNA abundance and potentially influenced miRNA binding energy. Gene ontology analyses implicated the increasing pattern in vesicle or organelle membrane-related genes and glutamate signaling pathways. We also found that the increasing pattern was selectively perturbed in spinal cord injury and glioblastoma. Our findings reveal global and dynamic aspects of RNA editing in brain, providing new insight into epitranscriptional regulation of sequence diversity. PMID:27348216

  11. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  12. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  13. Altered RNA editing in 3′ UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired “normal” tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3′UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors. PMID:26980570

  14. Analyzing MiRNA-LncRNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are noncoding transcripts usually longer than 200 nts that have recently emerged as one of the largest and significantly diverse RNA families. The biological role and functions of lncRNAs are still mostly uncharacterized. Their target-mimetic, sponge/decoy function on microRNAs was recently uncovered. miRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA species (~22 nts) that play a central role in posttranscriptional regulation of protein coding genes by mRNA cleavage, direct translational repression and/or mRNA destabilization. LncRNAs can act as miRNA sponges, reducing their regulatory effect on mRNAs. This function introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA-target interaction network. This chapter focuses on the study of miRNA-lncRNA interactions with either in silico or experimentally supported analyses. The proposed methodologies can be appropriately adapted in order to become the backbone of advanced multistep functional miRNA analyses. PMID:26721498

  15. Stranded Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq for All RNA Types

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pearlly X.; Fang, Fang; Buechlein, Aaron; Ford, James B.; Tang, Haixu; Huang, Tim H.; Burow, Matthew E.; Liu, Yunlong; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Stranded whole transcriptome RNA-Seq described in this unit captures quantitative expression data for all types of RNA including, but not limited to miRNA (microRNA), piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA), snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), lincRNA (large non-coding intergenic RNA), SRP RNA (signal recognition particle RNA), tRNA (transfer RNA), mtRNA (mitochondrial RNA) and mRNA (messenger RNA). The size and nature of these types of RNA are irrelevant to the approach described here. Barcoded libraries for multiplexing on the Illumina platform are generated with this approach but it can be applied to other platforms with a few modifications. PMID:25599667

  16. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems. PMID:27296148

  17. RNA-Catalyzed RNA Ligation on an External RNA Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the hc ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes ligation of the 3' end of an RNA substrate to the 5' end of the ribozyme, were utilized to evolve a ribozyme that catalyzes ligation reactions on an external RNA template. The evolved ribozyme catalyzes the joining of an oligonucleotide 3'-hydroxyl to the 5'-triphosphate of an RNA hairpin molecule. The ribozyme can also utilize various substrate sequences, demonstrating a largely sequence-independent mechanism for substrate recognition. The ribozyme also carries out the ligation of two oligonucleotides that are bound at adjacent positions on a complementary template. Finally, it catalyzes addition of mononucleoside '5-triphosphates onto the '3 end of an oligonucleotide primer in a template-dependent manner. The development of ribozymes that catalyze polymerase-type reactions contributes to the notion that an RNA world could have existed during the early history of life on Earth.

  18. Fast Prediction of RNA-RNA Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Raheleh; Backofen, Rolf; Sahinalp, S. Cenk

    Regulatory antisense RNAs are a class of ncRNAs that regulate gene expression by prohibiting the translation of an mRNA by establishing stable interactions with a target sequence. There is great demand for efficient computational methods to predict the specific interaction between an ncRNA and its target mRNA(s). There are a number of algorithms in the literature which can predict a variety of such interactions - unfortunately at a very high computational cost. Although some existing target prediction approaches are much faster, they are specialized for interactions with a single binding site.

  19. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures. PMID:21541694

  20. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  1. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  2. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  3. RNA Sequencing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Teng, Shaolei

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a serious psychiatric disorder that affects 1% of general population and places a heavy burden worldwide. The underlying genetic mechanism of SCZ remains unknown, but studies indicate that the disease is associated with a global gene expression disturbance across many genes. Next-generation sequencing, particularly of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), provides a powerful genome-scale technology to investigate the pathological processes of SCZ. RNA-Seq has been used to analyze the gene expressions and identify the novel splice isoforms and rare transcripts associated with SCZ. This paper provides an overview on the genetics of SCZ, the advantages of RNA-Seq for transcriptome analysis, the accomplishments of RNA-Seq in SCZ cohorts, and the applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and RNA-Seq in SCZ research. PMID:27053919

  4. Strategies in RNA crystallography.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Francis E; Garst, Andrew D; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNAs ranging from small helices to large megadalton ribonucleoprotein complexes have been solved to atomic resolution using X-ray crystallography. As with proteins, RNA crystallography involves a number of screening trials in which the concentration of macromolecule, precipitant, salt, and temperature are varied, an approach known as searching "condition space." In contrast to proteins, the nature of base pairing in nucleic acids creates predictable secondary structure that facilitates the rational design of RNA variants, allowing "sequence space" to be screened in parallel. This chapter reviews RNA-specific techniques and considerations for RNA crystallography and presents a complete workflow used by our laboratory for solving RNA structures starting with initial library construction, methods to investigate and improve RNA crystal quality, and finally phase determination and structure solution. PMID:20946787

  5. Comprehensive analysis of human small RNA sequencing data provides insights into expression profiles and miRNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Wu, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiantong; Liao, Yifang; Sibanda, Vusumuzi Leroy; Liu, Wei; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in various biological processes and diseases. A comprehensive analysis of large scale small RNA sequencing data (smRNA-seq) will be very helpful to explore tissue or disease specific miRNA markers and uncover miRNA variants. Here, we systematically analyzed 410 human smRNA-seq datasets, which samples are from 24 tissue/disease/cell lines. We tested the mapping strategies and found that it was necessary to make multiple-round mappings with different mismatch parameters. miRNA expression profiles revealed that on average ∼70% of known miRNAs were expressed at low level or not expressed (RPM < 1) in a sample and only ∼9% of known miRNAs were relatively highly expressed (RPM > 100). About 30% known miRNAs were not expressed in all of our used samples. The miRNA expression profiles were compiled into an online database (HMED, http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/smallRNA/). Dozens of tissue/disease specific miRNAs, disease/control dysregulated miRNAs and miRNAs with arm switching events were discovered. Further, we identified some highly confident editing sites including 24 A-to-I sites and 23 C-to-U sites. About half of them were widespread miRNA editing sites in different tissues. We characterized that the 2 types of editing sites have different features with regard to location, editing level and frequency. Our analyses for expression profiles, specific miRNA markers, arm switching, and editing sites, may provide valuable information for further studies of miRNA function and biomarker finding. PMID:25692236

  6. ADAR1 Activation Drives Leukemia Stem Cell Self-Renewal by Impairing Let-7 Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zipeto, Maria Anna; Court, Angela C; Sadarangani, Anil; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Balaian, Larisa; Chun, Hye-Jung; Pineda, Gabriel; Morris, Sheldon R; Mason, Cayla N; Geron, Ifat; Barrett, Christian; Goff, Daniel J; Wall, Russell; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Minden, Mark; Frazer, Kelly A; Marra, Marco A; Crews, Leslie A; Jiang, Qingfei; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-08-01

    Post-transcriptional adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA1 (ADAR1) promotes cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. However, ADAR1 editase-dependent mechanisms governing leukemia stem cell (LSC) generation have not been elucidated. In blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (BC CML), we show that increased JAK2 signaling and BCR-ABL1 amplification activate ADAR1. In a humanized BC CML mouse model, combined JAK2 and BCR-ABL1 inhibition prevents LSC self-renewal commensurate with ADAR1 downregulation. Lentiviral ADAR1 wild-type, but not an editing-defective ADAR1(E912A) mutant, induces self-renewal gene expression and impairs biogenesis of stem cell regulatory let-7 microRNAs. Combined RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, CLIP-ADAR1, and pri-let-7 mutagenesis data suggest that ADAR1 promotes LSC generation via let-7 pri-microRNA editing and LIN28B upregulation. A small-molecule tool compound antagonizes ADAR1's effect on LSC self-renewal in stromal co-cultures and restores let-7 biogenesis. Thus, ADAR1 activation represents a unique therapeutic vulnerability in LSCs with active JAK2 signaling. PMID:27292188

  7. Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Our recent advancements in RNA nanotechnology introduced novel nanoscaffolds (nanorings); however, the potential of their use for biomedical applications was never fully revealed. As presented here, besides functionalization with multiple different short interfering RNAs for combinatorial RNA interference (e.g., against multiple HIV-1 genes), nanorings also allow simultaneous embedment of assorted RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, proteins, as well as recently developed RNA–DNA hybrids aimed to conditionally activate multiple split functionalities inside cells. PMID:25267559

  8. Profiling RNA editing in human tissues: towards the inosinome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Aiello, Italia; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Adenine to Inosine RNA editing is a widespread co- and post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes acting on double stranded RNA. It has a plethora of biological effects, appears to be particularly pervasive in humans with respect to other mammals, and is implicated in a number of diverse human pathologies. Here we present the first human inosinome atlas comprising 3,041,422 A-to-I events identified in six tissues from three healthy individuals. Matched directional total-RNA-Seq and whole genome sequence datasets were generated and analysed within a dedicated computational framework, also capable of detecting hyper-edited reads. Inosinome profiles are tissue specific and edited gene sets consistently show enrichment of genes involved in neurological disorders and cancer. Overall frequency of editing also varies, but is strongly correlated with ADAR expression levels. The inosinome database is available at: http://srv00.ibbe.cnr.it/editing/. PMID:26449202

  9. RNA based evolutionary optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter

    1993-12-01

    The notion of an RNA world has been introduced for a prebiotic scenario that is dominated by RNA molecules and their properties, in particular their capabilities to act as templates for reproduction and as catalysts for several cleavage and ligation reactions of polynucleotides and polypeptides. This notion is used here also for simple experimental assays which are well suited to study evolution in the test tube. In molecular evolution experiments fitness is determined in essence by the molecular structures of RNA molecules. Evidence is presented for adaptation to environment in cell-free media. RNA based molecular evolution experiments have led to interesting spin-offs in biotechnology, commonly called ‘applied molecular evolution’, which make use of Darwinian trial-and-error strategies in order to synthesize new pharmacological compounds and other advanced materials on a biological basis. Error-propagation in RNA replication leads to formation of mutant spectra called ‘quasispecies’. An increase in the error rate broadens the mutant spectrum. There exists a sharply defined threshold beyond which heredity breaks down and evolutionary adaptation becomes impossible. Almost all RNA viruses studied so far operate at conditions close to this error threshold. Quasispecies and error thresholds are important for an understanding of RNA virus evolution, and they may help to develop novel antiviral strategies. Evolution of RNA molecules can be studied and interpreted by considering secondary structures. The notion of sequence space introduces a distance between pairs of RNA sequences which is tantamount to counting the minimal number of point mutations required to convert the sequences into each other. The mean sensitivity of RNA secondary structures to mutation depends strongly on the base pairing alphabet: structures from sequences which contain only one base pair (GC or AU are much less stable against mutation than those derived from the natural (AUGC) sequences

  10. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  11. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding. PMID:25993396

  12. CopraRNA and IntaRNA: predicting small RNA targets, networks and interaction domains.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patrick R; Georg, Jens; Mann, Martin; Sorescu, Dragos A; Richter, Andreas S; Lott, Steffen; Kleinkauf, Robert; Hess, Wolfgang R; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    CopraRNA (Comparative prediction algorithm for small RNA targets) is the most recent asset to the Freiburg RNA Tools webserver. It incorporates and extends the functionality of the existing tool IntaRNA (Interacting RNAs) in order to predict targets, interaction domains and consequently the regulatory networks of bacterial small RNA molecules. The CopraRNA prediction results are accompanied by extensive postprocessing methods such as functional enrichment analysis and visualization of interacting regions. Here, we introduce the functionality of the CopraRNA and IntaRNA webservers and give detailed explanations on their postprocessing functionalities. Both tools are freely accessible at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de. PMID:24838564

  13. CopraRNA and IntaRNA: predicting small RNA targets, networks and interaction domains

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Patrick R.; Georg, Jens; Mann, Martin; Sorescu, Dragos A.; Richter, Andreas S.; Lott, Steffen; Kleinkauf, Robert; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    CopraRNA (Comparative prediction algorithm for small RNA targets) is the most recent asset to the Freiburg RNA Tools webserver. It incorporates and extends the functionality of the existing tool IntaRNA (Interacting RNAs) in order to predict targets, interaction domains and consequently the regulatory networks of bacterial small RNA molecules. The CopraRNA prediction results are accompanied by extensive postprocessing methods such as functional enrichment analysis and visualization of interacting regions. Here, we introduce the functionality of the CopraRNA and IntaRNA webservers and give detailed explanations on their postprocessing functionalities. Both tools are freely accessible at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de. PMID:24838564

  14. lncRNA/MicroRNA interactions in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, MD; McDonald, RA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) have gained widespread attention for their role in diverse vascular processes including angiogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation, and migration. Despite great understanding of miRNA expression and function, knowledge of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecular mechanisms still remains limited. The influence of miRNA on lncRNA function, and the converse, is now beginning to emerge. lncRNA may regulate miRNA function by acting as endogenous sponges to regulate gene expression and miRNA have been shown to bind and regulate lncRNA stability. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular effects of lncRNA‐miRNA‐mediated interactions in vascular pathophysiology could pave the way for new diagnostic markers and therapeutic approaches, but first there is a requirement for a more detailed understanding of the impact of such regulatory networks. PMID:26910520

  15. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances. PMID:27120975

  16. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  17. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  18. Specific ligation to double-stranded RNA for analysis of cellular RNA::RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Faridani, Omid R; McInerney, Gerald M; Gradin, Katarina; Good, Liam

    2008-09-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is formed in cells as intra- and intermolecular RNA interactions and is involved in a range of biological processes including RNA metabolism, RNA interference and translation control mediated by natural antisense RNA and microRNA. Despite this breadth of activities, few molecular tools are available to analyse dsRNA as native hybrids. We describe a two-step ligation method for enzymatic joining of dsRNA adaptors to any dsRNA molecule in its duplex form without a need for prior sequence or termini information. The method is specific for dsRNA and can ligate various adaptors to label, map or amplify dsRNA sequences. When combined with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the method is sensitive and can detect low nanomolar concentrations of dsRNA in total RNA. As examples, we mapped dsRNA/single-stranded RNA junctions within Escherichia coli hok mRNA and the human immunodeficiency virus TAR element using RNA from bacteria and mammalian cells. PMID:18628292

  19. A third member of the RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene family, ADAR3, contains both single- and double-stranded RNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C X; Cho, D S; Wang, Q; Lai, F; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    2000-01-01

    Members of the double-stranded RNA- (dsRNA) specific adenosine deaminase gene family convert adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and are involved in A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts of glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and serotonin receptor subtype 2C (5-HT(2C)R). We have isolated hADAR3, the third member of this class of human enzyme and investigated its editing site selectivity using in vitro RNA editing assay systems. As originally reported for rat ADAR3 or RED2, purified ADAR3 proteins could not edit GluR-B RNA at the "Q/R" site, the "R/G" site, and the intronic "hot spot" site. In addition, ADAR3 did not edit any of five sites discovered recently within the intracellular loop II region of 5-HT(2C)R RNAs, confirming its total lack of editing activity for currently known substrate RNAs. Filter-binding analyses revealed that ADAR3 is capable of binding not only to dsRNA but also to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Deletion mutagenesis identified a region rich in arginine residues located in the N-terminus that is responsible for binding of ADAR3 to ssRNA. The presence of this ssRNA-binding domain as well as its expression in restricted brain regions and postmitotic neurons make ADAR3 distinct from the other two ADAR gene family members, editing competent ADAR1 and ADAR2. ADAR3 inhibited in vitro the activities of RNA editing enzymes of the ADAR gene family, raising the possibility of a regulatory role in RNA editing. PMID:10836796

  20. Biology Today: Respect for RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The high points of the story of RNA are presented. The functions of RNA within the cell, how these functions are carried out, and how they evolved are described. The topics of splicing, self-splicing, RNA editing, transcription and translation, and antisense RNA are discussed. (KR)

  1. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Huang, Fenix W D; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-07-01

    The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist for fixed genus only finitely many irreducible shadows. This implies that, for fixed genus, there are only finitely many classes of interaction structures. In particular, the simplest case of genus zero already provides the formalism for certain types of structures that occur in nature and are not covered by other filtrations. This case of genus zero interaction structures is already of practical interest, is studied here in detail, and is found to be expressed by a multiple context-free grammar that extends the usual one for RNA secondary structures. We show that, in O(n(6)) time and O(n(4)) space complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partition function and base pairing probabilities. PMID:22731621

  2. Alignments of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  3. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Schlatterer, Joerg C.; Wieder, Matthew S.; Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois; Brenowitz, Michael

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High {sup {center_dot}}OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels-Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ({sup {center_dot}}OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) can produce sufficient {sup {center_dot}}OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels-Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C-C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme's active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels-Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to {sup {center_dot}}OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop's flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  4. Genome-scale identification of miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Li, A; Zhang, J; Zhou, Z; Wang, L; Sun, X; Liu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Domestic animals show considerable genetic diversity. Previous studies suggested that animal phenotypes were affected by miRNA-mRNA interplay, but these studies focused mainly on the analysis of one or several miRNA-mRNA interactions. However, in this study, we investigated miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions on a genomic scale using miranda and targetscan algorithms. There has been strong directional artificial selection practiced during the domestication of animals. Thus, we investigated SNPs that were located in miRNAs and miRNA binding sites and found that several SNPs located in 3'-UTRs of mRNAs had the potential to affect miRNA-mRNA interactions. In addition, a database, named miRBond, was developed to provide visualization, analysis and downloading of the resulting datasets. Our results open the way to further experimental verification of miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions as well as the influence of SNPs upon such interplay. PMID:26360131

  5. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  6. RNA recombination in a coronavirus: recombination between viral genomic RNA and transfected RNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, C L; Lai, M M

    1992-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a coronavirus, has been shown to undergo a high frequency of RNA recombination both in tissue culture and in animal infection. So far, RNA recombination has been demonstrated only between genomic RNAs of two coinfecting viruses. To understand the mechanism of RNA recombination and to further explore the potential of RNA recombination, we studied whether recombination could occur between a replicating MHV RNA and transfected RNA fragments. We first used RNA fragments which represented the 5' end of genomic-sense sequences of MHV RNA for transfection. By using polymerase chain reaction amplification with two specific primers, we were able to detect recombinant RNAs which incorporated the transfected fragment into the 5' end of the viral RNA in the infected cells. Surprisingly, even the anti-genomic-sense RNA fragments complementary to the 5' end of MHV genomic RNA could also recombine with the MHV genomic RNAs. This observation suggests that RNA recombination can occur during both positive- and negative-strand RNA synthesis. Furthermore, the recombinant RNAs could be detected in the virion released from the infected cells even after several passages of virus in tissue culture cells, indicating that these recombinant RNAs represented functional virion RNAs. The crossover sites of these recombinants were detected throughout the transfected RNA fragments. However, when an RNA fragment with a nine-nucleotide (CUUUAUAAA) deletion immediately downstream of a pentanucleotide (UCUAA) repeat sequence in the leader RNA was transfected into MHV-infected cells, most of the recombinants between this RNA and the MHV genome contained crossover sites near this pentanucleotide repeat sequence. In contrast, when exogenous RNAs with the intact nine-nucleotide sequence were used in similar experiments, the crossover sites of recombinants in viral genomic RNA could be detected at more-downstream sites. This study demonstrated that recombination can occur

  7. dADAR, a Drosophila double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase is highly developmentally regulated and is itself a target for RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, M J; Keegan, L P; O'Connell, M A; Reenan, R A

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a homolog of the ADAR (adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) class of RNA editases from Drosophila, dADAR. The dADAR locus has been localized to the 2B6-7 region of the X chromosome and the complete genomic sequence organization is reported here. dADAR is most homologous to the mammalian RNA editing enzyme ADAR2, the enzyme that specifically edits the Q/R site in the pre-mRNA encoding the glutamate receptor subunit GluR-B. Partially purified dADAR expressed in Pichia pastoris has robust nonspecific A-to-I deaminase activity on synthetic dsRNA substrates. Transcripts of the dADAR locus originate from two regulated promoters. In addition, alternative splicing generates at least four major dADAR isoforms that differ at their amino-termini as well as altering the spacing between their dsRNA binding motifs. dADAR is expressed in the developing nervous system, making it a candidate for the editase that acts on para voltage-gated Na+ channel transcripts in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, dADAR itself undergoes developmentally regulated RNA editing that changes a conserved residue in the catalytic domain. Taken together, these findings show that both transcription and processing of dADAR transcripts are under strict developmental control and suggest that the process of RNA editing in Drosophila is dynamically regulated. PMID:10917596

  8. Mapping RNA-RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tri C; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA-RNA interactions have to rely on an 'anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA-RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA-RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA-FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA-RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  9. The RNA interference revolution.

    PubMed

    Lenz, G

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing. PMID:16302089

  10. Shaping tRNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  11. RNA in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Johnny T.Y.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2013-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in a variety of biological roles, particularly as cis or trans gene expression regulators. Reporting recently in Nature, Lai et al. (2013) show that a class of gene-activating lncRNAs combines two gene regulation paradigms: enhancer-directed chromosomal looping and RNA-mediated protein effector recruitment. PMID:23537627

  12. Divergent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine; Corless, Samuel; Gilbert, Nick

    2013-01-01

    New approaches using biotinylated-psoralen as a probe for investigating DNA structure have revealed new insights into the relationship between DNA supercoiling, transcription and chromatin compaction. We explore a hypothesis that divergent RNA transcription generates negative supercoiling at promoters facilitating initiation complex formation and subsequent promoter clearance. PMID:23863199

  13. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  14. Electrophilic activity-based RNA probes reveal a self-alkylating RNA for RNA labeling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Richard I.; Guilinger, John P.; Mukherji, Shankar; Curtis, Edward A.; Lee, Won I.; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Probes that form covalent bonds with RNA molecules based on their chemical reactivity would advance our ability to study the transcriptome. We developed a set of electrophilic activity-based RNA probes designed to react with unusually nucleophilic RNAs. We used these probes to identify reactive genome-encoded RNAs, resulting in the discovery of a 42-nt catalytic RNA from an archaebacterium that reacts with a 2,3-disubstituted epoxide at N7 of a specific guanosine. Detailed characterization of the catalytic RNA revealed the structural requirements for reactivity. We developed this catalytic RNA into a general tool to selectively conjugate a small molecule to an RNA of interest. This strategy enabled up to 500-fold enrichment of target RNA from total mammalian RNA or from cell lysate. We demonstrated the utility of this approach by selectively capturing proteins in yeast cell lysate that bind to the ASH1 mRNA. PMID:25306441

  15. Mammalian synthetic circuits with RNA binding proteins delivered by RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Liliana; Kitada, Tasuku; Endo, Kei; Siciliano, Velia; Stillo, Breanna; Saito, Hirohide; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic regulatory circuits encoded on RNA rather than DNA could provide a means to control cell behavior while avoiding potentially harmful genomic integration in therapeutic applications. We create post-transcriptional circuits using RNA-binding proteins, which can be wired in a plug-and-play fashion to create networks of higher complexity. We show that the circuits function in mammalian cells when encoded on modified mRNA or self-replicating RNA. PMID:26237515

  16. Quantitative Model of microRNA-mRNA interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Lang, Alex; Mehta, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs are short RNA sequences that regulate gene expression and protein translation by binding to mRNA. Experimental data reveals the existence of a threshold linear output of protein based on the expression level of microRNA. To understand this behavior, we propose a mathematical model of the chemical kinetics of the interaction between mRNA and microRNA. Using this model we have been able to quantify the threshold linear behavior. Furthermore, we have studied the effect of internal noise, showing the existence of an intermediary regime where the expression level of mRNA and microRNA has the same order of magnitude. In this crossover regime the mRNA translation becomes sensitive to small changes in the level of microRNA, resulting in large fluctuations in protein levels. Our work shows that chemical kinetics parameters can be quantified by studying protein fluctuations. In the future, studying protein levels and their fluctuations can provide a powerful tool to study the competing endogenous RNA hypothesis (ceRNA), in which mRNA crosstalk occurs due to competition over a limited pool of microRNAs.

  17. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Christopher P; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A J; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach termed RNA Tagging that enables the user to identify protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or cross-linking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA via high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The results showed that although RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also 'sample' RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We used the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. RNA Tagging is well suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  18. RNA-RNA interaction prediction using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-RNA interaction plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression and cell development. In this process, an RNA molecule prohibits the translation of another RNA molecule by establishing stable interactions with it. In the RNA-RNA interaction prediction problem, two RNA sequences are given as inputs and the goal is to find the optimal secondary structure of two RNAs and between them. Some different algorithms have been proposed to predict RNA-RNA interaction structure. However, most of them suffer from high computational time. Results In this paper, we introduce a novel genetic algorithm called GRNAs to predict the RNA-RNA interaction. The proposed algorithm is performed on some standard datasets with appropriate accuracy and lower time complexity in comparison to the other state-of-the-art algorithms. In the proposed algorithm, each individual is a secondary structure of two interacting RNAs. The minimum free energy is considered as a fitness function for each individual. In each generation, the algorithm is converged to find the optimal secondary structure (minimum free energy structure) of two interacting RNAs by using crossover and mutation operations. Conclusions This algorithm is properly employed for joint secondary structure prediction. The results achieved on a set of known interacting RNA pairs are compared with the other related algorithms and the effectiveness and validity of the proposed algorithm have been demonstrated. It has been shown that time complexity of the algorithm in each iteration is as efficient as the other approaches. PMID:25114714

  19. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  20. RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kocan, Katherine M.; Blouin, Edmour; de la Fuente, José

    2011-01-01

    Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of wild and domestic animals and humans, and are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases1 and the most important vectors affecting cattle industry worldwide2. Ticks are classified in the subclass Acari, order Parasitiformes, suborder Ixodida and are distributed worldwide from Arctic to tropical regions3. Despite efforts to control tick infestations, these ectoparasites remain a serious problem for human and animal health4,5. RNA interference (RNAi)6 is a nucleic acid-based reverse genetic approach that involves disruption of gene expression in order to determine gene function or its effect on a metabolic pathway. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the effector molecules of the RNAi pathway that is initiated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and results in a potent sequence-specific degradation of cytoplasmic mRNAs containing the same sequence as the dsRNA trigger7-9. Post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms initiated by dsRNA have been discovered in all eukaryotes studied thus far, and RNAi has been rapidly developed in a variety of organisms as a tool for functional genomics studies and other applications10. RNAi has become the most widely used gene-silencing technique in ticks and other organisms where alternative approaches for genetic manipulation are not available or are unreliable5,11. The genetic characterization of ticks has been limited until the recent application of RNAi12,13. In the short time that RNAi has been available, it has proved to be a valuable tool for studying tick gene function, the characterization of the tick-pathogen interface and the screening and characterization of tick protective antigens14. Herein, a method for RNAi through injection of dsRNA into unfed ticks is described. It is likely that the knowledge gained from this experimental approach will contribute markedly to the understanding of basic biological systems and the development of vaccines

  1. lncRNA-RNA Interactions across the Human Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a numerous class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. There is possibility that a fraction of lncRNAs are not functional and represent mere transcriptional noise but a growing body of evidence shows they are engaged in a plethora of molecular functions and contribute considerably to the observed diversification of eukaryotic transcriptomes and proteomes. Still, however, only ca. 1% of lncRNAs have well established functions and much remains to be done towards decipherment of their biological roles. One of the least studied aspects of lncRNAs biology is their engagement in gene expression regulation through RNA-RNA interactions. By hybridizing with mate RNA molecules, lncRNAs could potentially participate in modulation of pre-mRNA splicing, RNA editing, mRNA stability control, translation activation, or abrogation of miRNA-induced repression. Here, we implemented a similarity-search based method for transcriptome-wide identification of RNA-RNA interactions, which enabled us to find 18,871,097 lncRNA-RNA base-pairings in human. Further analyses showed that the interactions could be involved in processing, stability control and functions of 57,303 transcripts. An extensive use of RNA-Seq data provided support for approximately one third of the interactions, at least in terms of the two RNA components being co-expressed. The results suggest that lncRNA-RNA interactions are broadly used to regulate and diversify the human transcriptome. PMID:26930590

  2. 'RNA walk' a novel approach to study RNA-RNA interactions between a small RNA and its target.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Yaniv; Wachtel, Chaim; Safro, Mark; Liu, Li; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2010-01-01

    In this study we describe a novel method to investigate the RNA-RNA interactions between a small RNA and its target that we termed 'RNA walk'. The method is based on UV-induced AMT cross-linking in vivo followed by affinity selection of the hybrid molecules and mapping the intermolecular adducts by RT-PCR or real-time PCR. Domains carrying the cross-linked adducts fail to efficiently amplify by PCR compared with non-cross-linked domains. This method was calibrated and used to study the interaction between a special tRNA-like molecule (sRNA-85) that is part of the trypanosome signal recognition particle (SRP) complex and the ribosome. Four contact sites between sRNA-85 and rRNA were identified by 'RNA walk' and were further fine-mapped by primer extension. Two of the contact sites are expected; one contact site mimics the interaction of the mammalian Alu domain of SRP with the ribosome and the other contact sites include a canonical tRNA interaction. The two other cross-linked sites could not be predicted. We propose that 'RNA walk, is a generic method to map target RNA small RNAs interactions in vivo. PMID:19854950

  3. RNA Editing of Androgen Receptor Gene Transcripts in Prostate Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Harryl D.; Jasavala, Rohini J.; Hinkson, Izumi; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Trimmer, James S.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wright, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway represents a critical step in the growth and survival of androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer (CaP). In this study we show the DU145 and PC3 AI human CaP cell lines respond to androgens and require AR expression for optimal proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, AR gene transcripts in DU145 and PC3 cells harbored a large number of single base pair nucleotide transitions that resulted in missense mutations in selected AR codons. The most notable lesion detected in AR gene transcripts included the oncogenic codon 877T→A gain-of-function mutation. Surprisingly, AR gene transcript nucleotide transitions were not genome-encoded substitutions, but instead the mutations co-localized to putative A-to-I, U-to-C, C-to-U, and G-to-A RNA editing sites, suggesting the lesions were mediated through RNA editing mechanisms. Higher levels of mRNA encoding the A-to-I RNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADARB1 were observed in DU145 and PC3 cells relative to the androgen-responsive LNCaP and 22Rv1 human CaP cell lines, which correlated with higher levels of AR gene transcript A-to-I editing detected in DU145 and PC3 cells. Our results suggest that AR gene transcripts are targeted by different RNA editing enzymes in DU145 and PC3 cells. Thus RNA editing of AR gene transcripts may contribute to the etiology of hormone-refractory phenotypes in advanced stage AI CaP. PMID:18708348

  4. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Horning, David P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2016-08-30

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life-the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules-can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  5. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  6. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to (5'/sup 32/P)-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52/sup 0/C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share greater than or equal to 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups.

