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Sample records for adenosquamous cell lung

  1. Adenosquamous cell lung cancer successfully treated with gefitinib: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kurishima, Koichi; Ohara, Gen; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiroko; Takayashiki, Norio; Ishibashi, Atsushi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    Although adenosquamous cell lung cancer (ASCLC) is included in the non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), the number of currently available studies on the response of this type of cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) is limited. This is the case report of a 66-year-old female who was referred to the Mito Medical Center (Mito, Japan) with hemoptysis and the chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large cavitary mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient underwent surgical resection of the lesion and the final pathological diagnosis was ASCLC staged as pT2bN2M0. Notably, an EGFR exon 19 deletion was identified in the adenocarcinomatous as well as the squamous cell carcinomatous components of the tumor. Despite adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient developed small cavitary metastases in the lungs bilaterally. Therefore, treatment with gefitinib was initiated. The chest CT scan revealed substantial regression of the metastatic cavitary tumors in both lungs, with thinning of the walls. The patient remains alive and recurrence-free 19 months following the initiation of gefitinib therapy. This case demonstrated an optimal clinical response to gefitinib treatment for EGFR mutation-positive ASCLC, suggesting that gefitinib is a therapeutic option for such a subset of patients with ASCLC. PMID:24649347

  2. Successful pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, HIROKO; TAMURA, TOMOHIRO; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; KAWAGUCHI, MIO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2016-01-01

    Pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, although adenosquamous cell lung cancer (ASCLC) is a type of NSCLC, the availability of studies investigating its response to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy is limited. A 66-year-old woman was referred to Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba with hemoptysis and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large cavitary mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection. The tumor was staged as pT2bN2M0. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion was identified in the adenocarcinomatous as well as the squamous cell carcinomatous components. Despite gefitinib therapy for pulmonary metastases, the patient developed cavitary metastases in both lungs. Therefore, treatment with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was initiated. A chest CT scan revealed significant regression of the metastatic lesions in both lungs, with thinning of the walls. The patient remains well and recurrence-free 19 months after the initiation of pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy. Therefore, the clinical response of EGFR mutation-positive ASCLC to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was promising, suggesting pemetrexed to be one of the key drugs for this subset of ASCLC patients. PMID:27073680

  3. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. TPD52L1-ROS1, a new ROS1 fusion variant in lung adenosquamous cell carcinoma identified by comprehensive genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Viola Weijia; Upadhyay, Daya; Schrock, Alexa B; Gowen, Kyle; Ali, Siraj M; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-07-01

    Crizotinib was approved for the treatment of ROS1-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in the US on 11 March, 2016. Interestingly no one companion diagnostic test (CDx) has been approved simultaneously with this approval of crizotinib. Hence, an ideal and adequate CDx will have to be able to identify ROS1 fusions without the knowledge of the fusion partners to ROS1, and as to date there are 13 fusion partners reported for ROS1 in NSCLC. Here we report a novel TPD52L1-ROS1 fusion variant in NSCLC. This novel TPD52L1-ROS1 fusion variant is generated by the fusion of exons 1-3 of TPD52L1 on chromosome 6q22-23 to the exons 33-43 of ROS1 on chromosome 6q22, likely from an intra-chromosomal deletion and subsequent fusion event similar to the generation of EML4-ALK. The predicted TPD52L1-ROS1 protein product contains 655 amino acids comprising of the N-terminal amino acids 1-95 of TPD52L1 and C-terminal amino acids of 1789-2348 of ROS1. In summary, TPD52L1-ROS1 is a novel ROS1 fusion variant in NSCLC identified by comprehensive genomic profiling and should be included in any ROS1 detecting assays that depend on identifying the corresponding fusion partners, such as reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PMID:27237027

  6. [Adenosquamous carcinoma of the palate].

    PubMed

    Mancusi, G; Susani, M; Kornfehl, J; Girsch, W; Kautzky, M

    2002-08-01

    A rare case of adenosquamous carcinoma in a 74 year-old man is reported. Presenting as a nodule on the soft palate, diagnosis was prolonged because of the benign macroscopic aspect. CT-scan and MR-tomography showed an encapsulated lesion but biopsy and histologic examination revealed the typical features of adenosquamous carcinoma. The tumour consisted of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in close proximity to minor salivary glands of which the tumour seemed to have its origin. This entity, although rare in the head and neck region has been documented to be very aggressive with early regional and hematogenic metastasis. Therefore it has to be distinguished from other tumours, especially from mucoepidermoid carcinomas of the salivary glands, which have a better prognosis. Adenosquamous carcinoma is considered to have poor radiosensitivity and chemotherapeutic approaches have also not been successful in the literature. In our case radical surgical therapy was performed by excision of the whole soft palate and bilateral neck dissection. This resulted in total removal of the tumour but revealed bilateral lymph node metastases. Vital functions were saved by reconstruction of the palate with a free vascularized tensor-fasciae-latae-perforator-flap. For the first time in a case of adenosquamous carcinoma carcinoembryonic antigen in serum was monitored. A pretherapeutical 29-fold elevation resulted in a marked decrease after surgery, but supranormal values indicated remaining tumour burden which was found in metastases in the lung. Because of the limitations in therapy, early histologic diagnosis is most important in this highly malignant tumour.

  7. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. S0536: Cetuximab, Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Locally advanced adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix in Gynecologic Oncology Group trials of cisplatin-based chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter G; Java, James J; Whitney, Charles W.; Stehman, Frederick B; Lanciano, Rachelle; Thomas, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting results have been reported for adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix with respect to their response to therapy and prognosis. The current study sought to evaluate impact of adeno- and adenosquamous histology in the randomized trials of primary cisplatin-based chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Patients with adeno- and adenosquamous cervical carcinomas were retrospectively studied and compared to squamous cell carcinomas in GOG trials of chemoradiation. Results Among 1671 enrolled in clinical trials of chemoradiation, 182 adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were identified (10.9%). A higher percentage of adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were stage IB2 (27.5% versus 20.0%) and fewer had stage IIIB (21.4% versus 28.6%). The mean tumor size was larger for squamous than adeno- and adenosquamous. Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas were more often poorly differentiated (46.2% versus 26.8%). When treated with radiation therapy alone, the 70 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix showed a statistically poorer overall survival (p=0.0499) compared to the 647 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. However, when treated with radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, the 112 patients with adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas had a similar overall survival (p=0.459) compared the 842 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects to treatment were similar across histologies. Conclusion Adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix are associated with worse overall survival when treated with radiation alone but with similar progression-free and overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix when treated with cisplatin based chemoradiation. PMID:25152438

  13. Squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas of the gallbladder: clinicopathological analysis of 34 cases identified in 606 carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan C; Tapia, Oscar; Cakir, Asli; Basturk, Olca; Dursun, Nevra; Akdemir, Deniz; Saka, Burcu; Losada, Hector; Bagci, Pelin; Adsay, N Volkan

    2011-08-01

    The information in the literature on squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas of the gallbladder is highly limited. In this study, 606 resected invasive gallbladder carcinoma cases were analyzed. Squamous differentiation was identified in 41 cases (7%). Those without any identifiable glandular-type invasive component were classified as pure squamous cell carcinomas (8 cases) and those with the squamous component constituting 25-99% of the tumors were classified as adenosquamous carcinomas (26 cases) and included into the analysis. The remaining 7 that had <25% squamous component were classified as adenocarcinoma with focal squamous change and excluded. The clinicopathological characteristics of adenosquamous carcinoma/squamous cell carcinomas were documented and contrasted with that of ordinary gallbladder adenocarcinomas. The average patient age was 65 years (range 26-81); female/male ratio, 3.8. In only 13%, there was a preoperative clinical suspicion of malignancy. Grossly, 58% presented as thickening and hardening of the wall and 6% were polypoid. In 12%, mucosa adjacent to the tumor revealed squamous metaplasia. All pure squamous cell carcinomas had prominent keratinization. Giant cells and tumor-infiltrating eosinophils were observed in 29 and 51% of the squamous cell carcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas versus 10% (P=0.02) and 6% (P=0.001) in gallbladder adenocarcinomas, respectively. All but three cases had 'advanced' (pT2 and above) carcinomas. Follow-up was available in 31 patients: 25 died of disease (median=5 months, range 0-20), and 6 were alive (median=64 months, range 5-112.5). The survival of patients with squamous cell carcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas was significantly worse than that of gallbladder adenocarcinomas (P=0.003), and this adverse prognosis persisted when compared with stage-matched advanced gallbladder adenocarcinoma cases (median=11.4 months, P=0.01). In conclusion, squamous differentiation was noted in 7% of gallbladder

  14. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. A case of adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder with markedly elevated PTHrP and G-CSF levels.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kaoru; Kinoshita, Akiyoshi; Akasu, Takafumi; Hagiwara, Noriko; Yokota, Takeharu; Imai, Nami; Iwaku, Akira; Fushiya, Nao; Koike, Kazuhiko; Nishino, Hirokazu

    2016-09-01

    A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with anorexia. Computed tomography revealed a tumor lesion measuring 110mm in the liver at S4/5 with calcification and swelling of a paraaortic lymph node. The gallbladder was not visualized. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen from the liver tumor revealed squamous cell and undifferentiated carcinomas, and several tumor markers were elevated. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with gallbladder adenosquamous cell carcinoma T3N2M0 stage III. Because the serum parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were significantly elevated, we suspected that PTHrP and G-CSF production occurred because of adenosquamous cell carcinoma in the gallbladder. We initiated chemotherapy with S-1. PMID:27593366

  16. Correlation of HMGB1 expression to progression and poor prognosis of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell/adenosquamous carcinoma of gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zilu; Huang, Qian; Chen, Jian; Yu, Pengcheng; Wang, Xiaosong; Qiu, Hong; Chen, Yijie; Dong, Yangyang

    2015-01-01

    HMGB1 (High mobility group box 1) expressions in adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell/adenosquamous (SC/ASC) carcinoma of gallbladder, as well as its prognostic significance, have not yet been evaluated. We investigated HMGB1 expression in 80 cases of AC gallbladder cancer and 52 cases of SC/ASC gallbladder cancer. Survival information was concomitantly collected. The association of HMGB1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics and the possible prognostic role of HMGB1 for two aforementioned subtypes of gallbladder cancers were also analyzed. siRNA technique was utilized to explore the role of HMGB1 in proliferation and invasion of gallbladder cancer cells in vitro. HMGB1 overexpression is present in AC and SC/ASC gallbladder cancers. HMGB1 expression significantly associates with growth and metastasis of AC and SC/ASC gallbladder cancers. In vitro cell experiments based on siRNA demonstrated that HMGB1 downregulation inhibits proliferation and invasion of gallbladder cancer cells. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that HMGB1 expression is negatively associated with overall survival time of patients with AC or SC/ASC gallbladder cancer. Cox multivariate analysis confirmed that HMGB1 is an independent risk factor for survival of patients with AC or SC/ASC gallbladder cancer. HMGB1 overexpression closely correlates with progression and poor prognosis of AC and SC/ASC gallbladder cancers. PMID:26692945

  17. Biological and clinical significance of NAC1 expression in cervical carcinomas: a comparative study between squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yeasmin, Shamima; Nakayama, Kentaro; Rahman, Mohammed Tanjimur; Rahman, Munmun; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Otuski, Yoshiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Satoru; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the biological and clinical significance of NAC1 (nucleus accumbens associated 1) expression in both cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry, the frequency of positive NAC1 expression in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (31.0%; 18/58) was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinomas (16.2%; 12/74) (P = .043). NAC1 gene amplification was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 5 (7.2%) of 69 squamous cell carcinomas. NAC1 amplification was not identified in the adenocarcinomas (0%; 0/58). Positive NAC1 expression was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival in squamous cell carcinomas (P < .0001). A multivariate analysis showed that positive NAC1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival after standard radiotherapy (P = .0003). In contrast to squamous cell carcinomas, positive NAC1 expression did not correlate with shorter overall survival in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (P = .317). Profound growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased cell migration and invasion were observed in silencing RNA-treated cancer cells with NAC1 overexpression compared with cancer cells without NAC1 expression. NAC1 overexpression stimulated proliferation, migration, and invasion in the cervical cancer cell lines TCS and Hela P3, which normally lack NAC1 expression. These findings indicate that NAC1 overexpression is critical to the growth and survival of cervical carcinomas irrespective of histologic type. Furthermore, they suggest that NAC1 silencing RNA-induced phenotypes depend on the expression status of the targeted cell line. Therefore, cervical carcinoma patients with NAC1 expression may benefit from a targeted therapy irrespective of histologic type.

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  19. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  20. Oral adenosquamous carcinoma: Report of a rare entity with a special insight on its histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sravya, Taneeru; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen; Sudheerkanth, K

    2016-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the head and neck (H and N) is an aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). They are described as SCC subtype with high infiltrative capacity and also presents with dual histomorphology, having both squamous and glandular cell components. ASC of the H and N region is considered as a controversial tumor, as it is similar to salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinoma. It has been described in a variety of body sites, including uterine cervix, lung and pancreas. ASC rarely develops in the upper aerodigestive tract, particularly in the oral cavity. The affected sites in oral cavity include palate, tonsillar pillar areas and floor of the mouth. To the best of our knowledge in the literature, only 17 cases of ASC in the floor of the mouth have been reported. Hereby, we report an additional case of ASC occurring in the floor of the mouth in a 70-year-old male patient. PMID:27721632

  1. Differences in the ARID-1 alpha expressions in squamous and adenosquamous carcinomas of uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Solakoglu Kahraman, Dudu; Diniz, Gulden; Sayhan, Sevil; Ayaz, Duygu; Uncel, Melek; Karadeniz, Tugba; Akman, Tulay; Ozdemir, Aykut

    2015-10-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is a tumor suppressor gene involved in chromatin remodeling which encodes ARID1A (BAF250a) protein. Recent studies have shown the loss of ARID1A expression in several types of tumors. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the differences in tissue expressions of ARID1A in a spectrum of cervical neoplasms. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, invasive squamous or adenosquamous carcinomas were identified in 100 patients recently diagnosed as cervical neoplasms based on pathology databases. In this series, there were 29 low- and 29 high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, 27 squamous cell carcinomas, and 15 adenosquamous carcinomas. Mean age of the patients was 47.8 ± 13 years (20-80 years). It was determined that the expression of ARID1A was statistically significantly down-regulated in adenosquamous carcinomas when compared with non-invasive or invasive squamous cell carcinomas (p = 0.015). Lower levels of the ARID1A expression were detected in cases with adenosquamous carcinomas (60%), low- or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) (31%), and squamous cell carcinomas (18.5%). Our findings have demonstrated the presence of a correlation between ARID1A expression and adenomatous differentiation of uterine squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, ARID1A gene may suggestively have a role in the pathogenesis of cervical adenosquamous carcinomas.

  2. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  3. Accuracy of classifying poorly differentiated non-small cell lung carcinoma biopsies with commonly used lung carcinoma markers.

    PubMed

    Zachara-Szczakowski, Susanna; Verdun, Tyler; Churg, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining is an important adjunct to the classification of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Several studies have used tissue microarrays derived from resection specimens to evaluate the accuracy of IHC staining for classifying NSCLC, but few have used actual biopsies of poorly differentiated carcinomas, and the question of how often biopsy IHC in such tumors leads to the correct classification has received little attention. We identified 40 cases of NSCLC that, on biopsy, could not be subclassified by morphology and that had subsequent resection specimens. TTF-1, napsin, p63/p40, and CK5 or a subset thereof were used for IHC classification. Of the 40 cases classified by IHC on biopsy, 33 (82%) had no change in diagnosis after resection. Of the remaining 7 cases, 3 were classified as NSCLC--not otherwise specified on biopsy and subclassified as either adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on the surgical specimen. One adenocarcinoma biopsy was reclassified as pleomorphic carcinoma. Two SCCs were changed to adenosquamous carcinoma, and 1 SCC was changed to large cell lung carcinoma. Only 1 antibody pair (2%) was discordant between biopsy, and almost all reclassifications were done based on morphologic features rather than change in IHC pattern. We conclude that IHC staining allows accurate subclassification of poorly differentiated NSCLCs on small lung biopsies in most cases, but there is still a substantial "miss" rate (here, 18%). Surgical resection specimens allow further subclassification, mainly due to architectural features not present in the biopsies.

  4. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil--3/7, base of tongue--1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)--3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process.

  5. Diet as risk for lung cancer: a Swedish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Gosta; Rylander, Ragnar

    2002-01-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to study lung cancer in relation to dietary habits, occupational exposure, and living in urban or country areas. Suspect lung cancer cases in West Sweden and population controls were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire. The study comprised 177 female and 359 male cases and 916 controls. The cases mainly comprised former and current smokers (82% female, 95% male). For the analysis, cases were divided into the histological diagnoses adenocarcinoma and squamous cell, small cell, and adenosquamous cell carcinomas, as well as into smoking categories. A high frequency of consumption of vegetables was significantly related to a lower risk for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell and adenosquamous cell carcinoma among men and adenocarcinoma among women. A low odds ratio in the highest quartile of vegetable consumption in men was seen in all smoking categories. There were no significant protective effects from fruit in the different lung cancer subgroups, although a significant trend was found for heavy-smoking females. A high consumption of milk was related to an increased risk for lung cancer, especially adenosquamous cell carcinoma. The results suggest that the protective effect or risk due to dietary factors may affect different forms of lung cancer. The results from this as well as previous studies suggest a complex interaction between diet and lung cancer risk, involving the types of lung cancer as well as consumption patterns in the population.

  6. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  7. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  9. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  10. Adenosquamous carcinoma arising from a thyroglossal duct cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, YU-SUNG; SU, HSIN-HAO; HO, SZU-PEI

    2016-01-01

    The current study describes a case of adenosquamous carcinoma originating from a thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC). A 77-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic mass in the left mid-neck, which was soft and mobile on palpation. Fine-needle aspiration was performed, but cytology did not detect any malignant cells. Computed tomography demonstrated a single cystic lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland; therefore, surgery was performed on the suspected thyroid cyst. However, it was identified intraoperatively that the lesion was separated from the thyroid gland and instead adhered to an additional hyoid bone; therefore, the Sistrunk procedure was performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tumor confirmed the diagnosis of adenosquamous carcinoma originating from a TGDC. Carcinoma arising from a TGDC is rare, and accounts for 1% of all TGDC cases. The most common subtype of carcinoma associated with TGDC is papillary carcinoma, whilst adenosquamous carcinoma developing from a TGDC is extremely rare, with only one case currently reported in the literature. Although a consensus for the management of this disease has not yet been established, adequate surgical excision with long-term follow-up is currently the preferred treatment. PMID:27073536

  11. A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the lower bile duct diagnosed preoperatively via transpapillary biopsy.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yoshihiro; Iida, Tomoya; Kaneto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Itaru; Murakami, Kayo; Satoh, Shuji; Shimizu, Haruo; Sasaki, Kenichi; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Kon, Shinichiro

    2016-08-01

    A 78-year-old man presented to our hospital with fever and brownish urine. Upon thorough examination, a diagnosis of obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis associated with a lower bile duct tumor was made. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed entire circumferential stenosis of the lower bile duct. Examination of a transpapillary biopsy specimen of the lesion suggested adenosquamous carcinoma. The patient underwent subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed adenocarcinoma of the lower bile duct and squamous cell carcinoma components;a case of adenosquamous carcinoma was accordingly diagnosed. The lower bile duct tumor directly extended into the pancreatic parenchyma for approximately 1mm. We performed radical surgery and administered adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine because of advanced neural invasion after consulting with the patient. There was no sign of recurrence 46 months after surgery. As adenosquamous carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct is rare, it is difficult to preoperatively diagnose the condition. Only a few cases have been reported till date. PMID:27498940

  12. Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Erica B; Jalal, Shadia I

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer of neuroendocrine origin, which is strongly associated with cigarette smoking. Patients typically present with a short duration of symptoms and frequently (60-65 %) with metastatic disease. SCLC is a heterogeneous disease including extremely chemosensitive and chemoresistant clones. For this reason, a high percentage of patients respond to first-line chemotherapy but rapidly succumb to the disease. SCLC is generally divided into two stages, limited and extensive. Standard treatment of limited stage disease includes combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for four cycles, thoracic radiation initiated early with the first cycle of chemotherapy, and consideration of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in the subset of patients with good response. Surgery may play a role in TNM stages I and II. In extensive disease, platinum agents and etoposide, used in combination, are again the first-line standard of care in the USA. However, thoracic radiation therapy is used predominately in patients where local control is important and PCI is of uncertain benefit. Despite these treatments, prognosis remains poor and novel therapies are needed to improve survival in this disease. PMID:27535400

  13. Reevaluation and reclassification of resected lung carcinomas originally diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma using immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Kyuichi; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Rekhtman, Natasha; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Travis, William D

    2015-09-01

    Currently, non-small cell lung carcinomas are primarily classified by light microscopy. However, recent studies have shown that poorly differentiated tumors are more accurately classified by immunohistochemistry. In this study, we investigated the use of immunohistochemical analysis in reclassifying lung carcinomas that were originally diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor slides and blocks were available for histologic evaluation, and tissue microarrays were constructed from 480 patients with resected lung carcinomas originally diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma between 1999 and 2009. Immunohistochemical analyses for p40, p63, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1; clones SPT24 and 8G7G3/1), napsin A, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and CD56 were performed. Staining intensity (weak, moderate, or strong) and distribution (focal or diffuse) were also recorded. Of all, 449 (93.5%) patients were confirmed as having squamous cell carcinomas; the cases were mostly diffusely positive for p40 and negative for TTF-1 (8G7G3/1). Twenty cases (4.2%) were reclassified as adenocarcinoma, as they were positive for TTF-1 (8G7G3/1 or SPT24) with either no or focal p40 expression, and all of them were poorly differentiated with squamoid morphology. In addition, 1 case was reclassified as adenosquamous carcinoma, 4 cases as large cell carcinoma, 4 cases as large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, and 2 cases as small cell carcinoma. In poorly differentiated non-small cell lung carcinomas, an accurate distinction between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cannot be reliably determined by morphology alone and requires immunohistochemical analysis, even in resected specimens. Our findings suggest that TTF-1 8G7G3/1 may be better suited as the primary antibody in differentiating adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Calvaria and orbital metastases of pulmonary adenosquamous carcinoma in a cat: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    BINANTI, Diana; ZANI, Davide Danilo

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old cat with a 4-month history of lethargy, inappetence, dysphagia, partial mandibular paralysis and weight loss, was euthanized due to the rapid deterioration of his condition. Post-mortem radiographic examination revealed severe bone lysis of the left zygomatic arch, temporal and parietal bones. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed a large isointense mass of the left side of the skull associated with extensive lysis of the parietal and temporal bones and destruction of the adjacent tympanic bulla. Gross and histological examinations revealed a pulmonary adenosquamous carcinoma of the left lung, with metastases to the spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph nodes, mesentery, diaphragm, abdominal aorta, left orbit and calvaria. No limb or digit metastases were detected. PMID:25648372

  17. Clara epithelial cell depletion in the lung.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sanchaita S; Dudda, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium has been increasingly recognized as an important immunomodulatory compartment in asthma and other lung diseases. Clara cells, which comprise the nonciliated secretory epithelial cells, are an important epithelial cell type with functions in the regulation of lung homeostasis and inflammation. Using naphthalene, Clara cells can be depleted within 24 h and regenerate by 1 month, hence, providing an easy method to study the impact of Clara cells on lung inflammation.