  7. Current preclinical small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based conjugate systems for RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kang, Yoon Young; Jang, Hyo-Eun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-09-01

    Recent promising clinical results of RNA therapeutics have drawn big attention of academia and industries to RNA therapeutics and their carrier systems. To improve their feasibility in clinics, systemic evaluations of currently available carrier systems under clinical trials and preclinical studies are needed. In this review, we focus on recent noticeable preclinical studies and clinical results regarding siRNA-based conjugates for clinical translations. Advantages and drawbacks of siRNA-based conjugates are discussed, compared to particle-based delivery systems. Then, representative siRNA-based conjugates with aptamers, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, polymers, and nanostructured materials are introduced. To improve feasibility of siRNA conjugates in preclinical studies, several considerations for the rational design of siRNA conjugates in terms of cleavability, immune responses, multivalent conjugations, and mechanism of action are also presented. Lastly, we discuss lessons from previous preclinical and clinical studies related to siRNA conjugates and perspectives of their clinical applications. PMID:26514375

  8. The Impact of mRNA Structure on Guide RNA Targeting in Kinetoplastid RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Reifur, Larissa; Yu, Laura E.; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; vanHartesvelt, Michelle; Koslowsky, Donna J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial mRNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei requires the specific interaction of a guide RNA with its cognate mRNA. Hundreds of gRNAs are involved in the editing process, each needing to target their specific editing domain within the target message. We hypothesized that the structure surrounding the mRNA target may be a limiting factor and involved in the regulation process. In this study, we selected four mRNAs with distinct target structures and investigated how sequence and structure affected efficient gRNA targeting. Two of the mRNAs, including the ATPase subunit 6 and ND7-550 (5′ end of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 7) that have open, accessible anchor binding sites show very efficient gRNA targeting. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that the cognate gRNA for ND7-550 had 10-fold higher affinity for its mRNA than the A6 pair. Surface plasmon resonance studies indicate that the difference in affinity was due to a four-fold faster association rate. As expected, mRNAs with considerable structure surrounding the anchor binding sites were less accessible and had very low affinity for their cognate gRNAs. In vitro editing assays indicate that efficient pairing is crucial for gRNA directed cleavage. However, only the A6 substrate showed gRNA-directed cleavage at the correct editing site. This suggests that different gRNA/mRNA pairs may require different “sets” of accessory factors for efficient editing. By characterizing a number of different gRNA/mRNA interactions, we may be able to define a “bank” of RNA editing substrates with different putative chaperone and other co-factor requirements. This will allow the more efficient identification and characterization of transcript specific RNA editing accessory proteins. PMID:20808932

  9. RNA editing of the Drosophila para Na(+) channel transcript. Evolutionary conservation and developmental regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, C J; Palladino, M J; Ganetzky, B; Reenan, R A

    2000-01-01

    Post-transcriptional editing of pre-mRNAs through the action of dsRNA adenosine deaminases results in the modification of particular adenosine (A) residues to inosine (I), which can alter the coding potential of the modified transcripts. We describe here three sites in the para transcript, which encodes the major voltage-activated Na(+) channel polypeptide in Drosophila, where RNA editing occurs. The occurrence of RNA editing at the three sites was found to be developmentally regulated. Editing at two of these sites was also conserved across species between the D. melanogaster and D. virilis. In each case, a highly conserved region was found in the intron downstream of the editing site and this region was shown to be complementary to the region of the exonic editing site. Thus, editing at these sites would appear to involve a mechanism whereby the edited exon forms a base-paired secondary structure with the distant conserved noncoding sequences located in adjacent downstream introns, similar to the mechanism shown for A-to-I RNA editing of mammalian glutamate receptor subunits (GluRs). For the third site, neither RNA editing nor the predicted RNA secondary structures were evolutionarily conserved. Transcripts from transgenic Drosophila expressing a minimal editing site construct for this site were shown to faithfully undergo RNA editing. These results demonstrate that Na(+) channel diversity in Drosophila is increased by RNA editing via a mechanism analogous to that described for transcripts encoding mammalian GluRs. PMID:10880477

  10. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Ebbe S.; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne; Kristensen, Susie E.; Havgaard, Jakob H.; Torarinsson, Elfar; Larsen, Niels; Zwieb, Christian; Sestoft, Peter; Kjems, Jørgen; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a semiautomated RNA sequence editor (SARSE) that integrates tools for analyzing RNA alignments. The editor highlights different properties of the alignment by color, and its integrated analysis tools prevent the introduction of errors when doing alignment editing. SARSE readily connects to external tools to provide a flexible semiautomatic editing environment. A new method, Pcluster, is introduced for dividing the sequences of an RNA alignment into subgroups with secondary structure differences. Pcluster was used to evaluate 574 seed alignments obtained from the Rfam database and we identified 71 alignments with significant prediction of inconsistent base pairs and 102 alignments with significant prediction of novel base pairs. Four RNA families were used to illustrate how SARSE can be used to manually or automatically correct the inconsistent base pairs detected by Pcluster: the mir-399 RNA, vertebrate telomase RNA (vert-TR), bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), and the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. The general use of the method is illustrated by the ability to accommodate pseudoknots and handle even large and divergent RNA families. The open architecture of the SARSE editor makes it a flexible tool to improve all RNA alignments with relatively little human intervention. Online documentation and software are available at http://sarse.ku.dk. PMID:17804647

  11. Bacteriophage T5 transfer RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.; Desai, S.M.; Vaughan, J.; Weiss, S.B.

    1980-04-10

    Previous studies from this laboratory have provided a high resolution map for 16 tRNA genes located on the continuous heavy DNA strand of bacteriophage T5 DNA. All of the T5 tRNA genes were located in three clusters within the DNA C segment, except for tRNA/sup Arg/, which mapped on the left end of the DNA D segment. In this report, we present evidence for the presence of eight additional T5 tRNA species, five of which are located in two new loci within the DNA C segment. We also describe a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis system for the separation and isolation of T5 tRNA species from crude infected RNA preparations. The gel electrophoresis system separates tRNA isoacceptors specific for different amino acids; evidence is presented that the isoacceptors for isoleucine, histidine, and serine are coded by different T5 genes.

  12. Flavivirus RNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Takhampunya, Ratree; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Choi, Kyung H

    2015-12-01

    Establishment of in vitro systems to study mechanisms of RNA synthesis for positive strand RNA viruses have been very useful in the past and have shed light on the composition of protein and RNA components, optimum conditions, the nature of the products formed, cis-acting RNA elements and trans-acting protein factors required for efficient synthesis. In this review, we summarize our current understanding regarding the requirements for flavivirus RNA synthesis in vitro. We describe details of reaction conditions, the specificity of template used by either the multi-component membrane-bound viral replicase complex or by purified, recombinant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. We also discuss future perspectives to extend the boundaries of our knowledge. PMID:26272247

  13. The tmRNA website

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from themore » same organism.« less

  14. The tmRNA website

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  15. Global Mapping of Human RNA-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Eesha; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; O'Hanlon, Dave; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2016-05-19

    The majority of the human genome is transcribed into non-coding (nc)RNAs that lack known biological functions or else are only partially characterized. Numerous characterized ncRNAs function via base pairing with target RNA sequences to direct their biological activities, which include critical roles in RNA processing, modification, turnover, and translation. To define roles for ncRNAs, we have developed a method enabling the global-scale mapping of RNA-RNA duplexes crosslinked in vivo, "LIGation of interacting RNA followed by high-throughput sequencing" (LIGR-seq). Applying this method in human cells reveals a remarkable landscape of RNA-RNA interactions involving all major classes of ncRNA and mRNA. LIGR-seq data reveal unexpected interactions between small nucleolar (sno)RNAs and mRNAs, including those involving the orphan C/D box snoRNA, SNORD83B, that control steady-state levels of its target mRNAs. LIGR-seq thus represents a powerful approach for illuminating the functions of the myriad of uncharacterized RNAs that act via base-pairing interactions. PMID:27184080

  16. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  17. Transfer RNA and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jamie A.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Robey-Bond, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are “hotspots” for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  18. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner’99 and Turner’04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  19. Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein bridges RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Vienna L; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-07-20

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3'-termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified Northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution ("far-Northwestern blotting"). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  20. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  1. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  2. Subgenomic mRNA regulation by a distal RNA element in a (+)-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Slowinski, V; White, K A

    1999-01-01

    Subgenomic (sg) mRNAs are synthesized by (+)-strand RNA viruses to allow for efficient translation of products encoded 3' in their genomes. This strategy also provides a means for regulating the expression of such products via modulation of sg mRNA accumulation. We have studied the mechanism by which sg mRNAs levels are controlled in tomato bushy stunt virus, a small (+)-strand RNA virus which synthesizes two sg mRNAs during infections. Neither the viral capsid nor movement proteins were found to play any significant role in modulating the accumulation levels of either sg mRNA. Deletion analysis did, however, identify a 12-nt-long RNA sequence located approximately 1,000 nt upstream from the site of initiation of sg mRNA2 synthesis that was required specifically for accumulation of sg mRNA2. Further analysis revealed a potential base-pairing interaction between this sequence and a sequence located just 5' to the site of initiation for sg mRNA2 synthesis. Mutant genomes in which this interaction was either disrupted or maintained were analyzed and the results indicated a positive correlation between the predicted stability of the base-pairing interaction and the efficiency of sg mRNA2 accumulation. The functional significance of the long-distance interaction was further supported by phylogenetic sequence analysis which revealed conservation of base-pairing interactions of similar stability and relative position in the genomes of different tombusviruses. It is proposed that the upstream sequence represents a cis-acting RNA element which facilitates sg mRNA accumulation by promoting efficient synthesis of sg mRNA2 via a long-distance RNA-RNA interaction. PMID:10199571

  3. The RNA shapes studio

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Stefan; Giegerich, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Abstract shape analysis, first proposed in 2004, allows one to extract several relevant structures from the folding space of an RNA sequence, preferable to focusing in a single structure of minimal free energy. We report recent extensions to this approach. Results: We have rebuilt the original RNAshapes as a repository of components that allows us to integrate several established tools for RNA structure analysis: RNAshapes, RNAalishapes and pknotsRG, including its recent extension pKiss. As a spin-off, we obtain heretofore unavailable functionality: e. g. with pKiss, we can now perform abstract shape analysis for structures holding pseudoknots up to the complexity of kissing hairpin motifs. The new tool pAliKiss can predict kissing hairpin motifs from aligned sequences. Along with the integration, the functionality of the tools was also extended in manifold ways. Availability and implementation: As before, the tool is available on the Bielefeld Bioinformatics server at http://bibiserv.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/rnashapesstudio. Contact: bibi-help@cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de PMID:25273103

  4. RNA-Seq and find: entering the RNA deep field

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Initial high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments have revealed a complex and dynamic transcriptome, but because it samples transcripts in proportion to their abundances, assessing the extent and nature of low-level transcription using this technique has been difficult. A new assay, RNA CaptureSeq, addresses this limitation of RNA-Seq by enriching for low-level transcripts with cDNA tiling arrays prior to high-throughput sequencing. This approach reveals a plethora of transcripts that have been previously dismissed as 'noise', and hints at single-cell transcription fingerprints that may be crucial in defining cellular function in normal and disease states. PMID:22113004

  5. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. PMID:25161314

  6. antaRNA: ant colony-based RNA sequence design

    PubMed Central

    Kleinkauf, Robert; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA sequence design is studied at least as long as the classical folding problem. Although for the latter the functional fold of an RNA molecule is to be found, inverse folding tries to identify RNA sequences that fold into a function-specific target structure. In combination with RNA-based biotechnology and synthetic biology, reliable RNA sequence design becomes a crucial step to generate novel biochemical components. Results: In this article, the computational tool antaRNA is presented. It is capable of compiling RNA sequences for a given structure that comply in addition with an adjustable full range objective GC-content distribution, specific sequence constraints and additional fuzzy structure constraints. antaRNA applies ant colony optimization meta-heuristics and its superior performance is shown on a biological datasets. Availability and implementation: http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/antaRNA Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26023105

  7. Plant snoRNA database

    PubMed Central

    Brown, John W. S.; Echeverria, Manuel; Qu, Liang-Hu; Lowe, Todd M.; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Kastenmayer, James P.; Green, Pamela J.; Shaw, Paul; Marshall, Dave F.

    2003-01-01

    The Plant snoRNA database (http://www.scri.sari.ac.uk/plant_snoRNA/) provides information on small nucleolar RNAs from Arabidopsis and eighteen other plant species. Information includes sequences, expression data, methylation and pseudouridylation target modification sites, initial gene organization (polycistronic, single gene and intronic) and the number of gene variants. The Arabidopsis information is divided into box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs, and within each of these groups, by target sites in rRNA, snRNA or unknown. Alignments of orthologous genes and gene variants from different plant species are available for many snoRNA genes. Plant snoRNA genes have been given a standard nomenclature, designed wherever possible, to provide a consistent identity with yeast and human orthologues. PMID:12520043

  8. mRNA-mRNA duplexes that autoelicit Staufen1-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chenguang; Tang, Yalan; Maquat, Lynne E

    2013-10-01

    We report a new mechanism by which human mRNAs cross-talk: an Alu element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of one mRNA can base-pair with a partially complementary Alu element in the 3' UTR of a different mRNA, thereby creating a Staufen1 (STAU1)-binding site (SBS). STAU1 binding to a 3'-UTR SBS was previously shown to trigger STAU1-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) by directly recruiting the ATP-dependent RNA helicase UPF1, which is also a key factor in the mechanistically related nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. In the case of a 3'-UTR SBS created by mRNA-mRNA base-pairing, we show that SMD targets both mRNAs in the duplex, provided that both mRNAs are translated. If only one mRNA is translated, then it alone is targeted for SMD. We demonstrate the functional importance of mRNA-mRNA-triggered SMD in cell migration and invasion. PMID:24056942

  9. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  10. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  11. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  12. Synthetic biology with RNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirohide; Inoue, Tan

    2009-02-01

    Structural motifs in naturally occurring RNAs and RNPs can be employed as new molecular parts for synthetic biology to facilitate the development of novel devices and systems that modulate cellular functions. In this review, we focus on the following: (i) experimental evolution techniques of RNA molecules in vitro and (ii) their applications for regulating gene expression systems in vivo. For experimental evolution, new artificial RNA aptamers and RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been selected in vitro. These functional RNA molecules are likely to be applicable in the reprogramming of existing gene regulatory systems. Furthermore, they may be used for designing hypothetical RNA-based living systems in the so-called RNA world. For the regulation of gene expressions in living cells, the development of new riboswitches allows us to modulate the target gene expression in a tailor-made manner. Moreover, recently RNA-based synthetic genetic circuits have been reported by employing functional RNA molecules, expanding the repertory of synthetic biology with RNA motifs. PMID:18775792

  13. Bringing RNA into View: RNA and Its Roles in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, John F.; Ellington, Andrew; Friedman, B. Ellen; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Noller, Harry F.; Pasquale, Stephen M.; Storey, Richard D.; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.; Weiner, Alan M.

    This guide presents a module for college students on ribonucleic acid (RNA) and its role in biology. The module aims to integrate the latest research and its findings into college-level biology and provide an opportunity for students to understand biological processes. Four activities are presented: (1) "RNA Structure: Tapes to Shapes"; (2) "RNA…

  14. What is an RNA? A top layer for RNA classification

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Jürgen; Raabe, Carsten A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Every ribonucleic acid begins its cellular life as a transcript. If the transcript or its processing product has a function it should be regarded an RNA. Nonfunctional transcripts, by-products from processing, degradation intermediates, even those originating from (functional) RNAs, and non-functional products of transcriptional gene regulation accomplished via the act of transcription, as well as stochastic (co)transcripts could simply be addressed as transcripts (class 0). The copious functional RNAs (class I), often maturing after one or more processing steps, already are systematized into ever expanding sub-classifications ranging from micro RNAs to rRNAs. Established sub-classifications addressing a wide functional diversity remain unaffected. mRNAs (class II) are distinct from any other RNA by virtue of their potential to be translated into (poly)peptide(s) on ribosomes. We are not proposing a novel RNA classification, but wish to add a basic concept with existing terminology (transcript, RNA, and mRNA) that should serve as an additional framework for carefully delineating RNA function from an avalanche of RNA sequencing data. At the same time, this top level hierarchical model should illuminate important principles of RNA evolution and biology thus heightening our awareness that in biology boundaries and categorizations are typically fuzzy. PMID:26818079

  15. The pivotal regulatory landscape of RNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Mason, Christopher E

    2014-01-01

    Posttranscriptionally modified nucleosides in RNA play integral roles in the cellular control of biological information that is encoded in DNA. The modifications of RNA span all three phylogenetic domains (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya) and are pervasive across RNA types, including messenger RNA (mRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and (less frequently) small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Nucleotide modifications are also one of the most evolutionarily conserved properties of RNAs, and the sites of modification are under strong selective pressure. However, many of these modifications, as well as their prevalence and impact, have only recently been discovered. Here, we examine both labile and permanent modifications, from simple methylation to complex transcript alteration (RNA editing and intron retention); detail the models for their processing; and highlight remaining questions in the field of the epitranscriptome. PMID:24898039

  16. RCARE: RNA Sequence Comparison and Annotation for RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The post-transcriptional sequence modification of transcripts through RNA editing is an important mechanism for regulating protein function and is associated with human disease phenotypes. The identification of RNA editing or RNA-DNA difference (RDD) sites is a fundamental step in the study of RNA editing. However, a substantial number of false-positive RDD sites have been identified recently. A major challenge in identifying RDD sites is to distinguish between the true RNA editing sites and the false positives. Furthermore, determining the location of condition-specific RDD sites and elucidating their functional roles will help toward understanding various biological phenomena that are mediated by RNA editing. The present study developed RNA-sequence comparison and annotation for RNA editing (RCARE) for searching, annotating, and visualizing RDD sites using thousands of previously known editing sites, which can be used for comparative analyses between multiple samples. RCARE also provides evidence for improving the reliability of identified RDD sites. RCARE is a web-based comparison, annotation, and visualization tool, which provides rich biological annotations and useful summary plots. The developers of previous tools that identify or annotate RNA-editing sites seldom mention the reliability of their respective tools. In order to address the issue, RCARE utilizes a number of scientific publications and databases to find specific documentations respective to a particular RNA-editing site, which generates evidence levels to convey the reliability of RCARE. Sequence-based alignment files can be converted into VCF files using a Python script and uploaded to the RCARE server for further analysis. RCARE is available for free at http://www.snubi.org/software/rcare/. PMID:26043858

  17. Triggering of RNA Interference with RNA–RNA, RNA–DNA, and DNA–RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Control over cellular delivery of different functionalities and their synchronized activation is a challenging task. We report several RNA and RNA/DNA-based nanoparticles designed to conditionally activate the RNA interference in various human cells. These nanoparticles allow precise control over their formulation, stability in blood serum, and activation of multiple functionalities. Importantly, interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine activation assays indicate the significantly lower responses for DNA nanoparticles compared to the RNA counterparts, suggesting greater potential of these molecules for therapeutic use. PMID:25521794

  18. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-07-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation.

  19. Substrate recognition by ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S K; Sato, S; Lazinski, D W

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR1 and ADAR2 involves the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine within imperfectly duplexed RNA. ADAR1- and ADAR2-mediated editing occurs within transcripts of glutamate receptors (GluR) in the brain and in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA in the liver. Although the Q/R site within the GluR-B premessage is edited more efficiently by ADAR2 than it is by ADAR1, the converse is true for the +60 site within this same transcript. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are homologs having two common functional regions, an N-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal deaminase domain. It is neither understood why only certain adenosines within a substrate molecule serve as targets for ADARs, nor is it known which domain of an ADAR confers its specificity for particular editing sites. To assess the importance of several aspects of RNA sequence and structure on editing, we evaluated 20 different mutated substrates, derived from four editing sites, for their ability to be edited by either ADAR1 or ADAR2. We found that when these derivatives contained an A:C mismatch at the editing site, editing by both ADARs was enhanced compared to when A:A or A:G mismatches or A:U base pairs occurred at the same site. Hence substrate recognition and/or catalysis by ADARs could involve the base that opposes the edited adenosine. In addition, by using protein chimeras in which the deaminase domains were exchanged between ADAR1 and ADAR2, we found that this domain played a dominant role in defining the substrate specificity of the resulting enzyme. PMID:11421361

  20. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  1. Exploration of RNA structure spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    In order to understand the structure of real structure spaces, we are studying the 5S rRNA structure space experimentally. A plasmid containing a synthetic 5S rRNA gene, two rRNA promoters, and transcription terminators has been assembled. Assays are conducted to determine if the foreign 5S rRNA is expressed, and to see whether or not it is incorporated into ribosomes. Evolutionary competition is used to determine the relative fitness of strains containing the foreign 5S rRNA and a control 5S rRNA. By using site directed mutagenesis, a number of mutants can be made in order to study the boundaries of the structure space and how sharply defined they are. By making similar studies in the vicinity of structure space, it will be possible to determine how homogeneous the 5S rRNA structure space is. Useable experimental protocols have been developed, and a number of mutants have already been studied. Initial results suggest an explanation of why single stranded regions of the RNA are less subject to mutation than double stranded regions.

  2. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  3. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  4. Small RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Viral siRNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Xie, Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR) activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg) and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4%) and 22-nucleotide (12.9%) in size and originating predominately (79.9%) from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30) and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP α), respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5′RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity. PMID:19308254

  5. Editing of HIV-1 RNA by the double-stranded RNA deaminase ADAR1 stimulates viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Margherita; Neri, Francesca; Gallo, Angela; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on dsRNA (ADARs) are enzymes that target double-stranded regions of RNA converting adenosines into inosines (A-to-I editing) thus contributing to genome complexity and fine regulation of gene expression. It has been described that a member of the ADAR family, ADAR1, can target viruses and affect their replication process. Here we report evidence showing that ADAR1 stimulates human immuno deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by using both editing-dependent and editing-independent mechanisms. We show that over-expression of ADAR1 in HIV-1 producer cells increases viral protein accumulation in an editing-independent manner. Moreover, HIV-1 virions generated in the presence of over-expressed ADAR1 but not an editing-inactive ADAR1 mutant are released more efficiently and display enhanced infectivity, as demonstrated by challenge assays performed with T cell lines and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Finally, we report that ADAR1 associates with HIV-1 RNAs and edits adenosines in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and the Rev and Tat coding sequence. Overall these results suggest that HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to take advantage of specific RNA editing activity of the host cell and disclose a stimulatory function of ADAR1 in the spread of HIV-1. PMID:19651874

  6. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  7. RNA Protein Interaction in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have their own systems for regulating RNA. Several multigene families encode RNA binding proteins (RNABPs) that are uniquely expressed in neurons, including the well-known neuron-specific markers ELAV and NeuN, and the disease antigen NOVA. New technologies have emerged in recent years to assess the function of these proteins in vivo, and the answers are yielding insights into how and why neurons may regulate RNA in special ways—to increase cellular complexity, to spatially localize mRNA, and to regulate their expression in response to synaptic stimuli. The functions of such restricted neuronal proteins is likely to be complimented by more widely expressed RNABPs that may themselves have developed specialized functions in neurons, including Argonaute/miRNAs. Here we review what is known about such RNABPs, and explore the potential biologic and neurologic significance of neuronal RNA regulatory systems. PMID:23701460

  8. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  9. [Capping strategies in RNA viruses].

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Ferron, François; Imbert, Isabelle; Gluais, Laure; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-04-01

    Most viruses use the mRNA-cap dependent cellular translation machinery to translate their mRNAs into proteins. The addition of a cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is therefore an essential step for the replication of many virus families. Additionally, the cap protects the viral RNA from degradation by cellular nucleases and prevents viral RNA recognition by innate immunity mechanisms. Viral RNAs acquire their cap structure either by using cellular capping enzymes, by stealing the cap of cellular mRNA in a process named "cap snatching", or using virus-encoded capping enzymes. Many viral enzymes involved in this process have recently been structurally and functionally characterized. These studies have revealed original cap synthesis mechanisms and pave the way towards the development of specific inhibitors bearing antiviral drug potential. PMID:22549871

  10. Statistical Analysis of RNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Eli; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-01-01

    Local conformation is an important determinant of RNA catalysis and binding. The analysis of RNA conformation is particularly difficult due to the large number of degrees of freedom (torsion angles) per residue. Proteins, by comparison, have many fewer degrees of freedom per residue. In this work, we use and extend classical tools from statistics and signal processing to search for clusters in RNA conformational space. Results are reported both for scalar analysis, where each torsion angle is separately studied, and for vectorial analysis, where several angles are simultaneously clustered. Adapting techniques from vector quantization and clustering to the RNA structure, we find torsion angle clusters and RNA conformational motifs. We validate the technique using well-known conformational motifs, showing that the simultaneous study of the total torsion angle space leads to results consistent with known motifs reported in the literature and also to the finding of new ones. PMID:17048391

  11. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  12. The RNA WikiProject: community annotation of RNA families.

    PubMed

    Daub, Jennifer; Gardner, Paul P; Tate, John; Ramsköld, Daniel; Manske, Magnus; Scott, William G; Weinberg, Zasha; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Bateman, Alex

    2008-12-01

    The online encyclopedia Wikipedia has become one of the most important online references in the world and has a substantial and growing scientific content. A search of Google with many RNA-related keywords identifies a Wikipedia article as the top hit. We believe that the RNA community has an important and timely opportunity to maximize the content and quality of RNA information in Wikipedia. To this end, we have formed the RNA WikiProject (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_RNA) as part of the larger Molecular and Cellular Biology WikiProject. We have created over 600 new Wikipedia articles describing families of noncoding RNAs based on the Rfam database, and invite the community to update, edit, and correct these articles. The Rfam database now redistributes this Wikipedia content as the primary textual annotation of its RNA families. Users can, therefore, for the first time, directly edit the content of one of the major RNA databases. We believe that this Wikipedia/Rfam link acts as a functioning model for incorporating community annotation into molecular biology databases. PMID:18945806

  13. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  14. RNA Viruses: RNA Roles in Pathogenesis, Coreplication and Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Sun, Binlian; Mallardo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The review intends to present and recapitulate the current knowledge on the roles and importance of regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, RNA binding proteins and enzymes processing RNAs or activated by RNAs, in cells infected by RNA viruses. The review focuses on how non-coding RNAs are involved in RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and host response, especially in retroviruses HIV, with examples of the mechanisms of action, transcriptional regulation, and promotion of increased stability of their targets or their degradation. PMID:27047253

  15. RNA template-directed RNA synthesis by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Cazenave, C; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to synthesize an oligoribonucleotide by run-off transcription by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, a major transcript was produced that was much longer than expected. Analysis of the reaction indicated that the product resulted from initial DNA-directed run-off transcription followed by RNA template-directed RNA synthesis. This reaction occurred because the RNA made from the DNA template displayed self-complementarity at its 3' end and therefore could form an intra- or intermolecular primed template. In reactions containing only an RNA template, the rate of incorporation of NTPs was quite comparable to DNA-dependent transcription. RNA template-directed RNA synthesis has been found to occur with a great number of oligoribonucleotides, even with primed templates that are only marginally stable. In one instance, we observed a multistep extension reaction converting the oligonucleotide into a final product longer than twice its original length. Presumably, such a process could have generated some of the RNAs found to be efficiently replicated by T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:7518923

  16. Evolution in an RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    2009-01-01

    A longstanding research goal has been to develop a self-sustained chemical system that is capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. The notion of primitive RNA-based life suggests this goal might be achieved by constructing an RNA enzyme that catalyzes the replication of RNA molecules, including the RNA enzyme itself. This reaction recently was demonstrated in a cross-catalytic system involving two RNA enzymes that catalyze each other’s synthesis from a total of four component substrates. The cross-replicating RNA enzymes undergo self-sustained exponential amplification at a constant temperature in the absence of proteins or other biological materials. Amplification occurs with a doubling time of 30–60 min, and can be continued indefinitely. Small populations of cross-replicating RNA enzymes can be made to compete for limited resources within a common environment. The molecules reproduce with high fidelity, but occasionally give rise to recombinants that also can replicate. Over the course of many “generations” of selective amplification, novel variants arise and grow to dominate the population based on their relative fitness under the chosen reaction conditions. This is the first example, outside of biology, of evolutionary adaptation in a molecular genetic system. PMID:19667013

  17. Cofactors in the RNA World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ditzler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA world theories figure prominently in many scenarios for the origin and early evolution of life. These theories posit that RNA molecules played a much larger role in ancient biology than they do now, acting both as the dominant biocatalysts and as the repository of genetic information. Many features of modern RNA biology are potential examples of molecular fossils from an RNA world, such as the pervasive involvement of nucleotides in coenzymes, the existence of natural aptamers that bind these coenzymes, the existence of natural ribozymes, a biosynthetic pathway in which deoxynucleotides are produced from ribonucleotides, and the central role of ribosomal RNA in protein synthesis in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. Here, we uses both a top-down approach that evaluates RNA function in modern biology and a bottom-up approach that examines the capacities of RNA independent of modern biology. These complementary approaches exploit multiple in vitro evolution techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Together these complementary approaches advance our understanding of the most primitive organisms, their early evolution, and their eventual transition to modern biochemistry.

  18. Canine procalcitonin messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kuzi, Sharon; Aroch, Itamar; Peleg, Keren; Karnieli, Ohad; Klement, Eyal; Dank, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Procalcitonin is considered an acute phase protein used as both a marker of infection and prognosis in human medicine. Canine procalcitonin has been previously sequenced; however, its use as a diagnostic or prognostic tool in dogs has never been assessed. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for canine procalcitonin messenger RNA (mRNA) was developed. Whole blood samples were collected from ill and healthy dogs. RNA was extracted and the real-time PCR was assessed. The patients' diagnoses, complete blood cell count, and differential leukocyte count results were recorded. Based on the diagnosis, dogs were divided into 5 groups: inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, other diseases, and healthy controls. Procalcitonin mRNA expression and the hematological measures were compared between groups, and their correlations were assessed. Procalcitonin mRNA expression was assessed in 70 dogs, including infectious (17), noninfectious inflammatory (17), neoplastic (18), other diseases (7), and healthy controls (11), and was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in all ill dogs versus controls. Procalcitonin may therefore be considered an acutephase protein in dogs. However, there were no significant differences in procalcitonin mRNA expression between ill dog groups and no correlations between its expression levels and hematological measures. In 5 dogs of all disease categories, procalcitonin mRNA expression was measured twice during the course of disease. The changes in its levels were in agreement with the clinical evaluation of improvement or deterioration, suggesting a possible prognostic value. PMID:18776098

  19. Finding the right RNA: identification of cellular mRNA substrates for RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Trifillis, P; Day, N; Kiledjian, M

    1999-01-01

    Defects in RNA-binding proteins have been implicated in human genetic disorders. However, efforts in understanding the functions of these proteins have been hampered by the inability to obtain their mRNA substrates. To identify cognate cellular mRNAs associated with an RNA-binding protein, we devised a strategy termed isolation of specific nucleic acids associated with proteins (SNAAP). The SNAAP technique allows isolation and subsequent identification of these mRNAs. To assess the validity of this approach, we utilized cellular mRNA and protein from K562 cells and alphaCP1, a protein implicated in a-globin mRNA stability, as a model system. Immobilization of an RNA-binding protein with the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) domain enables isolation of mRNA within an mRNP context and the identity of the bound mRNAs is determined by the differential display assay. The specificity of protein-RNA interactions was considerably enhanced when the interactions were carried out in the presence of cellular extract rather than purified components. Two of the mRNAs specifically bound by alphaCP1 were mRNAs encoding the transmembrane receptor protein, TAPA-1, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II enzyme, coxII. A specific poly(C)-sensitive complex formed on the TAPA-1 and coxII 3' UTRs consistent with the binding of aCP1. Furthermore, direct binding of purified alphaCP proteins to these 3' UTRs was demonstrated and the binding sites determined. These results support the feasibility of the SNAAP technique and suggest a broad applicability for the approach in identifying mRNA targets for clinically relevant RNA-binding proteins that will provide insights into their possible functions. PMID:10445881

  20. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional) needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives. PMID:25426799

  1. tRNA synthetase: tRNA Aminoacylation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yan Ling Joy; Poruri, Kiranmai; Martinis, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are prominently known for their classic function in the first step of protein synthesis, where they bear the responsibility of setting the genetic code. Each enzyme is exquisitely adapted to covalently link a single standard amino acid to its cognate set of tRNA isoacceptors. These ancient enzymes have evolved idiosyncratically to host alternate activities that go far beyond their aminoacylation role and impact a wide range of other metabolic pathways and cell signaling processes. The family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have also been suggested as a remarkable scaffold to incorporate new domains that would drive evolution and the emergence of new organisms with more complex function. Because they are essential, the tRNA synthetases have served as pharmaceutical targets for drug and antibiotic development. The recent unfolding of novel important functions for this family of proteins offers new and promising pathways for therapeutic development to treat diverse human diseases. PMID:24706556

  2. An Integrative Analysis of microRNA and mRNA Profiling in CML Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Farah J; El Eit, Rabab; Nasr, Rihab

    2016-01-01

    Integrative analysis of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) in Chronic Myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells is an important technique to study the involvement of miRNA and their targets in CML stem cells self-renewal, maintenance, and therapeutic resistance. Here, we describe a simplified integrative analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software after performing proper RNA extraction, miRNA and mRNA microarray and data analysis. PMID:27581151

  3. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  4. The ViennaRNA web services.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Andreas R; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lorenz, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The ViennaRNA package is a widely used collection of programs for thermodynamic RNA secondary structure prediction. Over the years, many additional tools have been developed building on the core programs of the package to also address issues related to noncoding RNA detection, RNA folding kinetics, or efficient sequence design considering RNA-RNA hybridizations. The ViennaRNA web services provide easy and user-friendly web access to these tools. This chapter describes how to use this online platform to perform tasks such as prediction of minimum free energy structures, prediction of RNA-RNA hybrids, or noncoding RNA detection. The ViennaRNA web services can be used free of charge and can be accessed via http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at. PMID:25577387

  5. Cotranslational microRNA mediated messenger RNA destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Tat, Trinh To; Maroney, Patricia A; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Coller, Jeff; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (22 nucleotide) regulatory molecules that play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes. These RNAs, which bind to targeted mRNAs via limited base pairing interactions, act to reduce protein production from those mRNAs. Considerable evidence indicates that miRNAs destabilize targeted mRNAs by recruiting enzymes that function in normal mRNA decay and mRNA degradation is widely thought to occur when mRNAs are in a ribosome free state. Nevertheless, when examined, miRNA targeted mRNAs are invariably found to be polysome associated; observations that appear to be at face value incompatible with a simple decay model. Here, we provide evidence that turnover of miRNA-targeted mRNAs occurs while they are being translated. Cotranslational mRNA degradation is initiated by decapping and proceeds 5’ to 3’ behind the last translating ribosome. These results provide an explanation for a long standing mystery in the miRNA field. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12880.001 PMID:27058298

  6. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; Kockx, Christel E M; Gomez, Cesar Payan; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  7. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Kasper WJ; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam CGN; Kockx, Christel EM; Payan Gomez, Cesar; Brouwer, Rutger WW; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan HJ; van IJcken, Wilfred FJ; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  8. Isothermal titration calorimetry of RNA.

    PubMed

    Salim, Nilshad N; Feig, Andrew L

    2009-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a fast and robust method to study the physical basis of molecular interactions. A single well-designed experiment can provide complete thermodynamic characterization of a binding reaction, including K(a), DeltaG, DeltaH, DeltaS and reaction stoichiometry (n). Repeating the experiment at different temperatures allows determination of the heat capacity change (DeltaC(P)) of the interaction. Modern calorimeters are sensitive enough to probe even weak biological interactions making ITC a very popular method among biochemists. Although ITC has been applied to protein studies for many years, it is becoming widely applicable in RNA biochemistry as well, especially in studies which involve RNA folding and RNA interactions with small molecules, proteins and with other RNAs. This review focuses on best practices for planning, designing and executing effective ITC experiments when one or more of the reactants is an RNA. PMID:18835447

  9. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  10. RNA silencing: an antiviral mechanism.

    PubMed

    Csorba, T; Pantaleo, V; Burgyán, J

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins which can counteract the host silencing-based antiviral process. After the discovery of virus-encoded silencing suppressors, it was shown that these viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism and function of antiviral RNA silencing in plants, and on the virus's counterattack by expression of silencing-suppressor proteins. We also discuss emerging evidence that RNA silencing and expression of viral silencing-suppressor proteins are tools forged as a consequence of virus-host coevolution for fine-tuning host-pathogen coexistence. PMID:20109663

  11. The Annotation of RNA Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The recent deluge of new RNA structures, including complete atomic-resolution views of both subunits of the ribosome, has on the one hand literally overwhelmed our individual abilities to comprehend the diversity of RNA structure, and on the other hand presented us with new opportunities for comprehensive use of RNA sequences for comparative genetic, evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Two concepts are key to understanding RNA structure: hierarchical organization of global structure and isostericity of local interactions. Global structure changes extremely slowly, as it relies on conserved long-range tertiary interactions. Tertiary RNA–RNA and quaternary RNA–protein interactions are mediated by RNA motifs, defined as recurrent and ordered arrays of non-Watson–Crick base-pairs. A single RNA motif comprises a family of sequences, all of which can fold into the same three-dimensional structure and can mediate the same interaction(s). The chemistry and geometry of base pairing constrain the evolution of motifs in such a way that random mutations that occur within motifs are accepted or rejected insofar as they can mediate a similar ordered array of interactions. The steps involved in the analysis and annotation of RNA motifs in 3D structures are: (a) decomposition of each motif into non-Watson–Crick base-pairs; (b) geometric classification of each basepair; (c) identification of isosteric substitutions for each basepair by comparison to isostericity matrices; (d) alignment of homologous sequences using the isostericity matrices to identify corresponding positions in the crystal structure; (e) acceptance or rejection of the null hypothesis that the motif is conserved. PMID:18629252

  12. Localized control of oxidized RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Dhaliwal, James S; Adjibade, Pauline; Uniacke, James; Mazroui, Rachid; Zerges, William

    2015-11-15

    The oxidation of biological molecules by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can render them inactive or toxic. This includes the oxidation of RNA, which appears to underlie the detrimental effects of oxidative stress, aging and certain neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we investigate the management of oxidized RNA in the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our immunofluorescence microscopy results reveal that oxidized RNA (with 8-hydroxyguanine) is localized in the pyrenoid, a chloroplast microcompartment where CO2 is assimilated by the Calvin cycle enzyme Rubisco. Results of genetic analyses support a requirement for the Rubisco large subunit (RBCL), but not Rubisco, in the management of oxidized RNA. An RBCL pool that can carry out such a 'moonlighting' function is revealed by results of biochemical fractionation experiments. We also show that human (HeLa) cells localize oxidized RNA to cytoplasmic foci that are distinct from stress granules, processing bodies and mitochondria. Our results suggest that the compartmentalization of oxidized RNA management is a general phenomenon and therefore has some fundamental significance. PMID:26449969

  13. Predicting and Modeling RNA Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Westhof, Eric; Masquida, Benoît; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A general approach for modeling the architecture of large and structured RNA molecules is described. The method exploits the modularity and the hierarchical folding of RNA architecture that is viewed as the assembly of preformed double-stranded helices defined by Watson-Crick base pairs and RNA modules maintained by non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Despite the extensive molecular neutrality observed in RNA structures, specificity in RNA folding is achieved through global constraints like lengths of helices, coaxiality of helical stacks, and structures adopted at the junctions of helices. The Assemble integrated suite of computer tools allows for sequence and structure analysis as well as interactive modeling by homology or ab initio assembly with possibilities for fitting within electronic density maps. The local key role of non-Watson-Crick pairs guides RNA architecture formation and offers metrics for assessing the accuracy of three-dimensional models in a more useful way than usual root mean square deviation (RMSD) values. PMID:20504963

  14. Summary: the modified nucleosides of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, P A; Crain, P F; McCloskey, J A

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive listing is made of posttranscriptionally modified nucleosides from RNA reported in the literature through mid-1994. Included are chemical structures, common names, symbols, Chemical Abstracts registry numbers (for ribonucleoside and corresponding base), Chemical Abstracts Index Name, phylogenetic sources, and initial literature citations for structural characterization or occurrence, and for chemical synthesis. The listing is categorized by type of RNA: tRNA, rRNA, mRNA, snRNA, and other RNAs. A total of 93 different modified nucleosides have been reported in RNA, with the largest number and greatest structural diversity in tRNA, 79; and 28 in rRNA, 12 in mRNA, 11 in snRNA and 3 in other small RNAs. PMID:7518580

  15. RNA mediated assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, Jessica Lynn

    The first chapter of this work presents a comprehensive look at RNA mediated nanoparticle formation. The overall goal of this research is to gain a deeper understanding of the RNA-particle formation mechanism and the basic properties of the materials selected by modified RNA molecules. Understanding such RNA-substrate interactions and how they translate into the physical and chemical characteristics of the nanoparticles they create are important fundamental concepts when considering these biotemplated materials as potential chemical catalysts. The RNA sequences discussed in the first chapter (referred to as Pdases) were discovered using RNA in vitro selection techniques. These Pdases were found to be capable of forming inorganic palladium (Pd) containing nanoparticles with impressive control over an individual particle's size and shape, despite incubation with the same organometallic precursor. This discovery held exciting implications for inorganic nanoparticle design while also generating numerous questions regarding the mechanism of RNA mediated particle growth. The central question that arose after this initial discovery was how could a biomolecule be used to tailor the physical size and shape of inorganic materials? Starting with a chemical proof designed to uncover the composition of the nanoparticles formed by RNA mediation, this chapter investigates the basic material properties of the nanoparticles while also introducing surprising results regarding the effect of multiple sequences on nanoparticle growth outcomes. In the second chapter, the experiments shift to developing methods to investigate nanoparticle growth mechanisms by fluorescence spectroscopy. A fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) assay is presented in which the strengths of the technique are adapted for studying the formation of RNA mediated Pd nanoparticles in real time. This is a unique application of FPA, as it has been adapted to encompass both the biochemical and materials analysis

  16. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  17. miSolRNA: A tomato micro RNA relational database

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The economic importance of Solanaceae plant species is well documented and tomato has become a model for functional genomics studies. In plants, important processes are regulated by microRNAs (miRNA). Description We describe here a data base integrating genetic map positions of miRNA-targeted genes, their expression profiles and their relations with quantitative fruit metabolic loci and yield associated traits. miSolRNA provides a metadata source to facilitate the construction of hypothesis aimed at defining physiological modes of action of regulatory process underlying the metabolism of the tomato fruit. Conclusions The MiSolRNA database allows the simple extraction of metadata for the proposal of new hypothesis concerning possible roles of miRNAs in the regulation of tomato fruit metabolism. It permits i) to map miRNAs and their predicted target sites both on expressed (SGN-UNIGENES) and newly annotated sequences (BAC sequences released), ii) to co-locate any predicted miRNA-target interaction with metabolic QTL found in tomato fruits, iii) to retrieve expression data of target genes in tomato fruit along their developmental period and iv) to design further experiments for unresolved questions in complex trait biology based on the use of genetic materials that have been proven to be a useful tools for map-based cloning experiments in Solanaceae plant species. PMID:21059227

  18. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  19. Kinetic oscillations in the expression of messenger RNA, regulatory protein, and nonprotein coding RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-06-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-mRNA association or (ii) ncRNA-protein association resulting in degradation of the corresponding complex. The kinetic models, describing these two scenarios and taking into account that the association of ncRNA with a target occurs after ncRNA conversion from the initial form to the final form (e.g., from a long RNA to microRNA), are found to predict oscillations provided that the rate of ncRNA formation increases with increasing protein population.

  20. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. PMID:26159998

  1. A 22-nt artificial microRNA mediates widespread RNA silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Marcus; Eamens, Andrew L; Finnegan, E Jean; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    It is known that 22-nucleotide (nt) microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from asymmetric duplexes trigger phased small-interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from complementary targets. Here we investigate the efficacy of 22-nt artificial miRNA (amiRNA)-mediated RNA silencing relative to conventional hairpin RNA (hpRNA) and 21-nt amiRNA-mediated RNA silencing. CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS) was selected as a target in Arabidopsis thaliana due to the obvious and non-lethal loss of anthocyanin accumulation upon widespread RNA silencing. Over-expression of CHS in the pap1-D background facilitated visual detection of both local and systemic RNA silencing. RNA silencing was initiated in leaf tissues from hpRNA and amiRNA plant expression vectors under the control of an Arabidopsis RuBisCo small subunit 1A promoter (SSU). In this system, hpRNA expression triggered CHS silencing in most leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. Similarly, 21-nt amiRNA expression from symmetric miRNA/miRNA* duplexes triggered CHS silencing in all leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. However, 22-nt amiRNA expression from an asymmetric duplex triggered CHS silencing in all tissues, including roots and seed coats, in the majority of plant lines. This widespread CHS silencing required RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6-mediated accumulation of phasiRNAs from the endogenous CHS transcript. These results demonstrate the efficacy of asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing and associated phasiRNA production and activity, in mediating widespread RNA silencing of an endogenous target gene. Asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing requires little modification of existing amiRNA technology and is expected to be effective in suppressing other genes and/or members of gene families. PMID:23937661

  2. RNA Matchmaking: Finding Cellular Pairing Partners.

    PubMed

    Graveley, Brenton R

    2016-07-21

    RNA structure is intimately related to function, yet methods to identify base-paired RNA strands in a transcriptome-wide manner in cells have remained elusive. One recent paper in Cell and two in Molecular Cell describe related methods to identify RNA sequences that interact in living cells, setting the stage for breakthroughs in our understanding of RNA structure and function. PMID:27447984

  3. RSRE: RNA structural robustness evaluator.

    PubMed

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2007-07-01

    Biological robustness, defined as the ability to maintain stable functioning in the face of various perturbations, is an important and fundamental topic in current biology, and has become a focus of numerous studies in recent years. Although structural robustness has been explored in several types of RNA molecules, the origins of robustness are still controversial. Computational analysis results are needed to make up for the lack of evidence of robustness in natural biological systems. The RNA structural robustness evaluator (RSRE) web server presented here provides a freely available online tool to quantitatively evaluate the structural robustness of RNA based on the widely accepted definition of neutrality. Several classical structure comparison methods are employed; five randomization methods are implemented to generate control sequences; sub-optimal predicted structures can be optionally utilized to mitigate the uncertainty of secondary structure prediction. With a user-friendly interface, the web application is easy to use. Intuitive illustrations are provided along with the original computational results to facilitate analysis. The RSRE will be helpful in the wide exploration of RNA structural robustness and will catalyze our understanding of RNA evolution. The RSRE web server is freely available at http://biosrv1.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/ or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/. PMID:17567615

  4. Viral escape from antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Jacobson, A; Badgett, M R; Molineux, I J

    1998-05-01

    RNA coliphage SP was propagated for several generations on a host expressing an inhibitory antisense RNA complementary to bases 31-270 of the positive-stranded genome. Phages evolved that escaped inhibition. Typically, these escape mutants contained 3-4 base substitutions, but different sequences were observed among different isolates. The mutations were located within three different types of structural features within the predicted secondary structure of SP genomic RNA: (i) hairpin loops; (ii) hairpin stems; and (iii) the 5' region of the phage genome complementary to the antisense molecule. Computer modelling of the mutant genomic RNAs showed that all of the substitutions within hairpin stems improved the Watson-Crick pairing of the stem. No major structural rearrangements were predicted for any of the mutant genomes, and most substitutions in coding regions did not alter the amino acid sequence. Although the evolved phage populations were polymorphic for substitutions, many substitutions appeared independently in two selected lines. The creation of a new, perfect, antisense RNA against an escape mutant resulted in the inhibition of that mutant but not of other escape mutants nor of the ancestral, unevolved phage. Thus, at least in this system, a population of viruses that evolved to escape from a single antisense RNA would require a cocktail of several antisense RNAs for inhibition. PMID:9643550

  5. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA.

    PubMed

    Patton, James G; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Weaver, Alissa M; Vickers, Kasey; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J; Ansel, K Mark; Blelloch, Robert; Goga, Andrei; Huang, Bo; L'Etoille, Noelle; Raffai, Robert L; Lai, Charles P; Krichevsky, Anna M; Mateescu, Bogdan; Greiner, Vanille J; Hunter, Craig; Voinnet, Olivier; McManus, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s) by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA. PMID:26320939

  6. Polysome Preparation, RNA Isolation and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailong; Zhou, Muxiang

    2016-01-01

    During mRNA translation, 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits bind to target mRNA forming into an 80S complex (monosome). This ribosome moves along the mRNA during translational elongation to facilitate tRNA reading codon, where translation is activated and many monosome can bind the same mRNA simutaneously, which forms polysomes. Polysomes can be size-fractionated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The more specific mRNA in polysomes implies more active translational status of the mRNA.

  7. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  8. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-09-01

    Standard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specific method to determine the expression of small and large RNAs from ribosomal RNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserves all RNA classes. This characteristic allows comparisons between RNA classes, thereby facilitating relationships between different RNA classes. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedure associated with RNAome sequencing published by Derks and colleagues in RNA Biology (2015) [1]. We also provide the R code for the developed Total Rna Analysis Pipeline (TRAP), an algorithm to analyze RNAome sequencing datasets (deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus data repository, accession number GSE48084). PMID:26484291

  9. Hairpins under tension: RNA versus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bercy, Mathilde; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to control the folding and unfolding of individual DNA and RNA hairpins by force. Four hairpin molecules are studied in comparison: two DNA and two RNA ones. We observe that the conformational dynamics is slower for the RNA hairpins than for their DNA counterparts. Our results indicate that structures made of RNA are dynamically more stable. This difference might contribute to the fact that DNA and RNA play fundamentally different biological roles in spite of chemical similarity. PMID:26323319

  10. Unexpected functions of tRNA and tRNA processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hurto, Rebecca L

    2011-01-01

    tRNA and tRNA processing enzymes impact more than protein production. Studies have uncovered roles for tRNA in the regulation of transcription, translation and protein turnover. Induced by stress or as a programmed part of development, nonrandom tRNA fragments can guide mRNA cleavage, inhibit translation and promote morphological changes. Similarly, tRNA processing enzymes, such as RNaseP and tRNA aminoacyl-synthetases participate in tasks affecting more than tRNA function (i.e., mRNA function and cellular signaling). Unraveling the complexities of their functions will increase our understanding of how mutations associated with disease impact these functions and the downstream consequences. This chapter focuses on how tRNA and tRNA processing enzymes influence cellular function and RNA-infrastructure via pathways beyond the decoding activities that tRNA are known for. PMID:21915787

  11. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  12. Genomic analysis of RNA localization

    PubMed Central

    Taliaferro, J Matthew; Wang, Eric T; Burge, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The localization of mRNAs to specific subcellular sites is widespread, allowing cells to spatially restrict and regulate protein production, and playing important roles in development and cellular physiology. This process has been studied in mechanistic detail for several RNAs. However, the generality or specificity of RNA localization systems and mechanisms that impact the many thousands of localized mRNAs has been difficult to assess. In this review, we discuss the current state of the field in determining which RNAs localize, which RNA sequences mediate localization, the protein factors involved, and the biological implications of localization. For each question, we examine prominent systems and techniques that are used to study individual messages, highlight recent genome-wide studies of RNA localization, and discuss the potential for adapting other high-throughput approaches to the study of localization. PMID:25483039

  13. Shapes of RNA pseudoknot structures.

    PubMed

    Reidys, Christian M; Wang, Rita R

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we study abstract shapes of k-noncrossing, σ-canonical RNA pseudoknot structures. We consider lv1k- and lv5k-shapes, which represent a generalization of the abstract π'- and π-shapes of RNA secondary structures introduced by Giegerich et al. Using a novel approach, we compute the generating functions of lv1k- and lv5k-shapes as well as the generating functions of all lv1k- and lv5k-shapes induced by all k-noncrossing, σ-canonical RNA structures for fixed n. By means of singularity analysis of the generating functions, we derive explicit asymptotic expressions For online Supplementary Material, see www.liebertonline.com. PMID:20868269

  14. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable. PMID:26678076

  15. RNA Study Using DNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Masubuchi, Takeya; Ueda, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is one of the fundamental steps of gene expression, where RNA polymerases (RNAPs) bind to their template genes and make RNAs. In addition to RNAP and the template gene, many molecules such as transcription factors are involved. The interaction and the effect of these factors depend on the geometry. Molecular layout of these factors, RNAP and gene is thus important. DNA nanotechnology is a promising technology that allows controlling of the molecular layout in the range of nanometer to micrometer scale with nanometer resolution; thus, it is expected to expand the RNA study beyond the current limit. PMID:26970193

  16. The rise of regulatory RNA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K.V.; Mattick, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries over the last decade portend a paradigm shift in molecular biology. Evidence suggests that RNA is not only functional as a messenger between DNA and protein but also in the regulation of genome organization and gene expression, which is increasingly elaborated in complex organisms. Regulatory RNAs appear to operate at many levels, but in particular to play an important role in the epigenetic processes that control differentiation and development. These discoveries suggest a central role for RNA in human evolution and ontogeny. Here we survey the emergence of the previously unsuspected world of regulatory RNAs from an historical perspective. PMID:24776770

  17. Early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs due to saturation of microRNA pathways* #

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhen; Wu, Rong; Zhao, Yi-cheng; Wang, Kan-kan; Huang, Yong-ye; Yang, Xin; Xie, Zi-cong; Tu, Chang-chun; Ouyang, Hong-sheng; Wang, Tie-dong; Pang, Da-xin

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is considered as a potential modality for clinical treatment and anti-virus animal breeding. Here, we investigate the feasibility of inhibiting classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replication by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in vitro and in vivo. We generate four different shRNA-positive clonal cells and two types of shRNA-transgenic pigs. CSFV could be effectively inhibited in shRNA-positive clonal cells and tail tip fibroblasts of shRNA-transgenic pigs. Unexpectedly, an early lethality due to shRNA is observed in these shRNA-transgenic pigs. With further research on shRNA-positive clonal cells and transgenic pigs, we report a great induction of interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in shRNA-positive clonal cells, altered levels of endogenous microRNAs (miRNA), and their processing enzymes in shRNA-positive cells. What is more, abnormal expressions of miRNAs and their processing enzymes are also observed in the livers of shRNA-transgenic pigs, indicating saturation of miRNA/shRNA pathways induced by shRNA. In addition, we investigate the effects of shRNAs on the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. These results show that shRNA causes adverse effects in vitro and in vivo and shRNA-induced disruption of the endogenous miRNA pathway may lead to the early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs. We firstly report abnormalities of the miRNA pathway in shRNA-transgenic animals, which may explain the early lethality of shRNA-transgenic pigs and has important implications for shRNA-transgenic animal preparation. PMID:24793764

  18. RNA isolation and fractionation with compaction agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. C.; Fox, G. E.; Willson, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to the isolation of RNA from bacterial lysates employs selective precipitation by compaction agents, such as hexammine cobalt and spermidine. Using 3.5 mM hexammine cobalt, total RNA can be selectively precipitated from a cell lysate. At a concentration of 2 mM hexammine cobalt, rRNA can be fractionated from low molecular weight RNA. The resulting RNA mixture is readily resolved to pure 5S and mixed 16S/23S rRNA by nondenaturing anion-exchange chromatography. Using a second stage of precipitation at 8 mM hexammine cobalt, the low molecular weight RNA fraction can be isolated by precipitation. Compaction precipitation was also applied to the purification of an artificial stable RNA derived from Escherichia coli 5S rRNA and to the isolation of an Escherichia coli-expressed ribozyme. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. RNA helicases in infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Steimer, Lenz; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2012-06-01

    RNA helicases unwind their RNA substrates in an ATP-dependent reaction, and are central to all cellular processes involving RNA. They have important roles in viral life cycles, where RNA helicases are either virus-encoded or recruited from the host. Vertebrate RNA helicases sense viral infections, and trigger the innate antiviral immune response. RNA helicases have been implicated in protozoic, bacterial and fungal infections. They are also linked to neurological disorders, cancer, and aging processes.   Genome-wide studies continue to identify helicase genes that change their expression patterns after infection or disease outbreak, but the mechanism of RNA helicase action has been defined for only a few diseases. RNA helicases are prognostic and diagnostic markers and suitable drug targets, predominantly for antiviral and anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on RNA helicases in infection and disease, and their growing potential as drug targets. PMID:22699555

  20. Relicts and models of the RNA world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Kirsi; Karetnikov, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    It is widely believed that the current DNA-RNA-protein-based life forms have evolved from preceding RNA-protein-based life forms, and these again, from mere RNA replicons. By rationale, it can be assumed that the early RNA replicons were fully heterotrophic in terms of obtaining all their building blocks from their environment. In the absence of protein catalysts, their essential life functions had to be mediated by simple functional structures and mechanisms, such as RNA secondary structures, RNA-RNA interactions and RNA-mediated catalysis, and possibly by catalytic minerals or clays. The central role of RNA catalysts in early life forms is supported by the fact that several catalytic RNAs still perform central biological functions in current life forms, and at least some of these may be derived as molecular relicts from the early RNA-based life. The RNA-catalysed metabolic reactions and molecular fossils are more conserved in the eukaryotic life forms than in the prokaryotes, suggesting that the linear eukaryote genomes may more closely resemble the structure and function of the early RNA replicons, than what do the circular prokaryote genomes. Present-day RNA viruses and viroids utilize ultimately simple life strategies, which may be similar to those used by the early RNA replicons. Thus, molecular and functional properties of viruses and viroids may be considered as examples or models of the structures and replication mechanisms, which might have been used for the replication of the early biopolymers.

  1. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  2. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  3. Mitomycin C Inhibits Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Ryan G.; Collier, Abby C.; Coon, Amy E.; Pritsos, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a commonly used and extensively studied chemotherapeutic agent requiring biological reduction for activity. Damage to nuclear DNA is thought to be its primary mechanism of cell death. Due to a lack of evidence for significant MMC activation in the nucleus and for in vivo studies demonstrating the formation of MMC-DNA adducts, we chose to investigate alternative nucleic acid targets. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine changes in mitochondrial gene expression induced by MMC treatment. Although no consistent effects on mitochondrial mRNA expression were observed, complementary results from reverse transcription-PCR experiments and gel-shift and binding assays demonstrated that MMC rapidly decreased the transcript levels of 18S ribosomal RNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Under hypoxic conditions, transcript levels of 18S rRNA decreased by 1.5-fold compared with untreated controls within 30 min. Recovery to base line required several hours, indicating that de novo synthesis of 18S was necessary. Addition of MMC to an in vitro translation reaction significantly decreased protein production in the cell-free system. Functional assays performed using a luciferase reporter construct in vivo determined that protein translation was inhibited, further confirming this mechanism of toxicity. The interaction of MMC with ribosomal RNA and subsequent inhibition of protein translation is consistent with mechanisms proposed for other natural compounds. PMID:20418373

  4. Circular RNA expands its territory.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chunyang; Lyu, Dongbin; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-03-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a novel class of widespread non-coding RNAs in eukaryotes. They are unusually stable RNA molecules with cell type-specific expression patterns, and are predominantly present in the cytoplasm. We recently demonstrated the existence of abundant circRNAs in exosomes and suggest a potential application of exosomal circRNAs for cancer detection. PMID:27308606

  5. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  6. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  7. RNA cleavage and chain elongation by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a binary enzyme.RNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, C R; Solow-Cordero, D E; Chamberlin, M J

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of DNA, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) can bind RNA to form an equimolar binary complex with the concomitant release of the sigma factor. We show now that E. coli RNA polymerase binds at a region near the 3' terminus of the RNA and that an RNA in such RNA.RNA polymerase complexes undergoes reactions previously thought to be unique to nascent RNA in ternary complexes with DNA. These include GreA/GreB-dependent cleavage of the RNA and elongation by 3'-terminal addition of NMP from NTP. Both of these reactions are inhibited by rifampicin. Hence, by several criteria, the RNA in binary complexes is bound to the polymerase in a manner quite similar to that in ternary complexes. These findings can be explained by a model for the RNA polymerase ternary complex in which the RNA is bound at the 3' terminus through two protein binding sites located up to 10 nt apart. In this model, the stability of RNA binding to the polymerase in the ternary complex is due primarily to its interaction with the protein. Images PMID:7513426

  8. Roles of the Coding and Noncoding Regions of Rift Valley Fever Virus RNA Genome Segments in Viral RNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shin; Terasaki, Kaori; Narayanan, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the RNA elements involved in the packaging of Rift Valley fever virus RNA genome segments, L, M, and S. The 5′-terminal 25 nucleotides of each RNA segment were equally competent for RNA packaging and carried an RNA packaging signal, which overlapped with the RNA replication signal. Only the deletion mutants of L RNA, but not full-length L RNA, were efficiently packaged, implying the possible requirement of RNA compaction for L RNA packaging. PMID:22278239

  9. Multiple RNA interaction: beyond two.

    PubMed

    Mneimneh, Saad; Ahmed, Syed Ali

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of two RNA molecules involves a complex interplay between folding and binding that warranted recent developments in RNA-RNA interaction algorithms. However, biological mechanisms in which more than two RNAs take part in an interaction also exist. It is reasonable to believe that interactions involving multiple RNAs are generally more complex to be treated pairwise. In addition, given a pool of RNAs, it is not trivial to predict which RNAs interact without sufficient biological knowledge. Therefore, structures resulting from multiple RNA interactions often cannot be predicted by the existing algorithms that handle RNAs pairwise and may simply favor the best interacting pair. We propose a system for multiple RNA interaction that overcomes the difficulties mentioned above by formulating a combinatorial optimization problem called Pegs and Rubber Bands. A solution to this problem encodes a structure of interacting RNAs. The problem, not surprisingly, is NP-hard. However, our experiments with approximation algorithms and heuristics for the problem suggest that this formulation is adequate to predict known interaction patterns of multiple RNAs. In general, however, the optimal solution obtained does not necessarily correspond to the actual structure observed in biological experiments. Moreover, a structure produced by interacting RNAs may not be unique. We extend our approach to generate multiple suboptimal solutions. By clustering these solutions, we are able to reveal representatives that correspond to realistic structures. Specifically, our results on the U2-U6 complex with introns in the spliceosome of human/yeast and the CopA-CopT complex in E. coli are consistent with published biological structures. PMID:25680214

  10. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  11. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD+, FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation. PMID:26435376

  12. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y.; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  13. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-04-17

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  14. Intermediate States During mRNA-tRNA Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies support the notion that the pre-translocation (PRE) ribosomal complex functions, at least in part, as a Brownian machine, stochastically fluctuating among multiple conformations and transfer RNA (tRNA) binding configurations. Apart from the relatively more energetically stable conformational states of the PRE complex, termed macrostate I (MS I) and macrostate II (MS II), several additional intermediate states have been recently discovered. Structural and kinetic analyses of these states, made possible by cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM), X-ray crystallography, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET), have provided important insights into the translocation process, which is now understood to proceed, at least in the first step of the process, as a Brownian machine that is transiently stabilized in the “productive” MS II conformation by the binding of the translocase elongation factor G (EF-G). PMID:22906732

  15. Role of RNA polymerase IV in plant small RNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Henderson, Ian R; Lu, Cheng; Green, Pamela J; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2007-03-13

    In addition to the three RNA polymerases (RNAP I-III) shared by all eukaryotic organisms, plant genomes encode a fourth RNAP (RNAP IV) that appears to be specialized in the production of siRNAs. Available data support a model in which dsRNAs are generated by RNAP IV and RNA-dependent RNAP 2 (RDR2) and processed by DICER (DCL) enzymes into 21- to 24-nt siRNAs, which are associated with different ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins for transcriptional or posttranscriptional gene silencing. However, it is not yet clear what fraction of genomic siRNA production is RNAP IV-dependent, and to what extent these siRNAs are preferentially processed by certain DCL(s) or associated with specific AGOs for distinct downstream functions. To address these questions on a genome-wide scale, we sequenced approximately 335,000 siRNAs from wild-type and RNAP IV mutant Arabidopsis plants by using 454 technology. The results show that RNAP IV is required for the production of >90% of all siRNAs, which are faithfully produced from a discrete set of genomic loci. Comparisons of these siRNAs with those accumulated in rdr2 and dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and those associated with AGO1 and AGO4 provide important information regarding the processing, channeling, and functions of plant siRNAs. We also describe a class of RNAP IV-independent siRNAs produced from endogenous single-stranded hairpin RNA precursors. PMID:17360559

  16. siRNA and RNAi optimization.

    PubMed

    Alagia, Adele; Eritja, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The discovery and examination of the posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi) contributed to the identification of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the comprehension of its enormous potential for clinical purposes. Theoretically, the ability of specific target gene downregulation makes the RNAi pathway an appealing solution for several diseases. Despite numerous hurdles resulting from the inherent properties of siRNA molecule and proper delivery to the target tissue, more than 50 RNA-based drugs are currently under clinical testing. In this work, we analyze the recent literature in the optimization of siRNA molecules. In detail, we focused on describing the most recent advances of siRNA field aimed at optimize siRNA pharmacokinetic properties. Special attention has been given in describing the impact of RNA modifications in the potential off-target effects (OTEs) such as saturation of the RNAi machinery, passenger strand-mediated silencing, immunostimulation, and miRNA-like OTEs as well as to recent developments on the delivery issue. The novel delivery systems and modified siRNA provide significant steps toward the development of reliable siRNA molecules for therapeutic use. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:316-329. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26840434

  17. Linking RNA biology to lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Loyal A.; Rinn, John L.

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory potential of RNA has never ceased to amaze: from RNA catalysis, to RNA-mediated splicing, to RNA-based silencing of an entire chromosome during dosage compensation. More recently, thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts have been identified, the majority with unknown function. Thus, it is tempting to think that these lncRNAs represent a cadre of new factors that function through ribonucleic mechanisms. Some evidence points to several lncRNAs with tantalizing physiological contributions and thought-provoking molecular modalities. However, dissecting the RNA biology of lncRNAs has been difficult, and distinguishing the independent contributions of functional RNAs from underlying DNA elements, or the local act of transcription, is challenging. Here, we aim to survey the existing literature and highlight future approaches that will be needed to link the RNA-based biology and mechanisms of lncRNAs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26430155

  18. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  19. RNAseq by Total RNA Library Identifies Additional RNAs Compared to Poly(A) RNA Library

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Zhao, Shilin; Sheng, Quanhu; Guo, Mingsheng; Lehmann, Brian; Pietenpol, Jennifer; Samuels, David C.; Shyr, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The most popular RNA library used for RNA sequencing is the poly(A) captured RNA library. This library captures RNA based on the presence of poly(A) tails at the 3′ end. Another type of RNA library for RNA sequencing is the total RNA library which differs from the poly(A) library by capture method and price. The total RNA library costs more and its capture of RNA is not dependent on the presence of poly(A) tails. In practice, only ribosomal RNAs and small RNAs are washed out in the total RNA library preparation. To evaluate the ability of detecting RNA for both RNA libraries we designed a study using RNA sequencing data of the same two breast cancer cell lines from both RNA libraries. We found that the RNA expression values captured by both RNA libraries were highly correlated. However, the number of RNAs captured was significantly higher for the total RNA library. Furthermore, we identify several subsets of protein coding RNAs that were not captured efficiently by the poly(A) library. One of the most noticeable is the histone-encode genes, which lack the poly(A) tail. PMID:26543871

  20. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  1. Dynamic RNA modifications in disease.