  18. The human lung mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, S I

    1984-01-01

    Mast cells are present in human lung tissue, pulmonary epithelium, and free in the bronchial lumen. By virtue of their location and their possession of specific receptors for IgE and complement fragments, these cells are sentinel cells in host defense. The preformed granular mediators and newly generated lipid mediators liberated upon activation of mast cells by a variety of secretagogues supply potent vasoactive-spasmogenic mediators, chemotactic factors, active enzymes, and proteoglycans to the local environment. These factors acting together induce an immediate response manifest as edema, smooth muscle constriction, mucus production, and cough. Later these mediators and those provided from plasma and leukocytes generate a tissue infiltrate of inflammatory cells and more prolonged vasoactive-bronchospastic responses. Acute and prolonged responses may be homeostatic and provide for defense of the host, but if excessive in degree or duration may provide a chronic inflammatory substrate upon which such disorders as asthma and pulmonary fibrosis may ensue. PMID:6428878

  19. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum. An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, A; de la Cruz, E; Sanchez, M J; Ortiz, S; Lobato, A; Merino, E

    1993-05-01

    A rare adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum occurred in an 84-year-old woman. Histologically the neoplasm showed evidence of glandular and squamous differentiation, and both components showed malignant characteristics. Intermediate elements sharing squamous and glandular features, were found and were immunoreactive for carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratins of both low and high molecular weight. A review of the literature and discussion about the histogenesis is included.

  20. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-12-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3 are relatively high in a panel of lung tumor cell lines expressing high levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a key NE marker in lung tumors. In response to bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytotoxicity whereas non-NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytostasis, indicating a distinct role of autophagy for NE lung tumor cell survival. Intriguingly, in certain NE lung tumor cell lines, the levels of processed LC3 (LC3-II) were inversely correlated with AKT activity. When AKT activity was inhibited using AKTi or MK2206, the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1/p62 were increased. In contrast, torin 1, rapamycin or mTOR knockdown increased p62 levels, suggesting that these two pathways have opposing effects on autophagy in certain NE lung tumors. Moreover, inhibition of one pathway resulted in reduced activity of the other, suggesting that these two pathways crosstalk in the tumors. These results suggest that NE lung tumor cells share a common feature of autophagy and are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than non-NE lung tumor cells. PMID:24126619

  1. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients. PMID:27107715

  2. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-04-23

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients.

  3. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Isabel P; Randell, Scott H

    2004-01-01

    Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung. PMID:15285789

  4. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown on Acellular Rat Lung Matrix Create Perfusable Tumor Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Ott, Harald C.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix allows lung cancer to form its shape and grow. Recent studies on organ reengineering for orthotopic transplantation have provided a new avenue for isolating purified native matrix to use for growing cells. Whether human lung cancer cells grown in a decellularized rat lung matrix would create perfusable human lung cancer nodules was tested. Methods Rat lungs were harvested and native cells were removed using sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100 in a decellularization chamber to create a decellularized rat lung matrix. Human A549, H460, or H1299 lung cancer cells were placed into the decellularized rat lung matrix and grown in a customized bioreactor with perfusion of oxygenated media for 7 to 14 days. Results Decellularized rat lung matrix showed preservation of matrix architecture devoid of all rat cells. All three human lung cancer cell lines grown in the bioreactor developed tumor nodules with intact vasculature. Moreover, the lung cancer cells developed a pattern of growth similar to the original human lung cancer. Conclusions Overall, this study shows that human lung cancer cells form perfusable tumor nodules in a customized bioreactor on a decellularized rat lung matrix created by a customized decellularization chamber. The lung cancer cells grown in the matrix had features similar to the original human lung cancer. This ex vivo model can be used potentially to gain a deeper understanding of the biologic processes involved in human lung cancer. PMID:22385822

  8. Adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses and Kartagener syndrome: an unusual combination.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syeda Uzma; Hussain, Syed Iqbal; Quadri, Shaheen

    2014-03-01

    A 34 years old non-smoker male patient reported with growth of right maxillary region which on histopathology confirmed adenosquamous carcinoma of nose and paranasal sinus. Patient also had total situs inversus including dextrocardia, bronchiectasis and sinusitis. His blood group was AB negative. This association of Kartagener syndrome with adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses has never been reported. Carcinoma of paranasal sinuses accounts only 0.3% of all cancers. Adenosquamous carcinoma makes only 2% of the nose and paranasal sinuses tumours. Kartagener syndrome, AB negative blood group and adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses all are extremely rare clinical conditions found in populations and the combination of all three in the same patient have never been reported to the best of authors' knowledge.

  9. Low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast: imaging and histopathologic characteristics of this rare disease.

    PubMed

    Scali, Elena P; Ali, Rola H; Hayes, Malcolm; Tyldesley, Scott; Hassell, Patricia

    2013-11-01

    Low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare histologic subtype of breast carcinoma that has a variable mammographic and sonographic appearance, which overlaps with both benign and malignant neoplasms. Because of its lack of unique imaging features, a diagnosis of low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma is based on histopathology. The recognition of this entity is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of breast masses and carries implications for prognosis, which is more favorable than other types of breast carcinoma.

  10. Replication of cultured lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.; Bienkowski, R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have investigated the conditions necessary to support replication of lung type 2 epithelial cells in culture. Cells were isolated from mature fetal rabbit lungs (29d gestation) and cultured on feeder layers of mitotically inactivated 3T3 fibroblasts. The epithelial nature of the cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining for keratin and by polyacid dichrome stain. Ultrastructural examination during the first week showed that the cells contained myofilaments, microvilli and lamellar bodies (markers for type 2 cells). The following changes were observed after the first week: increase in cell size; loss of lamellar bodies and appearance of multivesicular bodies; increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi; increase in tonafilaments and well-defined junctions. General cell morphology was good for up to 10 wk. Cells cultured on plastic surface degenerated after 1 wk. Cell replication was assayed by autoradiography of cultures exposed to (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and by direct cell counts. The cells did not replicate during the first week; however, between 2-10 wk the cells incorporated the label and went through approximately 6 population doublings. They have demonstrated that lung alveolar epithelial cells can replicate in culture if they are maintained on an appropriate substrate. The coincidence of ability to replicate and loss of markers for differentiation may reflect the dichotomy between growth and differentiation commonly observed in developing systems.

  11. Obstructive jaundice in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar Pour, Ali; Masir, Noraidah; Isa, Mohd Rose

    2015-08-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) commonly metastasizes to distant organs. However, metastasis to the pancreas is not a common event. Moreover, obstructive jaundice as a first clinical presentation of SCLC is extremely unusual. This case reports a 51-year-old male with SCLC, manifesting with obstructive jaundice as the initial clinical presentation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograghy (ERCP) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass at the head of the pancreas. The patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure). Histopathology revealed a chromogranin- A-positive poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. No imaging study of the lung was performed before surgery. A few months later, a follow-up CT revealed unilateral lung nodules with ipsilateral hilar nodes. A lung biopsy was done and histopathology reported a TTF- 1-positive, chromogranin A-positive, small cell carcinoma of the lung. On review, the pancreatic tumour was also TTF-1-positive. He was then treated with combination chemotherapy (cisplatin, etoposide). These findings highlight that presentation of a mass at the head of pancreas could be a manifestation of a metastatic tumour from elsewhere such as the lung, and thorough investigations should be performed before metastases can be ruled out. PMID:26277673

  12. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is not a single and separate entity. Images PMID:4031101

  13. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  14. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  15. Ceramide path in human lung cell death.

    PubMed

    Chan, C; Goldkorn, T

    2000-04-01

    Lung epithelium plays a significant role in modulating the inflammatory response to lung injury. Airway epithelial cells are targeted by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and oxygen radicals, which are agents commonly produced during inflammatory processes. The mechanisms and molecular sites affected by H(2)O(2) are largely unknown but may involve the induction of sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis to generate ceramide, which serves as a second messenger in initiating an apoptotic response. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial (HAE) cells to 50 to 100 microM H(2)O(2) induces within 5 to 10 min a greater than 2-fold activation of neutral sphingomyelinase activity with concomitant SM hydrolysis, ceramide generation, and apoptosis. On the other hand, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate inhibits both H(2)O(2)-induced ceramide production and apoptosis. The apoptotic response could be restored by the addition of 25 microM cell-permeant C6-ceramide. These findings indicate that ceramide, the product of SM hydrolysis, plays an important role in H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in HAE cells, and that PKC counteracts ceramide-mediated apoptosis in these cells. We suggest that the mediation of epithelial cell apoptosis by ceramide and its inhibition by PKC constitute a central mechanism by which inflammatory processes are modulated in the epithelium of the lung.

  16. The lung in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, J; Murphy, T M; Browning, I

    1999-09-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited disorder in African-Americans. Although the primary defect is hematological, the changes in the erythrocytes lead to a vasculopathy with multiorgan injury. The pulmonary complications, i.e., acute chest syndrome and chronic sickle cell lung disease, are significant causes of morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary manifestations result from a unique constellation of factors which come into play in sickle cell disease. Based on the growing understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of sickle cell disease, new therapies are being developed that are likely to ameliorate the natural history of this disease and its complications. PMID:10495338

  17. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in Lung Biology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Allison N; Goodwin, Meagan; Kim, Carla F; Weiss, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    A number of novel approaches for repair and regeneration of injured lung have developed over the past several years. These include a better understanding of endogenous stem and progenitor cells in the lung that can function in reparative capacity as well as extensive exploration of the potential efficacy of administering exogenous stem or progenitor cells to function in lung repair. Recent advances in ex vivo lung engineering have also been increasingly applied to the lung. The current status of these approaches as well as initial clinical trials of cell therapies for lung diseases are reviewed below. PMID:22395528

  18. A hidden residential cell in the lung.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophils are classically known as proinflammatory cells, as they are equipped with a variety of preformed cytotoxic mediators and have been shown to definitively contribute to asthma. The connection between eosinophils and asthma development has led to a new class of asthma therapeutics based on blocking eosinophils with humanized antibodies that neutralize IL-5, a potent eosinophil growth, activation, and survival factor. Yet, recent studies have led to an increasing appreciation that eosinophils have a variety of homeostatic functions, including immunomodulation. In this issue of the JCI, Mesnil et al. identify a notable population of lung-resident eosinophils and demonstrate that, compared with traditional eosinophils, these cells have distinct characteristics, including nuclear structure, surface markers, IL-5 independence, and immunoregulatory function that is capable of polarizing adaptive immune responses, at least in vitro. Thus, these results reinforce a key homeostatic role for this enigmatic cell population, particularly in residing and regulating immunity in the lung. PMID:27548525

  19. Lung mast cells in plexogenic pulmonary arteriopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D; Yacoub, M

    1991-01-01

    The numbers of mast cells/mm2 of lung parenchyma were counted in four controls, 15 cases of primary plexogenic pulmonary arteriopathy (PPA), and 17 cases in which the arteriopathy was secondary to congenital heart disease, to determine if increased numbers occur in PPA and with what stage of disease they might be associated. Considerable accumulations of lung mast cells may occur in this disease, but these are not closely related to any particular histological stage in the development of the arteriopathy. It is postulated that while mast cells could conceivably exert a vasodilatory effect on constricted small pulmonary arteries, it seems more likely that they are part of the parenchymal changes that commonly develop in this disease. Images PMID:1791199

  20. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  2. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored.

  3. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratigos, Michalis; Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  4. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer. If lung ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  5. Spontaneous regression in advanced squamous cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon Hee; Park, Bo Mi; Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Ju Ock; Jung, Sung Soo; Park, Hee Sun; Moon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of malignant tumors is rare especially of lung tumor and biological mechanism of such remission has not been addressed. We report the case of a 79-year-old Korean patient with non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell cancer with a right hilar tumor and multiple lymph nodes, lung to lung metastasis that spontaneously regressed without any therapies. He has sustained partial remission state for one year and eight months after the first histological diagnosis. PMID:27076978

  6. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  7. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  8. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  9. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

  10. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  11. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  12. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  13. Prognostic markers in resectable non-small cell lung cancer: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Marc P.; deB. Edwardes, Michael D.; Michel, René P.; Halwani, Fawaz; Morin, Jean E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To identify the prognostic significance of certain clinical, cellular and immunologic markers in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Design A cohort of patients with resectable NSCLC was prospectively followed up for 8 years (100% follow-up). Setting A university hospital in a large Canadian city. Patients One hundred and thirteen consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection of primary NSCLC. Main outcome measures Presence of peritumoral B lymphocytes (identified with antibody to CD20) and T lymphocytes (antibody to CD43), along with tumour markers (carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], keratin, cytokeratin, S-100 protein, vimentin, chromogranin) and other factors such as age, sex, cell type, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, histologic grade, DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction were correlated with survival. Results The mean age of patients in the study was 66.0 years; 60% were male. Histologic types of the tumours were: adenocarcinoma 57 (50.4%), squamous cell 47 (41.6%), adenosquamous 6 (5.3%) and large cell 3 (2.6%). AJCC stages were: I 66 (58.4%), II 20 (17.7%) and III 27 (23.9%). Histologic grades were: I (well differentiated) 31 (27.4%), II 50 (44.2%), III 29 (25.7%) and IV 3 (2.6%). Survival was 85% at 1 year (95% confidence interval [CI] 76%–90%), 44% at 5 years (95% CI 34%–53%) and 34% at 10 years (95% CI 22%–46%). Multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model for survival confirmed AJCC stage (p < 0.001) in all histologic subtypes to be the strongest factor of independent prognostic significance. It also revealed the presence of CD20-stained B lymphocytes (p = 0.04) in the peritumoral region of all tumours to be a positive prognostic factor. This relation was especially strong for nonsquamous cell carcinomas (p < 0.001). For squamous cell carcinomas, the immunohistochemical presence of CEA was of marginally negative prognostic value (p = 0.04). DNA ploidy and a high S-phase fraction showed no

  14. Cell-derived microparticles and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Dario; Neri, Tommaso; Petrini, Silvia; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Cell-derived microparticles are small (0.1-1 μm) vesicles shed by most eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microparticles carry on their surface, and enclose within their cytoplasm, molecules derived from the parental cell, including proteins, DNA, RNA, microRNA and phospholipids. Microparticles are now considered functional units that represent a disseminated storage pool of bioactive effectors and participate both in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diseases. The mechanisms involved in microparticle generation include intracellular calcium mobilisation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, kinase phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear factor-κB. The role of microparticles in blood coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation, is well established in in vitro and animal models. The role of microparticles in human pulmonary diseases, both as pathogenic determinants and biomarkers, is being actively investigated. Microparticles of endothelial origin, suggestive of apoptosis, have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of patients with emphysema, lending support to the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a link with cardiovascular comorbidities. Microparticles also have potential roles in patients with asthma, diffuse parenchymal lung disease, thromboembolism, lung cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27581826

  15. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  16. Amine-containing cells of the lung.

    PubMed

    Pack, R J; Widdicombe, J G

    1984-11-01

    In many vertebrates, including mammals, there are amine-containing cells in the walls of the airways and the lungs. Despite a plethora of names for these cells, there is a general agreement about their structure. They occur singly or in groups (NEBs), but the functional distinction between the two types of distribution is uncertain. In spite of ultrastructural similarities, the cells may be physiologically heterogenous. The cells are characterised by their staining characteristics and content of electron-dense-core vesicles, which are believed to contain a biogenic amine. They also have additional cytoplasmic features common to other sensory paraganglia. They may be more numerous in certain species and also in the neonate. The NEBs may be innervated with afferent and/or efferent nerves, though physiological evidence of their innervation is scanty. The most popular hypothesis is that they can be stimulated by hypoxia to release mediators or to induce reflex activity. In the healthy animal, the amine-cells may control local ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) ratios via an action on the pulmonary vasculature. In disease, they may cause pulmonary hypertension. They can also give rise to three forms of tumour. Their full significance has yet to be established. PMID:6083878

  17. S0819: Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  18. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. How to target small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Ulsperger, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with dismal prognosis. Although great progress has been made in investigating genetic aberrations and putative drivers of this tumor entity, the mechanisms of rapid dissemination and acquisition of drug resistance are not clear. The majority of SCLC cases are characterized by inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) and, therefore, interchangeable drivers will be difficult to target successfully. Access to pure cultures of SCLC circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and study of their tumor biology has revealed a number of new potential targets. Most important, expression of chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) which controls expression of vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was newly described in these cells. The process switching CHI3L1-negative SCLC cells to CHI3L1-positive CTCs seems to be associated with cytokines released by inflammatory immune cells. Furthermore, these CTCs were found to promote monocyte-macrophage differentiation, most likely of the M2 tumor-promoting type, recently described to express PD-1 immune checkpoint antigen in SCLC. In conclusion, dissemination of SCLC seems to be linked to conversion of regular tumor cells to highly invasive CHI3L1-positive CTCs, which are protected by immune system suppression. Besides the classical targets VEGF, MMP-9 and PD-1, CHI3L1 constitutes a new possibly drugable molecule to retard down dissemination of SCLC cells, which may be similarly relevant for glioblastoma and other tumor entities. PMID:26425658

  20. Mediation of lung metastasis of murine melanomas by a lung-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D Z; Cheng, C F; Pauli, B U

    1991-11-01

    Organ-specific adhesion molecules expressed by vascular endothelial cells have been implicated in the arrest of blood-borne cancer cells in selective, secondary sites. A lung-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule (Lu-ECAM-1) localized on endothelia of distinct branches of lung blood vessels has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from detergent extracts of lung matrix-modulated endothelial cells using monoclonal antibody (mAb) 6D3. It has a molecular mass of 90 kDa and promotes the selective attachment of lung-metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Corresponding with their metastatic performance, B16-F10 tumor cells selected for higher lung colonization bind to Lu-ECAM-1 in significantly higher numbers than their low lung metastatic counterpart B16-F0. Binding of B16-F0 and B16-F10 is reduced with mAb 6D3 to slightly lower levels than B16-F0 bound to Lu-ECAM-1. mAb 6D3 injected into C57BL/6 mice 1 hr prior to an i.v. challenge with B16-F10 causes a 90% reduction in the number of lung colonies compared with animals injected with control mAb (6D8 or 3C6). Lu-ECAM-1 neither binds nor effects metastasis of other lung-colonizing tumor cells (e.g., KLN205). Thus, site-specific metastasis of tumor cells is regulated by similar mechanisms as the homing of lymphocytes--namely, by the ability of blood-borne cancer cells to recognize and adhere to distinct endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

  1. Mediation of lung metastasis of murine melanomas by a lung-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D Z; Cheng, C F; Pauli, B U

    1991-01-01

    Organ-specific adhesion molecules expressed by vascular endothelial cells have been implicated in the arrest of blood-borne cancer cells in selective, secondary sites. A lung-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule (Lu-ECAM-1) localized on endothelia of distinct branches of lung blood vessels has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from detergent extracts of lung matrix-modulated endothelial cells using monoclonal antibody (mAb) 6D3. It has a molecular mass of 90 kDa and promotes the selective attachment of lung-metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Corresponding with their metastatic performance, B16-F10 tumor cells selected for higher lung colonization bind to Lu-ECAM-1 in significantly higher numbers than their low lung metastatic counterpart B16-F0. Binding of B16-F0 and B16-F10 is reduced with mAb 6D3 to slightly lower levels than B16-F0 bound to Lu-ECAM-1. mAb 6D3 injected into C57BL/6 mice 1 hr prior to an i.v. challenge with B16-F10 causes a 90% reduction in the number of lung colonies compared with animals injected with control mAb (6D8 or 3C6). Lu-ECAM-1 neither binds nor effects metastasis of other lung-colonizing tumor cells (e.g., KLN205). Thus, site-specific metastasis of tumor cells is regulated by similar mechanisms as the homing of lymphocytes--namely, by the ability of blood-borne cancer cells to recognize and adhere to distinct endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Images PMID:1946371

  2. Regulation of allergic lung inflammation by endothelial cell transglutaminase 2.

    PubMed

    Soveg, Frank; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Campbell, Jackson; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2015-09-15

    Tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an enzyme with multiple functions, including catalysis of serotonin conjugation to proteins (serotonylation). Previous research indicates that TG2 expression is upregulated in human asthma and in the lung endothelium of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. It is not known whether endothelial cell TG2 is required for allergic inflammation. Therefore, to determine whether endothelial cell TG2 regulates allergic inflammation, mice with an endothelial cell-specific deletion of TG2 were generated, and these mice were sensitized and challenged in the airways with OVA. Deletion of TG2 in endothelial cells blocked OVA-induced serotonylation in lung endothelial cells, but not lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, deletion of endothelial TG2 reduced allergen-induced increases in respiratory system resistance, number of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage, and number of eosinophils in the lung tissue. Endothelial cell deletion of TG2 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules, cytokines, or chemokines that regulate leukocyte recruitment, consistent with other studies, demonstrating that deletion of endothelial cell signals does not alter lung cytokines and chemokines during allergic inflammation. Taken together, the data indicate that endothelial cell TG2 is required for allergic inflammation by regulating the recruitment of eosinophils into OVA-challenged lungs. In summary, TG2 functions as a critical signal for allergic lung responses. These data identify potential novel targets for intervention in allergy/asthma.

  3. Inhibition of rhotekin exhibits antitumor effects in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIZHEN; LIANG, ZHENYU; LI, JING

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause for cancer-related death, however, the pathogenesis mechanism is poorly understood. Although the rhotekin (RTKN) gene has been reported to encode an effector for the Rho protein that has critical roles in regulating cell growth, the role of RTKN in lung cancer has not been investigated. In clinical lung cancer patient tumor samples, we identified that the RTKN gene expression level was significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to that of the adjacent normal tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of RTKN in lung cancer, we established RTKN stable knock-down A549 and SPC-A-1 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using lentiviral transfection of RTKN shRNA and evaluated the antitumor effects. The results showed that RTKN knock-down inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell viability, induced S phase arrest and increased cell apoptosis. In addition, RTKN knock-down inhibited lung cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Further analysis showed that the S phase promoting factors cyclindependent kinase (CDK)1 and CDK2 levels were decreased in RTKN knock-down cells, and that the DNA replication initiation complex proteins Minichromosome maintenance protein complex (MCM)2 and MCM6 were decreased as well in RTKN knock-down cells. These results indicated that the RTKN protein was associated with lung cancer in clinic samples and exerted anticancer activity in lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibiting cell cycle progression and the DNA replication machinery. These findings suggest that RTKN inhibition may be a novel therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26935528

  4. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Impaired oxidative phosphorylation regulates necroptosis in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Michael Jakun; Rooney, Kristen T; Choi, Mary E; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Moon, Jong-Seok

    2015-08-28

    Cellular metabolism can impact cell life or death outcomes. While metabolic dysfunction has been linked to cell death, the mechanisms by which metabolic dysfunction regulates the cell death mode called necroptosis remain unclear. Our study demonstrates that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activates programmed necrotic cell death (necroptosis) in human lung epithelial cells. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis induced the phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) and necroptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), resulting from impaired mitochondrial OXPHOS, regulates necroptotic cell death. These results suggest that impaired mitochondrial OXPHOS contributes to necroptosis in human lung epithelial cells.

  6. Stem cells and lung cancer: future therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Alison, Malcolm R; Lebrenne, Arielle C; Islam, Shahriar

    2009-09-01

    In both the UK and USA more people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer's high mortality rate is also reflected on a global scale, with lung cancer accounting for more than 1 million deaths per year. In tissues with ordered structure such a lung epithelia, it is likely that the cancers have their origins in normal adult stem cells, and then the tumours themselves are maintained by a population of malignant stem cells - so-called cancer stem cells. This review examines both these postulates in animal models and in the clinical setting, noting that stem cell niches appear to foster tumour development, and that drug resistance can often be attributed to malignant cells with stem cell properties. PMID:19653862

  7. EF5 in Measuring Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-10

    Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Mechanobiology in Lung Epithelial Cells: Measurements, Perturbations, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra; Navajas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the lung are located at the interface between the environment and the organism and serve many important functions including barrier protection, fluid balance, clearance of particulate, initiation of immune responses, mucus and surfactant production, and repair following injury. Because of the complex structure of the lung and its cyclic deformation during the respiratory cycle, epithelial cells are exposed to continuously varying levels of mechanical stresses. While normal lung function is maintained under these conditions, changes in mechanical stresses can have profound effects on the function of epithelial cells and therefore the function of the organ. In this review, we will describe the types of stresses and strains in the lungs, how these are transmitted, and how these may vary in human disease or animal models. Many approaches have been developed to better understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical stresses, and we will discuss these approaches and how they have been used to study lung epithelial cells in culture. Understanding how cells sense and respond to changes in mechanical stresses will contribute to our understanding of the role of lung epithelial cells during normal function and development and how their function may change in diseases such as acute lung injury, asthma, emphysema, and fibrosis. PMID:23728969

  9. Mast cells and histamine enhance the proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Uddin, Mohib; Mankuta, David; Dubinett, Steven M; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer with an extremely low survival rate. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process with intense mast cell infiltrate that is associated with reduced survival. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells have an enhancing effect on NSCLC proliferation. To assess the tumor-promoting potential of mast cells, we used the human alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549) and the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell lines, umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMC) and the mast cell-deficient mouse Sash model. The proliferation rate of A549/LLC cells was markedly increased by mast cells and histamine. Histamine proliferating activity was mediated via H(1), H(2) and H(4) receptors and caused ERK phosphorylation. LLC induced in Sash mice or in wild-type mice treated with the mast cell stabilizer nedocromil sodium displayed an accelerated growth (number of metastic colonies in the lungs, total lung area and lung/total mice weight ratio). In summary, we have shown a significant effect of mast cells and histamine in enhancing NSCLC/LLCX growth in vitro, while in a mouse LLC model in vivo we have found that mast cells are important negative regulators of cancer development. Therefore our results would indicate a pro-tumorogenic effect of the mast cells in vitro on established lung tumor cell lines, and anti-tumorogenic effect in mice at lung cancer induction. In conclusion, mast cell/anti-histamine targeted therapies should carefully consider this dual effect. PMID:21733595

  10. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  11. Giant gingival pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guolin; Long, Xing; Han, Qianchao; Tian, Lihua

    2012-07-01

    We here describe a case of giant primary gingival pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in a 53-year-old Chinese male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pathogenesis of the lesion and the deferential diagnosis from invasive SCC are also discussed. To our knowledge, such a hugeous primary pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the gingiva accompanied with lung SCC is unusual.

  12. Transformation from non-small-cell lung cancer to small-cell lung cancer: molecular drivers and cells of origin.

    PubMed

    Oser, Matthew G; Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The two broad histological subtypes of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the cause of 15% of cases, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of cases and includes adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Although NSCLC and SCLC are commonly thought to be different diseases owing to their distinct biology and genomic abnormalities, the idea that these malignant disorders might share common cells of origin has been gaining support. This idea has been supported by the unexpected findings that a subset of NSCLCs with mutated EGFR return as SCLC when resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops. Additionally, other case reports have described the coexistence of NSCLC and SCLC, further challenging the commonly accepted view of their distinct lineages. Here, we summarise the published clinical observations and biology underlying tumours with combined SCLC and NSCLC histology and cancers that transform from adenocarcinoma to SCLC. We also discuss pre-clinical studies pointing to common potential cells of origin, and speculate how the distinct paths of differentiation are determined by the genomics of each disease.

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  14. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3–15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  15. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  16. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase.

  17. Lung cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ze-hong; White, James; Zhang, Lin-bo

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most dreaded of all cancers because of the higher mortality rates associated with it worldwide. The various subtypes of lung cancer respond differently to a particular treatment regime, which makes the therapeutic interventions all the more complicated. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. They are considered as the factors responsible for the cases of tumor relapse. The CSCs may have significant role in the development of lung tumorigenesis based on the identification of the CSCs which respond during injury. The properties of multi-potency and self-renewal are shared in common by the lung CSCs with the normal pluripotent stem cells which can be isolated using the similar markers. This review deals with the origin and characteristics of the lung cancer stem cells. The role of different markers used to isolate lung CSCs like CD44, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), CD133 and ABCG2 (ATP binding cassette sub family G member 2) have been discussed in detail. Analysis of the developmental signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog in the regulation and maintenance of the lung CSCs have been done. Finally, before targeting the lung CSC biomarkers for potential therapeutics, challenges faced in lung cancer stem cell research need to be taken into account. With the accepted notion that the CSCs are to blame for cancer relapse and drug resistance, targeting them can be an important aspect of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  18. Therapeutic effect of lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells on lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kensuke; Fujita, Tetsuo; Umezawa, Hiroki; Namiki, Kana; Yoshioka, Kento; Hagihara, Masahiko; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Sadao; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi

    2014-11-01

    Cell-based therapy is recognized as one of potential therapeutic options for lung fibrosis. However, preparing stem/progenitor cells is complicated and not always efficient. Here, we show easily prepared cell populations having therapeutic capacity for lung inflammatory disease that are named as 'lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells' (LMDECs). LMDECs expressed surfactant protein (SP)-C and gave rise to type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in vitro and in vivo that partly satisfied type II AEC-like characteristics. An intratracheal delivery of not HEK 293 cells but LMDECs to the lung ameliorated bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. A comprehensive analysis of bronchoalveolar fluid by western blot array revealed that LMDEC engraftment could improve the microenvironment in the BLM-instilled lung in association with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 signaling axis. SDF-1 enhanced both migration activity and differentiating efficiency of LMDECs. Further classification of LMDECs by flow cytometric study showed that a major population of LMDECs (LMDEC(Maj), 84% of total LMDECs) was simultaneously SP-C(+), CD44(+), CD45(+), and hematopoietic cell lineage(+) and that LMDECs included bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) showing SP-C(+)Clara cell secretory protein(+)stem cell antigen (Sca)1(+) as a small population (1.8% of total LMDECs). CD44(+)-sorted LMDEC(Maj) and Sca1(+)-sorted LMDECs equally ameliorated fibrosis induced by BLM like LMDECs did. However, infiltrated neutrophils were observed in Sca1(+)-sorted LMDEC-treated alveoli that was not typical in LMDEC(Maj)- or LMDEC-treated alveoli. These findings suggest that the protective effect of LMDECs against BLM-induced lung injury depends greatly on that of LMDEC(Maj). Furthermore, the cells expressing both alveolar epithelial and hematopoietic cell lineage markers (SP-C(+)CD45(+)) that have characteristics corresponding to LMDEC(Maj) were observed in the alveoli of lung and

  19. Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  20. The relationship between microvessel count and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, p53, and K-ras in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Y. H.; Kim, K. S.; Yu, Y. K.; Lim, S. C.; Kim, Y. C.; Park, K. O.

    2001-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical staining, we studied the relationship between the microvessel count (MC) and the expression of K-ras, mutant p53 protein, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 61 surgically resected non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) (42 squamous cell carcinoma, 14 adenocarcinoma, 2 large cell carcinoma, 2 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 1 mucoepidermoid carcinoma). MC of the tumors with lymph node (LN) metastasis was significantly higher than that of tumors without LN metastasis (66.1+/-23.1 vs. 33.8+/-13.1, p<0.05). VEGF was positive in 54 patients (88.5%). MC was 58.1+/-25.2 (mean+/-S.D.) in a x200 field, and it was significantly higher in VEGF(+) tumors than in VEGF(-) tumors (61.4+/-23.7 vs. 32.9+/-23.8, p<0.05). VEGF expression was higher in K-ras-positive or mutant p53-positive tumors than in negative tumors (p<0.05). MC was significantly higher in K-ras(+) tumors than in K-ras(-) tumors, although it did not differ according to the level of mutant p53 protein expression. Survival did not differ with VEGF, mutant p53, or K-ras expression, or the level of MC. In conclusion, there is a flow of molecular alterations from K-ras and p53, to VEGF expression, leading to angiogenesis and ultimately lymph node metastasis. Correlations between variables in close approximation and the lack of prognostic significance of individual molecular alterations suggest that tumorigenesis and metastasis are multifactorial processes. PMID:11511786

  1. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  2. Tracking the Clonal Evolution of Adenosquamous Carcinoma, a Rare Variant of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Suguru; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Ogata, Munehiko; Oikawa, Kensuke; Tamakawa, Susumu; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Muraki, Miho; Yokochi, Tomoki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is an uncommon variant of pancreatic neoplasm. We sought to trace the mode of tumor progression using specimens of ASC associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. A resected specimen of the primary pancreatic ASC, developed in a 72-year-old man, was subjected to mutation profiling using amplicon-targeted sequencing and digital polymerase chain reaction. DNA was isolated from each histological compartment including noninvasive IPMN, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and adenocarcinoma (AC). Histologically, an IPMN with a large mural nodule was identified. The invasive tumor predominantly consisted of SCC, and a smaller AC was found around the lesion. Squamous metaplasias were sporadically distributed within benign IPMNs. Mutation alleles KRAS and GNAS were identified in all specimens of IPMN including the areas of squamous metaplasia. In addition, these mutations were found in SCC and AC. Clear transition from flat/low-papillary IPMN to SCC indicated a potent invasion front, and the SCC compartment was genetically unique, because the area has a higher frequency of mutation KRAS. The invasive tumors with distinct histological appearances shared the form of noninvasive IPMN as a common precursor, rather than de novo cancer, suggesting the significance of a genetic profiling scheme of tumors associated with IPMN. PMID:27295533

  3. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Codony-Servat, Jordi; Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26958490

  5. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Amanda K; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  6. 27-Hydroxycholesterol accelerates cellular senescence in human lung resident cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Togo, Shinsaku; Koarai, Akira; Abe, Kyoko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Numakura, Tadahisa; Onodera, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Rie; Sato, Kei; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Tamada, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshinori; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Cellular senescence is reportedly involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We previously showed that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is elevated in the airways of COPD patients compared with those in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lung fibroblasts of COPD patients are senescent and to determine the effects of 27-OHC on senescence of lung resident cells, including fibroblasts and airway epithelial cells. Localization of senescence-associated proteins and sterol 27-hydroxylase was investigated in the lungs of COPD patients by immunohistochemical staining. To evaluate whether 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence, lung resident cells were exposed to 27-OHC. Senescence markers and fibroblast-mediated tissue repair were investigated in the 27-OHC-treated cells. Expression of senescence-associated proteins was significantly enhanced in lung fibroblasts of COPD patients. Similarly, expression of sterol 27-hydroxylase was significantly upregulated in lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages in these patients. Treatment with the concentration of 27-OHC detected in COPD airways significantly augmented expression of senescence-associated proteins and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and delayed cell growth through the prostaglandin E2-reactive nitrogen species pathway. The 27-OHC-treated fibroblasts impaired tissue repair function. Fibroblasts from lungs of COPD patients showed accelerated senescence and were more susceptible to 27-OHC-induced cellular senescence compared with those of healthy subjects. In conclusion, 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence in lung resident cells and may play a pivotal role in cellular senescence in COPD. PMID:27036870

  7. [A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the sigmoid colon with inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryota; Maruyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Akinari; Sato, Yayoi; Sazuka, Tetsutaro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Kanada, Yoko; Yanagihara, Akitoshi; Yokoyama, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shinichiro

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old man who had been admitted to another institute with sepsis and renal failure was referred to our hospital after computed tomography (CT) findings showed thickening of the walls in the sigmoid colon and a defect in contrast enhancement in the portal and inferior mesenteric veins. Emergency sigmoid colon resection with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed after detection of perforation due to sigmoid colon cancer. The histopathological diagnosis was adenosquamous carcinoma, pSS, int, INF b, ly1, v0, pN2, pStage IIIband inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis. He was discharged on day 12, and we administered anticoagulant warfarin therapy.

  8. Stage IB2 adenosquamous cervical cancer diagnosed at 19-weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Peculis, Luiza D; Ius, Yvette; Campion, Michael; Friedlander, Michael; Hacker, Neville

    2015-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for advanced cervical cancer in pregnancy has been shown to increase operability and be effective against spread of disease. In all reported cases of advanced disease, residual tumour has been found at surgery following NACT. We present a case of a 27-year old diagnosed with stage IB2 adenosquamous cervical carcinoma at 19-weeks' gestation who was treated with NACT. Following caesarean section and radical hysterectomy, histopathology showed no evidence of residual tumour in the cervix and negative pelvic lymph nodes.

  9. Does immunohistochemistry affect response to therapy and survival of inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma patients? A survey of 145 stage III-IV consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Haspinger, Eva Regina; Bimbatti, Manuela; Leone, Giorgia; Paolini, Biagio; Fabbri, Alessandra; Tamborini, Elena; Perrone, Federica; Testi, Adele; Garassino, Marina; Maisonneuve, Patrick; de Braud, Filippo; Pilotti, Silvana; Pastorino, Ugo

    2014-04-01

    Whether non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) unveiled by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has the same clinical outcome as those typed by morphology is still matter of debate. A total of 145 stage III-IV, consecutive inoperable NSCLC patients treated by chemotherapy (133 cases) or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (12 cases) and including 100 biopsies, 11 surgical specimens, and 34 cytological samples had originally accounted for 120 adenocarcinomas (ADs), 19 squamous cell carcinomas (SQCs), and 6 adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQCs) by integrating morphology and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1)/p40 IHC. Thirty-two NSCLC-not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) cases were identified by morphology revision of the original diagnoses, which showed solid growth pattern (P < .001), 22 ADs, 5 SQCs, and 5 ADSQCs by IHC profiling (P < .001), and 10 gene-altered tumors (3 EGFR, 5 KRAS, and 2 ALK). While no significant relationships were observed between response to therapy and original, morphology or IHC diagnoses, driver mutations and tumor differentiation by TTF1 expression, AD run better progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) than other tumor types by morphology (P = .010 and P = .047) and IHC (P = .033 and P = .046), respectively. Furthermore, patients with NSCLC-NOS confirmed as AD by IHC tended to have poorer OS (P = .179) and PFS (P = .193) similar to that of ADSQC and SQC (P = .702 and P = .540, respectively). A category of less differentiated AD with poorer prognosis on therapy could be identified by IHC, while there were no differences for SQC or ADSQC. The terminology of "NSCLC-NOS, favor by IHC" is appropriate to alert clinicians toward more aggressive tumors. PMID:24326823

  10. TRIM72 modulates caveolar endocytosis in repair of lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja; Wang, Shaohua; Kellett, Thomas; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Deng, Jing; Nishi, Miyuki; Shilo, Konstantin; Oeckler, Richard A; Yalowich, Jack C; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Christman, John; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar epithelial and endothelial cell injury is a major feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, in particular when in conjunction with ventilation therapies. Previously we showed [Kim SC, Kellett T, Wang S, Nishi M, Nagre N, Zhou B, Flodby P, Shilo K, Ghadiali SN, Takeshima H, Hubmayr RD, Zhao X. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 307: L449-L459, 2014.] that tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) is essential for amending alveolar epithelial cell injury. Here, we posit that TRIM72 improves cellular integrity through its interaction with caveolin 1 (Cav1). Our data show that, in primary type I alveolar epithelial cells, lack of TRIM72 led to significant reduction of Cav1 at the plasma membrane, accompanied by marked attenuation of caveolar endocytosis. Meanwhile, lentivirus-mediated overexpression of TRIM72 selectively increases caveolar endocytosis in rat lung epithelial cells, suggesting a functional association between these two. Further coimmunoprecipitation assays show that deletion of either functional domain of TRIM72, i.e., RING, B-box, coiled-coil, or PRY-SPRY, abolishes the physical interaction between TRIM72 and Cav1, suggesting that all theoretical domains of TRIM72 are required to forge a strong interaction between these two molecules. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that injurious ventilation-induced lung cell death was significantly increased in knockout (KO) TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) lungs compared with wild-type controls and was particularly pronounced in double KO mutants. Apoptosis was accompanied by accentuation of gross lung injury manifestations in the TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) mice. Our data show that TRIM72 directly and indirectly modulates caveolar endocytosis, an essential process involved in repair of lung epithelial cells through removal of plasma membrane wounds. Given TRIM72's role in endomembrane trafficking and cell repair, we consider this molecule an attractive therapeutic target for patients with injured lungs.

  11. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  12. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  13. Polyisoprenylated methylated protein methyl esterase overexpression and hyperactivity promotes lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Amissah, Felix; Duverna, Randolph; Aguilar, Byron J; Poku, Rosemary A; Kiros, Gebre-Egziabher; Lamango, Nazarius S

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of hyperactive polyisoprenylated proteins in cancers has stimulated the search for drugs to target and suppress their excessive activities. Polyisoprenylated methylated protein methyl esterase (PMPMEase) inhibition has been shown to modulate polyisoprenylated protein function. For PMPMEase inhibition to be effective against cancers, polyisoprenylated proteins, the signaling pathways they mediate and/or PMPMEase must be overexpressed, hyperactive and be involved in at least some cases of cancer. PMPMEase activity in lung cancer cells and its expression in lung cancer cells and cancer tissues were investigated. PMPMEase was found to be overexpressed and significantly more active in lung cancer A549 and H460 cells than in normal lung fibroblasts. In a tissue microarray study, PMPMEase immunoreactivity was found to be significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared to the normal controls (p < 0.0001). The mean scores ± SEM were 118.8 ± 7.7 (normal), 232.1 ± 25.1 (small-cell lung carcinomas), 352.1 ± 9.4 (squamous cell carcinomas), 311.7 ± 9.8 (adenocarcinomas), 350.0 ± 24.2 (papillary adenocarcinomas), 334.7 ± 30.1 (adenosquamous carcinomas), 321.9 ± 39.7 (bronchioloalveolar carcinomas), and 331.3 ± 85.0 (large-cell carcinomas). Treatment of lung cancer cells with L-28, a specific PMPMEase inhibitor, resulted in concentration-dependent cell death (EC50 of 8.5 μM for A549 and 2.8 μM for H460 cells). PMPMEase inhibition disrupted actin filament assembly, significantly inhibited cell migration and altered the transcription of cancer-related genes. These results indicate that elevated PMPMEase activity spur cell growth and migration, implying the possible use of PMPMEase as a protein biomarker and drug target for lung cancer. PMID:24660102

  14. The in vitro generation of lung and airway progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sarah X L; Green, Michael D; de Carvalho, Ana Toste; Mumau, Melanie; Chen, Ya-Wen; D’Souza, Sunita L.; Snoeck, Hans-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Lung and airway epithelial cells generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening and studies of human lung development. Here we describe a strategy for directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into developmental lung progenitors, and their subsequent differentiation into predominantly distal lung epithelial cells. The protocol entails four stages that recapitulate lung development and takes approximately 50 days. First, definitive endoderm is induced in the presence of high concentrations of Activin A. Subsequently, lung-biased anterior foregut endoderm is specified by sequential inhibition of BMP, TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Anterior foregut endoderm is then ventralized by applying Wnt, BMP, FGF and RA signaling to obtain lung and airway progenitors. Finally, these are further differentiated into more mature epithelial cells types using Wnt, FGF, c-AMP and glucocorticoid agonism. This protocol is conducted in defined conditions, does not involve genetic manipulation of the cells, and results in cultures where the majority of the cells express markers of various lung and airway epithelial cells, with a predominance of cells identifiable as functional type II alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:25654758

  15. Ubc9 promotes invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Niu, Huiyan; Peng, Yang; Wang, Jiahe; He, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The mortality is high mainly due to the lack of known effective screening procedures; there is a high tendency for early spread and systemic therapies do not cure metastatic disease. Thus, it is important to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer development and, specifically, to identify an effective method by which to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9), the sole conjugating enzyme for sumoylation, regulates protein function and plays a key role in tumorigenesis. Whether Ubc9 is involved in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer remains unknown. Herein, we report that Ubc9 exhibits an important role in lung cancer invasion and metastasis. We first investigated the biological effect of Ubc9 on lung cancer by cloning the Ubc9 gene into a eukaryotic expression plasmid and stably expressing it in the human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 in order to observe any biological changes. We further analyzed the effect of Ubc9 in an in vivo experiment, injecting NCI-H446 cells stably overexpressing Ubc9 into nude mice and analyzing their metastatic ability. Our results demonstrated that Ubc9 is expressed at higher levels in primary lung cancer tissue and metastatic nodules as compared to premalignant and/or normal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrated that upregulation of Ubc9 expression promotes migration and invasion. Ubc9 likely plays an important role in cancer progression by promoting invasion and metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:23381475

  16. KLN205--a murine lung carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; LePage, G A; Shnitka, T K

    1980-10-01

    KLN205 cells, a cloned cell line established from the Nettesheim lung carcinoma, grow in various synthetic media such as MEM, Fisher's or Roswell Park Memorial Institute Medium (RPMI) with the addition of 5 to 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS), calf-serum (CS) or horse serum (HS). They grow optimally in minimum Eagle's medium plus nonessential amino acids (NEAA) plus 5 to 10% FBS or HS. The cells are transplantable to DBA/2, BDF1, AKD2F1, and BALB/c, but not to C3H/He or ICR mice. The growth curves, plating efficiency, ultrastructural characteristics, modal number of chromosomes and transplantability to mice of various strains are almost the same for early and late passage of cells passaged in vitro. These parameters for 16th and 36th passages were: doubling time, 31 and 33 hr; plating efficiency, 12.4 +/- 1.2 and 14.6 +/- 2.6%; modal number of chromosomes, 73 and 76; lung colony formation in DBA/2, 50 and 45.9/mouse; and subcutaneous tumor diameter 24.5 and 27.4 mm, respectively. Only the numbers of lung colonies formed in BDF1 mice were different: 24.4/mouse with 16th passage cells, and 10.2/mouse with 36th passage cells. The results suggest that KLN205 is a relatively stable cultured cell line through 36 passages. As was expected, immunosuppression by higher concentrations of triaminolone acetonide (TA) enhanced lung colony formation in BDF1 mice. On the other hand, a low concentration of TA inhibited lung colony formation in DBA/2 mice, which was unexpected. These results suggest that KLN205 offers a model for investigations on metastases to lungs as well as chemotherapy for lung carcinoma.