    PubMed

    Klungland, Arne; Dahl, John Arne

    2014-06-01

    While the presence of 6-methyladenosine (m6A) modifications in mRNA was noted several decades ago, the first enzyme reversing this modification was identified very recently. Today we know of two methyltransferases introducing m6A in mRNA--METTL3 and METTL14--and two demethylases that remove it have been identified-FTO (ALKBH9) and ALKBH5. The conserved role of m6A seems to relate to meiosis, and mice lacking ALKBH5 are infertile. While loss-of-function mutation in FTO causes a recessive lethal syndrome, sequence variants in introns of the FTO gene are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25005745

  2. Current techniques for visualizing RNA in cells

    PubMed Central

    Mannack, Lilith V.J.C.; Eising, Sebastian; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Labeling RNA is of utmost interest, particularly in living cells, and thus RNA imaging is an emerging field. There are numerous methods relying on different concepts ranging from hybridization-based probes, over RNA-binding proteins to chemo-enzymatic modification of RNA. These methods have different benefits and limitations. This review aims to outline the current state-of-the-art techniques and point out their benefits and limitations. PMID:27158473

  3. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  4. RNA decay machines: the exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Lubas, Michał; Jensen, Torben Heick; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The multisubunit RNA exosome complex is a major ribonuclease of eukaryotic cells that participates in the processing, quality control and degradation of virtually all classes of RNA in Eukaryota. All this is achieved by about a dozen proteins with only three ribonuclease activities between them. At first glance, the versatility of the pathways involving the exosome and the sheer multitude of its substrates are astounding. However, after fifteen years of research we have some understanding of how exosome activity is controlled and applied inside the cell. The catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome are fairly well described and attention is now drawn to how the interplay between these activities impacts cell physiology. Also, it has become evident that exosome function relies on many auxiliary factors, which are intensely studied themselves. In this way, the focus of exosome research is slowly leaving the test tube and moving back into the cell. The exosome also has an interesting evolutionary history, which is evident within the eukaryotic lineage but only fully appreciated when considering similar protein complexes found in Bacteria and Archaea. Thus, while we keep this review focused on the most comprehensively described yeast and human exosomes, we shall point out similarities or dissimilarities to prokaryotic complexes and proteins where appropriate. The article is divided into three parts. In Part One we describe how the exosome is built and how it manifests in cells of different organisms. In Part Two we detail the enzymatic properties of the exosome, especially recent data obtained for holocomplexes. Finally, Part Three presents an overview of the RNA metabolism pathways that involve the exosome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. PMID:23352926

  5. Riboswitches and the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Breaker, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches are structured noncoding RNA domains that selectively bind metabolites and control gene expression (Mandal and Breaker 2004a; Coppins et al. 2007; Roth and Breaker 2009). Nearly all examples of the known riboswitches reside in noncoding regions of messenger RNAs where they control transcription or translation. Newfound classes of riboswitches are being reported at a rate of about three per year (Ames and Breaker 2009), and these have been shown to selectively respond to fundamental metabolites including coenzymes, nucleobases or their derivatives, amino acids, and other small molecule ligands. The characteristics of some riboswitches suggest they could be modern descendents of an ancient sensory and regulatory system that likely functioned before the emergence of enzymes and genetic factors made of protein (Nahvi et al. 2002; Vitreschak et al. 2004; Breaker 2006). If true, then some of the riboswitch structures and functions that serve modern cells so well may accurately reflect the capabilities of RNA sensors and switches that existed in the RNA World. This article will address some of the characteristics of modern riboswitches that may be relevant to ancient versions of these metabolite-sensing RNAs. PMID:21106649

  6. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  7. Salt RNA protection against thermodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2003-04-01

    We shown the structural integrity of tRNA at high temperature, 82^oC for 30h, in high salt concentrations (Tehei et al, 2002). Stability were also performed by measuring the residual specific tRNA charge capacity after heat treatment for 30 h at 82^oC. We have undertaken in vitro selection of RNA molecules at high temperature in presence of an ancient halite (NaCl) sample (reference : EZ08-K6-C9). This sample, collected in a borehole at 720.15 m depth, belongs to the Rupelian Upper Salt Formation of the Bresse salt basin (France). Its age is estimated to about 31±3 millions years. These studies provide support for the importance of salt to protect macromolecules against thermal degradation allowing activity to be recovered. These could be useful for searching traces of life in ancient sediments and in planetary exploration. Reference: Tehei Moeva, Franzetti Bruno, Maurel Marie-Christine, Vergne Jacques, Hountondji Codjo and Zaccai Giuseppe, Extremophiles, (2002), 6: 427-430.

  8. Structural features of microRNA (miRNA) precursors and their relevance to miRNA biogenesis and small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA design.

    PubMed

    Krol, Jacek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wilczynska, Urszula; Drath, Maria; Jasinska, Anna; Kaczynska, Danuta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2004-10-01

    We have established the structures of 10 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors using biochemical methods. Eight of these structures turned out to be different from those that were computer-predicted. The differences localized in the terminal loop region and at the opposite side of the precursor hairpin stem. We have analyzed the features of these structures from the perspectives of miRNA biogenesis and active strand selection. We demonstrated the different thermodynamic stability profiles for pre-miRNA hairpins harboring miRNAs at their 5'- and 3'-sides and discussed their functional implications. Our results showed that miRNA prediction based on predicted precursor structures may give ambiguous results, and the success rate is significantly higher for the experimentally determined structures. On the other hand, the differences between the predicted and experimentally determined structures did not affect the stability of termini produced through "conceptual dicing." This result confirms the value of thermodynamic analysis based on mfold as a predictor of strand section by RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC). PMID:15292246

  9. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Dedduwa-Mudalige, Gayani N. P.; Chow, Christine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA) including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human. PMID:26370969

  10. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    SciTech Connect

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  11. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  12. The RNA helicase MOV10L1 binds piRNA precursors to initiate piRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Vourekas, Anastassios; Fu, Qi; Maragkakis, Manolis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Ma, Jing; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Piwi–piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA) ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) enforce retrotransposon silencing, a function critical for preserving the genome integrity of germ cells. The molecular functions of most of the factors that have been genetically implicated in primary piRNA biogenesis are still elusive. Here we show that MOV10L1 exhibits 5′-to-3′ directional RNA-unwinding activity in vitro and that a point mutation that abolishes this activity causes a failure in primary piRNA biogenesis in vivo. We demonstrate that MOV10L1 selectively binds piRNA precursor transcripts and is essential for the generation of intermediate piRNA processing fragments that are subsequently loaded to Piwi proteins. Multiple analyses suggest an intimate coupling of piRNA precursor processing with elements of local secondary structures such as G quadruplexes. Our results support a model in which MOV10L1 RNA helicase activity promotes unwinding and funneling of the single-stranded piRNA precursor transcripts to the endonuclease that catalyzes the first cleavage step of piRNA processing. PMID:25762440

  13. PredcircRNA: computational classification of circular RNA from other long non-coding RNA using hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Recently circular RNA (circularRNA) has been discovered as an increasingly important type of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), playing an important role in gene regulation, such as functioning as miRNA sponges. So it is very promising to identify circularRNA transcripts from de novo assembled transcripts obtained by high-throughput sequencing, such as RNA-seq data. In this study, we presented a machine learning approach, named as PredcircRNA, focused on distinguishing circularRNA from other lncRNAs using multiple kernel learning. Firstly we extracted different sources of discriminative features, including graph features, conservation information and sequence compositions, ALU and tandem repeats, SNP densities and open reading frames (ORFs) from transcripts. Secondly, to better integrate features from different sources, we proposed a computational approach based on a multiple kernel learning framework to fuse those heterogeneous features. Our preliminary 5-fold cross-validation result showed that our proposed method can classify circularRNA from other types of lncRNAs with an accuracy of 0.778, sensitivity of 0.781, specificity of 0.770, precision of 0.784 and MCC of 0.554 in our constructed gold-standard dataset, respectively. Our feature importance analysis based on Random Forest illustrated some discriminative features, such as conservation features and a GTAG sequence motif. Our PredcircRNA tool is available for download at . PMID:26028480

  14. Identification and characterization of two novel genomic RNA segments RNA5 and RNA6 in rose rosette virus infecting roses.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Washburn, B K; Poduch, K; Knox, G W; Paret, M L

    2016-06-01

    Rose rosette virus (RRV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the genus Emaravirus, has recently been characterized to be the causal agent of rose rosette disease. Roses showing typical symptoms of RRV collected from a rose nursery in Florida were subjected to reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay using primers corresponding to the conserved inverted 13 nucleotide long stretches found at the termini of the RRV genomic RNA segments. RT-PCR analysis yielded two novel genomic RNA segments, RNA5 and RNA6, in addition to the previously identified four RNA segments. The RNA5 is 1650 bp long and encodes for a polypeptide of 465 amino acids (54.3 K), while RNA6 is 1400 bp long and encodes for a polypeptide of 233 amino acids (27.05 K). RACE analysis showed that, both the RNA segments posses at their 5' and 3' termini, stretches of conserved inverted complementary13 nucleotides long sequence with two nucleotide mismatches as previously identified in other genomic RNA segments. Northern blot analysis as well as RT-PCR using specific primers showed the presence of the novel genomic RNA segments in infected plants, but absent in the non-infected plants. The GenBank Acc. Nos. for the sequences reported in this paper are KT007556 and KT007557. PMID:27265465

  15. Initiation of minus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaicvirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: use of oligoribonucleotide primers.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, C C; Sun, J H

    1996-01-01

    Various DNA- and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases have been reported to use oligoribonucleotide primers to initiate nucleic acid synthesis. For the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), we determined that in reactions performed with limited GTP concentrations, minus-strand RNA synthesis can be stimulated by the inclusion of guanosine monophosphate or specific oligoribonucleotides. Furthermore, guanylyl-3',5'-guanosine (GpG) was incorporated into minus-strand RNA and increased the rate of minus-strand RNA synthesis. In the presence of GpG, RdRp's Km for GTP decreased from 50 microM to approximately 3 microM while the Kms for other nucleotides were unaffected. These results have implications for the mechanism of initiation by RdRp. PMID:8794323

  16. Effect of the "RNA control" locus in Escherichia coli on RNA bacteriophage R23 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Ernberg, J; Sköld, O

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the rel gene of Escherichia coli on the RNA synthesis induced by phage R23 was studied. This RNA phage has the property of inhibiting ribosomal RNA formation and completely dominating the RNA synthesis of the host. Phage-specific RNA formation was found to be dependent on the allelic state of the rel gene. Determinations of RNA synthesis were made by both cumulative and short-term incorporations of uracil and adenine. Variations in labeling of nucleotide pools were compensated for by determining specific activities of ATP and UTP and using these values to obtain true, relative rates of RNA synthesis. PMID:768516

  17. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  18. Rice RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 acts in small RNA biogenesis and spikelet development.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianwei; Wang, Dekai; Ma, Lijia; Chen, Zhiyu; Li, Pingchuan; Cui, Xia; Liu, Chunyan; Cao, Shouyun; Chu, Chengcai; Tao, Yuezhi; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2012-08-01

    Higher plants have evolved multiple RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), which work with Dicer-like (DCL) proteins to produce different classes of small RNAs with specialized molecular functions. Here we report that OsRDR6, the rice (Oryza sativa L.) homolog of Arabidopsis RDR6, acts in the biogenesis of various types and sizes of small RNAs. We isolated a rice osrdr6-1 mutant, which was temperature sensitive and showed spikelet defects. This mutant displays reduced accumulation of tasiR-ARFs, the conserved trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) derived from the TAS3 locus, and ectopic expression of tasiR-ARF target genes, the Auxin Response Factors (including ARF2 and ARF3/ETTIN). The loss of tasiR-mediated repression of ARFs in osrdr6-1 can explain its morphological defects, as expression of two non-targeted ARF3 gene constructs (ARF3muts) in a wild-type background mimics the osrdr6 and osdcl4-1 mutant phenotypes. Small RNA high-throughput sequencing also reveals that besides tasiRNAs, 21-nucleotide (nt) phased small RNAs are also largely dependent on OsRDR6. Unexpectedly, we found that osrdr6-1 has a strong impact on the accumulation of 24-nt phased small RNAs, but not on unphased ones. Our work uncovers the key roles of OsRDR6 in small RNA biogenesis and directly illustrates the crucial functions of tasiR-ARFs in rice development. PMID:22443269

  19. A conserved RNA polymerase III promoter required for gammaherpesvirus TMER transcription and microRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Diebel, Kevin W.; Claypool, David J.; van Dyk, Linda F.

    2014-01-01

    Canonical RNA polymerase III (pol III) type 2 promoters contain a single A and B box and are well documented for their role in tRNA and SINE transcription in eukaryotic cells. The genome of Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) contains eight polycistronic tRNA-microRNA encoded RNA (TMER) genes that are transcribed from a RNA pol III type 2-like promoter containing triplicated A box elements. Here, we demonstrate that the triplicated A box sequences are required in their entirety to produce functional MuHV-4 miRNAs. We also identify that these RNA pol III type 2-like promoters are conserved in eukaryotic genomes. Human and mouse predicted tRNA genes containing these promoters also show enrichment of alternative RNA pol III transcription termination sequences and are predicted to give rise to longer tRNA primary transcripts. PMID:24747015

  20. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji . E-mail: si360405@med.shimane-u.ac.jp; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-13

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use.

  1. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  2. Double-Stranded RNA Resists Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois

    2011-03-01

    Much attention has been focused on DNA condensation because of its fundamental biological importance. The recent discovery of new roles for RNA duplexes demands efficient packaging of double-stranded RNA for therapeutics. Here we report measurements of short DNA and RNA duplexes in the presence of trivalent ions. Under conditions where UV spectroscopy indicates condensation of DNA duplexes into (insoluble) precipitates, RNA duplexes remain soluble. Small angle x-ray scattering results suggest that the differing surface topologies of RNA and DNA may be crucial in generating the attractive forces that result in precipitation.

  3. Engineering biological systems with synthetic RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Joe C.; Bloom, Ryan J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA molecules play diverse functional roles in natural biological systems. There has been growing interest in designing synthetic RNA counterparts for programming biological function. The design of synthetic RNA molecules that exhibit diverse activities, including sensing, regulatory, information processing, and scaffolding activities, has highlighted the advantages of RNA as a programmable design substrate. Recent advances in implementing these engineered RNA molecules as key control elements in synthetic genetic networks are highlighting the functional relevance of this class of synthetic elements in programming cellular behaviors. PMID:21925380

  4. ADAR2-Mediated Editing of miR-214 and miR-122 Precursor and Antisense RNA Transcripts in Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Li, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Yi-Jinn; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei

    2013-01-01

    A growing list of microRNAs (miRNAs) show aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the regulatory mechanisms largely remain unclear. RNA editing catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) family could target the miRNA precursors and affect the biogenesis process. Therefore, we investigate whether RNA editing could be one mechanism contributing to the deregulation of specific miRNAs in HCC. By overexpression of individual ADARs in hepatoma cells, RNA editing on the precursors of 16 miRNAs frequently deregulated in HCC was screened by a sensitive high-resolution melting platform. The results identified RNA precursors of miR-214 and miR-122 as potential targets edited by ADAR2. A subset of HCC showing elevated ADAR2 verified the major editings identified in ARAR2 overexpressed hepatoma cells, either with A-to-I or U-to-C changes. The unusual U-to-C editing at specific residues was demonstrated as being attributed to the A-to-I editing on the RNA transcripts complementary to the pri-miRNAs. The editing event caused a decrease of the RNA transcript complementary to pri-miR-214, which led to the decrease of pri-miR-214 and miR-214 and resulted in the increased protein level of its novel target gene Rab15. In conclusion, the current study discovered ADAR2-mediated editing of the complementary antisense transcripts as a novel mechanism for regulating the biogenesis of specific miRNAs during hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24386085

  5. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Cancer.gov

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  6. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  7. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daming; Zhang, Caiming; Han, Huijian; Crandall, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding. PMID:25110687

  8. Emerging roles of RNA modifications in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marbaniang, Carmelita Nora; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    RNA modifications are known to abound in stable tRNA and rRNA, where they cluster around functionally important regions. However, RNA-seq based techniques profiling entire transcriptomes are now uncovering an abundance of modified ribonucleotides in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, too. While most of the recent progress in understanding the regulatory influence of these new RNA modifications stems from eukaryotes, there is growing evidence in bacteria for modified nucleotides beyond the stable RNA species, including modifications of small regulatory RNAs. Given their small genome size, good genetic tractability, and ample knowledge of modification enzymes, bacteria offer excellent model systems to decipher cellular functions of RNA modifications in many diverse physiological contexts. This review highlights how new global approaches combining classic analysis with new sequencing techniques may usher in an era of bacterial epitranscriptomics. PMID:26803287

  9. Developing mRNA-vaccine technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schlake, Thomas; Thess, Andreas; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Kallen, Karl-Josef

    2012-01-01

    mRNA vaccines combine desirable immunological properties with an outstanding safety profile and the unmet flexibility of genetic vaccines. Based on in situ protein expression, mRNA vaccines are capable of inducing a balanced immune response comprising both cellular and humoral immunity while not subject to MHC haplotype restriction. In addition, mRNA is an intrinsically safe vector as it is a minimal and only transient carrier of information that does not interact with the genome. Because any protein can be expressed from mRNA without the need to adjust the production process, mRNA vaccines also offer maximum flexibility with respect to development. Taken together, mRNA presents a promising vector that may well become the basis of a game-changing vaccine technology platform. Here, we outline the current knowledge regarding different aspects that should be considered when developing an mRNA-based vaccine technology. PMID:23064118

  10. Optimal alphabets for an RNA world.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul P; Holland, Barbara R; Moulton, Vincent; Hendy, Mike; Penny, David

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the canonical AUCG genetic alphabet is not the only possible nucleotide alphabet. In this work we address the question 'is the canonical alphabet optimal?' We make the assumption that the genetic alphabet was determined in the RNA world. Computational tools are used to infer the RNA secondary structure (shape) from a given RNA sequence, and statistics from RNA shapes are gathered with respect to alphabet size. Then, simulations based upon the replication and selection of fixed-sized RNA populations are used to investigate the effect of alternative alphabets upon RNA's ability to step through a fitness landscape. These results show that for a low copy fidelity the canonical alphabet is fitter than two-, six- and eight-letter alphabets. In higher copy-fidelity experiments, six-letter alphabets outperform the four-letter alphabets, suggesting that the canonical alphabet is indeed a relic of the RNA world. PMID:12816657

  11. Use of Deoxyribozymes in RNA Research

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Dana A.

    2010-01-01

    Since their first identification by in vitro selection in 1994, deoxyribozymes have been developed to catalyze a variety of chemical reactions. The first DNA-catalyzed reaction was cleavage of a ribonucleotide linkage within an oligonucleotide substrate. In subsequent years, growing collections of deoxyribozymes have been developed for several reactions that have practical utility for RNA research. These deoxyribozymes are useful for site-specific RNA cleavage as well as ligation to form linear, branched, and lariat RNA products. An application related to RNA ligation is deoxyribozyme-catalyzed labeling of RNA (DECAL), which is used to attach a biophysical tag to a desired RNA sequence at a specific position. With current achievements and likely future developments, deoxyribozymes are a useful contributor to the toolbox of RNA research methods. PMID:20946786

  12. Understanding the transcriptome through RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yue; Kertesz, Michael; Spitale, Robert C.; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard

    2013-01-01

    RNA structure is critical for gene regulation and function. In the past, transcriptomes have been largely parsed by primary sequences and expression levels, but it is now becoming feasible to annotate and compare transcriptomes based on RNA structure. In addition to computational prediction methods, the recent advent of experimental techniques to probe RNA structure by deep sequencing has enabled genome-wide measurements of RNA structure, and provided the first picture of the structural organization of an eukaryotic transcriptome—the “RNA structurome”. With additional advances in method refinement and interpretation, structural views of the transcriptome should help to identify and validate regulatory RNA motifs that are involved in diverse cellular processes, and thereby increase understanding of RNA function. PMID:21850044

  13. Polyadenylation of stable RNA precursors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongwei; Pandit, Shilpa; Deutscher, Murray P.

    1998-01-01

    Polyadenylation at the 3′ terminus has long been considered a specific feature of mRNA and a few other unstable RNA species. Here we show that stable RNAs in Escherichia coli can be polyadenylated as well. RNA molecules with poly(A) tails are the major products that accumulate for essentially all stable RNA precursors when RNA maturation is slowed because of the absence of processing exoribonucleases; poly(A) tails vary from one to seven residues in length. The polyadenylation process depends on the presence of poly(A) polymerase I. A stochastic competition between the exoribonucleases and poly(A) polymerase is proposed to explain the accumulation of polyadenylated RNAs. These data indicate that polyadenylation is not unique to mRNA, and its widespread occurrence suggests that it serves a more general function in RNA metabolism. PMID:9770456

  14. RNA sequence analysis using covariance models.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, S R; Durbin, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe a general approach to several RNA sequence analysis problems using probabilistic models that flexibly describe the secondary structure and primary sequence consensus of an RNA sequence family. We call these models 'covariance models'. A covariance model of tRNA sequences is an extremely sensitive and discriminative tool for searching for additional tRNAs and tRNA-related sequences in sequence databases. A model can be built automatically from an existing sequence alignment. We also describe an algorithm for learning a model and hence a consensus secondary structure from initially unaligned example sequences and no prior structural information. Models trained on unaligned tRNA examples correctly predict tRNA secondary structure and produce high-quality multiple alignments. The approach may be applied to any family of small RNA sequences. Images PMID:8029015

  15. Crystal structure of a plectonemic RNA supercoil

    SciTech Connect

    Stagno, Jason R.; Ma, Buyong; Li, Jess; Altieri, Amanda S.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-12-14

    Genome packaging is an essential housekeeping process in virtually all organisms for proper storage and maintenance of genetic information. Although the extent and mechanisms of packaging vary, the process involves the formation of nucleic-acid superstructures. Crystal structures of DNA coiled coils indicate that their geometries can vary according to sequence and/or the presence of stabilizers such as proteins or small molecules. However, such superstructures have not been revealed for RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of an RNA supercoil, which displays one level higher molecular organization than previously reported structures of DNA coiled coils. In the presence of an RNA-binding protein, two interlocking RNA coiled coils of double-stranded RNA, a 'coil of coiled coils', form a plectonemic supercoil. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that protein-RNA interaction is required for the stability of the supercoiled RNA. This study provides structural insight into higher order packaging mechanisms of nucleic acids.

  16. PNPASE Regulates RNA Import into Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Geng; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Oktay, Yavuz; Zhang, Jin; Allen, Eric L.; Smith, Geoffrey M.; Fan, Kelly C.; Hong, Jason S.; French, Samuel W.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Morse, Herbert C.; Koehler, Carla M.; Teitell, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA import into mammalian mitochondria is considered essential for replication, transcription, and translation of the mitochondrial genome but the pathway(s) and factors that control this import are poorly understood. Previously, we localized polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPASE), a 3′ → 5′ exoribonuclease and poly-A polymerase, in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, a location lacking resident RNAs. Here, we show a new role for PNPASE in regulating the import of nuclear-encoded RNAs into the mitochondrial matrix. PNPASE reduction impaired mitochondrial RNA processing and polycistronic transcripts accumulated. Augmented import of RNase P, 5S rRNA, and MRP RNAs depended on PNPASE expression and PNPASE–imported RNA interactions were identified. PNPASE RNA processing and import activities were separable and a mitochondrial RNA targeting signal was isolated that enabled RNA import in a PNPASE-dependent manner. Combined, these data strongly support an unanticipated role for PNPASE in mediating the translocation of RNAs into mitochondria. PMID:20691904

  17. Delivery materials for siRNA therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasty, Rosemary; Dorkin, Joseph Robert; Vegas, Arturo; Anderson, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has broad potential as a therapeutic to reversibly silence any gene. To achieve the clinical potential of RNAi, delivery materials are required to transport short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the site of action in the cells of target tissues. This Review provides an introduction to the biological challenges that siRNA delivery materials aim to overcome, as well as a discussion of the way that the most effective and clinically advanced classes of siRNA delivery systems, including lipid nanoparticles and siRNA conjugates, are designed to surmount these challenges. The systems that we discuss are diverse in their approaches to the delivery problem, and provide valuable insight to guide the design of future siRNA delivery materials.

  18. Regulation of Flavivirus RNA synthesis and replication.

    PubMed

    Selisko, Barbara; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva; Canard, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    RNA synthesis and replication of the members of the Flavivirus genus (including dengue, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses) is regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms and actors. These include the sequestration of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for functions other than RNA synthesis, regulatory interactions with other viral and host proteins within the replication complex (RC), and regulatory elements within the RNA genome itself. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the multiple levels at which Flavivirus RNA synthesis is controlled. We aim to bring together two active research fields: the structural and functional biology of individual proteins of the RC and the impressive wealth of knowledge acquired regarding the viral genomic RNA. PMID:25462437

  19. Regulation of Flavivirus RNA synthesis and replication

    PubMed Central

    Selisko, Barbara; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    RNA synthesis and replication of the members of the Flavivirus genus (including dengue, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses) is regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms and actors. These include the sequestration of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for functions other than RNA synthesis, regulatory interactions with other viral and host proteins within the replication complex (RC), and regulatory elements within the RNA genome itself. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the multiple levels at which Flavivirus RNA synthesis is controlled. We aim to bring together two active research fields: the structural and functional biology of individual proteins of the RC and the impressive wealth of knowledge acquired regarding the viral genomic RNA. PMID:25462437

  20. MicroRNA-mediated target mRNA cleavage and 3'-uridylation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Lin, Jing; Zandi, Roza; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in targeted gene silencing by facilitating posttranscriptional and translational repression. However, the precise mechanism of mammalian miRNA-mediated gene silencing remains to be elucidated. Here, we used a stem-loop array reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay to analyse miRNA-induced mRNA recognition, cleavage, posttranscriptional modification, and degradation. We detected endogenous let-7 miRNA-induced and Argonaute-catalysed endonucleolytic cleavage on target mRNAs at various sites within partially paired miRNA:mRNA sequences. Most of the cleaved mRNA 5'-fragments were 3'-oligouridylated by activities of terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases) in miRNA-induced silencing complexes and temporarily accumulated in the cytosol for 5'-3' degradation or other molecular fates. Some 3'-5' decayed mRNA fragments could also be captured by the miRNA-induced silencing complex stationed at the specific miRNA:mRNA target site and oligouridylated by other TUTases at its proximity without involving Argonaute-mediated RNA cleavage. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanics of mammalian miRNA-mediated gene silencing by coordinated target mRNA recognition, cleavage, uridylation and degradation. PMID:27440378

  1. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell’s RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  2. Fragment-based modelling of single stranded RNA bound to RNA recognition motif containing proteins.

    PubMed

    de Beauchene, Isaure Chauvot; de Vries, Sjoerd J; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Protein-RNA complexes are important for many biological processes. However, structural modeling of such complexes is hampered by the high flexibility of RNA. Particularly challenging is the docking of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). We have developed a fragment-based approach to model the structure of ssRNA bound to a protein, based on only the protein structure, the RNA sequence and conserved contacts. The conformational diversity of each RNA fragment is sampled by an exhaustive library of trinucleotides extracted from all known experimental protein-RNA complexes. The method was applied to ssRNA with up to 12 nucleotides which bind to dimers of the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), a highly abundant eukaryotic RNA-binding domain. The fragment based docking allows a precise de novo atomic modeling of protein-bound ssRNA chains. On a benchmark of seven experimental ssRNA-RRM complexes, near-native models (with a mean heavy-atom deviation of <3 Å from experiment) were generated for six out of seven bound RNA chains, and even more precise models (deviation < 2 Å) were obtained for five out of seven cases, a significant improvement compared to the state of the art. The method is not restricted to RRMs but was also successfully applied to Pumilio RNA binding proteins. PMID:27131381

  3. The rough endoplasmatic reticulum is a central nucleation site of siRNA-mediated RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Lukas; Heusermann, Wolf; Sokol, Lena; Trojer, Dominic; Wirz, Joel; Hean, Justin; Fritzsche, Anja; Aeschimann, Florian; Pfanzagl, Vera; Basselet, Pascal; Weiler, Jan; Hintersteiner, Martin; Morrissey, David V; Meisner-Kober, Nicole C

    2013-04-17

    Despite progress in mechanistic understanding of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways, the subcellular sites of RNA silencing remain under debate. Here we show that loading of lipid-transfected siRNAs and endogenous microRNAs (miRNA) into RISC (RNA-induced silencing complexes), encounter of the target mRNA, and Ago2-mediated mRNA slicing in mammalian cells are nucleated at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER). Although the major RNAi pathway proteins are found in most subcellular compartments, the miRNA- and siRNA-loaded Ago2 populations co-sediment almost exclusively with the rER membranes, together with the RISC loading complex (RLC) factors Dicer, TAR RNA binding protein (TRBP) and protein activator of the interferon-induced protein kinase (PACT). Fractionation and membrane co-immune precipitations further confirm that siRNA-loaded Ago2 physically associates with the cytosolic side of the rER membrane. Additionally, RLC-associated double-stranded siRNA, diagnostic of RISC loading, and RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage products exclusively co-sediment with rER. Finally, we identify TRBP and PACT as key factors anchoring RISC to ER membranes in an RNA-independent manner. Together, our findings demonstrate that the outer rER membrane is a central nucleation site of siRNA-mediated RNA silencing. PMID:23511973

  4. Sequence Dependence of Viral RNA Encapsidation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Joshua; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2016-07-01

    We develop a Flory mean-field theory for viral RNA (vRNA) molecules that extends the current RNA folding algorithms to include interactions between different sections of the secondary structure. The theory is applied to sequence-selective vRNA encapsidation. The dependence on sequence enters through a single parameter: the largest eigenvalue of the Kramers matrix of the branched polymer obtained by coarse graining the secondary structure. Differences between the work of encapsidation of vRNA molecules and of randomized isomers are found to be in the range of 20 kBT, more than sufficient to provide a strong bias in favor of vRNA encapsidation. The method is applied to a packaging competition experiment where large vRNA molecules compete for encapsidation with two smaller RNA species that together have the same nucleotide sequence as the large molecule. We encounter a substantial, generic free energy bias, that also is of the order of 20 kBT, in favor of encapsidating the single large RNA molecule. The bias is mainly the consequence of the fact that dividing up a large vRNA molecule involves the release of stored elastic energy. This provides an important, nonspecific mechanism for preferential encapsidation of single larger vRNA molecules over multiple smaller mRNA molecules with the same total number of nucleotides. The result is also consistent with recent RNA packaging competition experiments by Comas-Garcia et al.1 Finally, the Flory method leads to the result that when two RNA molecules are copackaged, they are expected to remain segregated inside the capsid. PMID:27116641

  5. Improving miRNA-mRNA interaction predictions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are short RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Today, microRNA target prediction remains challenging since very few have been experimentally validated and sequence-based predictions have large numbers of false positives. Furthermore, due to the different measuring rules used in each database of predicted interactions, the selection of the most reliable ones requires extensive knowledge about each algorithm. Results Here we propose two methods to measure the confidence of predicted interactions based on experimentally validated information. The output of the methods is a combined database where new scores and statistical confidences are re-assigned to each predicted interaction. The new scores allow the robust combination of several databases without the effect of low-performing algorithms dragging down good-performing ones. The combined databases obtained using both algorithms described in this paper outperform each of the existing predictive algorithms that were considered for the combination. Conclusions Our approaches are a useful way to integrate predicted interactions from different databases. They reduce the selection of interactions to a unique database based on an intuitive score and allow comparing databases between them. PMID:25559987

  6. Evaluation of Commercially Available RNA Amplification Kits for RNA Sequencing Using Very Low Input Amounts of Total RNA

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Savita; Paulson, Ariel; Edenberg, Howard J.; Peak, Allison; Perera, Anoja; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Beckloff, Nicholas; Bivens, Nathan J.; Donnelly, Robert; Gillaspy, Allison F.; Grove, Deborah; Gu, Weikuan; Jafari, Nadereh; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S.; Lyons, Robert H.; Tepper, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    This article includes supplemental data. Please visit http://www.fasebj.org to obtain this information.Multiple recent publications on RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) have demonstrated the power of next-generation sequencing technologies in whole-transcriptome analysis. Vendor-specific protocols used for RNA library construction often require at least 100 ng total RNA. However, under certain conditions, much less RNA is available for library construction. In these cases, effective transcriptome profiling requires amplification of subnanogram amounts of RNA. Several commercial RNA amplification kits are available for amplification prior to library construction for next-generation sequencing, but these kits have not been comprehensively field evaluated for accuracy and performance of RNA-seq for picogram amounts of RNA. To address this, 4 types of amplification kits were tested with 3 different concentrations, from 5 ng to 50 pg, of a commercially available RNA. Kits were tested at multiple sites to assess reproducibility and ease of use. The human total reference RNA used was spiked with a control pool of RNA molecules in order to further evaluate quantitative recovery of input material. Additional control data sets were generated from libraries constructed following polyA selection or ribosomal depletion using established kits and protocols. cDNA was collected from the different sites, and libraries were synthesized at a single site using established protocols. Sequencing runs were carried out on the Illumina platform. Numerous metrics were compared among the kits and dilutions used. Overall, no single kit appeared to meet all the challenges of small input material. However, it is encouraging that excellent data can be recovered with even the 50 pg input total RNA. PMID:25649271

  7. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  8. An all RNA hypercycle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Nilesh; Lehman, Niles

    The RNA world hypothesis suggests RNA-based catalysis and information storage as the first step in the evolution of life on the Earth. The central process of the RNA world was the replica-tion of RNA, which may have involved the joining of oligonucleotides, perhaps by recombination rather than organization along a linear template. To assist this build-up of information, a hy-percycle may have played a significant role by allowing cooperation between autocatalytic units in a cyclic linkage in such a way that there is a mutual survival and regulated growth of all the units involved (1). Compared to non-coupled self-replicating units, which can only sustain a limited amount of genetic information, the hypercycle allows the maintenance of large amounts of information through cooperation among otherwise competitive units. However, hypercycles have never been empirically demonstrated in the absence of cell-like compartmentalization. In the current work, hypercyclic behavior is demonstrated in the autocatalytic assembly of Azoar-cus group I ribozyme (2). Three different constructs of the Azoarcus ribozyme with different internal guide sequences (IGS) -GUG (canonical), GAG, and GCG -are capable of a min-imal amount of self-assembly when broken into two fragments. Here, self-assembly depends on a mismatch with non-complementary sequences, CGU, CAU and CUU, respectively, to be recognized by IGS via autocatalysis. Yet when all three constructs are present in the same reaction vessel, concomitant assembly of all three is enhanced through an interdependent hy-percyclic reaction network. Analysis of these reactions indicates that each system is capable of guiding its own reproduction weakly, along with providing enhanced catalytic support for the reproduction of one other construct system through matched IGS-tag interactions. Also, when co-incubated with non-interacting (i.e., selfish) yet efficient self-assembly systems, the hypercyclic assembly outcompetes the selfish self

  9. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided transposon cleavage initiates Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA production.