  17. Phase 3 Study of Bavituximab Plus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel Alone in Patients With Late-stage Non-squamous Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-01

    Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IIIB; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IV; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Interplay of macrophages and T cells in the lung vasculature.

    PubMed

    Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia; Kratzer, Adelheid; Sidiakova, Asya; Salys, Jonas; Zamora, Martin; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute

    2012-05-15

    In severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), vascular lesions are composed of phenotypically altered vascular and inflammatory cells that form clusters or tumorlets. Because macrophages are found in increased numbers in intravascular and perivascular space in human PAH, here we address the question whether macrophages play a role in pulmonary vascular remodeling and whether accumulation of macrophages in the lung vasculature could be compromised by the immune system. We used the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 because these cells are resistant to apoptosis, have high proliferative capacity, and resemble cells in the plexiform lesions that tend to pile up instead of maintaining a monolayer. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry with cell surface markers (Lycopersicon Esculentum Lectin, CD117, CD133, FVIII, CD31, VEGFR-2, and S100). Activated, but not quiescent, T cells were able to suppress RAW 264.7 cell proliferative and migration activity in vitro. The carboxyfluorescein diacetate-labeled RAW 264.7 cells were injected into the naïve Sprague Dawley (SD) rat and athymic nude rat. Twelve days later, cells were found in the lung vasculature of athymic nude rats that lack functional T cells, contributing to vascular remodeling. No labeled RAW 264.7 cells were detected in the lungs of immune-competent SD rats. Our data demonstrate that T cells can inhibit in vitro migration and in vivo accumulation of macrophage-like cells. PMID:22387295

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M.; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  1. Integrated quantitative fractal polarimetric analysis of monolayer lung cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman; Zhang, Lin; Quang, Tri; Farrahi, Tannaz; Narayan, Chaya; Deshpande, Aditi; Na, Ying; Blinzler, Adam; Ma, Junyu; Liu, Bo; Giakos, George C.

    2014-05-01

    Digital diagnostic pathology has become one of the most valuable and convenient advancements in technology over the past years. It allows us to acquire, store and analyze pathological information from the images of histological and immunohistochemical glass slides which are scanned to create digital slides. In this study, efficient fractal, wavelet-based polarimetric techniques for histological analysis of monolayer lung cancer cells will be introduced and different monolayer cancer lines will be studied. The outcome of this study indicates that application of fractal, wavelet polarimetric principles towards the analysis of squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines may be proved extremely useful in discriminating among healthy and lung cancer cells as well as differentiating among different lung cancer cells.

  2. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M; Le Péchoux, C; Postmus, P E; Sorensen, J B; Felip, E

    2011-09-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through discussion at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement in SCLC is reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update.

  3. Aerosol-Based Cell Therapy for Treatment of Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kardia, Egi; Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol-based cell delivery technique via intratracheal is an effective route for delivering transplant cells directly into the lungs. An aerosol device known as the MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer is invented to transform liquid into an aerosol form, which then can be applied via intratracheal administration for drug delivery. The device produces a uniform and concentrated distribution of aerosolized liquid. Using the capability of MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer to transform liquid into aerosol form, our group has designed a novel method of cell delivery using an aerosol-based technique. We have successfully delivered skin-derived fibroblast cells and airway epithelial cells into the airway of a rabbit with minimum risk of cell loss and have uniformly distributed the cells into the airway. This chapter illustrates the application of aerosol device to deliver any type of cells for future treatment of lung diseases. PMID:27062596

  4. 'LungGENS': a web-based tool for mapping single-cell gene expression in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Du, Yina; Guo, Minzhe; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Xu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We developed LungGENS (Lung Gene Expression iN Single-cell), a web-based bioinformatics resource for querying single-cell gene expression databases by entering a gene symbol or a list of genes or selecting a cell type of their interest. Gene query provides quantitative RNA expression of the gene of interest in each lung cell type. Cell type query returns associated selective gene signatures and genes encoding cell surface markers and transcription factors in interactive heatmap and tables. LungGENS will be broadly applicable in respiratory research, providing a cell-specific RNA expression resource at single-cell resolution. LungGENS is freely available for non-commercial use at https://research.cchmc.org/pbge/lunggens/default.html.

  5. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo.

  6. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Detection of Bone Marrow Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Krause, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the ability of bone marrow derived cells to adopt the morphology and protein expression of epithelial cells in vivo have expanded rapidly over the last decade, and hundreds of publications report that bone marrow derived cells can become epithelial cells of multiple organs including lung, liver, GI tract, skin, pancreas and others. In this review, we critically evaluate the literature related to engraftment of bone marrow derived cells as epithelial cells in the lung. Over 40 manuscripts focused on whether bone marrow cells can differentiate into lung epithelial cells have been published, nearly all of which claim to identify marrow derived epithelial cells. A few investigations have concluded that no such cells are present and that the phenomenon of marrow derived epithelial cells is based on detection artifacts. Here we discuss the problems that exist in published papers identifying marrow derived epithelial cells, and propose standards for detection methods that provide the most definitive data. Identification of BM derived epithelial cells requires reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection, which must include cell identification based on the presence of an epithelial marker and the absence of blood cell markers as well as a marker for donor BM origin. In order for these studies to be rigorous, they must also use approaches to rule out cell overlap by microscopy or single cell isolation. Once these stringent criteria for identification of marrow derived epithelial cells are used universally, then the field can move forward to address the critical questions regarding which bone marrow derived cells are responsible for engraftment as epithelial cells, the mechanisms by which this occurs, whether these cells play a role in normal tissue repair, and whether specific cell subsets can be used for therapeutic benefit. PMID:20447442

  8. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC) is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in lung SqCC have not been comprehensively characterized and no molecularly targeted agents have been developed specifically for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we profiled 178 lung SqCCs to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. Lung SqCC is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumor. We found statistically recurrent mutations in 18 genes in including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations were seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2/KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, PI3K/AKT in 47%, and CDKN2A/RB1 in 72% of tumors. We identified a potential therapeutic target in the majority of tumors, offering new avenues of investigation for lung SqCC treatment. PMID:22960745

  9. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  11. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2012-09-27

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, here we profile 178 lung squamous cell carcinomas to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. We show that the tumour type is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumour. We find statistically recurrent mutations in 11 genes, including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations are seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2 and KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway genes in 47%, and CDKN2A and RB1 in 72% of tumours. We identified a potential therapeutic target in most tumours, offering new avenues of investigation for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancers. PMID:22960745

  12. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  13. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  14. Detection of thrombomodulin in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, A.; Matsubara, O.; Hirokawa, K.; Aoki, N.

    1993-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), which usually exists in vascular endothelial cells and exerts an anticoagulant activity, was detected by Western blot analyses and immunocytochemical staining using three anti-TM monoclonal antibodies in cultured cell lines derived from a squamous cell carcinoma and an adenocarcinoma of the lung, but was not detected in a cell line derived from a small cell carcinoma. Functional assays indicated that TM detected in these cells was functionally active. The presence of TM in 22 specimens of surgically removed lung cancer tissue was also examined by an immunohistochemical method. TM was present along the cell membranes in 4 (36%) of 11 squamous cell carcinomas examined, but was not detected in 10 adenocarcinomas and 1 large cell carcinoma examined. Because TM is identical to fetomodulin, which modulates embryogenesis, the authors have concluded that TM is an oncodevelopmental antigen. The authors have also suggested that functionally active TM on lung cancer cells may modulate cancer cell behaviors in such ways as exhibiting anticoagulant activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8380956

  15. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  16. Target cell toxicity of inhaled spermidine in rat lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J. R.; Smith, L. L.; Hext, P. M.; Brammer, A.; Soames, A. R.; Wyatt, I.

    1990-01-01

    Rats were exposed for a single 6-h period to varying concentrations of aerosols of the polyamine, spermidine trihydrochloride. They were subsequently killed at 6 h, 1, 2, 5, 9 and 14 days after the start of exposure. The lungs were examined for histopathological alterations at both light and electron microscopic level and assays of lung spermidine burdens performed. In rats killed at the 6-h termination period, lung spermidine levels had increased approximately 1.5-fold although concentrations in animals killed on days 1 and 2 showed only marginal increases. Concentrations peaked again on day 5 and henceforth decreased until control spermidine levels were again achieved on day 14. Exposure of rat lungs to spermidine resulted in a specific dose-dependent necrosis of Clara cells of the bronchiolar epithelium and alveolar Type II cells. At the lowest dose used (6 mg/m3) specific necrosis of the Clara cells was seen at the earliest time interval studied, i.e. 6 h, but these cells were rapidly lost and subsequently replaced without evidence of significant cell proliferation by the 2-day sacrifice period. At all higher dose levels additional necrosis of the alveolar Type II cells occurred which was not reversible but which progressed through alveolitis to a fully developed subchronic pneumonitis by 14 days. Images Fig. 4 p624-a Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:2206983

  17. Discrimination and quantification of autofluorescence spectra of human lung cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mahya; Khani, Mohammad Mehdi; Khazaei Koohpar, Zeinab; Molik, Paria

    2016-10-01

    To study laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy of the human lung cell line, we evaluated the native fluorescence properties of cancer QU-DB and normal MRC-5 human lung cells during continuous exposure to 405 nm laser light. Two emission bands centered at ~470 nm and ~560 nm were observed. These peaks are most likely attributable to mitochondrial fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and riboflavin fluorophores, respectively. This article highlights lung cell autofluorescence characterization and signal discrimination by collective investigation of different spectral features. The absolute intensity, the spectral shape factor or redox ratio, the full width of half-maximum and the full width of quarter maximum was evaluated. Moreover, the intensity ratio, the area under the peak and the area ratio as a contrast factor for normal and cancerous cells were also calculated. Among all these features it seems that the contrast factor precisely and significantly discriminates the spectral differences of normal and cancerous lung cells. On the other hand, the relative quantum yield for both cell types were found by comparing the quantum yield of an unknown compound with known fluorescein sodium as a reference solution.

  18. Long-Term Outcome and Prognostic Factors for Adenocarcinoma/Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hsueh, Swei; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To study the outcomes of patients with adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT), identify the prognostic factors, and evaluate the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 148 patients with Stage I-IVA AC/ASC of cervix after full-course definitive RT were included. Of the 148 patients, 77% had advanced stage disease. Treatment failure was categorized as either distant or local failure. Local failure was further separated into persistent tumor or local relapse after complete remission. The effectiveness of CCRT with cisplatin and/or paclitaxel was examined, and the surgical salvage rate for local failure was reviewed. Results: The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 68%, 38%, 49%, 30%, and 0% for those with Stage IB/IIA nonbulky, IB/IIA bulky, IIB, III, and IVA disease, respectively, and appeared inferior to that of those with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated using the same RT protocol. Incomplete tumor regression after RT, a low hemoglobin level, and positive lymph node metastasis were independent poor prognostic factors for relapse-free survival. CCRT with weekly cisplatinum did not improve the outcome for our AC/ASC patients. Salvage surgery rescued 30% of patients with persistent disease. Conclusion: Patients with AC/ASC of the cervix primarily treated with RT had inferior outcomes compared to those with squamous cell carcinoma. Incomplete tumor regression after RT was the most important prognostic factor for local failure. Salvage surgery for patients with persistent tumor should be encouraged for selected patients. Our results did not demonstrate a benefit of CCRT with cisplatin for this disease.

  19. Generation of leukotrienes by purified human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, D W; Schleimer, R P; Peters, S P; Schulman, E S; Adams, G K; Newball, H H; Lichtenstein, L M

    1982-01-01

    Although mediator release from mast cells and basophils plays a central role in the pathogenesis of human allergic disease, biochemical studies have been restricted to rat peritoneal mast cells and basophilic leukemia cells because they could be easily purified. We have used two new techniques of cell separation to purify human lung mast cells to 98% homogeneity. Lung cell suspensions were obtained by dispersion of chopped lung tissue with proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells were then purified from the suspensions by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and affinity chromatography. The purified mast cells released both histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (leukotriene C and D) during stimulation with goat anti-human IgE antibody. Moreover, these preparations were able to generate significant quantities of SRS-A (32 +/- 7 x 10(-17) LTD mole-equivalents/mast cell) at all stages of purification, indicating that a secondary cell is not necessary for the antigen-induced release of SRS. Images PMID:7119113

  20. Isolation of CD146+ Resident Lung Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Rat Lungs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jennifer J P; Möbius, Marius A; Thébaud, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly recognized for their therapeutic potential in a wide range of diseases, including lung diseases. Besides the use of bone marrow and umbilical cord MSCs for exogenous cell therapy, there is also increasing interest in the repair and regenerative potential of resident tissue MSCs. Moreover, they likely have a role in normal organ development, and have been attributed roles in disease, particularly those with a fibrotic nature. The main hurdle for the study of these resident tissue MSCs is the lack of a clear marker for the isolation and identification of these cells. The isolation technique described here applies multiple characteristics of lung resident MSCs (L-MSCs). Upon sacrifice of the rats, lungs are removed and rinsed multiple times to remove blood. Following mechanical dissociation by scalpel, the lungs are digested for 2-3 hr using a mix of collagenase type I, neutral protease and DNase type I. The obtained single cell suspension is subsequently washed and layered over density gradient medium (density 1.073 g/ml). After centrifugation, cells from the interphase are washed and plated in culture-treated flasks. Cells are cultured for 4-7 days in physiological 5% O2, 5% CO2 conditions. To deplete fibroblasts (CD146(-)) and to ensure a population of only L-MSCs (CD146(+)), positive selection for CD146(+) cells is performed through magnetic bead selection. In summary, this procedure reliably produces a population of primary L-MSCs for further in vitro study and manipulation. Because of the nature of the protocol, it can easily be translated to other experimental animal models. PMID:27340891

  1. Identification of different subsets of lung cells using Raman microspectroscopy and whole cell nucleus isolation.

    PubMed

    Pijanka, Jacek K; Stone, Nicholas; Rutter, Abigail V; Forsyth, Nicholas; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2013-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used to study its possible clinical application in cancer diagnosis. However, in order to make it into clinical practice, it is important that this technique is able not only to identify cancer cells from their normal counterparts, but also from the array of cells present in human tissues. To this purpose, we used Raman spectroscopy to assess whether this technique was able to differentiate not only between lung cancer cells and lung epithelial cells but also from lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, we studied whether the differences were due to cell lineage (epithelial versus fibroblast) or to different proliferative characteristics of cells, and where in the cell compartment these differences might reside. To answer these questions we studied cell cytoplasm, cell nucleus and isolated whole cell nuclei. Our data suggests that Raman spectroscopy can differentiate between lung cancer, lung epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts. More important, it can also differentiate between 2 cells from the same lineage (fibroblast) but with one of them rendered immortal and with an increased proliferative activity. Finally, it seems that the main spectral differences reside in the cell nucleus and that the study of isolated nuclei strengthens the differences between cells.

  2. Lung epithelial cell death induced by oil-dispersant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Shi, Yongli; Major, Danielle; Yang, Zhanjun

    2012-08-01

    The dispersants used in oil spill disasters are claimed to be safe, but increased solubility of high-molecular-weight components in crude oil is of public health concern. The water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of crude oil mixed with dispersants may become airborne and cause lung epithelial damage when inhaled. This study was designed to examine the cell death and related death pathways of lung epithelial cells in response to WAF. Cultured A549 cells were treated for 2 or 24h with different concentrations of WAF. The WAF was prepared by mixing each of the dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and Corexit EC9580A) with crude oil for extraction with PBS. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase assay, morphology and cleaved caspase 9 protein, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 were all used to measure cell viability, necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy quantitation, respectively. Results showed that the WAF of oil-dispersant mixtures caused cell death in the lung epithelial cells, in a dose-dependent manner, with the major cellular pathways of necrosis and apoptosis involved. Autophagy also occurred in cells exposed to WAF mixtures at lower concentrations before any detectable cell death, indicating greater sensitivity to WAF exposure. The three types of cell behavior, namely necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, may play different roles in oil spill-related respiratory disorders. PMID:22504303

  3. Oncogenic role of epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongyi; Wang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Xiaogang; Li, Haitao; Liu, Ben; Pan, Pinhua

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, which is the most common non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 (ECT2) is frequently upregulated and acts as an oncogene in various human cancers. In addition, ECT2 was reported to be upregulated in early stage lung adenocarcinoma. However, the detailed role of ECT2 in mediating the malignant phenotypes of lung adenocarcinoma cells has not previously been elucidated. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to examine ECT2 mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. MTT, wound healing and Transwell assays were conducted to determine cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, respectively. In the present study, ECT2 was significantly upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H650, EKVX, HCC4006, HCC827, HCC2935, Hop62 and A549), as compared with a normal lung epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). Moreover, knockdown of ECT2, induced by transfection with ECT2 siRNA, significantly inhibited the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced A549 cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of ECT2 expression suppressed the migration and invasion of A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of A549 cells. Notably, inhibition of ECT2 also suppressed the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it enhanced the expression level of E-cadherin, indicating that ECT2 is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells. On the contrary, overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it reduced the expression level of E-cadherin in A549 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that ECT2 has an oncogenic role in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Therefore, ECT2 may be a potential novel target for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  4. Gene expression profiles of small-cell lung cancers: molecular signatures of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masaya; Daigo, Yataro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Takano, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yasui, Wataru; Inai, Kouki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the molecular mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and identify molecules to be applied as novel diagnostic markers and/or for development of molecular-targeted drugs, we applied cDNA microarray profile analysis coupled with purification of cancer cells by laser-microbeam microdissection (LMM). Expression profiles of 32,256 genes in 15 SCLCs identified 252 genes that were commonly up-regulated and 851 transcripts that were down-regulated in SCLC cells compared with non-cancerous lung tissue cells. An unsupervised clustering algorithm applied to the expression data easily distinguished SCLC from the other major histological type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and identified 475 genes that may represent distinct molecular features of each of the two histological types. In particular, SCLC was characterized by altered expression of genes related to neuroendocrine cell differentiation and/or growth such as ASCL1, NRCAM, and INSM1. We also identified 68 genes that were abundantly expressed both in advanced SCLCs and advanced adenocarcinomas (ADCs), both of which had been obtained from patients with extensive chemotherapy treatment. Some of them are known to be transcription factors and/or gene expression regulators such as TAF5L, TFCP2L4, PHF20, LMO4, TCF20, RFX2, and DKFZp547I048 as well as those encoding nucleotide-binding proteins such as C9orf76, EHD3, and GIMAP4. Our data provide valuable information for better understanding of lung carcinogenesis and chemoresistance. PMID:16865272

  5. Properties of lewis lung carcinoma cells surviving curcumin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dejun; Geusz, Michael E; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory agent curcumin can selectively eliminate malignant rather than normal cells. The present study examined the effects of curcumin on the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line and characterized a subpopulation surviving curcumin treatments. Cell density was measured after curcumin was applied at concentrations between 10 and 60 μM for 30 hours. Because of the high cell loss at 60 μM, this dose was chosen to select for surviving cells that were then used to establish a new cell line. The resulting line had approximately 20% slower growth than the original LLC cell line and based on ELISA contained less of two markers, NF-κB and ALDH1A, used to identify more aggressive cancer cells. We also injected cells from the original and surviving lines subcutaneously into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and monitored tumor development over three weeks and found that the curcumin surviving-line remained tumorigenic. Because curcumin has been reported to kill cancer cells more effectively when administered with light, we examined this as a possible way of enhancing the efficacy of curcumin against LLC cells. When LLC cells were exposed to curcumin and light from a fluorescent lamp source, cell loss caused by 20 μM curcumin was enhanced by about 50%, supporting a therapeutic use of curcumin in combination with white light. This study is the first to characterize a curcumin-surviving subpopulation among lung cancer cells. It shows that curcumin at a high concentration either selects for an intrinsically less aggressive cell subpopulation or generates these cells. The findings further support a role for curcumin as an adjunct to traditional chemical or radiation therapy of lung and other cancers.

  6. [Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Inoue, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody that has recently been approved in Japan, and has shown high response rates and more favorable safety profiles in 2 phase III clinical trials. Accordingly, immune checkpoint therapy has now been included as a new standard treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. These immune checkpoints are receptors expressed on T cells that regulate the immune response. The PD-1/PD-L1 signal inhibits cytotoxic T lymphocyte proliferation and survival, induces apoptosis of infiltrative T cells, and increases the amount of regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, severe immune-related adverse event(irAE)have been observed, including enterocolitis, neuropathies, and endocrinopathies. There are different management approaches to irAEs with conventional cytotoxic drugs. This article reviews the available data regarding immune checkpoint therapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27306803

  7. Lung endothelial dipeptidyl peptidase IV is an adhesion molecule for lung-metastatic rat breast and prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Attachment of circulating tumor cells to endothelial cell adhesion molecules restricted to select vascular compartments is thought to be responsible for site-specific metastasis. Lung-metastatic rat R3230AC- MET breast and RPC-2 prostate carcinoma cells bound outside-out endothelial cell membrane vesicles, prepared by perfusion of the rat lung vasculature with a low-strength formaldehyde solution, in significantly higher numbers than their nonmetastatic counterparts R3230AC-LR and RPC-LR. In contrast, vesicles derived from the vasculature of a nonmetastasized organ (e.g., hind leg muscle) showed no binding preference for either of the four tumor cell lines. Lung- derived endothelial vesicles were used here to generate mAbs against lung endothelial cell adhesion molecules. The first group of mice were actively immunized against lung endothelial vesicles, whereas the second group was injected with syngeneic mouse antiserum against leg endothelial vesicles before active immunization with lung endothelial vesicles. 17 hybridoma supernatants obtained from the two fusions bound lung vesicles with at least a 10-fold higher affinity than leg vesicles. Seven (four obtained by a passive/active immunization protocol) stained rat capillary endothelia. One mAb, mAb 8.6A3, inhibited specific adhesion of lung-derived vesicles to lung-metastatic breast and prostate carcinoma cells. Purification of the antigen (endothelial cell adhesion molecule) from rat lung extracts revealed a protein with a 110-kD mol wt. NH2-terminal sequencing established identity with dipeptidyl peptidase IV which had been reported to serve as a fibronectin-binding protein. These results indicate that vesicles obtained from in situ perfused organs are a convenient immunogen for the production of antibodies to compartment-specific endothelial cell surface molecules, and reinforce the concept that endothelial cell surface components are selectively recognized by circulating cancer cells during metastasis

  8. Silencing Aurora-A with siRNA inhibits cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ning; Shi, Shunbin; Wang, Hongzhen; Wu, Guangzhou; Wang, Yunliang; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuanhua; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-09-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase, it plays important roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated the expression of AURKA in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, the role of small interference RNA targeting AURKA on growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines in vitro. The AURKA is highly expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down AURKA expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines H1299 and A549. The results indicated that depletion of AURKA could inhibit cell growth, cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The potential mechanisms of AURKA inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis are associated with downregulated RAF-1, CCND2, CCND3, CDK4, PAK4, EGFR and upregulated WEE1 expression. Furthermore, AURKA knockdown cooperated with vincristine (VCR) to repress A549 cell proliferation. Therefore, AURKA plays important roles in the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which suggests that AURKA could be a promising tool for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. PMID:27571708

  9. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  10. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  11. Prevalence, distribution, and viral burden of all 15 high-risk human papillomavirus types in adenosquamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based study.

    PubMed

    Quddus, M Ruhul; Manna, Pradip; Sung, C James; Kerley, Spencer; Steinhoff, Margaret M; Lawrence, W Dwayne

    2014-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the types most commonly found in cervical adenosquamous carcinoma. Multiple HPV types have been found in cervical adenocarcinoma but not in the adenosquamous variant. Type-specific detection of high-risk (HR) HPV allows the detection of co-infection by multiple HPV types and assessment of viral load per cell. Our aim was to identify and quantify all HR HPV types in cervical adenosquamous carcinoma and to correlate viral loads with prognosis-related histologic features. All 15 HR HPV types were tested for by multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, and standard curves were created for each type. Viral loads were determined retrospectively. Prognosis-related histologic features were correlated with specific HPV types and the viral loads. A total of 80% of the tumors examined expressed HPV. Types 16/18 were detected in 86% of these cases, whereas the remaining 14% of the positive cases were infected by other types. A single type of virus was detected in 67% of cases, 2 in 29%, and 3 in 4%. Poor prognostic features were seen in 84.6% of the tumors infected with HPV 16, 46% of those infected with HPV 18, and 100% of those infected with other types. As expected, HPV 16, HPV 18, or both were the most frequent viral types; HPV 73 was the next most frequent type. Multiple HPV types were detected in 33% of the tumors. Non-HPV 16/18 cases had low viral loads, but all of these had poor prognosis-related histologic features. Two of the three recurrent cases had multiple viral types.

  12. Establishment and characterization of a lung cancer cell line, SMC-L001, from a lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, So-Jung; Lee, Hyeseon; Choe, Chungyoul; Shin, Yong-Sung; Lee, Jinseon; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Jhingook

    2014-06-01

    Lung cancer cell lines are a valuable tool for elucidating lung tumorigenesis and developing novel therapies. However, the majority of cell lines currently available were established from tumors in patients of Caucasian origin, limiting our ability to investigate how cancers in patients of different ethnicities differ from one another in terms of tumor biology and drug responses. In this study, we established a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line, SMC-L001, and characterized its genome and tumorigenic potential. SMC-L001 cells were isolated from a Korean lung adenocarcinoma patient (male, pStage IIb) and were propagated in culture. SMC-L001 cells were adherent. DNA fingerprinting analysis indicated that the SMC-L001 cell line originated from parental tumor tissue. Comparison of the genomic profile of the SMC-L001 cell line and the original tumor revealed an identical profile with 739 mutations in 46 cancer-related genes, including mutations in TP53 and KRAS. Furthermore, SMC-L001 cells were highly tumorigenic, as evidenced by the induction of solid tumors in immunodeficient mice. In summary, we established a new lung cancer cell line with point mutations in TP53 and KRAS from a Korean lung adenocarcinoma patient that will be useful for investigating ethnic differences in lung cancer biology and drug response.

  13. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  14. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Heise, Rebecca L; Link, Patrick A; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  15. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Link, Patrick A.; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  16. Proteomic profiling of rat lung epithelial cells induced by acrolein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Poonam; Hayes, Barbara E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Acrolein is a highly toxic unsaturated aldehyde and is also an endogenous byproduct produced from lipid peroxidation. It can be formed from the breakdown of certain pollutants in outdoor air or from burning tobacco or gasoline. Inhalation and dermal exposure to acrolein are extremely toxic to human tissue. Although it is known that acrolein is toxic to lung tissue, no studies have attempted to address the changes induced by acrolein on a global scale. Main methods In the present study we have attempted to address the changes in global protein expression induced by acrolein using proteomics analysis in rat lung epithelial cells. Key findings Our analysis reveals a comprehensive profiling of the proteins that includes a heterogeneous class of proteins and this compels one to consider that the toxic response to acrolein is very complex. There were 34 proteins that showed changes between the control cells and after acrolein treatment. The expression of 18 proteins was increased and the expression of 16 proteins was decreased following exposure to acrolein. We have further validated two differentially expressed proteins namely annexin II (ANXII) and prohibitin (PHB) in lung epithelial cells treated with acrolein. Significance Based on the results of the overall proteomic analysis, acrolein appears to induce changes in a diverse range of proteins suggesting a complex mechanism of acrolein-induced toxicity in lung epithelial cells. PMID:19490921

  17. Mutagenicity of instant coffee on cultured Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nakasato, F; Nakayasu, M; Fujita, Y; Nagao, M; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1984-10-01

    Coffee showed mutagenic activity in cultured Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells as assessed by using diphtheria toxin resistance as a selective marker. Most of the mutagenicity was suppressed in the presence of sodium bisulfite. The contribution of methylglyoxal to the total mutagenicity of coffee was less than 3%.

  18. Low-Grade Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Breast Developing Around a Localization Wire Fragment.

    PubMed

    Handa, Priyanka; Khader, Samer N; Buchbinder, Shalom S; Guelfguat, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 67-year-old white woman with a history of benign biopsy results in the previous 10 years before she developed low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma around a residual localization wire fragment. A possible theory of carcinogenesis may be related to reparative epithelium in a healing biopsy site that underwent squamous metaplasia; alternately, there may have been carcinogenesis related to long-term metal exposure at the wire placement site. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated a link between carcinogenesis and long-term exposure to various metals. This case report raises important questions regarding carcinogenesis in the setting of long-term metal exposure and the reparative response of the body at the site of injury or biopsy.

  19. Low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast: A diagnostic and clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing Ting; Chuwa, Esther Wee Lee; Chew, Sung Hock; Lim-Tan, Soo Kim; Lim, Swee Ho

    2015-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast (ASBC) is a rare variant of metaplastic breast cancer with both glandular as well as squamous differentiation. Their lack of distinct imaging characteristics, sometimes subtle histological characteristics and overlapping features with other benign lesions pose a diagnostic challenge. Unlike other forms of metaplastic breast cancer, low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma (LGAC) tends to follow an indolent course with favourable prognosis. We reviewed eight cases of LGAC in our institution from June 2005 to March 2014. In six cases, LGAC was only found after excisional biopsy. In our patients, LGAC frequently co-existed with other forms of breast pathology. Two patients had incidental findings of LGAC alongside their primary malignant tumour (adenoid cystic carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in one, four foci between 0.5 and 4.0 mm within a radial sclerosing lesion adjacent to a malignant phyllodes tumour in the other). A further four patients had LGAC within a complex sclerosing lesion. One patient had a focus of LGAC within a fibroadenoma. One had a focus of LGAC within a benign phyllodes tumour. None of the patients had evidence of nodal involvement. A high degree of suspicion is recommended as such lesions tend to be incidental histological findings within benign tumours or within complex sclerosing lesions. Although the risk of nodal and distant metastasis is low, the potential for local recurrence necessitates aggressive local excision with margin clearance. The role of axillary dissection has yet to be defined and routine sentinel node biopsy and axillary clearance may not be necessary in view of rarity of nodal metastasis in literature. Benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy is not clearly defined. All eight patients in our study have shown no evidence of recurrence after definitive surgery but longer periods of surveillance is required. PMID:25986061

  20. Plasma cell granuloma of the lung (inflammatory pseudotumor).

    PubMed

    Fassina, A S; Rugge, M; Scapinello, A; Viale, G; Dell'Orto, P; Ninfo, V

    1986-10-31

    A case of plasma cell granuloma (PCG) of the lung in a 54-year old man is reported. PCG is a rare benign lesion that usually presents as a solitary nodule in the lung (coin lesion) at routine X-ray examination. Microscopically it consists of a granulomatous tissue where the major components are mature plasma cells. The immunohistochemical demonstration of polyclonality of plasma cells, excluding the diagnosis of plasmacytoma, confirms the inflammatory pseudotumoral nature of this lesion, although the etiology remains obscure. The presence of lymphocytes, histiocytes, macrophages, blood vessels with prominent endothelial cells and peripheral sclero-hyalinized connective tissue may pose problems in the differential diagnosis with sclerosing hemangioma, pseudolymphoma, nodular amyloidosis, pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, chronic abscess and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin. The term inflammatory pseudotumor is preferable in describing this type of lesion. PMID:3798575

  1. Pneumopericardium as a non-small-cell lung carcinoma complication

    PubMed Central

    Kubisa, Anna; Dec, Paweł; Szewczak-Głodek, Małgorzata; Kochanowski, Leszek; Kubisa, Bartosz; Feledyk, Grzegorz; Czarnecka, Michalina; Wójcik, Janusz; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Below we present a case of a young man with symptoms of progressive weakness, fever, cough, rapid decrease in body weight and the presence of a tumor in the left axillary region. The chest radiography and echocardiography revealed gas bubbles in the pericardium. The more detailed diagnostics and computed tomography of the chest showed an infiltration of the left lung cavity and a fistula among the bronchus, pleural and pericardial cavities. Further diagnostics demonstrated that the pneumopericardium (diagnosed by means of chest radiograph and echocardiography) was a complication of a primary non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

  2. Current role of surgery in small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koletsis, Efstratios N; Prokakis, Christos; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma represents 15–20% of lung cancer. Is is characterized by rapid growth and early disseminated disease with poor outcome. For many years surgery was considered a contraindication in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) since radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy were found to be more efficient in the management of these patients. Never the less some surgeons continue to be in favor of surgery as part of a combined modality treatment in patients with SCLC. The revaluation of the role of surgery in this group of patients is based on clinical data indicating a much better prognosis in selected patients with limited disease (T1-2, N0, M0), the high rate of local recurrence after chemoradiotherapy with surgery considered eventually more efficient in the local control of the disease and the fact that surgery is the most accurate tool to access the response to chemotherapy, identify carcinoids misdiagnosed as SCLC and treat the Non Small Cell Lung Cancer component of mixed tumors. Performing surgery for local disease SCLC requires a complete preoperative assessment to exclude the presence of nodal involvement. In stage I surgery must always be followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, while in stage II and III surgery must be planned only in the context of clinical trials and after a pathologic response to induction chemoradiotherapy has been confirmed. Prophylactic cranial irradiation should be used to reduce the incidence of brain metastasis PMID:19589150

  3. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  4. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  5. Bilateral Choroidal Metastasis from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Namad, Tariq; Wang, Jiang; Tilton, Annemarie; Abdel Karim, Nagla

    2014-01-01

    Breast and lung cancers are the most common primary neoplasms to manifest with choroidal metastases. The incidence of choroidal metastases from metastatic lung cancer was reported to be 2–6.7%. We report a case of bilateral choroidal metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer. A 59-year-old Caucasian female patient, never a smoker, was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma metastatic to the pleura, bones, and the brain. Her initial scan of the chest showed innumerable soft tissue nodules and mediastinal adenopathy compatible with metastatic disease. Her initial brain MRI showed numerous small enhancing lesions consistent with extensive disease. Unfortunately, during her follow-up visits, she presented with bulge on her left eye. Simultaneously, her follow-up chest scan showed increase in the size of the lung nodules. She continued to have a reasonable performance status at that time, except for mild increase in her dyspnea. The choroidal metastases require a multidisciplinary care and should be among the differential patients with malignancy who present with ocular symptoms. PMID:25295203

  6. Cell-associated bacteria in the human lung microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have revealed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid contains previously unappreciated communities of bacteria. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that host inflammatory signals prompt bacteria to disperse from cell-associated biofilms and adopt a virulent free-living phenotype. The proportion of the lung microbiota that is cell-associated is unknown. Results Forty-six BAL specimens were obtained from lung transplant recipients and divided into two aliquots: ‘whole BAL’ and ‘acellular BAL,’ the latter processed with a low-speed, short-duration centrifugation step. Both aliquots were analyzed via bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The BAL specimens represented a wide spectrum of lung health, ranging from healthy and asymptomatic to acutely infected. Bacterial signal was detected in 52% of acellular BAL aliquots, fewer than were detected in whole BAL (96%, p ≤ 0.0001). Detection of bacteria in acellular BAL was associated with indices of acute infection [BAL neutrophilia, high total bacterial (16S) DNA, low community diversity, p < 0.01 for all] and, independently, with low relative abundance of specific taxonomic groups (p < 0.05). When whole and acellular aliquots from the same bronchoscopy were directly compared, acellular BAL contained fewer bacterial species (p < 0.05); whole and acellular BAL similarity was positively associated with evidence of infection and negatively associated with relative abundance of several prominent taxa (p < 0.001). Acellular BAL contained decreased relative abundance of Prevotella spp. (p < 0.05) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (p < 0.05). Conclusions We present a novel methodological and analytical approach to the localization of lung microbiota and show that prominent members of the lung microbiome are cell-associated, potentially via biofilms, cell adhesion, or intracellularity. PMID:25206976

  7. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-10

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Stem cells and cell therapy approaches in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Weiss, Daniel J

    2010-09-01

    Cell-based therapies with embryonic or adult stem cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as potential novel approaches for several devastating and otherwise incurable lung diseases, including emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although initial studies suggested engraftment of exogenously administered stem cells in lung, this is now generally felt to be a rare occurrence of uncertain physiologic significance. However, more recent studies have demonstrated paracrine effects of administered cells, including stimulation of angiogenesis and modulation of local inflammatory and immune responses in mouse lung disease models. Based on these studies and on safety and initial efficacy data from trials of adult stem cells in other diseases, groundbreaking clinical trials of cell-based therapy have been initiated for pulmonary hypertension and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In parallel, the identity and role of endogenous lung progenitor cells in development and in repair from injury and potential contribution as lung cancer stem cells continue to be elucidated. Most recently, novel bioengineering approaches have been applied to develop functional lung tissue ex vivo. Advances in each of these areas will be described in this review with particular reference to animal models.

  10. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  11. Effect of corticosteroid treatment on cell recovery by lung lavage in acute radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wesselius, L.J.; Floreani, A.A.; Kimler, B.F.; Papasian, C.J.; Dixon, A.Y. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate cell populations recovered by lung lavage up to 6 weeks following thoracic irradiation (24 Gy) as an index of the acute inflammatory response within lung structures. Additionally, rats were treated five times weekly with intraperitoneal saline (0.3 cc) or methylprednisolone (7.5 mg/kg/week). Lung lavage of irradiated rats recovered increased numbers of total cells compared to controls beginning 3 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). The initial increase in number of cells recovered was attributable to an influx of neutrophils (P less than 0.05), and further increases at 4 and 6 weeks were associated with increased numbers of recovered macrophages (P less than 0.05). Lung lavage of steroid-treated rats at 6 weeks after irradiation recovered increased numbers of all cell populations compared to controls (P less than 0.05); however, numbers of recovered total cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were all significantly decreased compared to saline-treated rats (P less than 0.05). The number of inflammatory cells recovered by lung lavage during acute radiation-induced lung injury is significantly diminished by corticosteroid treatment. Changes in cells recovered by lung lavage can also be correlated with alteration in body weight and respiration rate subsequent to treatment with thoracic irradiation and/or corticosteroids.

  12. Epithelial Cell Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Decellularized Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Julio J.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Identification of appropriate donor cell types is important for lung cell therapy and for lung regeneration. Previous studies have indicated that mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human bone marrow (hBM-MSCs) and from human adipose tissue (hAT-MSCs) may have the ability to trans-differentiate into lung epithelial cells. However, these data remain controversial. Herein, the ability of hBM-MSCs and hAT-MSCs to repopulate acellular rodent lung tissue was evaluated. hBM-MSCs and hAT-MSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and lipoaspirate, respectively. Rat lungs were decellularized with CHAPS detergent, followed by seeding the matrix with hBM-MSCs and hAT-MSCs. Under appropriate culture conditions, both human MSC populations attached to and proliferated within the lung tissue scaffold. In addition, cells were capable of type 2 pneumocyte differentiation, as assessed by marker expression of surfactant protein C (pro-SPC) at the protein and the RNA level, and by the presence of lamellar bodies by transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, hAT-MSCs contributed to Clara-like cells that lined the airways in the lung scaffolds, whereas the hBM-MSCs did not. We also tested the differentiation potential of MSCs on different extracellular matrix components in vitro, and found that protein substrate influences MSC epithelial differentiation. Together our data show the capacity for human MSCs to differentiate toward lung epithelial phenotypes, and the possibility of using these cells for lung cell therapies and tissue engineering. PMID:24393055

  13. Differential sensitivity to apoptosome apparatus activation in non-small cell lung carcinoma and the lung

    PubMed Central

    MORAVCIKOVA, ERIKA; KREPELA, EVZEN; PROCHAZKA, JAN; BENKOVA, KAMILA; PAUK, NORBERT

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic apoptosis pathway represents an important mechanism of stress-induced death of cancer cells. To gain insight into the functional status of the apoptosome apparatus in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), we studied its sensitivity to activation, the assembly of apoptosome complexes and stability of their precursors, and the importance of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in the regulation of apoptosome activity, using cell-free cytosols from NSCLC cell lines and NSCLC tumours and lungs from 62 surgically treated patients. Treatment of cytosol samples with cytochrome c (cyt-c) and dATP induced proteolytic processing of procaspase-9 to caspase-9, which was followed by procaspase-3 processing to caspase-3, and by generation of caspase-3-like activity in 5 of 7 studied NSCLC cell lines. Further analysis demonstrated formation of high-Mr Apaf-1 complexes associated with cleaved caspase-9 in the (cyt-c + dATP)-responsive COLO-699 and CALU-1 cells. By contrast, in A549 cells, Apaf-1 and procaspase-9 co-eluted in the high-Mr fractions, indicating formation of an apoptosome complex unable of procaspase-9 processing. Thermal pre-treatment of cell-free cytosols in the absence of exogenous cyt-c and dATP lead to formation of Apaf-1 aggregates, unable to recruit and activate procaspase-9 in the presence of cyt-c and dATP, and to generate caspase-3-like activity. Further studies showed that the treatment with cyt-c and dATP induced a substantially higher increase of caspase-3-like activity in cytosol samples from NSCLC tumours compared to matched lungs. Tumour histology, grade and stage had no significant impact on the endogenous and the (cyt-c + dATP)-induced caspase-3-like activity. Upon addition into the cytosol, the XIAP-neutralizing peptides AVPIAQK and ATPFQEG only moderately heightened the (cyt-c + dATP)-induced caspase-3-like activity in some NSCLC tumours. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that the apoptosome apparatus is

  14. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  15. The anticancer effects of hispolon on lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuge; Kang, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hongmin; Liu, Yuanhua; Wang, Jing

    2014-10-24

    Hispolon is isolated from Phellinus igniarius and exhibits antitumor activity. Here, we explored the effects of hispolon on the lung cancer A549 and H661 cells. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of hispolon (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 or 160μM) for 12, 24, 48 or 72h. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis assay were assessed by flow cytometry. Hispolon decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cell cycle distribution showed that hispolon enhanced the accumulations of the cells in G0/G1 phase. Mechanically, hispolon decreased the expression of G1-S transition-related proteins: Cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6, but increased the expression of CDK inhibitor p21(CIP1) and p27(KIP1). Moreover, hispolon induced cell apoptosis through activation of the mitochondrial pathway, evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c into cytosol, and the cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in hispolon-treated cells. Additionally, hispolon enhanced the expression of p53, specific silencing of which almost completely reversed hispolon-mediated antitumor activity. Moreover, hispolon treatment was more effective on H661 cells than on A549 cells in inhibiting cell viability and inducing cell apoptosis. Our results indicate that hispolon inhibits the cell viability, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells and p53 plays a critical role in hispolon-mediated antitumor activity. PMID:25268766

  16. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  18. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  20. Studies on quantitative analysis and automatic recognition of cell types of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Hu, Kuang-Hu; Li, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shu-Yu; Su, Wan-Fang; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Hu, Ying-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of lung cancer cells is very important to the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. In this paper we present a novel method to extract the structure characteristics of lung cancer cells and automatically recognize their types. Firstly soft mathematical morphology methods are used to enhance the grayscale image, to improve the definition of images, and to eliminate most of disturbance, noise and information of subordinate images, so the contour of target lung cancer cell and biological shape characteristic parameters can be extracted accurately. Then the minimum distance classifier is introduced to realize the automatic recognition of different types of lung cancer cells. A software system named "CANCER.LUNG" is established to demonstrate the efficiency of this method. The clinical experiments show that this method can accurately and objectively recognize the type of lung cancer cells, which can significantly improve the pathology research on the pathological changes of lung cancer and clinical assistant diagnoses.