    PubMed

    Han, Bo W; Wang, Wei; Li, Chengjian; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D

    2015-05-15

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) protect the animal germ line by silencing transposons. Primary piRNAs, generated from transcripts of genomic transposon "junkyards" (piRNA clusters), are amplified by the "ping-pong" pathway, yielding secondary piRNAs. We report that secondary piRNAs, bound to the PIWI protein Ago3, can initiate primary piRNA production from cleaved transposon RNAs. The first ~26 nucleotides (nt) of each cleaved RNA becomes a secondary piRNA, but the subsequent ~26 nt become the first in a series of phased primary piRNAs that bind Piwi, allowing piRNAs to spread beyond the site of RNA cleavage. The ping-pong pathway increases only the abundance of piRNAs, whereas production of phased primary piRNAs from cleaved transposon RNAs adds sequence diversity to the piRNA pool, allowing adaptation to changes in transposon sequence. PMID:25977554

  10. Computational prediction of microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Jana; Langenberger, David; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The computational identification of novel microRNA (miRNA) genes is a challenging task in bioinformatics. Massive amounts of data describing unknown functional RNA transcripts have to be analyzed for putative miRNA candidates with automated computational pipelines. Beyond those miRNAs that meet the classical definition, high-throughput sequencing techniques have revealed additional miRNA-like molecules that are derived by alternative biogenesis pathways. Exhaustive bioinformatics analyses on such data involve statistical issues as well as precise sequence and structure inspection not only of the functional mature part but also of the whole precursor sequence of the putative miRNA. Apart from a considerable amount of species-specific miRNAs, the majority of all those genes are conserved at least among closely related organisms. Some miRNAs, however, can be traced back to very early points in the evolution of eukaryotic species. Thus, the investigation of the conservation of newly found miRNA candidates comprises an important step in the computational annotation of miRNAs.Topics covered in this chapter include a review on the obvious problem of miRNA annotation and family definition, recommended pipelines of computational miRNA annotation or detection, and an overview of current computer tools for the prediction of miRNAs and their limitations. The chapter closes discussing how those bioinformatic approaches address the problem of faithful miRNA prediction and correct annotation. PMID:24639171

  11. Advances in Systemic siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qixin; Woodle, Martin C; Lu, Patrick Y; Mixson, A James

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) has transformed basic science research, and the efficacy of siRNA therapeutics toward a variety of diseases is now being evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Despite its potential value, the highly negatively charged siRNA has the classic delivery problem of requiring transport across cell membranes to the cytosol. Consequently, carrier development for siRNA delivery is one of the most important problems to solve before siRNA can achieve widespread clinical use. An assortment of non-viral carriers including liposomes, peptides, polymers, and aptamers are being evaluated for their ability to shepherd siRNA to the target tissue and cross the plasma membrane barrier into the cell. Several promising carriers with low toxicity and increased specificity for disease targets have emerged for siRNA-based therapeutics. This review will discuss non-viral approaches for siRNA therapeutics, with particular focus on synthetic carriers for in vivo systemic delivery of siRNA. PMID:20161621

  12. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  13. MicroRNA control of ovarian function

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation, a regulatory mechanism classically involved in female and male germ cell function has recently been implicated in control of somatic cells of the ovary and testis. Recent advancements in this field may be attributed primarily to the discovery and study of microRNAs (miRNA), small RNA transcripts that can influence mRNA expression via post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanisms. In the ovary, targeted deletion of Dicer 1, a key enzyme in miRNA biogenesis, provided the first empirical evidence that miRNA/siRNA were critically involved in multiple aspects of ovarian function (folliculogenesis, oocyte maturation, ovulation, and luteal function). Functional studies of miRNA in the ovary have mostly focused on granulosa cells during the critical period of the ovarian cycle surrounding the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). Specific miRNA have been implicated in ovarian responses, due to their transcriptional induction by the LH surge (i.e., miR-21, -132 and -212) or through bioinformatic approaches (miR-224, -17-5p and let-7b). Numerous other miRNA are highly abundant in ovarian somatic tissues, suggesting that we have much to discover with respect to the role of miRNA and regulation of ovarian function. This review will recap the key observations of these early studies and provide insight into future experiments that might further our understanding of ovarian function. PMID:21666774

  14. The evolution of chloroplast RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Lehwark, Pascal; Morton, Brian R; Maier, Uwe G

    2006-10-01

    RNA editing alters the nucleotide sequence of an RNA molecule so that it deviates from the sequence of its DNA template. Different RNA-editing systems are found in the major eukaryotic lineages, and these systems are thought to have evolved independently. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of data on C-to-U editing sites in land plant chloroplasts and propose a model for the evolution of RNA editing in land plants. First, our data suggest that the limited RNA-editing system of seed plants and the much more extensive systems found in hornworts and ferns are of monophyletic origin. Further, although some eukaryotic editing systems appear to have evolved to regulate gene expression, or at least are now involved in gene regulation, there is no evidence that RNA editing plays a role in gene regulation in land plant chloroplasts. Instead, our results suggest that land plant chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing originated as a mechanism to generate variation at the RNA level, which could complement variation at the DNA level. Under this model, many of the original sites, particularly in seed plants, have been subsequently lost due to mutation at the DNA level, and the function of extant sites is merely to conserve certain codons. This is the first comprehensive model for the evolution of the chloroplast RNA-editing system of land plants and may also be applicable to the evolution of RNA editing in plant mitochondria. PMID:16835291

  15. Evaluation of microRNA alignment techniques.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Mark; Kaspi, Antony; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-08-01

    Genomic alignment of small RNA (smRNA) sequences such as microRNAs poses considerable challenges due to their short length (∼21 nucleotides [nt]) as well as the large size and complexity of plant and animal genomes. While several tools have been developed for high-throughput mapping of longer mRNA-seq reads (>30 nt), there are few that are specifically designed for mapping of smRNA reads including microRNAs. The accuracy of these mappers has not been systematically determined in the case of smRNA-seq. In addition, it is unknown whether these aligners accurately map smRNA reads containing sequence errors and polymorphisms. By using simulated read sets, we determine the alignment sensitivity and accuracy of 16 short-read mappers and quantify their robustness to mismatches, indels, and nontemplated nucleotide additions. These were explored in the context of a plant genome (Oryza sativa, ∼500 Mbp) and a mammalian genome (Homo sapiens, ∼3.1 Gbp). Analysis of simulated and real smRNA-seq data demonstrates that mapper selection impacts differential expression results and interpretation. These results will inform on best practice for smRNA mapping and enable more accurate smRNA detection and quantification of expression and RNA editing. PMID:27284164

  16. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  17. Regulation of Cell Death by Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Both transfer RNA (tRNA) and cytochrome c are essential molecules for the survival of cells. tRNA decodes mRNA codons into amino-acid-building blocks in protein in all organisms, whereas cytochrome c functions in the electron transport chain that powers ATP synthesis in mitochondrion-containing eukaryotes. Additionally, in vertebrates, cytochrome c that is released from mitochondria is a potent inducer of apoptosis, activating apoptotic proteins (caspases) in the cytoplasm to dismantle cells. A better understanding of both tRNA and cytochrome c is essential for an insight into the regulation of cell life and death. Recent Advances: A recent study showed that the mitochondrion-released cytochrome c can be removed from the cell-death pathway by tRNA molecules. The direct binding of cytochrome c by tRNA provides a mechanism for tRNA to regulate cell death, beyond its role in gene expression. Critical Issues: The nature of the tRNA–cytochrome c binding interaction remains unknown. The questions of how this interaction affects tRNA function, cellular metabolism, and apoptotic sensitivity are unanswered. Future Directions: Investigations into the critical issues raised above will improve the understanding of tRNA in the fundamental processes of cell death and metabolism. Such knowledge will inform therapies in cell death-related diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 583–594. PMID:23350625

  18. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Rusty L; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular disease. While many studies have shown therapeutic efficacy using miRNA inhibitors, efforts to restore or increase the function of a miRNA have been lagging behind. The miR-29 family has gained a lot of attention for its clear function in tissue fibrosis. This fibroblast-enriched miRNA family is downregulated in fibrotic diseases which induces a coordinate increase of many extracellular matrix genes. Here, we show that intravenous injection of synthetic RNA duplexes can increase miR-29 levels in vivo for several days. Moreover, therapeutic delivery of these miR-29 mimics during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis restores endogenous miR-29 function whereby decreasing collagen expression and blocking and reversing pulmonary fibrosis. Our data support the feasibility of using miRNA mimics to therapeutically increase miRNAs and indicate miR-29 to be a potent therapeutic miRNA for treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25239947

  19. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  20. Initiator RNA in Discontinuous Polyoma DNA Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Peter; Eliasson, Rolf; Söderman, Gunilla

    1974-01-01

    During replication of polyoma DNA in isolated nuclei, RNA was found attached to the 5′ ends of growing progeny strands. This RNA starts with either ATP or GTP and can be labeled at its 5′ end with 32P from β-labeled nucleotides. Digestion of progeny strands with pancreatic DNase released 32P-labeled RNA that, on gel electrophoresis, gave a distinct peak in the position expected for a decanucleotide. We believe that this short RNA is involved in the initiation of the discontinuous synthesis of DNA and propose the name “initiator RNA” for it. The covalent linkage of initiator RNA to 5′ ends of growing DNA chains was substantiated by the finding that 32P was transferred to ribonucleotides by alkaline hydrolysis of purified initiator RNA obtained by DNase digestion of polyoma progeny strands synthesized from [α-32P]dTTP. While initiator RNA was quite homogeneous in size, it had no unique base sequence since digestion with pancreatic RNase of initiator RNA labeled at its 5′ end with 32P released a variety of different [32P]oligonucleotides. The switch from RNA to DNA synthesis during strand elongation may thus depend on the size of initiator RNA rather than on a specific base sequence. PMID:4373733

  1. Controlled evolution of an RNA enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    It is generally thought that prior to the origin of protein synthesis, life on earth was based on self-replicating RNA molecules. This idea has become especially popular recently due to the discovery of catalytic RNA (ribozymes). RNA has both genotypic and phenotypic properties, suggesting that it is capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. RNA evolution is likely to have played a critical role in the early history of life on earth, and thus is important in considering the possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system. We have constructed an RNA-based evolving system in the laboratory, combining amplification and mutation of an RNA genotype with selection of a corresponding RNA phenotype. This system serves as a functional model of a primitive organism. It can also be used as a tool to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. By altering the selection constraints, we are attempting to modify the substrate specificity of an existing ribozyme in order to develop ribozymes with novel catalytic function. In this way, we hope to gain a better understanding of RNA's catalytic versatility and to assess its suitability for the role of primordial catalyst. All of the RNA enzymes that are known to exist in contemporary biology carry out cleavage/ligation reactions involving RNA substrates. The Tetrahymena ribozyme, for example, catalyzes phosphoester transfer between a guanosine containing and an oligopyrimidine containing substrate. We tested the ability of mutant forms of the Tetrahymena ribozyme to carry out a comparable reaction using DNA, rather than RNA substrate. An ensemble of structural variants of the ribozyme was prepared and tested for their ability to specifically cleave d(GGCCCTCT-A3TA3TA) at the phosphodiester bond following the sequence CCCTCT. We recovered a mutant form of the enzyme that cleaves DNA more efficiently than does the wild-type. Beginning with this selected mutant we have now scattered random mutations throughout the ribozyme and have begun

  2. Construction of RNA nanocages by re-engineering the packaging RNA of Phi29 bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chenhui; Li, Xiang; Tian, Cheng; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2014-05-01

    RNA nanotechnology promises rational design of RNA nanostructures with wide array of structural diversities and functionalities. Such nanostructures could be used in applications such as small interfering RNA delivery and organization of in vivo chemical reactions. Though having impressive development in recent years, RNA nanotechnology is still quite limited and its programmability and complexity could not rival the degree of its closely related cousin: DNA nanotechnology. Novel strategies are needed for programmed RNA self-assembly. Here, we have assembled RNA nanocages by re-engineering a natural, biological RNA motif: the packaging RNA of phi29 bacteriophage. The resulting RNA nanostructures have been thoroughly characterized by gel electrophoresis, cryogenic electron microscopy imaging and dynamic light scattering.

  3. REDIdb: the RNA editing database

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Regina, Teresa Maria Rosaria; Brennicke, Axel; Quagliariello, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The RNA Editing Database (REDIdb) is an interactive, web-based database created and designed with the aim to allocate RNA editing events such as substitutions, insertions and deletions occurring in a wide range of organisms. The database contains both fully and partially sequenced DNA molecules for which editing information is available either by experimental inspection (in vitro) or by computational detection (in silico). Each record of REDIdb is organized in a specific flat-file containing a description of the main characteristics of the entry, a feature table with the editing events and related details and a sequence zone with both the genomic sequence and the corresponding edited transcript. REDIdb is a relational database in which the browsing and identification of editing sites has been simplified by means of two facilities to either graphically display genomic or cDNA sequences or to show the corresponding alignment. In both cases, all editing sites are highlighted in colour and their relative positions are detailed by mousing over. New editing positions can be directly submitted to REDIdb after a user-specific registration to obtain authorized secure access. This first version of REDIdb database stores 9964 editing events and can be freely queried at . PMID:17175530

  4. Circulating microbial RNA and health

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ross Ka-Kit; Wu, Ying-Kit

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of health indicators in the blood is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure. Two blood studies one involving extended observations on the health of an individual by integrative Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), and the other tracking the impact of Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) placement on nine heart failure patients were examined for the association of change in health status with change in microbial RNA species. Decrease in RNA expression ratios of human to bacteria and viruses accompanying deteriorated conditions was evident in both studies. Despite large between-subject variations in bacterial composition before LVAD implantation among all the patients, on day 180 after the implantation they manifested apparent between-subject bacterial similarity. In the iPOP study three periods, namely, pre-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection with normal blood glucose level, RSV infection with normal blood glucose level, and post-RSV infection with high blood glucose level could be defined. The upsurge of Enterobacteria phage PhiX 174 sensu lato and Escherichia coli gene expression, in which membrane transporters, membrane receptors for environment signalling, carbohydrate catabolic genes and carbohydrate-active enzymes were enriched only throughout the second period, which suggests a potentially overlooked microbial response to or modulation of the host blood glucose level. PMID:26576508

  5. RNA structures that resist degradation by Xrn1 produce a pathogenic Dengue virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Erich G; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a growing global health threat. Dengue and other flaviviruses commandeer the host cell's RNA degradation machinery to generate the small flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), a noncoding RNA that induces cytopathicity and pathogenesis. Host cell exonuclease Xrn1 likely loads on the 5' end of viral genomic RNA and degrades processively through ∼10 kB of RNA, halting near the 3' end of the viral RNA. The surviving RNA is the sfRNA. We interrogated the architecture of the complete Dengue 2 sfRNA, identifying five independently-folded RNA structures, two of which quantitatively confer Xrn1 resistance. We developed an assay for real-time monitoring of Xrn1 resistance that we used with mutagenesis and RNA folding experiments to show that Xrn1-resistant RNAs adopt a specific fold organized around a three-way junction. Disrupting the junction's fold eliminates the buildup of disease-related sfRNAs in human cells infected with a flavivirus, directly linking RNA structure to sfRNA production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01892.001. PMID:24692447

  6. RNA structures that resist degradation by Xrn1 produce a pathogenic Dengue virus RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Erich G; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a growing global health threat. Dengue and other flaviviruses commandeer the host cell’s RNA degradation machinery to generate the small flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), a noncoding RNA that induces cytopathicity and pathogenesis. Host cell exonuclease Xrn1 likely loads on the 5′ end of viral genomic RNA and degrades processively through ∼10 kB of RNA, halting near the 3′ end of the viral RNA. The surviving RNA is the sfRNA. We interrogated the architecture of the complete Dengue 2 sfRNA, identifying five independently-folded RNA structures, two of which quantitatively confer Xrn1 resistance. We developed an assay for real-time monitoring of Xrn1 resistance that we used with mutagenesis and RNA folding experiments to show that Xrn1-resistant RNAs adopt a specific fold organized around a three-way junction. Disrupting the junction’s fold eliminates the buildup of disease-related sfRNAs in human cells infected with a flavivirus, directly linking RNA structure to sfRNA production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01892.001 PMID:24692447

  7. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Syun-Ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-03-26

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  8. Fetal Bovine Serum RNA Interferes with the Cell Culture derived Extracellular RNA.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiyun; Batagov, Arsen O; Carter, David R F; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) has been used in eukaryotic cell cultures for decades. However, little attention has been paid to the biological effects associated with RNA content of FBS on cell cultures. Here, using RNA sequencing, we demonstrate that FBS contains a diverse repertoire of protein-coding and regulatory RNA species, including mRNA, miRNA, rRNA, and snoRNA. The majority of them (>70%) are retained even after extended ultracentrifugation in the preparations of vesicle-depleted FBS (vdFBS) commonly utilized in the studies of extracellular vesicles (EV) and intercellular communication. FBS-associated RNA is co-isolated with cell-culture derived extracellular RNA (exRNA) and interferes with the downstream RNA analysis. Many evolutionally conserved FBS-derived RNA species can be falsely annotated as human or mouse transcripts. Notably, specific miRNAs abundant in FBS, such as miR-122, miR-451a and miR-1246, have been previously reported as enriched in cell-culture derived EVs, possibly due to the confounding effect of the FBS. Analysis of publically available exRNA datasets supports the notion of FBS contamination. Furthermore, FBS transcripts can be taken up by cultured cells and affect the results of highly sensitive gene expression profiling technologies. Therefore, precautions for experimental design are warranted to minimize the interference and misinterpretations caused by FBS-derived RNA. PMID:27503761

  9. piRNA cluster database: a web resource for piRNA producing loci

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, David

    2016-01-01

    Piwi proteins and their guiding small RNAs, termed Piwi-interacting (pi-) RNAs, are essential for silencing of transposons in the germline of animals. A substantial fraction of piRNAs originates from genomic loci termed piRNA clusters and sequences encoded in these piRNA clusters determine putative targets for the Piwi/piRNA system. In the past decade, studies of piRNA transcriptomes in different species revealed additional roles for piRNAs beyond transposon silencing, reflecting the astonishing plasticity of the Piwi/piRNA system along different phylogenetic branches. Moreover, piRNA transcriptomes can change drastically during development and vary across different tissues. Since piRNA clusters crucially shape piRNA profiles, analysis of these loci is imperative for a thorough understanding of functional and evolutionary aspects of the piRNA pathway. But despite the ever-growing amount of available piRNA sequence data, we know little about the factors that determine differential regulation of piRNA clusters, nor the evolutionary events that cause their gain or loss. In order to facilitate addressing these subjects, we established a user-friendly piRNA cluster database (http://www.smallrnagroup-mainz.de/piRNAclusterDB.html) that provides comprehensive data on piRNA clusters in multiple species, tissues and developmental stages based on small RNA sequence data deposited at NCBI's Sequence Read Archive (SRA). PMID:26582915

  10. Fragment-based modelling of single stranded RNA bound to RNA recognition motif containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Beauchene, Isaure Chauvot; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes are important for many biological processes. However, structural modeling of such complexes is hampered by the high flexibility of RNA. Particularly challenging is the docking of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). We have developed a fragment-based approach to model the structure of ssRNA bound to a protein, based on only the protein structure, the RNA sequence and conserved contacts. The conformational diversity of each RNA fragment is sampled by an exhaustive library of trinucleotides extracted from all known experimental protein–RNA complexes. The method was applied to ssRNA with up to 12 nucleotides which bind to dimers of the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), a highly abundant eukaryotic RNA-binding domain. The fragment based docking allows a precise de novo atomic modeling of protein-bound ssRNA chains. On a benchmark of seven experimental ssRNA–RRM complexes, near-native models (with a mean heavy-atom deviation of <3 Å from experiment) were generated for six out of seven bound RNA chains, and even more precise models (deviation < 2 Å) were obtained for five out of seven cases, a significant improvement compared to the state of the art. The method is not restricted to RRMs but was also successfully applied to Pumilio RNA binding proteins. PMID:27131381

  11. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alyssa C; Bartley, Laura E; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29-like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29-like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self-assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428-437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  12. Deep Sequencing Insights in Therapeutic shRNA Processing and siRNA Target Cleavage Precision

    PubMed Central

    Denise, Hubert; Moschos, Sterghios A.; Sidders, Benjamin; Burden, Frances; Perkins, Hannah; Carter, Nikki; Stroud, Tim; Kennedy, Michael; Fancy, Sally-Ann; Lapthorn, Cris; Lavender, Helen; Kinloch, Ross; Suhy, David; Corbau, Romu

    2014-01-01

    TT-034 (PF-05095808) is a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) agent expressing three short hairpin RNA (shRNA) pro-drugs that target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. The cytosolic enzyme Dicer cleaves each shRNA into multiple, potentially active small interfering RNA (siRNA) drugs. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify and characterize active shRNAs maturation products, we observed that each TT-034–encoded shRNA could be processed into as many as 95 separate siRNA strands. Few of these appeared active as determined by Sanger 5′ RNA Ligase-Mediated Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5-RACE) and through synthetic shRNA and siRNA analogue studies. Moreover, NGS scrutiny applied on 5-RACE products (RACE-seq) suggested that synthetic siRNAs could direct cleavage in not one, but up to five separate positions on targeted RNA, in a sequence-dependent manner. These data support an on-target mechanism of action for TT-034 without cytotoxicity and question the accepted precision of substrate processing by the key RNA interference (RNAi) enzymes Dicer and siRNA-induced silencing complex (siRISC). PMID:24496437

  13. Identification of dengue RNA binding proteins using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex M; Gunaratne, J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in dengue virus (DENV) research has been to understand the interaction of the viral RNA with host cell proteins during infection. Until recently, there were no comprehensive studies identifying host RNA binding proteins that interact with DENV RNA (Ward et al. RNA Biol 8 (6):1173-1186, 2011). Here, we describe a method for identifying proteins that associate with DENV RNA using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry. The method utilizes a tobramycin RNA aptamer incorporated into an RNA containing the dengue 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) in order to reversibly bind RNA to a tobramycin matrix. The RNA-tobramycin matrix is incubated with SILAC-labeled cell lysates, and bound proteins are eluted using an excess of tobramycin. The eluate is analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, which allows direct and quantitative comparison of proteins bound to DENV UTRs and a control RNA-tobramycin matrix. This technique has the advantage of allowing one to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding proteins based on the ratio of protein preferentially bound to the DENV UTRs versus the control RNA. This methodology can also be used for validation of quantitative mass spectrometry results using conventional Western blotting for specific proteins. Furthermore, though it was specifically developed to identify DENV RNA binding proteins, the RNA chromatography method described here can be applied to a broad range of viral and cellular RNAs for identification of interacting proteins. PMID:24696342

  14. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Syun-ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  15. piRNA cluster database: a web resource for piRNA producing loci.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, David

    2016-01-01

    Piwi proteins and their guiding small RNAs, termed Piwi-interacting (pi-) RNAs, are essential for silencing of transposons in the germline of animals. A substantial fraction of piRNAs originates from genomic loci termed piRNA clusters and sequences encoded in these piRNA clusters determine putative targets for the Piwi/piRNA system. In the past decade, studies of piRNA transcriptomes in different species revealed additional roles for piRNAs beyond transposon silencing, reflecting the astonishing plasticity of the Piwi/piRNA system along different phylogenetic branches. Moreover, piRNA transcriptomes can change drastically during development and vary across different tissues.Since piRNA clusters crucially shape piRNA profiles, analysis of these loci is imperative for a thorough understanding of functional and evolutionary aspects of the piRNA pathway. But despite the ever-growing amount of available piRNA sequence data, we know little about the factors that determine differential regulation of piRNA clusters, nor the evolutionary events that cause their gain or loss.In order to facilitate addressing these subjects, we established a user-friendly piRNA cluster database (http://www.smallrnagroup-mainz.de/piRNAclusterDB.html) that provides comprehensive data on piRNA clusters in multiple species, tissues and developmental stages based on small RNA sequence data deposited at NCBI's Sequence Read Archive (SRA). PMID:26582915

  16. Fetal Bovine Serum RNA Interferes with the Cell Culture derived Extracellular RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiyun; Batagov, Arsen O.; Carter, David R. F.; Krichevsky, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) has been used in eukaryotic cell cultures for decades. However, little attention has been paid to the biological effects associated with RNA content of FBS on cell cultures. Here, using RNA sequencing, we demonstrate that FBS contains a diverse repertoire of protein-coding and regulatory RNA species, including mRNA, miRNA, rRNA, and snoRNA. The majority of them (>70%) are retained even after extended ultracentrifugation in the preparations of vesicle-depleted FBS (vdFBS) commonly utilized in the studies of extracellular vesicles (EV) and intercellular communication. FBS-associated RNA is co-isolated with cell-culture derived extracellular RNA (exRNA) and interferes with the downstream RNA analysis. Many evolutionally conserved FBS-derived RNA species can be falsely annotated as human or mouse transcripts. Notably, specific miRNAs abundant in FBS, such as miR-122, miR-451a and miR-1246, have been previously reported as enriched in cell-culture derived EVs, possibly due to the confounding effect of the FBS. Analysis of publically available exRNA datasets supports the notion of FBS contamination. Furthermore, FBS transcripts can be taken up by cultured cells and affect the results of highly sensitive gene expression profiling technologies. Therefore, precautions for experimental design are warranted to minimize the interference and misinterpretations caused by FBS-derived RNA. PMID:27503761

  17. Protein mediated miRNA detection and siRNA enrichment using p19.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Cid, Melissa; Poole, Catherine B; McReynolds, Larry A

    2010-06-01

    p19 RNA binding protein from the Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is an RNA-silencing suppressor that binds small interfering RNA (siRNA) with high affinity. We created a bifunctional p19 fusion protein with an N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP), for protein purification, and a C-terminal chitin binding domain (CBD) to bind p19 to chitin magnetic beads. The fusion protein binds dsRNAs in the size range of 20-23 nucleotides, but does not bind ssRNA or dsDNA. Relative affinities of the p19 fusion protein for different-length RNA and DNA substrates were determined. Binding specificity of the p19 fusion protein for small dsRNA allows detection of miRNA:RNA probe duplexes. Using radioactive RNA probes, we were able to detect low levels of miRNAs in the sub-femtomole range and in the presence of a million-fold excess of total RNA. Detection is linear over three logs. Unlike most nucleic acid detection methods, p19 selects for RNA hybrids of correct length and structure. Rules for designing optimal RNA probes for p19 detection of miRNAs were determined by in vitro binding of 18 different dsRNA oligos to p19. These studies demonstrate the potential of p19 fusion protein to detect miRNAs and isolate endogenous siRNAs. PMID:20569217

  18. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  19. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3’untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3’ UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3’UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3’UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3’ UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory

  20. Tethering in RNA: An RNA-Binding Fragment Discovery Tool

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kiet; Arkin, Michelle R.; Beal, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Tethering has been extensively used to study small molecule interactions with proteins through reversible disulfide bond forming reactions to cysteine residues. We describe the adaptation of Tethering to the study of small molecule binding to RNA using a thiol-containing adenosine analog (ASH). Among 30 disulfide-containing small molecules screened for efficient Tethering to ASH-bearing RNAs derived from pre-miR21, a benzotriazole-containing compound showed prominent adduct formation and selectivity for one of the RNAs tested. The results of this screen demonstrate the viability of using thiol-modified nucleic acids to discover molecules with binding affinity and specificity for the purpose of therapeutic compound lead discovery. PMID:25749683

  1. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70-100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs). In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves. PMID:25629271

  2. siRNA release from pri-miRNA scaffolds is controlled by the sequence and structure of RNA.