  1. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoting; Guo, Yinan; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Meng; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4), is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24591841

  2. Lung Epithelial Cell-Specific Expression of Human Lysosomal Acid Lipase Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis in Lipa(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway of neutral lipids, has a close connection with inflammation and tumor progression. One major manifestation in LAL-deficient (Lipa(-/-)) mice is an increase of tumor growth and metastasis associated with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In the lung, LAL is highly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells. To assess how LAL in lung epithelial cells plays a role in this inflammation-related pathogenic process, lung alveolar type II epithelial cell-specific expression of human LAL (hLAL) in Lipa(-/-) mice was established by crossbreeding of CCSP-driven rtTA transgene and (TetO)7-CMV-hLAL transgene into Lipa(-/-) mice (CCSP-Tg/KO). hLAL expression in lung epithelial cells not only reduced tumor-promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the lung, but also down-regulated the synthesis and secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines and chemokines into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Lipa(-/-) mice. hLAL expression reduced the immunosuppressive functions of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, inhibited bone marrow cell transendothelial migration, and inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and migration in Lipa(-/-) mice. As a result, hLAL expression in CCSP-Tg/KO mice corrected pulmonary damage, and inhibited tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor metastasis to the lung in vivo. These results support a concept that LAL is a critical metabolic enzyme in lung epithelial cells that regulates lung homeostasis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. PMID:27461363

  3. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  4. Human lung cancer-derived microparticles enhanced angiogenesis and growth of hepatoma cells in rodent lung parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Meng-Shen TongYen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human lung cancer-derived microparticles (LcD-MPs) played an important role in tumor angiogenesis and growth. Fischer 344 rats (F344, n=18) were equally categorized into group 1 [Sham Control (3.0 mL normal saline intravenous injection (IV))], group 2 [hepatoma cell line (2.0 x 10(6) cells, IV)], and group 3 [hepatoma cell line + LcD-MPs (3.0 x 10(6), IV)]. Animals were euthanized by day 28 after hepatoma cells transfusion. Our result showed that the gross pathology confirmed growth of hepatoma cell line in lung parenchyma. The size and weight of the lungs were significantly increased in group 2 and further elevated in group 3 than in group 1 (all p<0.001). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that the lung crowded score and number of small vessel exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the number of alveolar sacs showed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among the three groups (all p<0.0001). The cellular expressions of CD34(+), CXCR4(+), c-Kit(+), CK19(+), VEGF(+) and vimentin+ cells in lung parenchyma exhibited an identical pattern compared to those of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The protein expressions of apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and c-PARP), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), and tumor suppression (PTEN) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas that of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers were displayed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The MPs could enhance angiogenesis and accelerated hepatoma cell growth in rodent lung parenchyma.

  5. Human lung cancer-derived microparticles enhanced angiogenesis and growth of hepatoma cells in rodent lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Meng-Shen TongYen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human lung cancer-derived microparticles (LcD-MPs) played an important role in tumor angiogenesis and growth. Fischer 344 rats (F344, n=18) were equally categorized into group 1 [Sham Control (3.0 mL normal saline intravenous injection (IV))], group 2 [hepatoma cell line (2.0 x 106 cells, IV)], and group 3 [hepatoma cell line + LcD-MPs (3.0 x 106, IV)]. Animals were euthanized by day 28 after hepatoma cells transfusion. Our result showed that the gross pathology confirmed growth of hepatoma cell line in lung parenchyma. The size and weight of the lungs were significantly increased in group 2 and further elevated in group 3 than in group 1 (all p<0.001). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that the lung crowded score and number of small vessel exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the number of alveolar sacs showed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among the three groups (all p<0.0001). The cellular expressions of CD34+, CXCR4+, c-Kit+, CK19+, VEGF+ and vimentin+ cells in lung parenchyma exhibited an identical pattern compared to those of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The protein expressions of apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and c-PARP), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), and tumor suppression (PTEN) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas that of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers were displayed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The MPs could enhance angiogenesis and accelerated hepatoma cell growth in rodent lung parenchyma. PMID:27186261

  6. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  7. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  8. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  9. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  10. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  11. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  12. Telomerase activity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobija-Kubica, Katarzyna; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Rogoziński, Paweł; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Gawrychowska, Agata; Gawrychowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High telomerase activity has been detected in the majority of malignant neoplasms including lung cancer. The purpose of the study was to attempt to use telomerase activity as a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods Telomerase activity was analyzed in 47 tissue specimens taken from patients with NSCLC. The control group consisted of 30 specimens of non-cancerous lung parenchyma. Telomerase activity was measured by means of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Results Telomerase activity in the neoplastic tissue was significantly higher than in the lung parenchyma that was free from neoplastic infiltration. There was no significant association between telomerase activity and age, gender, tobacco smoking, histological type of the tumor, or staging (pTNM). No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients (p = 0.326). A higher level of telomerase activity in poorly differentiated tumors (G3) as compared to moderately differentiated tumors (G2) was detected (p = 0.008). A positive association was identified between telomerase activity in pulmonary parenchyma free from tumor infiltration and the presence of leukocyte infiltration (p = 0.0001). Conclusions No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients. The study has revealed a positive association between telomerase activity and the grade of differentiation (G) in NSCLC. PMID:27212973

  13. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality. PMID:26539515

  14. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality. PMID:26539515

  15. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  16. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xue; Frey, Kirk; Matuszak, Martha; Paul, Stanton; Ten Haken, Randall; Yu, Jinming; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.

  17. Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: An Outcomes Study

    SciTech Connect

    Newlin, Heather E.; Iyengar, Meera; Morris, Christopher G.; Olivier, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To report survival and control rates in patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-five patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (Stages I-IIIB) who received radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy given with curative intent at University of Florida between 1963 and 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Overall survival (OS) at 5 years for Stages I, II, and III was 10%, 14%, and 7% (p = 0.0034); local-regional control at 5 years was 51%, 38%, and 29% (p = 0.0003); and freedom from metastases at 5 years was 81%, 60%, and 65% (p = 0.0689), respectively. Patients who received doses {>=} 65 Gy had improved cause-specific survival (CSS), OS, and metastasis-free survival at 5 years compared with those who received doses < 65 Gy. Five-year regional control was significantly improved with twice-daily vs. once-daily treatment (37% vs. 14%, p = 0.02). Chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year regional control (36% for patients who received chemotherapy vs. 13% for those who did not; p = 0.01). Conclusions: Dose escalation, accelerated fractionation, and combined modality therapies improve outcomes in SCC of the lung. Our review of the literature highlights the different natural history for SCC vs. other non-small cell lung cancers and emphasizes the importance of tailoring treatment strategies to individual patients. At University of Florida, we have begun treating unresectable Stage III patients with SCC of the lung using 69.6 Gy twice daily with concurrent chemotherapy.

  18. Guinea Pig Lung Lavage Cells After Intranasal BCG Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Terai, T.; Ganguly, Rama; Waldman, Robert H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intranasal administration of antigen can induce local cell-mediated immunity in lung lavage cells. The present study was designed to examine the changes in composition of lung lavage cells and their capacity to produce the lymphokine migration inhibitory factor after intranasal immunization with BCG in guinea pigs. Results indicate that guinea pigs responded to respiratory tract BCG infection with an increase in immunocompetent cells in the bronchoalveolar tract and with production of migration inhibitory factor. After local pulmonary BCG administration, the total number of cells increased as compared with that of the uninfected animals, the increase being statistically significant within 2 weeks. This marked increase in the total cell population is due to a more than doubling of the number of macrophages in the lavage fluid. Animals also developed at this time positive delayed hypersensitivity to intradermally administered purified protein derivative. A significant increase in the total lymphoid cells and macrophage population was observed again at 6 weeks after sensitization, suggesting that the response is biphasic in nature. At 6 weeks, however, there was also a significant rise in total lymphocytes and T cell population in addition to macrophage numbers. This increase in T cells correlated with an increase in production of migration inhibitory factor in the presence of purified protein derivative. These data suggest that the immune response of the respiratory tract after BCG challenge involves increased recruitment of immunocompetent cells locally at the site of infection and that these cells are capable of producing effector molecules in terms of the elaboration of migration inhibitory factor. PMID:387595

  19. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers. PMID:27738385

  20. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell’s ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. PMID:23811327

  2. Chloroquine inhibits cell growth and induces cell death in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chuandong; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effects of chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) on lung cancer cell growth, we treated A549 cells, a lung cancer cell line, with the drug at various concentrations (0.25-128 microM) for 24-72 h. The results showed that, at lower concentrations (from 0.25 to 32 microM), CQ inhibited the growth of A549 cells and, at the same time, it induced vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments (VAC). On the other hand, at higher concentrations (64-128 microM), CQ induced apoptosis at 24 h, while its effect of inducing vacuolation declined. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed that with the treatment of CQ 32-64 microM for 72 h or 128 microM for 48 h, CQ induced necrosis of A549 cells. To understand the possible mechanism by which CQ acts in A549 cells, we further incubated the cells with this drug at the concentrations of 32 or 128 microM in the presence of D609, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). The results showed that D609 (50 microM) could inhibit the effects of CQ 32 microM on the viability and VAC, but it could not change the effects of CQ 128 microM on the same. Our data suggested that CQ inhibited A549 lung cancer cell growth at lower concentrations by increasing the volume of lysosomes and that PC-PLC might be involved in this process. The data also indicated that, at higher concentrations, CQ induced apoptosis and necrosis, but at this time its ability to increase the volume of lysosome gradually declined, and PC-PLC might not be implicated in the process. PMID:16413786

  3. Monoamine-containing granulated cells in the frog lung.

    PubMed

    Wasano, K; Yamamoto, T

    1978-10-17

    The epithelium of the primary bronchus of the frog lung has been studied by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Clusters of five to ten, ovoid, brilliantly yellow fluorescent cells were observed in the basal portion of the epithelium. These cells contained numerous electron-dense granules of variable shape and size. The granules gave a positive argentaffin reaction at the ultrastructural level, suggesting a possible existence of monoamines in the granules. In addition, synaptic contact between the intraepithelial nerves and the cells, which was characterized by the aggregation of the granules toward the presynaptic membrane thickening of the cell, was also noted. These data are discussed in relation to similar studies in birds and mammals, and a possible function of these cells suggested.

  4. Utility of GATA3 immunohistochemistry in differentiating urothelial carcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, anus, and lung.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Amin, Ali; Gabrielson, Edward; Illei, Peter; Roden, Richard B; Sharma, Rajni; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2012-10-01

    Distinguishing invasive high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC) from other carcinomas occurring in the genitourinary tract may be difficult. The differential diagnosis includes high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma, spread from an anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or spread from a uterine cervical SCC. In terms of metastatic UC, the most common problem is differentiating spread of UC to the lung from a primary pulmonary SCC. Immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) for GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), thrombomodulin (THROMBO), and uroplakin III was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 35 cases of invasive high-grade UC. GATA3 IHC was also performed on TMAs containing 38 high-grade (Gleason score ≥8) prostatic adenocarcinomas, representative tissue sections from 15 invasive anal SCCs, representative tissue sections from 19 invasive cervical SCCs, and TMAs with 12 invasive cervical carcinomas of the cervix [SCC (n=10), SCC with neuroendocrine features (n=1), and adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1)]. In addition, GATA3 IHC was performed on representative tissue sections from 15 pulmonary UC metastases and a TMA with 25 SCCs of the lung and 5 pulmonary non-small cell carcinomas with squamous features. GATA3, THROMBO, and uroplakin III were positive in 28 (80%), 22 (63%), and 21 (60%) cases of high-grade UC, respectively. All cases of GATA3-positive staining were nonfocal; 25 (89%) cases demonstrated moderate to strong staining, and 3 (11%) demonstrated weak staining. Of the 7 cases that failed to express GATA3, 5 were positive for THROMBO and/or uroplakin III, whereas 2 were negative for all 3 markers. None of the 38 high-grade prostatic adenocarcinomas was positive for GATA3. Weak GATA3 staining was present in occasional basal cells of benign prostate glands, in a few benign atrophic glands, and in urothelial metaplasia. Of the 15 cases of anal SCCs, 2 (7%) cases showed focal weak staining, and 1 (3%) showed focal moderate staining. Weak staining was also rarely

  5. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  6. Genomic instability of gold nanoparticle treated human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine J; Lo, Soo-Ling; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Gurung, Resham Lal; Hartono, Deny; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Ong, Choon-Nam; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2011-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are one of the most versatile and widely researched materials for novel biomedical applications. However, the current knowledge in their toxicological profile is still incomplete and many on-going investigations aim to understand the potential adverse effects in human body. Here, we employed two dimensional gel electrophoresis to perform a comparative proteomic analysis of AuNP treated MRC-5 lung fibroblast cells. In our findings, we identified 16 proteins that were differentially expressed in MRC-5 lung fibroblasts following exposure to AuNPs. Their expression levels were also verified by western blotting and real time RT-PCR analysis. Of interest was the difference in the oxidative stress related proteins (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDUFS1), protein disulfide isomerase associate 3 (PDIA3), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and thioredoxin-like protein 1 (TXNL1)) as well as proteins associated with cell cycle regulation, cytoskeleton and DNA repair (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and Secernin-1 (SCN1)). This finding is consistent with the genotoxicity observed in the AuNP treated lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AuNP treatment can induce oxidative stress-mediated genomic instability.

  7. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches.

  8. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26958493

  9. Lung Adenocarcinomas and Lung Cancer Cell Lines Show Association of MMP-1 Expression With STAT3 Activation.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Alexander; Röser, Katrin; Klitzsch, Jana; Lieder, Franziska; Aberger, Fritz; Gruber, Wolfgang; Mueller, Kristina M; Pupyshev, Alexander; Moriggl, Richard; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2015-04-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in the majority of lung cancer. This study aims at defining connections between STAT3 function and the malignant properties of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. To address possible mechanisms by which STAT3 influences invasiveness, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) was analyzed and correlated with the STAT3 activity status. Studies on both surgical biopsies and on lung cancer cell lines revealed a coincidence of STAT3 activation and strong expression of MMP-1. MMP-1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated activated STAT3 were found co-localized in cancer tissues, most pronounced in tumor fronts, and in particular in adenocarcinomas. STAT3 activity was constitutive, although to different degrees, in the lung cancer cell lines investigated. Three cell lines (BEN, KNS62, and A549) were identified in which STAT3 activitation was inducible by Interleukin-6 (IL-6). In A549 cells, STAT3 activity enhanced the level of MMP-1 mRNA and stimulated transcription from the MMP-1 promoter in IL-6-stimulated A549 cells. STAT3 specificity of this effect was confirmed by STAT3 knockdown through RNA interference. Our results link aberrant activity of STAT3 in lung cancer cells to malignant tumor progression through up-regulation of expression of invasiveness-associated MMPs.

  10. [Therapy of Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Reinmuth, N; Gröschel, A; Schumann, C; Sebastian, M; Wiewrodt, R; Reck, M

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the leading cause of cancer deaths in Germany and is characterized by early metastasis formation. The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive systemic therapy for treatment of their disease. Importantly together with the identification of targetable oncogenic alterations, systemic treatment of NSCLC has dramatically changed in recent years with the implementation of various new agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti angiogenic agents, and immune modulating drugs. However, these new therapeutic options also challenge the treating physician since molecular, histologic, and clinical factors need to be considered for the clinical decision-making. Moreover, supportive therapy including bronchoscopic therapy has evolved. The following therapy recommendations will summarize the up-to date treatment strategies for metastatic NSCLC. PMID:27603945

  11. Lung Master Protocol (Lung-MAP)—A Biomarker-Driven Protocol for Accelerating Development of Therapies for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: SWOG S1400

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Roy S.; Gandara, David R.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Redman, Mary W.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mack, Philip C.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Vokes, Everett; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Sparks, Dana; Zhou, Yang; Miwa, Crystal; Miller, Vincent A.; Yelensky, Roman; Li, Yali; Allen, Jeff D.; Sigal, Ellen V.; Wholley, David; Sigman, Caroline C.; Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Malik, Shakun; Kelloff, Gary J.; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Blanke, Charles D.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.

    2015-01-01

    The Lung Master Protocol (Lung-MAP, S1400) is a groundbreaking clinical trial designed to advance the efficient development of targeted therapies for squamous cell cancer (SCCA) of the lung. There are no approved targeted therapies specific to advanced lung SCCA, although The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project and similar studies have detected a significant number of somatic gene mutations/amplifications in lung SCCA, some of which are targetable by investigational agents. However, the frequency of these changes is low (5–20%), making recruitment and study conduct challenging in the traditional clinical trial setting. Here we describe our approach to development of a biomarker-driven phase 2/3 multi-substudy “Master Protocol,” employing a common platform (Next Generation DNA Sequencing) to identify actionable molecular abnormalities, followed by randomization to the relevant targeted therapy versus standard of care. PMID:25680375

  12. Lung Master Protocol (Lung-MAP)-A Biomarker-Driven Protocol for Accelerating Development of Therapies for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: SWOG S1400.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Gandara, David R; Hirsch, Fred R; Redman, Mary W; LeBlanc, Michael; Mack, Philip C; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Vokes, Everett; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Sparks, Dana; Zhou, Yang; Miwa, Crystal; Miller, Vincent A; Yelensky, Roman; Li, Yali; Allen, Jeff D; Sigal, Ellen V; Wholley, David; Sigman, Caroline C; Blumenthal, Gideon M; Malik, Shakun; Kelloff, Gary J; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Blanke, Charles D; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A

    2015-04-01

    The Lung Master Protocol (Lung-MAP, S1400) is a groundbreaking clinical trial designed to advance the efficient development of targeted therapies for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung. There are no approved targeted therapies specific to advanced lung SCC, although The Cancer Genome Atlas project and similar studies have detected a significant number of somatic gene mutations/amplifications in lung SCC, some of which are targetable by investigational agents. However, the frequency of these changes is low (5%-20%), making recruitment and study conduct challenging in the traditional clinical trial setting. Here, we describe our approach to development of a biomarker-driven phase II/II multisubstudy "Master Protocol," using a common platform (next-generation DNA sequencing) to identify actionable molecular abnormalities, followed by randomization to the relevant targeted therapy versus standard of care.

  13. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: Molecular characterization of 23 patients along with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Borazanci, Erkut; Millis, Sherri Z; Korn, Ron; Han, Haiyong; Whatcott, Clifford J; Gatalica, Zoran; Barrett, Michael T; Cridebring, Derek; Von Hoff, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCP) is a rare entity. Like adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, overall survival is poor. Characteristics of ASCP include central tumor necrosis, along with osteoclasts and hypercalcemia. Various theories exist as to why this histological subtype exists, as normal pancreas tissue has no benign squamous epithelium. Due to the rarity of this disease, limited molecular analysis has been performed, and those reports indicate unique molecular features of ASCP. In this paper, we characterize 23 patients diagnosed with ASCP through molecular profiling using immunohistochemistry staining, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromogenic in situ hybridization, and gene sequencing, Additionally, we provide a comprehensive literature review of what is known to date of ASCP. Molecular characterization revealed overexpression in MRP1 (80%), MGMT (79%), TOP2A (75), RRM1 (42%), TOPO1 (42%), PTEN (45%), CMET (40%), and C-KIT (10%) among others. One hundred percent of samples tested were positive for KRAS mutations. This analysis shows heretofore unsuspected leads to be considered for treatments of this rare type of exocrine pancreas cancer. Molecular profiling may be appropriate to provide maximum information regarding the patient’s tumor. Further work should be pursued to better characterize this disease. PMID:26380056

  14. SOX2 suppresses CDKN1A to sustain growth of lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Takuya; Guo, Minzhe; Ishida, Naomasa; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Takaoka, Munenori; Yokota, Etsuko; Haisa, Minoru; Miyake, Noriko; Ikeda, Tomoko; Okui, Tatsuo; Takigawa, Nagio; Maeda, Yutaka; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Since the SOX2 amplification was identified in lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SCC), SOX2 transcriptional downstream targets have been actively investigated; however, such targets are often cell line specific. Here, in order to identify highly consensus SOX2 downstream genes in lung SCC cells, we used RNA-seq data from 178 lung SCC specimens (containing tumor and tumor-associated cells) and analyzed the correlation between SOX2 and previously-reported SOX2-controlled genes in lung SCC. In addition, we used another RNA-seq dataset from 105 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (NSCLC; including 4 lung SCC cell lines) and again analyzed the correlation between SOX2 and the reported SOX2-controlled genes in the NSCLC cell lines (no tumor-associated cells). We combined the two analyses and identified genes commonly correlated with SOX2 in both datasets. Among the 99 genes reported as SOX2 downstream and/or correlated genes, we found 4 negatively-correlated (e.g., CDKN1A) and 11 positively-correlated genes with SOX2. We used biological studies to demonstrate that CDKN1A was suppressed by SOX2 in lung SCC cells. G1 cell cycle arrest induced by SOX2 siRNA was rescued by CDKN1A siRNA. These results indicate that the tumorigenic effect of SOX2 in lung SCC cells is mediated in part by suppression of CDKN1A. PMID:26846300

  15. Identification and Targeting of Long-Term Tumor-Propagating Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jahchan, Nadine S; Lim, Jing Shan; Bola, Becky; Morris, Karen; Seitz, Garrett; Tran, Kim Q; Xu, Lei; Trapani, Francesca; Morrow, Christopher J; Cristea, Sandra; Coles, Garry L; Yang, Dian; Vaka, Dedeepya; Kareta, Michael S; George, Julie; Mazur, Pawel K; Nguyen, Thuyen; Anderson, Wade C; Dylla, Scott J; Blackhall, Fiona; Peifer, Martin; Dive, Caroline; Sage, Julien

    2016-07-19

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a neuroendocrine lung cancer characterized by fast growth, early dissemination, and rapid resistance to chemotherapy. We identified a population of long-term tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) in a mouse model of SCLC. This population, marked by high levels of EpCAM and CD24, is also prevalent in human primary SCLC tumors. Murine SCLC TPCs are numerous and highly proliferative but not intrinsically chemoresistant, indicating that not all clinical features of SCLC are linked to TPCs. SCLC TPCs possess a distinct transcriptional profile compared to non-TPCs, including elevated MYC activity. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of MYC in SCLC cells to non-TPC levels inhibits long-term propagation but not short-term growth. These studies identify a highly tumorigenic population of SCLC cells in mouse models, cell lines, and patient tumors and a means to target them in this most fatal form of lung cancer.

  16. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  17. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  18. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  19. Distinct patterns of somatic genome alterations in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joshua D; Alexandrov, Anton; Kim, Jaegil; Wala, Jeremiah; Berger, Alice H; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Shukla, Sachet A; Guo, Guangwu; Brooks, Angela N; Murray, Bradley A; Imielinski, Marcin; Hu, Xin; Ling, Shiyun; Akbani, Rehan; Rosenberg, Mara; Cibulskis, Carrie; Ramachandran, Aruna; Collisson, Eric A; Kwiatkowski, David J; Lawrence, Michael S; Weinstein, John N; Verhaak, Roel G W; Wu, Catherine J; Hammerman, Peter S; Cherniack, Andrew D; Getz, Gad; Artyomov, Maxim N; Schreiber, Robert; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and to identify new drivers of lung carcinogenesis, we examined the exome sequences and copy number profiles of 660 lung ADC and 484 lung SqCC tumor-normal pairs. Recurrent alterations in lung SqCCs were more similar to those of other squamous carcinomas than to alterations in lung ADCs. New significantly mutated genes included PPP3CA, DOT1L, and FTSJD1 in lung ADC, RASA1 in lung SqCC, and KLF5, EP300, and CREBBP in both tumor types. New amplification peaks encompassed MIR21 in lung ADC, MIR205 in lung SqCC, and MAPK1 in both. Lung ADCs lacking receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-Raf pathway alterations had mutations in SOS1, VAV1, RASA1, and ARHGAP35. Regarding neoantigens, 47% of the lung ADC and 53% of the lung SqCC tumors had at least five predicted neoepitopes. Although targeted therapies for lung ADC and SqCC are largely distinct, immunotherapies may aid in treatment for both subtypes.

  20. Lung Injury Combined with Loss of Regulatory T Cells Leads to De Novo Lung-Restricted Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephen; Fernandez, Ramiro; Subramanian, Vijay; Sun, Haiying; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Kreisel, Daniel; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    More than one third of patients with chronic lung disease undergoing lung transplantation have pre-existing Abs against lung-restricted self-Ags, collagen type V (ColV), and k-α1 tubulin (KAT). These Abs can also develop de novo after lung transplantation and mediate allograft rejection. However, the mechanisms leading to lung-restricted autoimmunity remain unknown. Because these self-Ags are normally sequestered, tissue injury is required to expose them to the immune system. We previously showed that respiratory viruses can induce apoptosis in CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), the key mediators of self-tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that lung-tissue injury can lead to lung-restricted immunity if it occurs in a setting when Tregs are impaired. We found that human lung recipients who suffer respiratory viral infections experienced a decrease in peripheral Tregs. Pre-existing lung allograft injury from donor-directed Abs or gastroesophageal reflux led to new ColV and KAT Abs post respiratory viral infection. Similarly, murine parainfluenza (Sendai) respiratory viral infection caused a decrease in Tregs. Intratracheal instillation of anti-MHC class I Abs, but not isotype control, followed by murine Sendai virus infection led to development of Abs against ColV and KAT, but not collagen type II (ColII), a cartilaginous protein. This was associated with expansion of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells specific to ColV and KAT, but not ColII. Intratracheal anti-MHC class I Abs or hydrochloric acid in Foxp3-DTR mice induced ColV and KAT, but not ColII, immunity, only if Tregs were depleted using diphtheria toxin. We conclude that tissue injury combined with loss of Tregs can lead to lung-tissue-restricted immunity. PMID:27194786

  1. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  2. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. Growth of respiratory syncytial virus in mink lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeolekar, L R; Damle, R G; Basu, A; Rao, B L

    2002-12-01

    Mink lung epithelial cells (Mv-1-Lu) were tested for their ability to support the growth and serial passage of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro. Indian isolates of RSV induced distinctive cytopathic effect with typical rounding of cells followed by detachment with more than 50 per cent cells showing bright fluorescence using anti-RSV monoclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence test. Serial passage of RSV was possible in Mv-1-Lu cells without loss of sensitivity of the cells for virus growth. Titration of cell associated virus and virus released in the supernatant indicated that 60 per cent of the virus was released in the supernatant, and 40 per cent remained cell associated. Transmission electron microscopic studies of negatively stained RSV particles and ultra-thin sections of RSV infected Mv-1-Lu cells showed roughly spherical particles with club shaped projections, budding from the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicate that Mv-1-Lu cell line is suitable for the growth and propagation of RSV.

  4. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: From Tumor Genomics to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, David R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sos, Martin L.; Lara, Primo N.; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the last several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common NSCLC histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC. PMID:25979930

  5. Blocking of lung endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Lu-ECAM-1) inhibits murine melanoma lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Cheng, C F; Pauli, B U

    1992-06-01

    The 90-kD lung endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Lu-ECAM-1) selectively promotes Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion of lung-metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Corresponding with their metastatic performance, high lung-metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells bind in significantly higher numbers to Lu-ECAM-1 than their intermediate and low lung-metastatic counterparts B16-L8-F10 and B16-F0, respectively. Maximum attachment is observed at a density of approximately 2.4 x 10(2) Lu-ECAM-1 sites/microns2 of plastic surface. B16 melanoma cell binding to Lu-ECAM-1 is blocked by mAb 6D3 and is competitively inhibited by soluble Lu-ECAM-1. C57B1/6 mice passively immunized with anti-Lu-ECAM-1 mAb 6D3 or actively immunized with purified Lu-ECAM-1 exhibit an anti-Lu-ECAM-1 antibody titer-dependent reduction in the number of B16 experimental metastases. Lu-ECAM-1 promotes neither binding nor metastasis of other lung-metastatic tumor cells (e.g., KLN205). Our data indicate that an "antiadhesion" therapy directed at interfering with the adherence of blood-borne tumor cells to organ-specific vascular endothelium is efficient in the control of metastasis formation in selective organ sites.

  6. Blocking of lung endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Lu-ECAM-1) inhibits murine melanoma lung metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D; Cheng, C F; Pauli, B U

    1992-01-01

    The 90-kD lung endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Lu-ECAM-1) selectively promotes Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion of lung-metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Corresponding with their metastatic performance, high lung-metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells bind in significantly higher numbers to Lu-ECAM-1 than their intermediate and low lung-metastatic counterparts B16-L8-F10 and B16-F0, respectively. Maximum attachment is observed at a density of approximately 2.4 x 10(2) Lu-ECAM-1 sites/microns2 of plastic surface. B16 melanoma cell binding to Lu-ECAM-1 is blocked by mAb 6D3 and is competitively inhibited by soluble Lu-ECAM-1. C57B1/6 mice passively immunized with anti-Lu-ECAM-1 mAb 6D3 or actively immunized with purified Lu-ECAM-1 exhibit an anti-Lu-ECAM-1 antibody titer-dependent reduction in the number of B16 experimental metastases. Lu-ECAM-1 promotes neither binding nor metastasis of other lung-metastatic tumor cells (e.g., KLN205). Our data indicate that an "antiadhesion" therapy directed at interfering with the adherence of blood-borne tumor cells to organ-specific vascular endothelium is efficient in the control of metastasis formation in selective organ sites. Images PMID:1601982

  7. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpressionmore » of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.« less

  8. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpression of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.

  9. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  10. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  11. Significance of stem cell marker Nanog gene in the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zeng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Honggang; Sun, Guiming; Wang, Baozhong; Wang, Yanwen; Yang, Mengxiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the stem cell marker, Nanog gene, for the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer cases, and to study its application in the diagnosis of lung cancer. In total, 100 patients diagnosed with lung cancer between April, 2013 and May, 2015 were included in the present study. The patients were randomly divided into group A (lung cancer) and group B (squamous cell lung carcinoma). RT-PCR was used to detect the cancer and adjacent tissues, and Nanog gene expression was detected in groups A and B in cells. The results showed that, analysis of Nanog gene expression in the two groups of patients varied to different degrees. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to age, gender, disease stage and lymph node metastasis. Nanog gene expression in patients with carcinoma were significantly higher than that in the adjacent tissues (p<0.05). By contrast, differentiated and well-differentiated carcinoma tissue showed a significantly higher Nanog gene expression than poorly differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma (p<0.05). The expression of Nanog in normal cells was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissues and benign lesions in lung cancer stem cells. Nanog was highly expressed in CD44+ cells, and Nanog expression in lung cancer stem cells was significantly higher (p<0.05). In conclusion, for groups A (lung cancer) and B (squamous cell lung carcinoma) the Nanog gene expression was significantly higher. The data of the present study show that the patients with stage III and IV lung cancer had a higher Nanog gene expression. In addition, there was a higher expression of Nanog in lung cancer patients. By contrast, a lower degree of cell differentiation was associated with strong Nanog gene expression in lung cancer.

  12. Extraosseous Benign Notochordal Cell Tumor Originating in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Motoi, Toru; Harada, Masahiko; Fukuda, Yumiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Horio, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Benign notochordal cell tumors (BNCTs) are tumors originating in the axial skeleton, where chordomas occur. Although very rare, some cases of extraosseous chordoma, such as in the soft tissue and lungs, have been reported. We report a case of a primary tumor showing the notochordal characteristics of BNCTs within the axial skeleton. An asymptomatic 57-year-old woman presented with an abnormal shadow on her chest radiograph; chest computed tomography revealed a well-defined round nodule. The resected sample tissue contained a jelly-like small nodule. Histologically, it was identified as a BNCT, based on minimal nuclear atypia, extremely low mitotic activity within the tumor cells lying in a sheet-like arrangement, and focal immunopositivity for brachyury. This is the third case report of BNCT originating in the lungs; BNCTs are considered asymptomatic tumors that are identified by using highly developed chest imaging technology; however, our findings also suggest that these notochordal tumors may potentially originate from extraosseous sites that lack ideal precursor cells. Our case suggests that notochordal tumors can arise from organs that are unrelated to known notochordal development. PMID:25569657

  13. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  14. FTIR characterization of animal lung cells: normal and precancerous modified e10 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezell, D. M.; Pereira, T. M.; Mennecier, G.; Bachmann, L.; Govone, A. B.; Dagli, M. L. Z.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical carcinogens from tobacco are related to over 90% of lung cancers around the world. The risk of death of this kind of cancer is high because the diagnosis usually is made only in advanced stages. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new diagnostic methods for detecting the lung cancer in earlier stages. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) can offer high sensibility and accuracy to detect the minimal chemical changes into the biological sample. The aim of this study is to evaluate the differences on infrared spectra between normal lung cells and precancerous lung cells transformed by NNK. Non-cancerous lung cell line e10 (ATCC) and NNK-transformed e10 cell lines were maintained in complete culture medium (1:1 mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and Ham's F12 [DMEM/Ham's F12], supplemented with 100 ng/ml cholera enterotoxin, 10 lg/ml insulin, 0.5 lg/ml. hydrocortisol, 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor, and 5% horse serum. The cultures were maintained in alcohol 70%. The infrared spectra were acquired on ATR-FTIR Nicolet 6700 spectrophotometer at 4 cm-1 resolution, 30 scans, in the 1800-900 cm-1 spectral range. Each sample had 3 spectra recorded, 30 infrared spectra were obtained from each cell line. The second derivate of spectra indicates that there are displacement in 1646 cm-1 (amine I) and 1255 cm-1(DNA), allowing the possibility to differentiate the two king of cells, with accuracy of 89,9%. These preliminary results indicate that ATR-FTIR is useful to differentiate normal e10 lung cells from precancerous e10 transformed by NNK.

  15. Signal transduction mediated by endostatin directly modulates cellular function of lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ri; Ohashi, Rina; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Yoshioka, Masakata; Tominaga, Shigeru; Sasaki, Shinichi; Gu, Tao; Takagi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2007-06-01

    Endostatin (ED) is a carboxyl-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII with strong antiangiogenic activity. ED has been considered as a highly specific inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation and migration through interaction with its receptor on the surface of endothelial cells. Recently, direct antitumor effects of ED in colon cancer cells and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells has been reported. However, its effect on lung cancer cells has not been clarified. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of ED on in vitro lung cancer cell function and to identify its receptor on lung cancer cells. We revealed that alpha5 integrin is capable of being a functional ED receptor among several integrins that are expressed on murine lung cancer (Lewis lung cancer [LLC]) cells. We further demonstrated that the ED-integrin interaction modulates various in vitro biological functions of LLC cells as we revealed that immobilized ED helps in LLC cell adhesion and migration in an integrin-dependent manner. Furthermore, ED inhibited LLC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Interestingly, ED did not demonstrate any antiproliferative activity against the other murine lung cancer cell line, KLN205, that lacks alpha5 integrin but binds to immobilized ED through the beta1 integrin. In addition, the binding of ED to alpha5 integrin on LLC cells induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Taken together, these results suggest that the interaction between ED and alpha5 integrin may play an important role in lung cancer cell function.

  16. Carcinomas of ovary and lung with clear cell features: can immunohistochemistry help in differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Howell, Nicole R; Zheng, Wenxin; Cheng, Liang; Tornos, Carmen; Kane, Philip; Pearl, Michael; Chalas, Eva; Liang, Sharon X

    2007-04-01

    Metastatic lung carcinomas with clear cell morphology can be confused with primary ovarian clear cell carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical stains in 14 cases of non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features and 14 cases of ovarian clear cell carcinomas using a panel of markers, including thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Wilms tumor gene 1, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4), cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Among non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features, 87.5% of adenocarcinomas (or 50% overall frequency in lung carcinomas) were positive for TTF-1, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas were positive (P = 0.002). All 14 ovarian clear cell carcinomas stained for CA-125 as compared with 1 non-small cell lung carcinoma (P < 0.001). On the other hand, 85% of non-small cell lung carcinomas stained for CEA, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas did (P < 0.001). Interestingly, 4 ovarian clear cell carcinomas (28%) showed positive staining for the germ cell marker OCT-4. Either lung or ovarian carcinomas stained for Wilms tumor gene 1, estrogen receptor, or progesterone receptor very infrequently; and the difference between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that an immunohistochemical panel consisting of TTF-1, CEA, CA-125, and OCT-4 is helpful in distinguishing most pulmonary and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell features.

  17. Current Status of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in Lung Biology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the 3rd leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been utilized to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy based clinical trials in lung diseases. PMID:23959715

  18. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases.

  19. Concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, E; Boraska Jelavic, T; Saratlija-Novakovic, Z; Hamm, W

    2005-01-01

    The optimal treatment of women with locally advanced adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix uteri is still undefined. We report a series of four consecutive patients with locally advanced adeno- or adenosquamous carcinomas of the uterine cervix (FIGO Stages IB-IIIB) treated by concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by one to four cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination. After completion of this treatment all patients showed complete clinical remission. Now, after a median follow-up of 40 (range: 13.5-61) months all patients still present with no evidence of disease. Despite the low number of patients in this series we may conclude that concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination is an efficacious treatment of patients with locally advanced adeno- or adenosquamous carcinomas of the cervix uteri.

  20. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  1. Pleural mesothelial cells in pleural and lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Batra, Hitesh; Antony, Veena B

    2015-06-01

    During development, the mesoderm maintains a complex relationship with the developing endoderm giving rise to the mature lung. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) derived from the mesoderm play a key role during the development of the lung. The pleural mesothelium differentiates to give rise to the endothelium and smooth muscle cells via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). An aberrant recapitulation of such developmental pathways can play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease processes such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The PMC is the central component of the immune responses of the pleura. When exposed to noxious stimuli, it demonstrates innate immune responses such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns as well as causes the release of several cytokines to activate adaptive immune responses. Development of pleural effusions occurs due to an imbalance in the dynamic interaction between junctional proteins, n-cadherin and β-catenin, and phosphorylation of adherens junctions between PMCs, which is caused in part by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released by PMCs. PMCs play an important role in defense mechanisms against bacterial and mycobacterial pleural infections, and in pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion, asbestos related pleural disease and malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMCs also play a key role in the resolution of inflammation, which can occur with or without fibrosis. Fibrosis occurs as a result of disordered fibrin turnover and due to the effects of cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor; which are released by PMCs. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for PMCs in the pathogenesis of IPF suggesting their potential as a cellular biomarker of disease activity and as a possible therapeutic target. Pleural-based therapies targeting PMCs for treatment of IPF and other lung diseases need

  2. Pleural mesothelial cells in pleural and lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Veena B.

    2015-01-01

    During development, the mesoderm maintains a complex relationship with the developing endoderm giving rise to the mature lung. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) derived from the mesoderm play a key role during the development of the lung. The pleural mesothelium differentiates to give rise to the endothelium and smooth muscle cells via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). An aberrant recapitulation of such developmental pathways can play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease processes such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The PMC is the central component of the immune responses of the pleura. When exposed to noxious stimuli, it demonstrates innate immune responses such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns as well as causes the release of several cytokines to activate adaptive immune responses. Development of pleural effusions occurs due to an imbalance in the dynamic interaction between junctional proteins, n-cadherin and β-catenin, and phosphorylation of adherens junctions between PMCs, which is caused in part by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released by PMCs. PMCs play an important role in defense mechanisms against bacterial and mycobacterial pleural infections, and in pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion, asbestos related pleural disease and malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMCs also play a key role in the resolution of inflammation, which can occur with or without fibrosis. Fibrosis occurs as a result of disordered fibrin turnover and due to the effects of cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor; which are released by PMCs. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for PMCs in the pathogenesis of IPF suggesting their potential as a cellular biomarker of disease activity and as a possible therapeutic target. Pleural-based therapies targeting PMCs for treatment of IPF and other lung diseases need

  3. EMX2 Is a Predictive Marker for Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Tolani, Bhairavi; Mo, Minli; Zhang, Hua; Zheng, Qingfeng; Yang, Yue; Cheng, Runfen; Jin, Joy Q.; Luh, Thomas W.; Yang, Cathryn; Tseng, Hsin-Hui K.; Giroux-Leprieur, Etienne; Woodard, Gavitt A.; Hao, Xishan; Wang, Changli; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) account for approximately 30% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Current staging methods do not adequately predict outcome for this disease. EMX2 is a homeo-domain containing transcription factor known to regulate a key developmental pathway. This study assessed the significance of EMX2 as a prognostic and predictive marker for resectable lung SCC. Methods Two independent cohorts of patients with lung SCC undergoing surgical resection were studied. EMX2 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, or immunofluorescence. EMX2 expression levels in tissue specimens were scored and correlated with patient outcomes. Chemo-sensitivity of lung SCC cell lines stably transfected with EMX2 shRNAs to cisplatin, carboplatin, and docetaxel was examined in vitro. Results EMX2 expression was down-regulated in lung SCC tissue samples compared to their matched adjacent normal tissues. Positive EMX2 expression was significantly associated with improved overall survival in stage I lung SCC patients, and in stage II/IIIA lung SCC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. EMX2 expression was also associated with expression of EMT markers in both lung SCC cell lines and tissue samples. Knock-down of EMX2 expression in lung SCC cells promoted chemo-resistance and cell migration. Conclusions EMX2 expression is down-regulated in lung SCC and its down-regulation is associated with chemo-resistance in lung SCC cells, possibly through regulation of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). EMX2 may serve as a novel prognostic marker for stage I lung SCC patients and a prediction marker for stage II/IIIA lung SCC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26132438

  4. Fgf10-positive cells represent a progenitor cell population during lung development and postnatally

    PubMed Central

    El Agha, Elie; Herold, Susanne; Alam, Denise Al; Quantius, Jennifer; MacKenzie, BreAnne; Carraro, Gianni; Moiseenko, Alena; Chao, Cho-Ming; Minoo, Parviz; Seeger, Werner; Bellusci, Saverio

    2014-01-01

    The lung mesenchyme consists of a widely heterogeneous population of cells that play crucial roles during development and homeostasis after birth. These cells belong to myogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, neuronal and other lineages. Yet, no clear hierarchy for these lineages has been established. We have previously generated a novel Fgf10iCre knock-in mouse line that allows lineage tracing of Fgf10-positive cells during development and postnatally. Using these mice, we hereby demonstrate the presence of two waves of Fgf10 expression during embryonic lung development: the first wave, comprising Fgf10-positive cells residing in the submesothelial mesenchyme at early pseudoglandular stage (as well as their descendants); and the second wave, comprising Fgf10-positive cells from late pseudoglandular stage (as well as their descendants). Our lineage-tracing data reveal that the first wave contributes to the formation of parabronchial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as lipofibroblasts at later developmental stages, whereas the second wave does not give rise to smooth muscle cells but to lipofibroblasts as well as an Nkx2.1- E-Cad- Epcam+ Pro-Spc+ lineage that requires further in-depth analysis. During alveologenesis, Fgf10-positive cells give rise to lipofibroblasts rather than alveolar myofibroblasts, and during adult life, a subpopulation of Fgf10-expressing cells represents a pool of resident mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) (Cd45- Cd31- Sca-1+). Taken together, we show for the first time that Fgf10-expressing cells represent a pool of mesenchymal progenitors in the embryonic and postnatal lung. Our findings suggest that Fgf10-positive cells could be useful for developing stem cell-based therapies for treating interstitial lung diseases. PMID:24353064

  5. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  6. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  7. In situ activation of helper T cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Raju, B; Tung, C F; Cheng, D; Yousefzadeh, N; Condos, R; Rom, W N; Tse, D B

    2001-08-01

    To better understand the lung and systemic responses of helper T cells mediating memory immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we used three- and four-color flow cytometry to study the surface phenotype of CD4(+) lymphocytes. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and peripheral blood (PB) samples were obtained from a total of 25 subjects, including 10 tuberculosis (TB)-infected subjects, 8 purified-protein-derivative-negative subjects, and 7 purified-protein-derivative-positive subjects. In marked contrast to CD4(+) lymphocytes from PB (9% +/- 5% expressing CD45RA and CD29), the majority (55% +/- 16%) of CD4(+) lymphocytes in BAL (ALs) simultaneously expressed CD45RA, a naïve T-cell marker, and CD29, members of the very late activation family. Further evaluation revealed that CD4(+) ALs expressed both CD45RA and CD45RO, a memory T-cell marker. In addition, the proportion of CD4(+) lymphocytes expressing CD69, an early activation marker, was drastically increased in BAL fluid (83% +/- 9%) compared to PB (1% +/- 1%), whereas no significant difference was seen in the expression of CD25, the low-affinity interleukin 2 receptor (34% +/- 15% versus 40% +/- 16%). More importantly, we identified a minor population of CD69(bright) CD25(bright) CD4(+) lymphocytes in BAL (10% +/- 6%) that were consistently absent from PB (1% +/- 1%). Thus, CD4(+) lymphocytes in the lung paradoxically coexpress surface molecules characteristic of naïve and memory helper T cells as well as surface molecules commonly associated with early and late stages of activation. No difference was observed for ALs obtained from TB-infected and uninfected lung segments in this regard. It remains to be determined if these surface molecules are induced by the alveolar environment or if CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing this unusual combination of surface molecules are selectively recruited from the circulation. Our data suggest that ex vivo experiments on helper T-cell subsets that display distinctive

  8. Neuronal characteristics of small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onganer, P U; Seckl, M J; Djamgoz, M B A

    2005-01-01

    Wide ranging experimental evidence suggests that human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a number of molecular and subcellular characteristics normally associated with neurones. This review outlines and discusses these characteristics in the light of recent developments in the field. Emphasis is placed upon neuronal cell adhesion molecules, neurone-restrictive silencer factor, neurotransmitters/peptides and voltage-gated ion, especially Na+ channels. The hypothesis is put forward that acquisition of such characteristics and the membrane ‘excitability' that would follow can accelerate metastatic progression. The clinical potential of the neuronal characteristics of SCLC, in particular ion channel expression/activity, is discussed in relation to possible novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. PMID:16265346

  9. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients.