    PubMed

    Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Olejniczak, Marta; Starega-Roslan, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal W; Makalowska, Izabela; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    shmiRs are pri-miRNA-based RNA interference triggers from which exogenous siRNAs are expressed in cells to silence target genes. These reagents are very promising tools in RNAi in vivo applications due to their good activity profile and lower toxicity than observed for other vector-based reagents such as shRNAs. In this study, using high-resolution northern blotting and small RNA sequencing, we investigated the precision with which RNases Drosha and Dicer process shmiRs. The fidelity of siRNA release from the commonly used pri-miRNA shuttles was found to depend on both the siRNA insert and the pri-miR scaffold. Then, we searched for specific factors that may affect the precision of siRNA release and found that both the structural features of shmiR hairpins and the nucleotide sequence at Drosha and Dicer processing sites contribute to cleavage site selection and cleavage precision. An analysis of multiple shRNA intermediates generated from several reagents revealed the complexity of shmiR processing by Drosha and demonstrated that Dicer selects substrates for further processing. Aside from providing new basic knowledge regarding the specificity of nucleases involved in miRNA biogenesis, our results facilitate the rational design of more efficient genetic reagents for RNAi technology. PMID:26921501

  3. Battle against RNA oxidation: molecular mechanisms for reducing oxidized RNA to protect cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwei; Malla, Sulochan; Shin, Brian; Li, James M

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation is probably the most common type of damage that occurs in cellular RNA. Oxidized RNA may be dysfunctional and is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related human diseases. Cellular mechanisms controlling oxidized RNA have begun to be revealed. Currently, a number of ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins have been shown to reduce oxidized RNA and to protect cells under oxidative stress. Although information about how these factors work is still very limited, we suggest several mechanisms that can be used to minimize oxidized RNA in various organisms. PMID:24375979

  4. BATTLE AGAINST RNA OXIDATION: Molecular mechanisms for reducing oxidized RNA to protect cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongwei; Malla, Sulochan; Shin, Brian; Li, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation is probably the most common type of damage that occurs in cellular RNA. Oxidized RNA may be dysfunctional and is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related human diseases. Cellular mechanisms controlling oxidized RNA have begun to be revealed. Currently, a number of ribonucleases and RNA binding proteins have been shown to reduce oxidized RNA and to protect cells under oxidative stress. Although information about how these factors work is still very limited, we suggest several mechanisms that can be used to minimize oxidized RNA in various organisms. PMID:24375979

  5. Primer-Dependent and Primer-Independent Initiation of Double Stranded RNA Synthesis by Purified Arabidopsis RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    PubMed Central

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maïna; Canard, Bruno; Robaglia, Christophe; Crété, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of RNA silencing in plants. PMID:25793874

  6. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6.

    PubMed

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maïna; Canard, Bruno; Robaglia, Christophe; Crété, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of RNA silencing in plants. PMID:25793874

  7. Rna catalysis and the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Norman R.; Marsh, Terry L.

    1985-06-01

    Until the discovery of catalytic RNAs, first the self-splicing intron inTetrahymena and then the bacterial RNAse P, cellular enzymes had always seemed to be protein in nature. The recognition that RNA can catalytically make and break phosphodiester bonds simplifies some of the assumptions required of a rudimentary self-replicating entity. Available information on the chemistry of RNA-catalyzed reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to self-splicing introns and tRNA processing by RNase P. An explicit model for a self-replicating RNA is described. The model postulates a nucleotide binding/polymerization site in the RNA, and takes advantage of intrinsic fluidity in RNA higher order structure to dissociate parent and progeny complementary strands.

  8. Quantitative transcriptome analysis using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Külahoglu, Canan; Bräutigam, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq has emerged as the technology of choice to quantify gene expression. This technology is a convenient accurate tool to quantify diurnal changes in gene expression, gene discovery, differential use of promoters, and splice variants for all genes expressed in a single tissue. Thus, RNA-seq experiments provide sequence information and absolute expression values about transcripts in addition to relative quantification available with microarrays or qRT-PCR. The depth of information by sequencing requires careful assessment of RNA intactness and DNA contamination. Although the RNA-seq is comparatively recent, a standard analysis framework has emerged with the packages of Bowtie2, TopHat, and Cufflinks. With rising popularity of RNA-seq tools have become manageable for researchers without much bioinformatical knowledge or programming skills. Here, we present a workflow for a RNA-seq experiment from experimental planning to biological data extraction. PMID:24792045

  9. Argonaute: The executor of small RNA function.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Azali; Dzaki, Najat; Azzam, Ghows

    2016-08-20

    The discovery of small non-coding RNAs - microRNA (miRNA), short interfering RNA (siRNA) and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) - represents one of the most exciting frontiers in biology specifically on the mechanism of gene regulation. In order to execute their functions, these small RNAs require physical interactions with their protein partners, the Argonaute (AGO) family proteins. Over the years, numerous studies have made tremendous progress on understanding the roles of AGO in gene silencing in various organisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress of AGO-mediated gene silencing and other cellular processes in which AGO proteins have been implicated with a particular focus on progress made in flies, humans and other model organisms as compliment. PMID:27569398

  10. Analysis of the miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA networks in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Guo, Li; Jiang, Fei; Li, Lei; Li, Zhong; Chen, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Recently, rapid advances in bioinformatics analysis have expanded our understanding of the transcriptome to a genome-wide level. miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA interactions have been shown to play critical regulatory role in cancer biology. In this study, we discussed the use of an integrated systematic approach to explore new facets of the oestrogen receptor (ER)-regulated transcriptome. The identification of RNAs that are related to the expression status of the ER may be useful in clinical therapy and prognosis. We used a network modelling strategy. First, microarray expression profiling of mRNA, lncRNA and miRNA was performed in MCF-7 (ER-positive) and MDA-MB-231 cells (ER- negative). A co-expression network was then built using co-expression relationships of the differentially expressed mRNAs and lncRNAs. Finally, the selected miRNA-mRNA network was added to the network. The key miRNA-mRNA-lncRNA interaction can be inferred from the network. The mRNA and non-coding RNA expression profiles of the cells with different ER phenotypes were distinct. Among the aberrantly expressed miRNAs, the expression levels of miR-19a-3p, miR-19b-3p and miR-130a-3p were much lower in the MCF-7 cells, whereas that of miR-148b-3p was much higher. In a cluster of miR-17-92, the expression levels of six of seven miRNAs were lower in the MCF-7 cells, in addition to miR-20b in the miR-106a-363 cluster. However, the levels of all the miRNAs in the miR-106a-25 cluster were higher in the MCF-7 cells. In the co-expression networking, CD74 and FMNL2 gene which is involved in the immune response and metastasis, respectively, had a stronger correlation with ER. Among the aberrantly expressed lncRNAs, lncRNA-DLEU1 was highly expressed in the MCF-7 cells. A statistical analysis revealed that there was a co-expression relationship between ESR1 and lncRNA-DLEU1. In addition, miR-19a and lncRNA-DLEU1 are both located on the human chromosome 13q. We speculate that miR-19a might be co-expressed with lncRNA-DLEU1

  11. RNA Virus Reverse Genetics and Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses are capable of rapid spread and severe or potentially lethal disease in both animals and humans. The development of reverse genetics systems for manipulation and study of RNA virus genomes has provided platforms for designing and optimizing viral mutants for vaccine development. Here, we review the impact of RNA virus reverse genetics systems on past and current efforts to design effective and safe viral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:24967693

  12. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  13. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    SciTech Connect

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  14. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  15. U1 RNA Induces Innate Immunity Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert W.; Gazitt, Tal; Foecking, Mark F.; Ortmann, Robert A.; Misfeldt, Michael; Jorgenson, Rebecca; Young, Steven L.; Greidinger, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The U1–70-kd RNP is a prominent target of autoimmunity in connective tissue diseases. In this study, we explored whether its endogenous ligand, U1 RNA, mediates a proimmune signal and may be immunogenic. Methods We assayed the proliferation of control and MyD88-knockout splenocytes in response to in vitro–synthesized U1 RNA, and measured interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 secretion induced by U1 RNA in a human cell line competent for signaling through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) and TLR-5. Results Treatment with U1 RNA or with poly(I-C), a known agonist of TLR-3, induced approximately twice as much control splenocyte proliferation as did treatment with RNase-digested U1 RNA. Proliferation in response to either poly(I-C) or U1 RNA by MyD88-knockout splenocytes was similarly attenuated. Similar to poly(I-C), U1 RNA induced significant secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 from a TLR-3–expressing human cell line; in contrast, the TLR-5 agonist flagellin induced predominantly IL-8 secretion. Pretreatment of U1 RNA with RNase abolished IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Conclusion U1 RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR-3 activation. The ability of U1 RNA (which has a substantial double-stranded secondary structure) to activate TLR-3 may contribute to the immunogenicity of the U1–70-kd autoantigen. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins. PMID:15457457

  16. DNA and RNA technology in soil biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    DNA technology has come a long way and state of the art techniques are currently used in the analysis of soil biodiversity. Current methods will be presented and their strengths and limitations discussed. RNA technology, for the study of gene expression and potential activity of functional groups in the soil, is lagging behind, mostly due to the difficulties of extracting stable RNA from the soil. The potentials and challenges of adopting RNA technology for soil analysis will be discussed.

  17. A chemical screen for biological small molecule–RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E.; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3′-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5′-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule–RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule–RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule–RNA conjugates, including 3′-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5′ terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (≲200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  18. A chemical screen for biological small molecule-RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA.

    PubMed

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R

    2009-05-12

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule-RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule-RNA conjugates, including 3'-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5' terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (approximately < 200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  19. Complete sequence of RNA1 and subgenomic RNA3 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus (AHNV).

    PubMed

    Sommerset, Ingunn; Nerland, Audun H

    2004-03-10

    The Nodaviridae are divided into the alphanodavirus genus, which infects insects, and the betanodavirus genus, which infects fishes. Betanodaviruses are the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) in a number of cultivated marine fish species. The Nodaviridae are small non-enveloped RNA viruses that contain a genome consisting of 2 single-stranded positivesense RNA segments: RNA1 (3.1 kb), which encodes the viral part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp); and RNA2 (1.4 kb), which encodes the capsid protein. In addition to RNA1 and RNA2, a subgenomic transcript of RNA1, RNA3, is present in infected cells. We have cloned and sequenced RNA1 from the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus nodavirus (AHNV), and for the first time, the sequence of a betanodaviral subgenomic RNA3 has been determined. AHNV RNA1 was 3100 nucleotides in length and contained a main open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 981 amino acids. Conservative motifs for RdRp were found in the deduced amino acid sequence. RNA3 was 371 nucleotides in length, and contained an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 75 amino acids corresponding to a hypothetical B2 protein, although sequence alignments with the alphanodavirus B2 proteins showed only marginal similarities. AHNV RNA replication in the fish cell-line SSN-1 (derived from striped snakehead) was analysed by Northern blot analysis, which indicated that RNA3 was synthesised in large amounts (compared to RNA1) at an early point in time post-infection. PMID:15109133

  20. Identifying miRNA/mRNA negative regulation pairs in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xile; Xu, Xiangming; Wang, Jinhai; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in the molecular biology of Colorectal cancer (CRC), novel approaches are still required to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism of CRC. We aim to explore the potential negatively regulated miRNA-mRNA pairs and investigate their regulatory roles so as to elaborate the potential roles of the critical proteins in the signaling pathways enriched by the differential target genes of negatively regulated miRNA in CRC. Firstly, the differential miRNA-mRNA pairs were selected, followed by pairs of miRNA and their target genes. The obtained relationships were subjected to do functional enrichment analysis and those enriched in CRC pathways were chose to further construct a protein interaction network. Finally, we analyzed the regulatory roles of these relationships and constructed a regulatory network of negatively regulated miRNA and mRNA relationships. A total of 372 pairs of miRNA-mRNA were found and 108 target genes of miRNA were obtained. Three miRNAs including hsa-mir-23b, hsa-mir-365-1 and hsa-mir-365-2 showed significant influence on prognosis of CRC patients. To conclude, the miRNA/mRNA deregulations pairs identified in this study have high potentials to be further applied in diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26269151

  1. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D

    2014-07-24

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome. PMID:25043052

  2. Interactions between 23S rRNA and tRNA in the ribosomal E site.

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, M; Xiong, L; Shah, S; Mankin, A S

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between tRNA or its analogs and 23S rRNA in the large ribosomal subunit were analyzed by RNA footprinting and by modification-interference selection. In the E site, tRNA protected bases G2112, A2392, and C2394 of 23S rRNA. Truncated tRNA, lacking the anticodon stem-loop, protected A2392 and C2394, but not G2112, and tRNA derivatives with a shortened 3' end protected only G2112, but not A2392 or C2394. Modification interference revealed C2394 as the only accessible nucleotide in 23S rRNA whose modification interferes with binding of tRNA in the large ribosomal subunit E site. The results suggest a direct contact between A76 of tRNA A76 and C2394 of 23S rRNA. Protections at G2112 may reflect interaction of this 23S rRNA region with the tRNA central fold. PMID:11214181

  3. Messenger RNAs bearing tRNA-like features exemplified by interferon alfa 5 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toledano, Rosa; Gómez, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to ascertain whether liver mRNA species share common structural features with hepatitis C virus (HCV) mRNA that allow them to support the RNase-P (pre-tRNA/processing enzyme) cleavage reaction in vitro. The presence of RNase-P competitive elements in the liver mRNA population was determined by means of biochemical techniques, and a set of sensitive mRNA species were identified through microarray screening. Cleavage specificity and substrate length requirement of around 200 nts, were determined for three mRNA species. One of these cleavage sites was found in interferon-alpha 5 (IFNA5) mRNA between specific base positions and with the characteristic RNase-P chemistry of cleavage. It was mapped within a cloverleaf-like structure revealed by a comparative structural analysis based on several direct enzymes and chemical probing methods of three RNA fragments of increasing size, and subsequently contrasted against site-directed mutants. The core region was coincident with the reported signal for the cytoplasmic accumulation region (CAR) in IFNAs. Striking similarities with the tRNA-like element of the antagonist HCV mRNA were found. In general, this study provides a new way of looking at a variety of viral tRNA-like motifs as this type of structural mimicry might be related to specific host mRNA species rather than, or in addition to, tRNA itself. PMID:25900662

  4. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D.

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  5. A new way to see RNA

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Kevin S.; Humphris, Elisabeth L.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Unlike proteins, the RNA backbone has numerous degrees of freedom (eight, if one counts the sugar pucker), making RNA modeling, structure building and prediction a multidimensional problem of exceptionally high complexity. And yet RNA tertiary structures are not infinite in their structural morphology; rather, they are built from a limited set of discrete units. In order to reduce the dimensionality of the RNA backbone in a physically reasonable way, a shorthand notation was created that reduced the RNA backbone torsion angles to two (η and θ, analogous to ϕ and ψ in proteins). When these torsion angles are calculated for nucleotides in a crystallographic database and plotted against one another, one obtains a plot analogous to a Ramachandran plot (the η/θ plot), with highly populated and unpopulated regions. Nucleotides that occupy proximal positions on the plot have identical structures and are found in the same units of tertiary structure. In this review, we describe the statistical validation of the η/θ formalism and the exploration of features within the η/θ plot. We also describe the application of the η/θ formalism in RNA motif discovery, structural comparison, RNA structure building and tertiary structure prediction. More than a tool, however, the η/θ formalism has provided new insights into RNA structure itself, revealing its fundamental components and the factors underlying RNA architectural form. PMID:21729350

  6. The Origins of the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michael P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2012-01-01

    The general notion of an “RNA World” is that, in the early development of life on the Earth, genetic continuity was assured by the replication of RNA and genetically encoded proteins were not involved as catalysts. There is now strong evidence indicating that an RNA World did indeed exist before DNA- and protein-based life. However, arguments regarding whether life on Earth began with RNA are more tenuous. It might be imagined that all of the components of RNA were available in some prebiotic pool, and that these components assembled into replicating, evolving polynucleotides without the prior existence of any evolved macromolecules. A thorough consideration of this “RNA-first” view of the origin of life must reconcile concerns regarding the intractable mixtures that are obtained in experiments designed to simulate the chemistry of the primitive Earth. Perhaps these concerns will eventually be resolved, and recent experimental findings provide some reason for optimism. However, the problem of the origin of the RNA World is far from being solved, and it is fruitful to consider the alternative possibility that RNA was preceded by some other replicating, evolving molecule, just as DNA and proteins were preceded by RNA. PMID:20739415

  7. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  8. MicroRNA biogenesis pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuibin; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression. Amplification and overexpression of individual ‘oncomiRs’ or genetic loss of tumour suppressor miRNAs are associated with human cancer and are sufficient to drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. Furthermore, global miRNA depletion caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery is oncogenic. This, together with the recent identification of novel miRNA regulatory factors and pathways, highlights the importance of miRNA dysregulation in cancer. PMID:25998712

  9. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    PubMed

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  10. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

  11. Specific RNA binding to ordered phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Tadeusz; Janas, Teresa; Yarus, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have studied RNA binding to vesicles bounded by ordered and disordered phospholipid membranes. A positive correlation exists between bilayer order and RNA affinity. In particular, structure-dependent RNA binding appears for rafted (liquid-ordered) domains in sphingomyelin-cholesterol-1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles. Binding to more highly ordered gel phase membranes is stronger, but much less RNA structure-dependent. All modes of RNA-membrane association seem to be electrostatic and headgroup directed. Fluorometry on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes indicates that bound RNA broadens the gel-fluid melting transition, and reduces lipid headgroup order, as detected via fluorometric measurement of intramembrane electric fields. RNA preference for rafted lipid was visualized and confirmed using multiple fluorophores that allow fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy on RNA molecules closely associated with ordered lipid patches within giant vesicles. Accordingly, both RNA structure and membrane order could modulate biological RNA–membrane interactions. PMID:16641318

  12. The RNA World and its origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, A. W.

    1995-01-01

    The theory of the "RNA World" states that the first molecular systems to display the properties of self-replication and evolution were RNA molecules. The origin of life not only depended crucially upon this event, but RNA molecules can even be viewed as the first "living" things. In recent years this theory has gained ascendancy over competing ideas and is now largely accepted by biologists as the most satisfactory explanation for the origin of life. The reasons for this development will be reviewed and the problem of the origin of the first RNA molecules will be discussed.

  13. The relationship between RNA catalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedergren, Robert; Lang, B. Franz; Gravel, Denis

    1988-09-01

    Proposals that an RNA-based genetic system preceeded DNA, stem from the ability of RNA to store genetic information and to promote simple catalysis. However, to be a valid basis for the RNA world, RNA catalysis must demonstrate or be related to intrinsic chemical properties which could have existed in primordial times. We analyze this question by first classifying RNA catalysis and related processes according to their mechanism. We define: (A) thedisjunct nucleophile class which leads to 5'-phosphates. These include Group I and II intron splicing, nuclear mRNA splicing and RNase P reactions. Although Group I introns and its excision mechanism is likely to have existed in primordial times, present-day examples have arisen independently in different phyla much more recently. Comparative methodology indicates that RNase P catalysis originated before the divergence of the major kingdoms. In addition, alldisjunct nucleophile reactions can be interrelated by a proposed mechanism involving a distant 2-OH nucleophile. (B) theconjunct nucleophile class leading to 3'-phosphates. This class is composed of self-cleaving RNAs found in plant viruses and the newt. We propose that tRNA splicing is related to this mechanism rather than the previous one. The presence of introns in tRNA genes of eukaryotes and archaebacteria supports the idea that tRNA splicing predates the divergence of these cell types.

  14. RNA-Seq: revelation of the messengers.

    PubMed

    Van Verk, Marcel C; Hickman, Richard; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2013-04-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) is rapidly outcompeting microarrays as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, the bioinformatics skills required for RNA-Seq data analysis often pose a significant hurdle for many biologists. Here, we put forward the concepts and considerations that are critical for RNA-Seq data analysis and provide a generic tutorial with example data that outlines the whole pipeline from next-generation sequencing output to quantification of differential gene expression. PMID:23481128

  15. RNA silencing movement in plants.

    PubMed

    Mermigka, Glykeria; Verret, Frédéric; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular organisms, like higher plants, need to coordinate their growth and development and to cope with environmental cues. To achieve this, various signal molecules are transported between neighboring cells and distant organs to control the fate of the recipient cells and organs. RNA silencing produces cell non-autonomous signal molecules that can move over short or long distances leading to the sequence specific silencing of a target gene in a well defined area of cells or throughout the entire plant, respectively. The nature of these signal molecules, the route of silencing spread, and the genes involved in their production, movement and reception are discussed in this review. Additionally, a short section on features of silencing spread in animal models is presented at the end of this review. PMID:26297506

  16. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Carrington, James C; Liu, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate step of RNA silencing via binding to siRNAs, although the molecular features required for duplex siRNA binding differ among the three proteins. None of the suppressors affected the activity of preassembled RISC complexes. In contrast, each suppressor uniformly inhibited the siRNA-initiated RISC assembly pathway by preventing RNA silencing initiator complex formation. PMID:16724105

  17. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Carrington, James C; Liu, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-06-21

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate step of RNA silencing via binding to siRNAs, although the molecular features required for duplex siRNA binding differ among the three proteins. None of the suppressors affected the activity of preassembled RISC complexes. In contrast, each suppressor uniformly inhibited the siRNA-initiated RISC assembly pathway by preventing RNA silencing initiator complex formation. PMID:16724105

  18. Hyaluronic acid-siRNA conjugate/reducible polyethylenimine complexes for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeon Lim; Ku, Sook Hee; Jin, So; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Won Jong; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2014-10-01

    The clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA remain as a challenge due to the lack of efficient delivery system. In the present study, hyaluronic acid-siRNA conjugate (HA-SS-siRNA)/reducible polyethylenimine (BPEI1.2k-SS) complexes were developed to efficiently deliver the siRNA to HA receptor abundant region with the improved siRNA stability. HA and siRNA were conjugated with disulfide bonds, which are cleavable in cytoplasm. The synthesized HA-SS-siRNA was further complexed with BPEI1.2k-SS, resulting in the formation of spherical nanostructures with approximately 190 nm of size and neutral surface charge. HA-SS-siRNA/BPEI1.2k-SS complexes exhibited the improved stability against serum proteins or polyanions. These complexes were successfully translocated into intracellular region via HA receptor-mediated endocytosis, and silenced target gene expression. PMID:25942799

  19. RNA-mediated RNA degradation in transgene- and virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Metzlaff, Michael

    2002-10-01

    In the 'RNA world' hypothesis it is postulated that RNA was the first genetic molecule. Recent discoveries in gene silencing research on plants, fungi and animals show that RNA indeed plays a key role not only in controlling invading nucleic acids, like viruses and transposable elements, but also in regulating the expression of transgenes and endogenous genes. Double-stranded RNAs were identified to be the triggering structures for the induction of a specific and highly efficient RNA silencing system, in which enzyme complexes, like Dicer and RISC, facilitate as 'molecular machines' the processing of dsRNA into characteristic small RNA species. RNA silencing can be transmitted rapidly from silenced to non-silenced cells by short and long distance signaling. There is evidence that at least one component of the signal is a specific, degradation-resistant RNA. PMID:12452426

  20. Integrated microRNA-mRNA analyses reveal OPLL specific microRNA regulatory network using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yuanyuan; Shen, Xiaolong; Shi, Changgui; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a genetic disorder which involves pathological heterotopic ossification of the spinal ligaments. Although studies have identified several genes that correlated with OPLL, the underlying regulation network is far from clear. Through small RNA sequencing, we compared the microRNA expressions of primary posterior longitudinal ligament cells form OPLL patients with normal patients (PLL) and identified 218 dysregulated miRNAs (FDR < 0.01). Furthermore, assessing the miRNA profiling data of multiple cell types, we found these dysregulated miRNAs were mostly OPLL specific. In order to decipher the regulation network of these OPLL specific miRNAs, we integrated mRNA expression profiling data with miRNA sequencing data. Through computational approaches, we showed the pivotal roles of these OPLL specific miRNAs in heterotopic ossification of longitudinal ligament by discovering highly correlated miRNA/mRNA pairs that associated with skeletal system development, collagen fibril organization, and extracellular matrix organization. The results of which provide strong evidence that the miRNA regulatory networks we established may indeed play vital roles in OPLL onset and progression. To date, this is the first systematic analysis of the micronome in OPLL, and thus may provide valuable resources in finding novel treatment and diagnostic targets of OPLL. PMID:26868491

  1. Relationships among the positive strand and double-strand RNA viruses as viewed through their RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Bruenn, J A

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of 50 RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) from 43 positive strand and 7 double strand RNA (dsRNA) viruses have been compared. The alignment permitted calculation of distances among the 50 viruses and a resultant dendrogram based on every amino acid, rather than just those amino acids in the conserved motifs. Remarkably, a large subgroup of these viruses, including vertebrate, plant, and insect viruses, forms a single cluster whose only common characteristic is exploitation of insect hosts or vectors. This similarity may be due to molecular constraints associated with a present and/or past ability to infect insects and/or to common descent from insect viruses. If common descent is important, as it appears to be, all the positive strand RNA viruses of eucaryotes except for the picornaviruses may have evolved from an ancestral dsRNA virus. Viral RDRPs appear to be inherited as modules rather than as portions of single RNA segments, implying that RNA recombination has played an important role in their dissemination. PMID:2014162

  2. Global analysis of the mammalian RNA degradome reveals widespread miRNA-dependent and miRNA-independent endonucleolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Cameron P.; Szubert, Jan M.; Mercer, Tim R.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Thomson, Daniel W.; Mattick, John S.; Michael, Michael Z.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The Ago2 component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is an endonuclease that cleaves mRNAs that base pair with high complementarity to RISC-bound microRNAs. Many examples of such direct cleavage have been identified in plants, but not in vertebrates, despite the conservation of catalytic capacity in vertebrate Ago2. We performed parallel analysis of RNA ends (PAREs), a deep sequencing approach that identifies 5′-phosphorylated, polyadenylated RNAs, to detect potential microRNA-directed mRNA cleavages in mouse embryo and adult tissues. We found that numerous mRNAs are potentially targeted for cleavage by endogenous microRNAs, but at very low levels relative to the mRNA abundance, apart from miR-151-5p-guided cleavage of the N4BP1 mRNA. We also find numerous examples of non-miRNA-directed cleavage, including cleavage of a group of mRNAs within a CA-repeat consensus sequence. The PARE analysis also identified many examples of adenylated small non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, tRNA processing intermediates and various other small RNAs, consistent with adenylation being part of a widespread proof-reading and/or degradation pathway for small RNAs. PMID:21427086

  3. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  4. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses. PMID:23035235

  5. Noncoding Flavivirus RNA Displays RNA Interference Suppressor Activity in Insect and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G.; Leung, Jason Y.; Metz, Stefan W.; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W.; Vlak, Just M.; Kohl, Alain

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3′-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses. PMID:23035235

  6. N(6)-methyladenosine-dependent RNA structural switches regulate RNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Dai, Qing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan; Parisien, Marc; Pan, Tao

    2015-02-26

    RNA-binding proteins control many aspects of cellular biology through binding single-stranded RNA binding motifs (RBMs). However, RBMs can be buried within their local RNA structures, thus inhibiting RNA-protein interactions. N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), the most abundant and dynamic internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA, can be selectively recognized by the YTHDF2 protein to affect the stability of cytoplasmic mRNAs, but how m(6)A achieves its wide-ranging physiological role needs further exploration. Here we show in human cells that m(6)A controls the RNA-structure-dependent accessibility of RBMs to affect RNA-protein interactions for biological regulation; we term this mechanism 'the m(6)A-switch'. We found that m(6)A alters the local structure in mRNA and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) to facilitate binding of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (HNRNPC), an abundant nuclear RNA-binding protein responsible for pre-mRNA processing. Combining photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and anti-m(6)A immunoprecipitation (MeRIP) approaches enabled us to identify 39,060 m(6)A-switches among HNRNPC-binding sites; and global m(6)A reduction decreased HNRNPC binding at 2,798 high-confidence m(6)A-switches. We determined that these m(6)A-switch-regulated HNRNPC-binding activities affect the abundance as well as alternative splicing of target mRNAs, demonstrating the regulatory role of m(6)A-switches on gene expression and RNA maturation. Our results illustrate how RNA-binding proteins gain regulated access to their RBMs through m(6)A-dependent RNA structural remodelling, and provide a new direction for investigating RNA-modification-coded cellular biology. PMID:25719671

  7. Mapping protein-RNA interactions by RCAP, RNA-cross-linking and peptide fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Robert C; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology often feature protein RNA complexes. The interaction between proteins and large RNAs are difficult to study using traditional structure-based methods like NMR or X-ray crystallography. RCAP, an approach that uses reversible-cross-linking affinity purification method coupled with mass spectrometry, has been developed to map regions within proteins that contact RNA. This chapter details how RCAP is applied to map protein-RNA contacts within virions. PMID:25896007

  8. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. PMID:27107644

  9. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends. PMID:25977553

  10. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  11. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H cleaves RNA/RNA in arrested complexes: implications for the mechanism by which RNase H discriminates between RNA/RNA and RNA/DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Götte, M; Fackler, S; Hermann, T; Perola, E; Cellai, L; Gross, H J; Le Grice, S F; Heumann, H

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is primed by tRNA(Lys3), which forms an 18 base pair RNA homoduplex with its 3' terminus and the primer binding site (PBS) of the viral genome. Using an in vitro system mimicking initiation of minus strand DNA synthesis, we analyzed the mechanism by which HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) distinguishes between RNA/DNA and RNA/RNA (dsRNA). tRNA(Lys3) was hybridized to a PBS-containing RNA template and extended by addition of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). In the presence of all four dNTPs, initial cleavage of the RNA template occurred immediately downstream of the tRNA-DNA junction, reflecting RNase H specificity for RNA in a RNA/DNA hybrid. However, in the absence of DNA synthesis, or limiting this by chain termination, the PBS was cleaved at a constant distance of 18 nucleotides upstream of the nascent primer 3' terminus. The position of cleavage remained in register with the position of DNA synthesis arrest, indicating that hydrolysis of homoduplex RNA is spatialy co-ordinated with DNA synthesis. Kinetic studies comparing cleavage rates of an analogous DNA primer/PBS heteroduplex and the tRNA(Lys3)/PBS homoduplex showed that while the former is cleaved as rapidly as RT polymerizes, the latter proceeds 30-fold slower. Although the RNase H domain hydrolyzes dsRNA when RT is artificially arrested, specificity for RNA/DNA hybrids is maintained when DNA is actively synthesized, since residency of the RNase H domain at a single base position is not long enough to allow significant cleavage on dsRNA. Images PMID:7533725

  12. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5-3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson-Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/. PMID:25883046

  13. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W.; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H.; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5–3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson–Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/. PMID:25883046

  14. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-06-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  15. MiRNA expression profile and miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis (MMIA) during podocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigui; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Jing; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-06-01

    The podocyte is a prominent cell type, which encases the capillaries of glomerulus. Podocyte-selective deletion of Dicer or Drosha was reported to induce proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis, suggesting the essential role of microRNA (miRNA) in podocytes for renal function. However, no comprehensive miRNA expression or miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis (MMIA) can be found during podocyte differentiation. Herein, miRNA and mRNA microarrays are presented, which were carried out in differentiated and undifferentiated mouse podocyte cell lines (MPC5). A total of 50 abnormal miRNAs (26 down-regulated and 24 up-regulated) were identified in differentiated and undifferentiated podocytes. Using MMIA, 80 of the 743 mRNAs (>twofold change) were predicted for potential crosstalk with 30 miRNAs of the 50 abnormal miRNAs. In addition, the gene ontology of mRNAs and the pathway analysis of miRNAs revealed a new potential-regulated network during podocyte differentiation. The expressions of three remarkably changed miRNAs (miR-34c, miR-200a and miR-467e) and four mRNAs (Runx1t1, Atp2a2, Glrp1, and Mmp15), were randomly chosen for further validation by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and their expression trends were consistent with the microarray data. Reference searching was also conducted to confirm our data and to find potential new molecules and miRNA-target pairs involved in the podocyte differentiation. The dual luciferase reporter assay for miR-200a/GLRX and let-7b/ARL4D confirmed the prediction of MMIA. The results of this study provide a detailed integration of mRNA and miRNA during podocyte differentiation. The molecular integration mode will open up new perspectives for a better understanding of the mechanism during podocyte differentiation. PMID:25433550

  16. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways. PMID:27045817

  17. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  18. Fluorescence anisotropy: analysis of tRNA binding to the T box riboswitch antiterminator RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Anupam, R; Hines, J V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy can be utilized in drug discovery screening assays to identify compounds that disrupt medicinally important RNA-macromolecular complexes. Here we describe the application of this technique to monitor tRNA binding to T box riboswitch antiterminator RNA. PMID:25352143

  19. Covalent small-molecule-RNA complex formation enables cellular profiling of small-molecule-RNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lirui

    2013-01-01

    Won’t let you go! A strategy is described to design small molecules that react with their cellular RNA targets. This approach not only improves the activity of compounds targeting RNA in cell culture by ≈2500-fold but also enables cell-wide profiling of its RNA targets. PMID:23913698

  20. Covalent small-molecule-RNA complex formation enables cellular profiling of small-molecule-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-09-16

    Won't let you go! A strategy is described to design small molecules that react with their cellular RNA targets. This approach not only improves the activity of compounds targeting RNA in cell culture by a factor of about 2500 but also enables cell-wide profiling of its RNA targets. PMID:23913698

  1. VIRsiRNAdb: a curated database of experimentally validated viral siRNA/shRNA

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Nishant; Qureshi, Abid; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    RNAi technology has been emerging as a potential modality to inhibit viruses during past decade. In literature a few siRNA databases have been reported that focus on targeting human and mammalian genes but experimentally validated viral siRNA databases are lacking. We have developed VIRsiRNAdb, a manually curated database having comprehensive details of 1358 siRNA/shRNA targeting viral genome regions. Further, wherever available, information regarding alternative efficacies of above 300 siRNAs derived from different assays has also been incorporated. Important fields included in the database are siRNA sequence, virus subtype, target genome region, cell type, target object, experimental assay, efficacy, off-target and siRNA matching with reference viral sequences. Database also provides the users with facilities of advance search, browsing, data submission, linking to external databases and useful siRNA analysis tools especially siTarAlign which align the siRNA with reference viral genomes or user defined sequences. VIRsiRNAdb contains extensive details of siRNA/shRNA targeting 42 important human viruses including influenza virus, hepatitis B virus, HPV and SARS Corona virus. VIRsiRNAdb would prove useful for researchers in picking up the best viral siRNA for antiviral therapeutics development and also for developing better viral siRNA design tools. The database is freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/virsirnadb. PMID:22139916

  2. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon-anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed. PMID:24904644

  3. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  4. Posttranscriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. Through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress precursor mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs identified until now. PMID:23178169

  5. A structural determinant required for RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Nan; Yang, Yun; Sachsenmaier, Nora; Muggenhumer, Dominik; Bi, Jingpei; Waldsich, Christina; Jantsch, Michael F.; Jin, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs) can be both specific and non-specific, depending on the substrate. Specific editing of particular adenosines may depend on the overall sequence and structural context. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying these preferences are not fully understood. Here, we show that duplex structures mimicking an editing site in the Gabra3 pre-mRNA unexpectedly fail to support RNA editing at the Gabra3 I/M site, although phylogenetic analysis suggest an evolutionarily conserved duplex structure essential for efficient RNA editing. These unusual results led us to revisit the structural requirement for this editing by mutagenesis analysis. In vivo nuclear injection experiments of mutated editing substrates demonstrate that a non-conserved structure is a determinant for editing. This structure contains bulges either on the same or the strand opposing the edited adenosine. The position of these bulges and the distance to the edited base regulate editing. Moreover, elevated folding temperature can lead to a switch in RNA editing suggesting an RNA structural change. Our results indicate the importance of RNA tertiary structure in determining RNA editing. PMID:21427087

  6. In silico selection of RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Chushak, Yaroslav; Stone, Morley O.

    2009-01-01

    In vitro selection of RNA aptamers that bind to a specific ligand usually begins with a random pool of RNA sequences. We propose a computational approach for designing a starting pool of RNA sequences for the selection of RNA aptamers for specific analyte binding. Our approach consists of three steps: (i) selection of RNA sequences based on their secondary structure, (ii) generating a library of three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA molecules and (iii) high-throughput virtual screening of this library to select aptamers with binding affinity to a desired small molecule. We developed a set of criteria that allows one to select a sequence with potential binding affinity from a pool of random sequences and developed a protocol for RNA 3D structure prediction. As verification, we tested the performance of in silico selection on a set of six known aptamer–ligand complexes. The structures of the native sequences for the ligands in the testing set were among the top 5% of the selected structures. The proposed approach reduces the RNA sequences search space by four to five orders of magnitude—significantly accelerating the experimental screening and selection of high-affinity aptamers. PMID:19465396

  7. Alternative applications for distinct RNA sequencing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Leng; Vickers, Kasey C.; Samuels, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA library preparation methods, platform accessibility and cost efficiency have allowed high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to replace conventional hybridization microarray platforms as the method of choice for mRNA profiling and transcriptome analyses. RNAseq is a powerful technique to profile both long and short RNA expression, and the depth of information gained from distinct RNAseq methods is striking and facilitates discovery. In addition to expression analysis, distinct RNAseq approaches also allow investigators the ability to assess transcriptional elongation, DNA variance and exogenous RNA content. Here we review the current state of the art in transcriptome sequencing and address epigenetic regulation, quantification of transcription activation, RNAseq output and a diverse set of applications for RNAseq data. We detail how RNAseq can be used to identify allele-specific expression, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and somatic mutations and discuss the benefits and limitations of using RNAseq to monitor DNA characteristics. Moreover, we highlight the power of combining RNA- and DNAseq methods for genomic analysis. In summary, RNAseq provides the opportunity to gain greater insight into transcriptional regulation and output than simply miRNA and mRNA profiling. PMID:25246237

  8. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  9. Next generation sequencing of viral RNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, the ability to generate large amounts of sequence data has revolutionized the genomics field. Most RNA viruses have relatively small genomes in comparison to other organisms and as such, would appear to be an obvious success story for the use of NGS technologies. However, due to the relatively low abundance of viral RNA in relation to host RNA, RNA viruses have proved relatively difficult to sequence using NGS technologies. Here we detail a simple, robust methodology, without the use of ultra-centrifugation, filtration or viral enrichment protocols, to prepare RNA from diagnostic clinical tissue samples, cell monolayers and tissue culture supernatant, for subsequent sequencing on the Roche 454 platform. Results As representative RNA viruses, full genome sequence was successfully obtained from known lyssaviruses belonging to recognized species and a novel lyssavirus species using these protocols and assembling the reads using de novo algorithms. Furthermore, genome sequences were generated from considerably less than 200 ng RNA, indicating that manufacturers’ minimum template guidance is conservative. In addition to obtaining genome consensus sequence, a high proportion of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were identified in the majority of samples analyzed. Conclusions The approaches reported clearly facilitate successful full genome lyssavirus sequencing and can be universally applied to discovering and obtaining consensus genome sequences of RNA viruses from a variety of sources. PMID:23822119

  10. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  11. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  12. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hornak, Katherine E.; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5–7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA) are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses. PMID:27428993

  13. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  14. MicroRNA: Mechanism of Gene Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  15. Alternative applications for distinct RNA sequencing strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Leng; Vickers, Kasey C; Samuels, David C; Guo, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in RNA library preparation methods, platform accessibility and cost efficiency have allowed high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to replace conventional hybridization microarray platforms as the method of choice for mRNA profiling and transcriptome analyses. RNAseq is a powerful technique to profile both long and short RNA expression, and the depth of information gained from distinct RNAseq methods is striking and facilitates discovery. In addition to expression analysis, distinct RNAseq approaches also allow investigators the ability to assess transcriptional elongation, DNA variance and exogenous RNA content. Here we review the current state of the art in transcriptome sequencing and address epigenetic regulation, quantification of transcription activation, RNAseq output and a diverse set of applications for RNAseq data. We detail how RNAseq can be used to identify allele-specific expression, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and somatic mutations and discuss the benefits and limitations of using RNAseq to monitor DNA characteristics. Moreover, we highlight the power of combining RNA- and DNAseq methods for genomic analysis. In summary, RNAseq provides the opportunity to gain greater insight into transcriptional regulation and output than simply miRNA and mRNA profiling. PMID:25246237

  16. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  17. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses.

    PubMed

    Hornak, Katherine E; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5-7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA) are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses. PMID:27428993

  18. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  19. Isolation of total RNA from pollens.

    PubMed

    Bijli, K M; Singh, B P; Sridhara, S; Arora, N

    2001-05-01

    Isolation of total RNA from plant materials has been difficult, due to the presence of complex organic substances and the associated pigmentation. In fact, there is a dearth of standardized protocols for isolating total RNA from pollens. To find a simple and reliable method for isolating total RNA from pollen, four methods, viz. phenol/SDS (PS), guanidine HCl (GH), tri-reagent (TR), and modified SDS-betaME (SB) were tested with fresh pollen of Ricinus communis (procured at -70 degrees C) and pollen dried at 30-37 degrees C. The quality and quantity of RNA was superior for the material processed at -70 degrees C. SB gave the highest RNA yield (2.35 mg/g, OD260/280 >2.0), compared to other methods. The results obtained by the SB method were found to be comparable with the widely used tri-reagent method. This was validated with other pollens of Imperata cylindrica and Xanthium strumarium. The yield obtained from graded amounts of pollen was consistent with SB, compared to the TR method. The RNA isolated by SB gave good quality mRNA for synthesizing cDNA. The SDS-betaME method is simple, efficient, and uses less expensive reagents. Hence, we recommend the modified SDS-betaME method for isolating total RNA from pollens. PMID:11426703

  20. Changing genetic information through RNA editing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, S.; Rich, A.

    2000-01-01

    RNA editing, the post-transcriptional alteration of a gene-encoded sequence, is a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes. As a consequence of RNA editing, functionally distinct proteins can be produced from a single gene. The molecular mechanisms involved include single or multiple base insertions or deletions as well as base substitutions. In mammals, one type of substitutional RNA editing, characterized by site-specific base-modification, was shown to modulate important physiological processes. The underlying reaction mechanism of substitutional RNA editing involves hydrolytic deamination of cytosine or adenosine bases to uracil or inosine, respectively. Protein factors have been characterized that are able to induce RNA editing in vitro. A supergene family of RNA-dependent deaminases has emerged with the recent addition of adenosine deaminases specific for tRNA. Here we review the developments that have substantially increased our understanding of base-modification RNA editing over the past few years, with an emphasis on mechanistic differences, evolutionary aspects and the first insights into the regulation of editing activity.

  1. In silico selection of RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Chushak, Yaroslav; Stone, Morley O

    2009-07-01

    In vitro selection of RNA aptamers that bind to a specific ligand usually begins with a random pool of RNA sequences. We propose a computational approach for designing a starting pool of RNA sequences for the selection of RNA aptamers for specific analyte binding. Our approach consists of three steps: (i) selection of RNA sequences based on their secondary structure, (ii) generating a library of three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA molecules and (iii) high-throughput virtual screening of this library to select aptamers with binding affinity to a desired small molecule. We developed a set of criteria that allows one to select a sequence with potential binding affinity from a pool of random sequences and developed a protocol for RNA 3D structure prediction. As verification, we tested the performance of in silico selection on a set of six known aptamer-ligand complexes. The structures of the native sequences for the ligands in the testing set were among the top 5% of the selected structures. The proposed approach reduces the RNA sequences search space by four to five orders of magnitude--significantly accelerating the experimental screening and selection of high-affinity aptamers. PMID:19465396

  2. Lipid-Based Nanocarriers for RNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui Yi; Guo, Pengbo; Wen, Wu-Cheng; Wong, Ho Lun

    2015-01-01

    RNA-interference (RNAi) agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) have strong potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of a broad range of diseases such as malignancies, infections, autoimmune diseases and neurological diseases that are associated with undesirable gene expression. In recent years, several clinical trials of RNAi therapeutics especially siRNAs have been conducted with limited success so far. For systemic administration of these poorly permeable and easily degradable macromolecules, it is obvious that a safe and efficient delivery platform is highly desirable. Because of high biocompatibility, biodegradability and solid track record for clinical use, nanocarriers made of lipids and/or phospholipids have been commonly employed to facilitate RNA delivery. In this article, the key features of the major sub-classes of lipid-based nanocarriers, e.g. liposomes, lipid nanoparticles and lipid nanoemulsions, will be reviewed. Focus of the discussion is on the various challenges researchers face when developing lipid-based RNA nanocarriers, such as the toxicity of cationic lipids and issues related to PEGylated lipids, as well as the strategies employed in tackling these challenges. It is hoped that by understanding more about the pros and cons of these most frequently used RNA delivery systems, the pharmaceutical scientists, biomedical researchers and clinicians will be more successful in overcoming some of the obstacles that currently limit the clinical translation of RNAi therapy. PMID:26027572

  3. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  4. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Megan; Kim, Gunjune; Westwood, James H

    2012-01-01

    RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs, and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host-parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host-parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking. PMID:22936942

  5. Lipid-Based Nanocarriers for RNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui Yi; Guo, Pengbo; Wen, Wu-Cheng; Wong, Ho Lun

    2015-01-01

    RNA-interference (RNAi) agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) have strong potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of a broad range of diseases such as malignancies, infections, autoimmune diseases and neurological diseases that are associated with undesirable gene expression. In recent years, several clinical trials of RNAi therapeutics especially siRNAs have been conducted with limited success so far. For systemic administration of these poorly permeable and easily degradable macromolecules, it is obvious that a safe and efficient delivery platform is highly desirable. Because of high biocompatibility, biodegradability and solid track record for clinical use, nanocarriers made of lipids and/or phospholipids have been commonly employed to facilitate RNA delivery. In this article, the key features of the major sub-classes of lipid-based nanocarriers, e.g. liposomes, lipid nanoparticles and lipid nanoemulsions, will be reviewed. Focus of the discussion is on the various challenges researchers face when developing lipid-based RNA nanocarriers, such as the toxicity of cationic lipids and issues related to PEGylated lipids, as well as the strategies employed in tackling these challenges. It is hoped that by understanding more about the pros and cons of these most frequently used RNA delivery systems, the pharmaceutical scientists, biomedical researchers and clinicians will be more successful in overcoming some of the obstacles that currently limit the clinical translation of RNAi therapy. PMID:26027572

  6. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Di, Yanming; Cumbie, Jason S; Chang, Jeff H

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent findings for host-associated bacteria. We also discuss the technical and statistical challenges in the practical application of RNA-Seq for studying bacterial transcriptomes and describe some of the currently available solutions. PMID:24710287

  7. RNA quaternary structure and global symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2015-04-01

    Many proteins associate into symmetric multisubunit complexes. Structural analyses suggested that, by contrast, virtually all RNAs with complex 3D structures function as asymmetric monomers. Recent crystal structures revealed that several biological RNAs exhibit global symmetry at the level of their tertiary and quaternary structures. Here we survey known examples of global RNA symmetry, including the true quaternary symmetry of the bacteriophage ϕ29 prohead RNA (pRNA) and the internal pseudosymmetry of the single-chain flavin mononucleotide (FMN), glycine, and cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) riboswitches. For these RNAs, global symmetry stabilizes the RNA fold, coordinates ligand-RNA interactions, and facilitates association with symmetric binding partners. PMID:25778613

  8. MicroRNA profiling: approaches and considerations

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Cheng, Heather H.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (~22 nt long) that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of thousands of genes in a broad range of organisms, in both normal physiologic and disease contexts. MiRNA expression profiling is gaining popularity because miRNAs, as key regulators in gene expression networks, can influence many biological processes and have also shown promise as biomarkers for disease. Technological advances have enabled the development of various platforms for miRNA profiling, and an understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of different approaches can aid in the effective use of miRNA profiling for diverse applications. We review here the major considerations for carrying out and interpreting results of miRNA profiling studies, as well as current and emerging applications of miRNA profiling. PMID:22510765

  9. RNA quaternary structure and global symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins associate into symmetric multisubunit complexes. Structural analyses suggested that, in contrast, virtually all RNAs with complex three-dimensional structures function as asymmetric monomers. Recent crystal structures revealed that several biological RNAs exhibit global symmetry at the level of their tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we survey known examples of global RNA symmetry, including the true quaternary symmetry of the bacteriophage ϕ29 prohead RNA (pRNA), and the internal pseudosymmetry of the single-chain flavin mononucleotide (FMN), glycine, and cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) riboswitches. For these RNAs, global symmetry stabilizes the RNA fold, coordinates ligand-RNA interactions, and facilitates association with symmetric binding partners. PMID:25778613

  10. Identifying and Characterizing Hfq-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Faner, M.A.; Feig, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    To regulate stress responses and virulence, bacteria use small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs). These RNAs can up or down regulate target mRNAs through base pairing by influencing ribosomal access and RNA decay. A large class of these sRNAs, called trans-encoded sRNAs, requires the RNA binding protein Hfq to facilitate base pairing between the regulatory RNA and its target mRNA. The resulting network of regulation is best characterized in E. coli and S. typhimurium, but the importance of Hfq dependent sRNA regulation is recognized in a diverse population of bacteria. In this review we present the approaches and methods used to discover Hfq binding RNAs, characterize their interactions and elucidate their functions. PMID:23707622

  11. Revealing protein–lncRNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Colantoni, Alessio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated to a plethora of cellular functions, most of which require the interaction with one or more RNA-binding proteins (RBPs); similarly, RBPs are often able to bind a large number of different RNAs. The currently available knowledge is already drawing an intricate network of interactions, whose deregulation is frequently associated to pathological states. Several different techniques were developed in the past years to obtain protein–RNA binding data in a high-throughput fashion. In parallel, in silico inference methods were developed for the accurate computational prediction of the interaction of RBP–lncRNA pairs. The field is growing rapidly, and it is foreseeable that in the near future, the protein–lncRNA interaction network will rise, offering essential clues for a better understanding of lncRNA cellular mechanisms and their disease-associated perturbations. PMID:26041786

  12. Single Guide RNA Library Design and Construction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to generate a single guide RNA (sgRNA) library for use in genetic screens. There are many online tools available for predicting sgRNA sequences with high target specificity and/or cleavage activity. Here, we refer the user to genome-wide sgRNA sequence predictions that we have developed for both the human and mouse and that are available from the Broad Institute website. Once a set of target genes and corresponding sgRNA sequences has been identified, customized oligonucleotide pools can be rapidly synthesized by a number of commercial vendors. Thereafter, as described here, the oligonucleotides can be efficiently cloned into an appropriate lentiviral expression vector backbone. The resulting plasmid pool can then be packaged into lentiviral particles and used to generate knockouts in any cell line of choice. PMID:26933249

  13. RNA-exporting machine in action

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A tiny motor tasked with one of nature's biggest jobs is now better understood. The molecular machinery that helps export messenger RNA from a cell's nucleus has been structurally mapped at the Advanced Light Source, a synchrotron located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). In this simulation, Gle1 (yellow) binds Dbp5 (green and blue-grey) causing Dbp5 to release RNA (orange). The movie begins with Dbp5 bound to RNA and then transitions to the Gle1-Dbp5 state, the step that jettisons RNA. The simulation then plays in reverse to mimic RNA and ATP dependent closing of Dbp5 and release of Gle1 (Movie courtesy of Karsten Weis's and James Berger's labs)

  14. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  15. Modeling the Thermoproteaceae RNase P RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Patricia P.; Brown, James W.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA component of the RNase P complex is found throughout most branches of the tree of life and is principally responsible for removing the 5′ leader sequence from pre-tRNA transcripts during tRNA maturation. RNase P RNA has a number of universal core features, however variations in sequence and structure found in homologs across the tree of life require multiple Rfam covariance search models to detect accurately. We describe a new Rfam search model to enable efficient detection of the diminutive archaeal Type T RNase P RNAs, which are missed by existing Rfam models. Using the new model, we establish effective score detection thresholds, and detect four new RNase P RNA genes in recently completed genomes from the crenarchaeal family Thermoproteaceae. PMID:23018780

  16. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Di, Yanming; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent findings for host-associated bacteria. We also discuss the technical and statistical challenges in the practical application of RNA-Seq for studying bacterial transcriptomes and describe some of the currently available solutions. PMID:24710287

  17. Promoter analysis of influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Parvin, J D; Palese, P; Honda, A; Ishihama, A; Krystal, M

    1989-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase, which was prepared depleted of viral RNA, was used to copy small RNA templates prepared from plasmid-encoded sequences. Template constructions containing only the 3' end of genomic RNA were shown to be efficiently copied, indicating that the promoter lay solely within the 15-nucleotide 3' terminus. Sequences not specific for the influenza virus termini were not copied, and, surprisingly, RNAs containing termini identical to those from plus-sense cRNA were copied at low levels. The specificity for recognition of the virus sense promoter was further defined by site-specific mutagenesis. It was also found that increased levels of viral protein were required in order to catalyze both the cap endonuclease-primed and primer-free RNA synthesis from these model templates, as well as from genomic-length RNAs. This finding indicates that the reconstituted system has catalytic properties very similar to those of native viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. Images PMID:2585601

  18. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  19. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  20. Four RNA families with functional transient structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5′ flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5′ UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM

  1. Size, shape, and flexibility of RNA structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Thirumalai, D.

    2006-11-01

    Determination of sizes and flexibilities of RNA molecules is important in understanding the nature of packing in folded structures and in elucidating interactions between RNA and DNA or proteins. Using the coordinates of the structures of RNA in the Protein Data Bank we find that the size of the folded RNA structures, measured using the radius of gyration RG, follows the Flory scaling law, namely, RG=5.5N1/3Å, where N is the number of nucleotides. The shape of RNA molecules is characterized by the asphericity Δ and the shape S parameters that are computed using the eigenvalues of the moment of inertia tensor. From the distribution of Δ, we find that a large fraction of folded RNA structures are aspherical and the distribution of S values shows that RNA molecules are prolate (S>0). The flexibility of folded structures is characterized by the persistence length lp. By fitting the distance distribution function P(r ), that is computed using the coordinates of the folded RNA, to the wormlike chain model we extracted the persistence length lp. We find that lp≈1.5N0.33Å which might reflect the large separation between the free energies that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. The dependence of lp on N implies that the average length of helices should increase as the size of RNA grows. We also analyze packing in the structures of ribosomes (30S, 50S, and 70S) in terms of RG, Δ, S, and lp. The 70S and the 50S subunits are more spherical compared to most RNA molecules. The globularity in 50S is due to the presence of an unusually large number (compared to 30S subunit) of small helices that are stitched together by bulges and loops. Comparison of the shapes of the intact 70S ribosome and the constituent particles suggests that folding of the individual molecules might occur prior to assembly.

  2. Small RNA in the nucleus: the RNA-chromatin ping-pong

    PubMed Central

    Olovnikov, Ivan; Aravin, Alexei A.; Toth, Katalin Fejes

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes use several classes of small RNA molecules to guide diverse protein machineries to target messenger RNA. The role of small RNA in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability and translation is now well established. Small RNAs can also guide sequence-specific modification of chromatin structure and thus contribute to establishment and maintenance of distinct chromatin domains. In this review we summarize the model for the inter-dependent interaction between small RNA and chromatin that has emerged from studies on fission yeast and plants. We focus on recent results that link a distinct class of small RNAs, the piRNAs, to chromatin regulation in animals. PMID:22349141

  3. RNA biochemistry. Transcriptome-wide distribution and function of RNA hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Delatte, Benjamin; Wang, Fei; Ngoc, Long Vo; Collignon, Evelyne; Bonvin, Elise; Deplus, Rachel; Calonne, Emilie; Hassabi, Bouchra; Putmans, Pascale; Awe, Stephan; Wetzel, Collin; Kreher, Judith; Soin, Romuald; Creppe, Catherine; Limbach, Patrick A; Gueydan, Cyril; Kruys, Véronique; Brehm, Alexander; Minakhina, Svetlana; Defrance, Matthieu; Steward, Ruth; Fuks, François

    2016-01-15

    Hydroxymethylcytosine, well described in DNA, occurs also in RNA. Here, we show that hydroxymethylcytosine preferentially marks polyadenylated RNAs and is deposited by Tet in Drosophila. We map the transcriptome-wide hydroxymethylation landscape, revealing hydroxymethylcytosine in the transcripts of many genes, notably in coding sequences, and identify consensus sites for hydroxymethylation. We found that RNA hydroxymethylation can favor mRNA translation. Tet and hydroxymethylated RNA are found to be most abundant in the Drosophila brain, and Tet-deficient fruitflies suffer impaired brain development, accompanied by decreased RNA hydroxymethylation. This study highlights the distribution, localization, and function of cytosine hydroxymethylation and identifies central roles for this modification in Drosophila. PMID:26816380

  4. microRNA: Diagnostic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Faruq, Omar; Vecchione, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers are biological measures of a biological state. An ideal marker should be safe and easy to measure, cost efficient, modifiable with treatment, and consistent across gender and ethnic groups. To date, none of the available biomarkers satisfy all of these criteria. In addition, the major limitations of these markers are low specificity, sensitivity, and false positive results. Recently identified, microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNA (about 22–25 nt long), also known as micro-coordinators of gene expression, which have been shown to be an effective tools to study the biology of diseases and to have great potential as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity. In fact, it has been demonstrated that miRNAs play a pivotal role in the regulation of a wide range of developmental and physiological processes and their deficiencies have been related to a number of disease. In addition, miRNAs are stable and can be easily isolated and measured from tissues and body fluids. In this review, we provide a perspective on emerging concepts and potential usefulness of miRNAs as diagnostic markers, emphasizing the involvement of specific miRNAs in particular tumor types, subtypes, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, and forensic test. PMID:26284247

  5. MicroRNA and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are important regulatory molecules of cellular processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that bind to complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region of target mRNAs, leading to degradation of the target mRNAs and/or inhibition of their translation. Some miRNAs are essential for normal animal development; however, many other miRNAs are dispensable for development but play a critical role in pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis and metastasis. miRNA genes often reside at fragile chromosome sites and are deregulated in cancer. Some miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, collectively termed "oncomirs." Specific metastasis-regulating miRNAs, collectively termed "metastamirs," govern molecular processes and pathways in malignant progression in either a tumor cell-autonomous or a cell-nonautonomous manner. Recently, exosome-transferred miRNAs have emerged as mediators of the tumor-stroma cross talk. In this chapter, we focus on the functions, mechanisms of action, and therapeutic potential of miRNAs, particularly oncomirs and metastamirs. PMID:27613133

  6. Probing N6-methyladenosine RNA modification status at single nucleotide resolution in mRNA and long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan; Pan, Tao

    2013-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant modification in mammalian mRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). Recent discoveries of two m6A demethylases and cell-type and cell-state-dependent m6A patterns indicate that m6A modifications are highly dynamic and likely play important biological roles for RNA akin to DNA methylation or histone modification. Proposed functions for m6A modification include mRNA splicing, export, stability, and immune tolerance; but m6A studies have been hindered by the lack of methods for its identification at single nucleotide resolution. Here, we develop a method that accurately determines m6A status at any site in mRNA/lncRNA, termed site-specific cleavage and radioactive-labeling followed by ligation-assisted extraction and thin-layer chromatography (SCARLET). The method determines the precise location of the m6A residue and its modification fraction, which are crucial parameters in probing the cellular dynamics of m6A modification. We applied the method to determine the m6A status at several sites in two human lncRNAs and three human mRNAs and found that m6A fraction varies between 6% and 80% among these sites. We also found that many m6A candidate sites in these RNAs are however not modified. The precise determination of m6A status in a long noncoding RNA also enables the identification of an m6A-containing RNA structural motif. PMID:24141618

  7. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  8. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K48-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  9. The role of a metastable RNA secondary structure in hepatitis delta virus genotype III RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Casey, John L.

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing plays a critical role in the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The host editing enzyme ADAR1 recognizes specific RNA secondary structure features around the amber/W site in the HDV antigenome and deaminates the amber/W adenosine. A previous report suggested that a branched secondary structure is necessary for editing in HDV genotype III. This branched structure, which is distinct from the characteristic unbranched rod structure required for HDV replication, was only partially characterized, and knowledge concerning its formation and stability was limited. Here, we examine the secondary structures, conformational dynamics, and amber/W site editing of HDV genotype III RNA using a miniaturized HDV genotype III RNA in vitro. Computational analysis of this RNA using the MPGAfold algorithm indicated that the RNA has a tendency to form both metastable and stable unbranched secondary structures. Moreover, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that this RNA forms both branched and unbranched rod structures when transcribed in vitro. As predicted, the branched structure is a metastable structure that converts readily to the unbranched rod structure. Only branched RNA was edited at the amber/W site by ADAR1 in vitro. The structural heterogeneity of HDV genotype III RNA is significant because not only are both conformations of the RNA functionally important for viral replication, but the ratio of the two forms could modulate editing by determining the amount of substrate RNA available for modification. PMID:16790843

  10. RNA exosome regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N.; Bradner, James E.; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3’ regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPRCas9 mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3’regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers, by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  11. Resected RNA pseudoknots and their recognition by histidyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Felden, Brice; Giegé, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Duplexes constituted by closed or open RNA circles paired to single-stranded oligonucleotides terminating with 3′-CCAOH form resected pseudoknots that are substrates of yeast histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Design of this RNA fold is linked to the mimicry of the pseudoknotted amino acid accepting branch of the tRNA-like domain from brome mosaic virus, known to be charged by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, with RNA minihelices recapitulating accepting branches of canonical tRNAs. Prediction of the histidylation function of the new family of minimalist tRNA-like structures relates to the geometry of resected pseudoknots that allows proper presentation to histidyl-tRNA synthetase of analogues of the histidine identity determinants N-1 and N73 present in tRNAs. This geometry is such that the analogue of the major N-1 histidine determinant in the RNA circles faces the analogue of the discriminator N73 nucleotide in the accepting oligonucleotides. The combination of identity elements found in tRNAHis species from archaea, eubacteria, and organelles (G-1/C73) is the most efficient for determining histidylation of the duplexes. The inverse combination (C-1/G73) leads to the worst histidine acceptors with charging efficiencies reduced by 2–3 orders of magnitude. Altogether, these findings open new perspectives for understanding evolution of tRNA identity and serendipitous RNA functions. PMID:9724720

  12. Resected RNA pseudoknots and their recognition by histidyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Felden, B; Giegé, R

    1998-09-01

    Duplexes constituted by closed or open RNA circles paired to single-stranded oligonucleotides terminating with 3'-CCAOH form resected pseudoknots that are substrates of yeast histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Design of this RNA fold is linked to the mimicry of the pseudoknotted amino acid accepting branch of the tRNA-like domain from brome mosaic virus, known to be charged by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, with RNA minihelices recapitulating accepting branches of canonical tRNAs. Prediction of the histidylation function of the new family of minimalist tRNA-like structures relates to the geometry of resected pseudoknots that allows proper presentation to histidyl-tRNA synthetase of analogues of the histidine identity determinants N-1 and N73 present in tRNAs. This geometry is such that the analogue of the major N-1 histidine determinant in the RNA circles faces the analogue of the discriminator N73 nucleotide in the accepting oligonucleotides. The combination of identity elements found in tRNAHis species from archaea, eubacteria, and organelles (G-1/C73) is the most efficient for determining histidylation of the duplexes. The inverse combination (C-1/G73) leads to the worst histidine acceptors with charging efficiencies reduced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Altogether, these findings open new perspectives for understanding evolution of tRNA identity and serendipitous RNA functions. PMID:9724720

  13. Self-assembled Messenger RNA Nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) for Efficient Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Lee, Jong Bum

    2015-01-01

    Although mRNA has several advantages over plasmid DNA when delivered into cells for gene expression, mRNA transfection is a very rare occurrence in gene delivery. This is mainly because of the labile nature of RNA, resulting in a low expression level of the desired protein. In this study, self-assembled mRNA nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) packed with multiple repeats of mRNA were synthesized to achieve efficient gene expression. This approach required only a one-step process to synthesize particles with a minimal amount of plasmid DNA to produce the RNA transcripts via rolling circle transcription. Moreover, there are no concerns for cytotoxicity which can be caused by chemical condensates because mRNA-NPs are made entirely of mRNA. An examination of the cells transfected with the mRNA-NPs encoding the green fluorescence protein (GFP) confirmed that the mRNA-NPs can be used as a novel platform for effective gene delivery. PMID:26235529

  14. In vitro RNA synthesis by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus-associated RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P P; Jamieson, P B; Dobos, P

    1982-03-01

    The presence of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was demonstrated in purified infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The enzyme was active in vitro without any pretreatment of the virus. Optimum activity was shown at 30 degrees C, pH 8 and in the presence of 6 mM-magnesium ions. Approx. 50% of the polymerase product remained associated with the dsRNA template of the virions. The remainder was found as extravirion ssRNA broken down to 5S to 7S fragments by virus-associated RNase(s). Although the addition of bentonite considerably reduced the amount of RNA synthesized, it protected the ssRNA product from degradation. This, in turn, permitted the synthesis of small amounts of ssRNA, which when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis behaved identically to the 24S single-stranded virus mRNA produced in infected cells. The virion polymerase was not stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine or the addition of cellular or capped reovirus ssRNA. Several other modifications of the assay system were tried in an attempt to increase 24S RNA synthesis, but with little success. When [3H]uridine-labelled virus was used in the polymerase reaction, some labelled 24S ssRNA was obtained, indicating that in vitro transcription may proceed by a semi-conservative (displacement) mechanism. PMID:6175731

  15. A comprehensive comparison of general RNA-RNA interaction prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Lai, Daniel; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2016-04-20

    RNA-RNA interactions are fast emerging as a major functional component in many newly discovered non-coding RNAs. Basepairing is believed to be a major contributor to the stability of these intermolecular interactions, much like intramolecular basepairs formed in RNA secondary structure. As such, using algorithms similar to those for predicting RNA secondary structure, computational methods have been recently developed for the prediction of RNA-RNA interactions.We provide the first comprehensive comparison comprising 14 methods that predict general intermolecular basepairs. To evaluate these, we compile an extensive data set of 54 experimentally confirmed fungal snoRNA-rRNA interactions and 102 bacterial sRNA-mRNA interactions. We test the performance accuracy of all methods, evaluating the effects of tool settings, sequence length, and multiple sequence alignment usage and quality.Our results show that-unlike for RNA secondary structure prediction-the overall best performing tools are non-comparative energy-based tools utilizing accessibility information that predict short interactions on this data set. Furthermore, we find that maintaining high accuracy across biologically different data sets and increasing input lengths remains a huge challenge, causing implications forde novotranscriptome-wide searches. Finally, we make our interaction data set publicly available for future development and benchmarking efforts. PMID:26673718

  16. Hairpin dsRNA does not trigger RNA interference in Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Staab, Janet F; White, Theodore C; Marr, Kieren A

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference/silencing mechanisms triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) have been described in many eukaryotes, including fungi. These mechanisms have in common small RNA molecules (siRNAs or microRNAs) originating from dsRNAs that, together with the effector protein Argonaute, mediate silencing. The genome of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans harbours a well-conserved Argonaute and a non-canonical Dicer, essential members of silencing pathways. Prototypical siRNAs are detected as members of the C. albicans transcriptome, which is potential evidence of RNA interference/silencing pathways in this organism. Surprisingly, expression of a dsRNA a hairpin ADE2 dsRNA molecule to interfere with the endogenous ADE2 mRNA did not result in down-regulation of the message or produce adenine auxotrophic strains. Cell free assays showed that the hairpin dsRNA was a substrate for the putative C. albicans Dicer, discounting the possibility that the nature of the dsRNA trigger affects silencing functionality. Our results suggested that unknown cellular events govern the functionality of siRNAs originating from transgenes in RNA interference/silencing pathways in C. albicans. PMID:20737430

  17. The hub protein loquacious connects the microRNA and short interfering RNA pathways in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Haac, Mary Etna; Anderson, Michelle A.E.; Eggleston, Heather; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes vector several arboviruses of global health significance, including dengue viruses and chikungunya virus. RNA interference (RNAi) plays an important role in antiviral immunity, gene regulation and protection from transposable elements. Double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs) are important for efficient RNAi; in Drosophila functional specialization of the miRNA, endo-siRNA and exo-siRNA pathway is aided by the dsRBPs Loquacious (Loqs-PB, Loqs-PD) and R2D2, respectively. However, this functional specialization has not been investigated in other dipterans. We were unable to detect Loqs-PD in Ae. aegypti; analysis of other dipteran genomes demonstrated that this isoform is not conserved outside of Drosophila. Overexpression experiments and small RNA sequencing following depletion of each dsRBP revealed that R2D2 and Loqs-PA cooperate non-redundantly in siRNA production, and that these proteins exhibit an inhibitory effect on miRNA levels. Conversely, Loqs-PB alone interacted with mosquito dicer-1 and was essential for full miRNA production. Mosquito Loqs interacted with both argonaute 1 and 2 in a manner independent of its interactions with dicer. We conclude that the functional specialization of Loqs-PD in Drosophila is a recently derived trait, and that in other dipterans, including the medically important mosquitoes, Loqs-PA participates in both the miRNA and endo-siRNA based pathways. PMID:25765650

  18. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K(48)-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  19. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  20. Kinetic models of the interference of gene transcription to ncRNA and mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-06-01

    The experiments indicate that the transcription of genes into ncRNA can positively or negatively interfere with transcription into mRNA. We propose two kinetic models describing this effect. The first model is focused on the ncRNA-induced chromatin modification facilitating the transcription of the downstream gene into mRNA. The second model includes the competition between the transcription into ncRNA and the binding of activator to a regulatory site of the downstream gene transcribed into mRNA. Our analysis based on the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations shows the likely dependences of the transcription rate on RNA polymerase concentration in situations with different rate-limiting steps. Our models can also be used to scrutinize the dependence of the transcription rate on other kinetic parameters. Our kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that the first model predicts stochastic bursts in the mRNA formation provided that the transcription into ncRNA is slow, while the second model predicts in addition anti-phase stochastic bursts in the mRNA and ncRNA formation provided that that the protein attachment to and detachment from a regulatory site is slow.

  1. Aminoacylation of tRNA with phosphoserine for synthesis of cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Mei; Liu, Cuiping; Slater, Simon; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2008-05-01

    Cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys) (Cys-tRNA(Cys)) is required for translation and is typically synthesized by cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). However, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii synthesizes Cys-tRNA(Cys) by an indirect pathway, whereby O-phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase (SepRS) acylates tRNA(Cys) with phosphoserine (Sep), and Sep-tRNA-Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts the tRNA-bound phosphoserine to cysteine. We show here that M. jannaschii SepRS differs from CysRS by recruiting the m1G37 modification as a determinant for aminoacylation, and in showing limited discrimination against mutations of conserved nucleotides. Kinetic and binding measurements show that both SepRS and SepCysS bind the reaction intermediate Sep-tRNA(Cys) tightly, and these two enzymes form a stable binary complex that promotes conversion of the intermediate to the product and sequesters the intermediate from binding to elongation factor EF-1alpha or infiltrating into the ribosome. These results highlight the importance of the protein binary complex for efficient synthesis of Cys-tRNA(Cys). PMID:18425141

  2. RNA Synthesis by in Vitro Selected Ribozymes for Recreating an RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lyssa L.; Unrau, Peter J.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis states that during an early stage of life, RNA molecules functioned as genome and as the only genome-encoded catalyst. This hypothesis is supported by several lines of evidence, one of which is the in vitro selection of catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) in the laboratory for a wide range of reactions that might have been used by RNA world organisms. This review focuses on three types of ribozymes that could have been involved in the synthesis of RNA, the core activity in the self-replication of RNA world organisms. These ribozyme classes catalyze nucleoside synthesis, triphosphorylation, and the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphates. The strengths and weaknesses regarding each ribozyme’s possible function in a self-replicating RNA network are described, together with the obstacles that need to be overcome before an RNA world organism can be generated in the laboratory. PMID:25610978

  3. Escherichia coli proline tRNA: structure and recognition sites for prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Yokogawa, T

    2000-01-01

    A major proline tRNA was purified from bulk Escherichia coli A19 tRNA by affinity chromatography with a biotinylated DNA probe. Its nucleotide sequence including modified nucleotides was determined by the post-labelling technique. In order to study the recognition sites of this proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase, various mutant transcripts were prepared using an in vitro transcription system with T7 RNA polymerase. Based on the results of in vitro kinetic analyses of mutant transcripts, it was concluded that the second and third letters, G35 and G36, of the anticodon, G37 of the anticodon loop, the discriminator base A73, G72 of the acceptor stem, G49 and U17A that existed in the corner of an L-shaped structure are the recognition sites of proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase. PMID:12903242

  4. Origins of Life and the RNA World: Evolution of RNA-Replicase Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guogas, Laura; Hogle, James; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-06-01

    Central to understanding the origin of life is the elucidation of the first replication mechanism. The RNA World hypothesis suggests that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs and that DNA later superceded RNA as the genetic material. RNA viruses were not subjected to the same evolutionary pressures as cellular organisms; consequently, they likely possess remnants of earlier replication strategies. Our laboratory investigates how members of the RNA virus family Bromoviridae can have structurally distinct 3' end tags yet are specifically recognized by conserved replication enzymes. This work addresses the idea that 3' tRNA tails were functionally replaced in some viruses by an RNA-protein complex. These viruses may serve as a timeline for the transition from the RNA world to DNA and protein based life.

  5. RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulation: the coding and noncoding players.

    PubMed

    Guil, Sonia; Esteller, Manel

    2015-05-01

    The past few years have witnessed an exciting increase in the richness and complexity of RNA-mediated regulatory circuitries, including new types of RNA-RNA interaction that underlie key steps in gene expression control in an organized and probably hierarchic system to dictate final protein output. Both small (especially miRNAs) and long coding (lc) and noncoding (nc) RNAs contain structural domains that can sense and bind other RNAs via complementary base pairing. The versatility of the interaction confers multiple roles to RNA-RNA hybrids, from control of RNA biogenesis to competition for common targets. Here, we focus on the emerging evidence around RNA networks and their impact on gene expression regulation in light of recent breakthroughs around the crosstalk between coding RNAs and ncRNAs. PMID:25818326

  6. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression. PMID:23392244

  7. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  8. Who Watches the Watchmen: Roles of RNA Modifications in the RNA Interference Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xhemalce, Blerta

    2016-01-01

    RNA levels are widely thought to be predictive of RNA function. However, the existence of more than a hundred chemically distinct modifications of RNA alone is a major indication that these moieties may impart distinct functions to subgroups of RNA molecules that share a primary sequence but display distinct RNA “epigenetic” marks. RNAs can be modified on many sites, including 5′ and 3′ ends, the sugar phosphate backbone, or internal bases, which collectively provide many opportunities for posttranscriptional regulation through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we will focus on how modifications on messenger and microRNAs may affect the process of RNA interference in mammalian cells. We believe that taking RNA modifications into account will not only advance our understanding of this crucial pathway in disease and cancer but will also open the path to exploiting the enzymes that “write” and “erase” them as targets for therapeutic drug development. PMID:27441695

  9. Evolution of RNA-Based Networks.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules have served for decades as a paradigmatic example of molecular evolution that is tractable both in in vitro experiments and in detailed computer simulation. The adaptation of RNA sequences to external selection pressures is well studied and well understood. The de novo innovation or optimization of RNA aptamers and riboswitches in SELEX experiments serves as a case in point. Likewise, fitness landscapes building upon the efficiently computable RNA secondary structures have been a key toward understanding realistic fitness landscapes. Much less is known, however, on models in which multiple RNAs interact with each other, thus actively influencing the selection pressures acting on them. From a computational perspective, RNA-RNA interactions can be dealt with by same basic methods as the folding of a single RNA molecule, although many details become more complicated. RNA-RNA interactions are frequently employed in cellular regulation networks, e.g., as miRNA bases mRNA silencing or in the modulation of bacterial mRNAs by small, often highly structured sRNAs. In this chapter, we summarize the key features of networks of replicators. We highlight the differences between quasispecies-like models describing templates copied by an external replicase and hypercycle similar to autocatalytic replicators. Two aspects are of importance: the dynamics of selection within a population, usually described by conventional dynamical systems, and the evolution of replicating species in the space of chemical types. Product inhibition plays a key role in modulating selection dynamics from survival of the fittest to extinction of unfittest. The sequence evolution of replicators is rather well understood as approximate optimization in a fitness landscape for templates that is shaped by the sequence-structure map of RNA. Some of the properties of this map, in particular shape space covering and extensive neutral networks, give rise to evolutionary patterns such as drift

  10. A minimalist mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase exhibits tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during proofreading.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yong; Chen, Yun; Liu, Ru-Juan; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-12-16

    Yeast mitochondria contain a minimalist threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) composed only of the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain but lacking the entire editing domain. Besides the usual tRNA(Thr)2, some budding yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also contain a non-canonical tRNA(Thr)1 with an enlarged 8-nucleotide anticodon loop, reprograming the usual leucine CUN codons to threonine. This raises interesting questions about the aminoacylation fidelity of such ThrRSs and the possible contribution of the two tRNA(Thr)s during editing. Here, we found that, despite the absence of the editing domain, S. cerevisiae mitochondrial ThrRS (ScmtThrRS) harbors a tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing activity. Remarkably, only the usual tRNA(Thr)2 stimulated pre-transfer editing, thus, establishing the first example of a synthetase exhibiting tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during pre-transfer editing. We also showed that the failure of tRNA(Thr)1 to stimulate tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing was due to the lack of an editing domain. Using assays of the complementation of a ScmtThrRS gene knockout strain, we showed that the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain of ScmtThrRS co-evolved to recognize the unusual tRNA(Thr)1. In combination, the results provide insights into the tRNA-dependent editing process and suggest that tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing takes place in the aminoacylation catalytic core. PMID:25414329

  11. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  12. The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase homolog of Geobacter sulfurreducens specifically methylates tRNA-Glu.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Aklujkar, Muktak; Schäfer, Matthias; Reinhardt, Richard; Nickel, Olaf; Reuter, Gunter; Lovley, Derek R; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann; Nellen, Wolfgang; Ankri, Serge; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Dnmt2 enzymes are conserved in eukaryotes, where they methylate C38 of tRNA-Asp with high activity. Here, the activity of one of the very few prokaryotic Dnmt2 homologs from Geobacter species (GsDnmt2) was investigated. GsDnmt2 was observed to methylate tRNA-Asp from flies and mice. Unexpectedly, it had only a weak activity toward its matching Geobacter tRNA-Asp, but methylated Geobacter tRNA-Glu with good activity. In agreement with this result, we show that tRNA-Glu is methylated in Geobacter while the methylation is absent in tRNA-Asp. The activities of Dnmt2 enzymes from Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Dictyostelium discoideum for methylation of the Geobacter tRNA-Asp and tRNA-Glu were determined showing that all these Dnmt2s preferentially methylate tRNA-Asp. Hence, the GsDnmt2 enzyme has a swapped transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) specificity. By comparing the different tRNAs, a characteristic sequence pattern was identified in the variable loop of all preferred tRNA substrates. An exchange of two nucleotides in the variable loop of murine tRNA-Asp converted it to the corresponding variable loop of tRNA-Glu and led to a strong reduction of GsDnmt2 activity. Interestingly, the same loss of activity was observed with human DNMT2, indicating that the variable loop functions as a specificity determinant in tRNA recognition of Dnmt2 enzymes. PMID:24711368

  13. The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase homolog of Geobacter sulfurreducens specifically methylates tRNA-Glu

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Aklujkar, Muktak; Schäfer, Matthias; Reinhardt, Richard; Nickel, Olaf; Reuter, Gunter; Lovley, Derek R.; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann; Nellen, Wolfgang; Ankri, Serge; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Dnmt2 enzymes are conserved in eukaryotes, where they methylate C38 of tRNA-Asp with high activity. Here, the activity of one of the very few prokaryotic Dnmt2 homologs from Geobacter species (GsDnmt2) was investigated. GsDnmt2 was observed to methylate tRNA-Asp from flies and mice. Unexpectedly, it had only a weak activity toward its matching Geobacter tRNA-Asp, but methylated Geobacter tRNA-Glu with good activity. In agreement with this result, we show that tRNA-Glu is methylated in Geobacter while the methylation is absent in tRNA-Asp. The activities of Dnmt2 enzymes from Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Dictyostelium discoideum for methylation of the Geobacter tRNA-Asp and tRNA-Glu were determined showing that all these Dnmt2s preferentially methylate tRNA-Asp. Hence, the GsDnmt2 enzyme has a swapped transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) specificity. By comparing the different tRNAs, a characteristic sequence pattern was identified in the variable loop of all preferred tRNA substrates. An exchange of two nucleotides in the variable loop of murine tRNA-Asp converted it to the corresponding variable loop of tRNA-Glu and led to a strong reduction of GsDnmt2 activity. Interestingly, the same loss of activity was observed with human DNMT2, indicating that the variable loop functions as a specificity determinant in tRNA recognition of Dnmt2 enzymes. PMID:24711368

  14. Effect of RNA Integrity Determined With the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer on Bacterial RNA Quantification with RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA integrity is critical for successful RNA quantification. The level of integrity required differs among sources and extraction procedures and has not been determined for bacterial RNA. Three RNA isolation methods were evaluated for their ability to produce high quality RNA from D. dadantii. The i...

  15. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  16. Bioengineered Nanoparticles for siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kozielski, Kristen L.; Tzeng, Stephany Y.; Green, Jordan J.

    2014-01-01

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been an important laboratory tool in the last two decades and has allowed researchers to better understand the functions of non-protein-coding genes through RNA interference (RNAi). Although RNAi holds great promise for this purpose as well as for treatment of many diseases, efforts at using siRNA have been hampered by the difficulty of safely and effectively introducing it into cells of interest, both in vitro and in vivo. To overcome this challenge, many biomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed and optimized for siRNA delivery, often taking cues from the DNA delivery field, although different barriers exist for these two types of molecules. In this review, we discuss general properties of biomaterials and nanoparticles that are necessary for effective nucleic acid delivery. We also discuss specific examples of bioengineered materials, including lipid-based NPs, polymeric NPs, inorganic NPs, and RNA-based NPs, which clearly illustrate the problems and successes in siRNA delivery. PMID:23821336

  17. Use of DNA, RNA, and Chimeric Templates by a Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase: Evolutionary Implications for the Transition from the RNA to the DNA World

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Robert W.; Bellon, Laurent; Beigelman, Leonid; Kao, C. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position −11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes. PMID:10400735

  18. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A.; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J. Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA- protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3′ RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK that participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications, but not Xist localization and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen that interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing. PMID:25843628

  19. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  20. High-Resolution Shadowing of Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abermann, Reinhard J.; Yoshikami, Doju

    1972-01-01

    High-resolution shadowing with metals that melt at high temperatures was used to study macromolecules. Molecules of transfer RNA shadowed with tantalum-tungsten are readily visualized in an electron microscope. Mounting procedures for tRNA were perfected that reproducibly gave uniform distributions of both monomeric and dimeric tRNA particles, and allowed a statistical assessment of their gross shapes and sizes. Monomeric tRNA yielded a fairly homogeneous population of rod-shaped particles, with axial dimensions of about 40 × 85 Å. Dimers of yeast alanine tRNA held together by hydrogen bonds and dimers constructed by covalent linkage of the amino-acid acceptor (3′-) termini of monomers both gave slightly more heterogeneous populations of particles. Yet, their structures were also basically rod shaped, with their lengths ranging to about twice that of the monomer; this result indicates an end-to-end arrangement of the monomeric units within both dimers. These results suggest that the amino-acid acceptor terminus and the anticodon region are at the ends of the rod-shaped, dehydrated tRNA monomer visible by electron microscopy, consistent with the generally accepted view of tRNA structure in solution suggested by other workers using other methods. This study demonstrates that high-resolution shadowing with tantalum-tungsten provides a means to examine the three-dimensional structures of relatively small biological macromolecules. Images PMID:4504373

  1. [The cellular receptors of exogenous RNA].

    PubMed

    Reniewicz, Patryk; Zyzak, Joanna; Siednienko, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    One of the key determinants of survival for organisms is proper recognition of exogenous and endogenous nucleic acids. Therefore, high eukaryotes developed a number of receptors that allow for discrimination between friend or foe DNA and RNA. Appearance of exogenous RNA in cytoplasm provides a signal of danger and triggers cellular responses that facilitate eradication of a pathogen. Recognition of exogenous RNA is additionally complicated by fact that large amount of endogenous RNA is present in cytoplasm Thus, number of different receptors, found in eukaryotic cells, is able to recognize that nucleic acid. First group of those receptors consist endosomal Toll like receptors, namely TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR13. Those receptors recognize RNA released from pathogens that enter the cell by endocytosis. The second group includes cytoplasmic sensors like PKR and the family of RLRs comprised of RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2. Cytoplasmic receptors recognize RNA from pathogens invading the cell by non-endocytic pathway. In both cases binding of RNA by its receptors results in activation of the signalling cascades that lead to the production of interferon and other cytokines. PMID:27117110

  2. Stacking interactions in PUF-RNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-07-02

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

  3. Structure of yeast Argonaute with guide RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Kotaro; Weinberg, David E.; Bartel, David P.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-06-26

    The RNA-induced silencing complex, comprising Argonaute and guide RNA, mediates RNA interference. Here we report the 3.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of Kluyveromyces polysporus Argonaute (KpAGO) fortuitously complexed with guide RNA originating from small-RNA duplexes autonomously loaded and processed by recombinant KpAGO. Despite their diverse sequences, guide-RNA nucleotides 1-8 are positioned similarly, with sequence-independent contacts to bases, phosphates and 2{prime}-hydroxyl groups pre-organizing the backbone of nucleotides 2-8 in a near-A-form conformation. Compared with prokaryotic Argonautes, KpAGO has numerous surface-exposed insertion segments, with a cluster of conserved insertions repositioning the N domain to enable full propagation of guide-target pairing. Compared with Argonautes in inactive conformations, KpAGO has a hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes an expanded and repositioned loop, which inserts an invariant glutamate into the catalytic pocket. Mutation analyses and analogies to ribonuclease H indicate that insertion of this glutamate finger completes a universally conserved catalytic tetrad, thereby activating Argonaute for RNA cleavage.

  4. RNA nanomedicines: the next generation drugs?

    PubMed

    Singh, Manu Smriti; Peer, Dan

    2016-06-01

    RNA therapeutics could represent the next generation personalized medicine. The variety of RNA molecules that can inhibit the expression of any mRNA using, for example, RNA interference (RNAi) strategies, or increase the expression of a given protein using modified mRNA together with new gene editing strategies open new avenues for manipulating the fate of diseased cells while leaving healthy cells untouched. In addition, these therapeutic RNA molecules can maximize the treatment of diseases and minimize its adverse effects. Yet, the promise of RNA therapeutics is hindered by the lack of efficient delivery strategies to selectively target these molecules into specific cells. Herein, we will focus on the challenges and opportunities of the delivery of therapeutic RNAi molecules into cancer cells with special emphasis on solid tumors. Solid tumors represent more than 80 percent of cancers and some are very challenging to treat, not merely due to physiological barriers but also since the tumor microenvironment (TME) is a complex milieu of accessory cells besides the cancerous cells. In this review, we will highlight various limiting factors to successful delivery, current clinical achievements and future outlook focusing on RNAi therapeutics to the TME. PMID:26773301

  5. Prediction of miRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Karathanasis, Nestoras; Louloupi, Annita; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Poirazi, Panayiota; Kalantidis, Kriton; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for miRNA target prediction are currently undergoing extensive review and evaluation. There is still a great need for improvement of these tools and bioinformatics approaches are looking towards high-throughput experiments in order to validate predictions. The combination of large-scale techniques with computational tools will not only provide greater credence to computational predictions but also lead to the better understanding of specific biological questions. Current miRNA target prediction tools utilize probabilistic learning algorithms, machine learning methods and even empirical biologically defined rules in order to build models based on experimentally verified miRNA targets. Large-scale protein downregulation assays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) are now being used to validate methodologies and compare the performance of existing tools. Tools that exhibit greater correlation between computational predictions and protein downregulation or RNA downregulation are considered the state of the art. Moreover, efficiency in prediction of miRNA targets that are concurrently verified experimentally provides additional validity to computational predictions and further highlights the competitive advantage of specific tools and their efficacy in extracting biologically significant results. In this review paper, we discuss the computational methods for miRNA target prediction and provide a detailed comparison of methodologies and features utilized by each specific tool. Moreover, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art high-throughput methods used in miRNA target prediction. PMID:25577381

  6. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-04-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3' RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK, which participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications but not Xist localization, and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen, which interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing. PMID:25843628

  7. Transcription and translation in an RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, William R

    2006-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis requires a ribozyme that was an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (ribopolymerase). If such a replicase makes a reverse complementary copy of any sequence (including itself), in a simple RNA world, there is no mechanism to prevent self-hybridization. It is proposed that this can be avoided through the synthesis of a parallel complementary copy. The logical consequences of this are pursued and developed in a computer simulation, where the behaviour of the parallel copy is compared to the conventional reverse complementary copy. It is found that the parallel copy is more efficient at higher temperatures (up to 90°C). A model for the ribopolymerase, based on the core of the large subunit (LSU) of the ribosome, is described. The geometry of a potential active site for this ribopolymerase suggests that it contained a cavity (now occupied by the aminoacyl-tRNA) and that an amino acid binding in this might have ‘poisoned’ the ribopolymerase by cross-reacting with the nucleoside-triphosphate before polymerization could occur. Based on a similarity to the active site components of the class-I tRNA synthetase enzymes, it is proposed that the amino acid could become attached to the nascent RNA transcript producing a variety of aminoacylated tRNA-like products. Using base-pairing interactions, some of these molecules might cross-link two ribopolymerases, giving rise to a precursor of the modern ribosome. A hybrid dimer, half polymerase and half proto-ribosome, could account for mRNA translocation before the advent of protein elongation factors. PMID:17008216

  8. α-Enolase binds to RNA.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Liliana; Depardón, Francisco; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Sánchez-Trujillo, Alejandra; Bermúdez-Crúz, Rosa María; Dangott, Lawrence; Montañez, Cecilia

    2011-09-01

    To detect proteins binding to CUG triplet repeats, we performed magnetic bead affinity assays and North-Western analysis using a (CUG)(10) ssRNA probe and either nuclear or total extracts from rat L6 myoblasts. We report the isolation and identification by mass spectrometry and immunodetection of α-enolase, as a novel (CUG)n triplet repeat binding protein. To confirm our findings, rat recombinant α-enolase was cloned, expressed and purified; the RNA binding activity was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using radiolabeled RNA probes. Enolase may play other roles in addition to its well described function in glycolysis. PMID:21621582

  9. MicroRNA targets in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Anton J; John, Bino; Gaul, Ulrike; Tuschl, Thomas; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S

    2004-01-01

    Background The recent discoveries of microRNA (miRNA) genes and characterization of the first few target genes regulated by miRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have set the stage for elucidation of a novel network of regulatory control. We present a computational method for whole-genome prediction of miRNA target genes. The method is validated using known examples. For each miRNA, target genes are selected on the basis of three properties: sequence complementarity using a position-weighted local alignment algorithm, free energies of RNA-RNA duplexes, and conservation of target sites in related genomes. Application to the D. melanogaster, Drosophila pseudoobscura and Anopheles gambiae genomes identifies several hundred target genes potentially regulated by one or more known miRNAs. Results These potential targets are rich in genes that are expressed at specific developmental stages and that are involved in cell fate specification, morphogenesis and the coordination of developmental processes, as well as genes that are active in the mature nervous system. High-ranking target genes are enriched in transcription factors two-fold and include genes already known to be under translational regulation. Our results reaffirm the thesis that miRNAs have an important role in establishing the complex spatial and temporal patterns of gene activity necessary for the orderly progression of development and suggest additional roles in the function of the mature organism. In addition the results point the way to directed experiments to determine miRNA functions. Conclusions The emerging combinatorics of miRNA target sites in the 3' untranslated regions of messenger RNAs are reminiscent of transcriptional regulation in promoter regions of DNA, with both one-to-many and many-to-one relationships between regulator and target. Typically, more than one miRNA regulates one message, indicative of cooperative translational control. Conversely, one miRNA may have

  10. RNA virus genomics: a world of possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome sequences of RNA viruses has the potential to shed new light on fundamental aspects of their biology. Here, I use case studies of 3 RNA viruses to explore the impact of genomic sequence data, with particular emphasis on influenza A virus. Notably, the studies of RNA virus genomics undertaken to date largely focused on issues of evolution and epidemiology, and they have given these disciplines new impetus. However, genomic data have so far made fewer inroads into areas of more direct importance for disease, prevention, and control; thus, harnessing their full potential remains an important goal. PMID:19729846

  11. Quantitative bacterial transcriptomics with RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Creecy, James P.; Conway, Tyrrell

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing has emerged as the premier approach to study bacterial transcriptomes. While the earliest published studies analyzed the data qualitatively, the data are readily digitized and lend themselves to quantitative analysis. High-resolution RNA sequence (RNA-seq) data allows transcriptional features (promoters, terminators, operons, etc.) to be pinpointed on any bacterial transcriptome. Once the transcriptome is mapped, the activity of transcriptional features can be quantified. Here we highlight how quantitative transcriptome analysis can reveal biological insights and briefly discuss some of the challenges to be faced by the field of bacterial transcriptomics in the near future. PMID:25483350

  12. RNA topology remolds electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2014-03-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell: the capsid. Spontaneous coassembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to maximize the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing viral RNAs to out-compete cellular RNAs during replication in infected host cells.

  13. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) biosynthesis in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Hajjawi, Omar S

    2015-01-01

    In many respects, the most remarkable chemical substances within the genome of eukaryotic cells are remarkable proteins which are the critical structural and functional units of living cells. The specifications for everything that goes in the cell are natural digital-to-digital decoding process in an archive sequence by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and an articulate construction by ribonucleic acid (RNA). The products of DNA transcription are long polymers of ribonucleotides rather than deoxyribonucleotides and are termed ribonucleic acids. Certain deoxyribonucleotide sequences, or genes, give rise to transfer RNA (tRNA) and other ribosomal RNA (rRNA) when transcribed. The ribonucleotide sequences fold extensively and rRNA is associated with specific proteins to yield the essential cell components, ribosomes. Transcription of other special sequences yields messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain ribonucleotide sequences that will be ultimately translated into new types of amino acid sequences of functional cellular protein molecules. This switch to a different variety of cellular molecular sequences is complex, but each sequence of the three ribonucleotides specifies the insertion of one particular amino acid into the polypeptide chain under production. Whilst mRNA is considered the vehicle by which genetic information is transmitted from the genome and allocated in the appropriate cytoplasmic sites for translation into protein via cap-dependent mechanism, the actual translation depends also on the presence of other so-called household and luxury protein molecules. Recent evidence suggests RNA species are required at initiation, because treatment of cells with antibiotics or drugs that inhibit RNA synthesis cause a decrease in protein synthesis. The rRNA is necessary as a structural constituent of the ribosomes upon which translation takes place, whereas tRNA is necessary as an adaptor in amino acid activation and elongation protein chains to ribosomes. In this article

  14. microRNA and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jaideep; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules which play pivotal roles in wound healing. The increased expression of certain genes and expression of some others represent a key component of the wound biology and are largely under the regulation of naturally occurring miRNAs. Understanding the dysregulated miRNAs in chronic wound biology will therefore enable the development of newer therapies. This chapter focuses on the miRNAs that can be potentially targeted for improving skin wound healing and the challenges in miRNA therapy, including considerations in miRNA target identification and delivery. PMID:26663189

  15. The mRNA-edited form of GABRA3 suppresses GABRA3-mediated Akt activation and breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Sakurai, Masayuki; Yan, Jinchun; Li, Yan; Xu, Hua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Paul J.; Zhang, Lin; Showe, Louise C.; Nishikura, Kazuko; Huang, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a critical event affecting breast cancer patient survival. To identify molecules contributing to the metastatic process, we analysed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer data and identified 41 genes whose expression is inversely correlated with survival. Here we show that GABAA receptor alpha3 (Gabra3), normally exclusively expressed in adult brain, is also expressed in breast cancer, with high expression of Gabra3 being inversely correlated with breast cancer survival. We demonstrate that Gabra3 activates the AKT pathway to promote breast cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, we find an A-to-I RNA-edited form of Gabra3 only in non-invasive breast cancers and show that edited Gabra3 suppresses breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. A-to-I-edited Gabra3 has reduced cell surface expression and suppresses the activation of AKT required for cell migration and invasion. Our study demonstrates a significant role for mRNA-edited Gabra3 in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26869349

  16. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M.; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D.; Steiner, Michaela C.; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1–7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1–7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3′ untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3′ ends. PMID:26944680

  17. Mapping RNA–RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tri C.; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H.; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA–RNA interactions have to rely on an ‘anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA–RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA–RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA–FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA–RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  18. RNA Remodeling Activity of DEAD Box Proteins Tuned by Protein Concentration, RNA Length, and ATP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Myong, Sua

    2016-09-01

    DEAD box RNA helicases play central roles in RNP biogenesis. We reported earlier that LAF-1, a DEAD box RNA helicase in C. elegans, dynamically interacts with RNA and that the interaction likely contributes to the fluidity of RNP droplets. Here we investigate the molecular basis of the interaction of RNA with LAF-1 and its human homolog, DDX3X. We show that both LAF-1 and DDX3X, at low concentrations, are monomers that induce tight compaction of single-stranded RNA. At high concentrations, the proteins are multimeric and dynamically interact with RNA in an RNA length-dependent manner. The dynamic LAF-1-RNA interaction stimulates RNA annealing activity. ATP adversely affects the RNA remodeling ability of LAF-1 by suppressing the affinity, dynamics, and annealing activity of LAF-1, suggesting that ATP may promote disassembly of the RNP complex. Based on our results, we postulate a plausible molecular mechanism underlying the dynamic equilibrium of the LAF-1 RNP complex. PMID:27546789

  19. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  20. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467