  10. Coagulation activation by MC28 fibrosarcoma cells facilitates lung tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, M; Francis, J L

    1995-01-01

    Tumor cells interact with the hemostatic system in various ways and may thus influence malignant growth and spread. MC28 fibrosarcoma cells possess a potent procoagulant activity (PCA) and form lung tumors following intravenous injection. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between PCA, intravascular coagulation and lung seeding in the MC28 model. MC28 cells were injected into control, warfarinized and heparinized hooded Lister rats. Coagulation changes were monitored by thromboelastography (TEG) and Sonoclot analysis (SA), lung fibrin formation by light and electron microscopy, tumor seeding by macroscopic counting and tumor cell and platelet deposition in the lungs by radiolabelling. PCA was measured by chromogenic assay. MC28 PCA was characterized as a tissue factor-factor VIIa complex that probably arose during cell culture or disaggregation of solid tumors. Injection of tumor cells caused marked coagulopathy and was rapidly (within 30 min) followed by fibrin deposition in the lungs and accumulation of radiolabelled platelets. Heparin and warfarin significantly reduced lung seeding (p < 0.001) and reduced retention of radiolabelled tumor cells in the pulmonary circulation (p < 0.01). Inhibition of cellular PCA by prior treatment with concanavalin A markedly reduced intravascular coagulation and lung seeding. We conclude that MC28 cells cause intravascular coagulation as a direct result of their procoagulant activity. The data suggest that tumor cells form complexes with platelets and fibrin which are retained in the lungs long enough for extravasation and seeding to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Coagulation activation by MC28 fibrosarcoma cells facilitates lung tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, M; Francis, J L

    1995-01-01

    Tumor cells interact with the hemostatic system in various ways and may thus influence malignant growth and spread. MC28 fibrosarcoma cells possess a potent procoagulant activity (PCA) and form lung tumors following intravenous injection. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between PCA, intravascular coagulation and lung seeding in the MC28 model. MC28 cells were injected into control, warfarinized and heparinized hooded Lister rats. Coagulation changes were monitored by thromboelastography (TEG) and Sonoclot analysis (SA), lung fibrin formation by light and electron microscopy, tumor seeding by macroscopic counting and tumor cell and platelet deposition in the lungs by radiolabelling. PCA was measured by chromogenic assay. MC28 PCA was characterized as a tissue factor-factor VIIa complex that probably arose during cell culture or disaggregation of solid tumors. Injection of tumor cells caused marked coagulopathy and was rapidly (within 30 min) followed by fibrin deposition in the lungs and accumulation of radiolabelled platelets. Heparin and warfarin significantly reduced lung seeding (p < 0.001) and reduced retention of radiolabelled tumor cells in the pulmonary circulation (p < 0.01). Inhibition of cellular PCA by prior treatment with concanavalin A markedly reduced intravascular coagulation and lung seeding. We conclude that MC28 cells cause intravascular coagulation as a direct result of their procoagulant activity. The data suggest that tumor cells form complexes with platelets and fibrin which are retained in the lungs long enough for extravasation and seeding to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7740497

  12. MicroRNA-15a/16 Regulates Apoptosis of Lung Epithelial Cells After Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong; Zhang, Duo; Moon, Hyung-Geun; Lee, Heedoo; Haspel, Jeffrey A; Hu, Kebin; Xie, Lixin; Jin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lung epithelial cell apoptosis is an important feature of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. The death receptor–associated extrinsic pathway and mitochondria-associated intrinsic pathway both mediate the development of lung epithelial cell apoptosis. Despite decades of research, molecular mechanisms of hyperoxia-induced epithelial cell apoptosis remain incompletely understood. Here, we report a novel regulatory paradigm in response to hyperoxia-associated oxidative stress. Hyperoxia markedly upregulated microRNA (miR)-15a/16 levels in lung epithelial cells, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue. This effect was mediated by hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species. Functionally, miR-15a/16 inhibitors induced caspase-3–mediated lung epithelial cell apoptosis, in the presence of hyperoxia. MiR-15a/16 inhibitors robustly enhanced FADD level and downregulated Bcl-2 expression. Consistently, cleaved caspase-8 and -9 were highly induced in the miR-15a/16–deficient cells, after hyperoxia. Using airway epithelial cell–specific, miR-15a/16–/– mice, we found that Bcl-2 was significantly reduced in lung epithelial cells in vivo after hyperoxia. In contrast, caspase-3, caspase-8 and Bcl-2–associated death promoter (BAD) were highly elevated in the miR-15a/16–/– epithelial cells in vivo. Interestingly, in lung epithelial malignant cells, rather than benign cells, deletion of miR-15a/16 prevented apoptosis. Furthermore, deletion of miR-15a/16 in macrophages also prohibited apoptosis, which is the opposite of what we have found in normal lung epithelial cells. Taken together, our data suggested that miR-15a/16 may exert differential roles in different cell types. MiR-15a/16 deficiency results in lung epithelial cell apoptosis in response to hyperoxia, via modulating both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. PMID:27257854

  13. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  14. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Li, Yu; Whitson, Bryan A.; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hunter, John C.; McLeod, Robbie L.; Weisleder, Noah; Zeng, Chunyu; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion and over-ventilation induced injury to the lung when compared with wild type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases. PMID:25034454

  15. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  16. Fibrocytes Regulate Wilms’ Tumor 1-Positive Cell Accumulation in Severe Fibrotic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Shanmukhappa, Shiva K.; DiPasquale, Betsy A.; Reddy, Geereddy B.; Medvedovic, Mario; Hardie, William D.; White, Eric S.; Madala, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-producing myofibroblast transdifferentiation is considered a crucial determinant in the formation of scar tissue in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Multiple resident pulmonary cell types and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes have been implicated as contributors to fibrotic lesions due to the transdifferentiation potential of these cells into myofibroblasts. In this study, we assessed the expression of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1), a known marker of mesothelial cells, in various cell types in normal and fibrotic lungs. We demonstrate that WT1 is expressed by both mesothelial and mesenchymal cells in IPF lungs, but has limited or no expression in normal human lungs. We also demonstrate that WT1-positive cells accumulate in fibrotic lung lesions, using two different mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis and WT1 promoter-driven fluorescent reporter mice. Reconstitution of bone-marrow cells into a transforming growth factor-α transgenic-mouse model demonstrated that fibrocytes do not transform into WT1-positive mesenchymal cells, but do augment accumulation of WT1-positive cells in severe fibrotic lung disease. Importantly, the number of WT1-positive cells in fibrotic lesions were correlated with severity of lung disease as assessed by changes in lung function, histology, and hydroxyproline levels in mice. Finally, inhibition of WT1 expression was sufficient to attenuate collagen and other extracellular-matrix gene production by mesenchymal cells from both murine and human fibrotic lungs. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate a novel association between fibrocyte-driven WT1-positive cell accumulation and severe fibrotic lung disease. PMID:26371248

  17. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  18. Cavitary lung cancer lined with normal bronchial epithelium and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Reports of cavitary lung cancer are not uncommon, and the cavity generally contains either dilated bronchi or cancer cells. Recently, we encountered a surgical case of cavitary lung cancer whose cavity tended to enlarge during long-term follow-up, and was found to be lined with normal bronchial epithelium and adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:21980325

  19. Chemotherapy advances in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Bryan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although chemotherapeutic advances have recently been heralded in lung adenocarcinomas, such success with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has been ominously absent. Indeed, the dismal outlook of this disease is exemplified by the failure of any significant advances in first line therapy since the introduction of the current standard platinum-etoposide doublet over 30 years ago. Moreover, such sluggish progress is compounded by the dearth of FDA-approved agents for patients with relapsed disease. However, over the past decade, novel formulations of drug classes commonly used in SCLC (e.g. topoisomerase inhibitors, anthracyclines, alkylating and platinum agents) are emerging as potential alternatives that could effectively add to the armamentarium of agents currently at our disposal. This review is introduced with an overview on the historical development of chemotherapeutic regimens used in this disease and followed by the recent encouraging advances witnessed in clinical trials with drugs such as amrubicin and belotecan which are forging new horizons for future treatment algorithms. PMID:24163749

  20. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  1. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Associated With Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Okuda, Masaya; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Kameda, Tomohiro; Tadokoro, Akira; Wakiya, Risa; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Bandoh, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We here describe a 50-year-old woman diagnosed with squamous cell lung cancer (SqLC) with underlying interstitial lung disease (ILD) 14 years after a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We reviewed the literature and collected 21 well-documented cases with SqLC associated with SSc including the present case. Several characteristics of SqLC associated with SSc have been found. First, the average age at diagnosis of SqLC is 57 years, which is much younger than that reported for patients without SSc. Second, SqLC could occur even in never or light smokers, although SqLC usually has a strong association with smoking history. Third, two-thirds of the available cases have ILD. In addition, SqLC developed in the area of ILD in most cases with ILD. Fourth, SqLC generally occurs after a long period from the diagnosis of SSc; the average of this interval reaches 12 years. It would be helpful to know these features so that physicians follow up and treat SSc patients adequately. PMID:26491504

  2. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority. PMID:26683772

  3. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  4. The antitumor activity study of ginsenosides and metabolites in lung cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng-Yuan; Shang, Wen-Qing; Yu, Jia-Jun; Sun, Qian; Li, Ming-Qing; Sun, Jian-Song

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng and its components exert various biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, and antitumor activity. Ginsenosides are the main biological components of ginseng. Protopanaxadiol (PPD) and protopanaxatriol (PPT) are two metabolites of ginsenosides. However, the difference between these compounds in anti-lung cancer is unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor activity of PPD, PPT, Ginsenosides-Rg3 (G-Rg3) and Ginsenosides-Rh2 (G-Rh2) in lung cancer cell. After treatment with cisplatin, PPD, PPT, G-Rg3 or G-Rh2, the viability, apoptosis level and invasiveness of lung cell lines (A549 cell, a lung adenocarcinoma cell line and SK-MES-1 cell, a lung squamous cell line) in vitro were analyzed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), Annexin V/PI apoptosis and Matrigel invasion assays, respectively. Here we found that all these compounds led to significant decreases of viability and invasiveness and an obvious increase of apoptosis of A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. Among these, the viability of SK-MES-1 cell treated with PPT was decreased to 66.8%, and this effect was closest to Cisplatin. G-Rg3 had the highest stimulatory effect on apoptosis, and PTT had the highest inhibitory effect on cell invasiveness in A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. These results indicate that both ginsenosides and two metabolites have antitumor activity on lung cancer cell in vitro. However, PPT is more powerful for inhibiting the viability and invasiveness of lung cancer cell, especially lung squamous cell. G-Rg3 has the best pro-apoptosis effects. This study provides a scientific basis for potential therapeutic strategies targeted to lung cancer by further structure modification. PMID:27186294

  5. The Pivotal Role of IKKα in the Development of Spontaneous Lung Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zouxiang; Jiang, Qun; Willette-Brown, Jami; Xi, Sichuan; Zhu, Feng; Burkett, Sandra; Back, Timothy; Song, Na-Young; Datla, Mahesh; Sun, Zhonghe; Goldszmid, Romina; Lin, Fanching; Cohoon, Travis; Pike, Kristen; Wu, Xiaolin; Schrump, David S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Young, Howard A.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Hu, Yinling

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Here, we report that kinase-dead IKKα knock-in mice develop spontaneous lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) associated with IKKα downregulation and marked pulmonary inflammation. IKKα reduction upregulated the expression of p63, Trim29, and keratin 5 (K5), which serve as diagnostic markers for human lung SCCs. IKKαlowK5+p63hi cell expansion and SCC formation were accompanied by inflammation-associated deregulation of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and stem cell regulators. Reintroducing transgenic K5.IKKα, depleting macrophages, and reconstituting irradiated mutant animals with WT bone marrow (BM) prevented SCC development, suggesting that BM-derived IKKα-mutant macrophages promote the transition of IKKαlowK5+p63hi cells to tumor cells. This mouse model resembles human lung SCCs, sheds light on the mechanisms underlying lung malignancy development, and identifies targets for therapy of lung SCCs. PMID:23597566

  6. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  7. Hedgehog/Gli promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) account for approximately 30% of non-small cell lung cancer. Investigation of the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of lung SCC will be of great help for the development of meaningful targeted therapeutics. This study is intended to understand whether the activation of Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is involved in lung SCC, and whether activated Hh signaling regulates metastasis through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung SCC. Methods Two cohorts of patients with lung SCC were studied. Protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, or immunofluorescence. Protein expression levels in tissue specimens were scored and correlations were analyzed. Vismodegib and a Gli inhibitor were used to inhibit Shh/Gli activity, and recombinant Shh proteins were used to stimulate the Hh pathway in lung SCC cell lines. Cell migration assay was performed in vitro. Results Shh/Gli pathway components were aberrantly expressed in lung SCC tissue samples. Gli1 expression was reversely associated with the expression of EMT markers E-Cadherin and β-Catenin in lung SCC specimens. Inhibition of the Shh/Gli pathway suppressed migration and up-regulated E-Cadherin expression in lung SCC cells. Stimulation of the pathway increased migration and down-regulated E-Cadherin expression in lung SCC cells. Conclusions Our results suggested that the Shh/Gli pathway may be critical for lung SCC recurrence, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. Inhibition of the Shh/Gli pathway activity/function is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung SCC patients. PMID:24758269

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  10. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  14. Knockdown of cullin 4A inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; You, Liang; Jablons, David M; Li, Ya-Chin; Mao, Jian-Hua; Xu, Zhidong; Lung, Jr-Hau; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 4A (Cul4A) has been observed to be overexpressed in various cancers. In this study, the role of Cul4A in the growth and chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells were studied. We showed that Cul4A is overexpressed in lung cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of the Cul4A expression by shRNA in lung cancer cells resulted in decreased cellular proliferation and growth in lung cancer cells. Increased sensitivity to gemcitabine, a chemotherapy drug, was also noted in those Cul4A knockdown lung cancer cells. Moreover, increased expression of p21, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) and TGF beta-induced (TGFBI) was observed in lung cancer cells after Cul4A knockdown, which may be partially related to increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was also noted after Cul4A knockdown. Notably, decreased tumour growth and increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine were also noted after Cul4A knockdown in lung cancer xenograft nude mice models. In summary, our study showed that targeting Cul4A with RNAi or other techniques may provide a possible insight to the development of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  15. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  16. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Jenson, A Bennett; Moore, Grace D; Rezazedeh, Arash; Slone, Stephen P; Ghim, Shin-je; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2010-12-01

    Certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) induce cancers, especially cervical cancers in women. A meta-analysis of the literature suggests that HPV is also associated with 20%-25% of non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Merkel cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes most Merkel cell carcinomas in immunocompromised hosts, and is associated with some squamous carcinomas of skin in immunocompetent individuals. Since both oncogenic viruses appear to involve the tonsils and, therefore, have clear access to the lungs, we examined that the possible association of HPV and MCPyV infections with lung cancers, especially, NSCLC. DNAs were extracted from 51 frozen tissues from 30 lung cancer patients, and examined for the presence of HPV and MCPyV by PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Clinical data was correlated with the viral status. HPVs were only detected in 5 adenocarcinomas (16.7% of all lung cancers examined). Three were positive for HPV-16, 1 for HPV-11 and 1 had an unknown HPV type DNA. None was identified in benign tissue. MCPyV DNA was detected in 5 NSCLCs (16.7%). Three of the 5 were identified in squamous carcinomas, 1 in adenocarcinoma, and 1 in an unspecified NSCLC. Two additional samples were positive for MCPyV DNA within benign adjacent lung tissue only. In one adenocarcinoma, HPV-11 was identified in an adenocarcinoma, and MCPyV DNA was detected in the adjacent "benign" tissue. HPV and MCPyV were directly associated with 33.3% of NSCLC. Further studies are necessary to determine if polyomavirus and papillomavirus are necessary risk factors for some cases of NSCLC.

  18. Genetic alterations and protein expression in combined small cell lung cancers and small cell lung cancers arising from lung adenocarcinomas after therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaohua; Duan, Huanli; Liu, Xuguang; Zhou, Liangrui; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    There are 2 hypotheses regarding the mechanism underlying the adenocarcinoma (AD) to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transition in patients receiving Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy: 1) AD gives rise to SCLC owing to the pressure of the TKI therapy, and 2) the SCLC coexists with the AD de novo, but is not detected in biopsy specimens of the heterogeneous tumor. In this study, we try to address this issue by examination the genetic alteration and protein expression profile between SCLC arising from AD, and SCLC in combined small cell lung cancers (CSCLC). In the former, the SCLC had the same genetic profile as the AD, and we strongly suggest that the transition was a consequence of TKI therapy. In the latter, genetic alterations and protein expression tended to differ between the NSCLC and SCLC components of the CSCLC. The results showed that EGFR and KRAS mutation were found in 1 but not both component of CSCLC, and the NSCLC component usually expressed the EGFR and RB1 proteins, whereas the SCLC component did not. This finding indicates that the NSCLC and SCLC components arose separately and that CSCLC are unsuitable for TKI therapy despite the presence of sensitive EGFR mutations. PMID:27145273

  19. Is cervical screening preventing adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix?

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Rebecca; Sasieni, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    While the incidence of squamous carcinoma of the cervix has declined in countries with organised screening, adenocarcinoma has become more common. Cervical screening by cytology often fails to prevent adenocarcinoma. Using prospectively recorded cervical screening data in England and Wales, we conducted a population‐based case–control study to examine whether cervical screening leads to early diagnosis and down‐staging of adenocarcinoma. Conditional logistic regression modelling was carried out to provide odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) on 12,418 women with cervical cancer diagnosed between ages 30 and 69 and 24,453 age‐matched controls. Of women with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 44.3% were up to date with screening and 14.6% were non‐attenders. The overall OR comparing women up to date with screening with non‐attenders was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.39–0.55) for adenocarcinoma. The odds were significantly decreased (OR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.15–0.33) in up to date women with Stage 2 or worse adenocarcinoma, but not for women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma 0.71 (95% CI: 0.46–1.09). The odds of Stage 1A adenocarcinoma was double among lapsed attenders (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.52–3.62) compared to non‐attenders. Relative to women with no negative cytology within 7 years of diagnosis, women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma were very unlikely to be detected within 3 years of a negative cytology test (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.05–0.13); however, the odds doubled 3–5 years after a negative test (OR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.67–3.18). ORs associated with up to date screening were smaller for squamous and adenosquamous cervical carcinoma. Although cytology screening is inefficient at preventing adenocarcinomas, invasive adenocarcinomas are detected earlier than they would be in the absence of screening, substantially preventing Stage 2 and worse adenocarcinomas. PMID:27096255

  20. Chemoprevention of lung squamous cell carcinoma in mice by a mixture of Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yian; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Garbow, Joel R; Rowland, Doug J; Lubet, Ronald A; Sit, Daniel; Law, Francis; You, Ming

    2009-07-01

    Antitumor B (ATB) is a Chinese herbal mixture of six plants. Previous studies have shown significant chemopreventive efficacy of ATB against human esophageal and lung cancers. We have recently developed a new mouse model for lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In this study, lung SCC mouse model was characterized using small-animal imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography). ATB decreased lung SCC significantly (3.1-fold; P < 0.05) and increased lung hyperplastic lesions by 2.4-fold (P < 0.05). This observation suggests that ATB can block hyperplasia from progression to SCC. ATB tissue distribution was determined using matrine as a marker chemical. We found that ATB is rapidly absorbed and then distributes to various tissues including the lung. These results indicate that ATB is a potent chemopreventive agent against the development of mouse lung SCCs. PMID:19584077

  1. Resected small cell lung cancer-time for more?

    PubMed

    Marr, Alissa S; Zhang, Chi; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often presents with either regional or systemic metastases, but approximately 4% of patients present with a solitary pulmonary nodule. Surgical resection can be an option for these patients and is endorsed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. There are no prospective randomized clinical trials evaluating the role of adjuvant systemic therapy in these resected SCLC patients. A recent National Cancer Database analysis found that the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy alone [hazard ratio (HR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95] or with brain radiation (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36-0.75) was associated with significantly improved survival as compared to surgery alone. As it is unlikely that a randomized prospective clinical trial addressing this question will be completed, these data should assist with decision making in these patients. PMID:27620199

  2. Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Martin F; Gerber, David E

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer has seen an unprecedented augmentation of therapeutic options over the last couple of years. Improved understanding of molecular drivers and the role of the immune system in cancer therapy have brought new drugs to the armamentarium. Despite these advances, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains a substantial part of therapy for most patients in locally advanced and metastatic stage. Initially thought to be a chemotherapy-resistant entity, meta-analyses in the mid-1990s demonstrated modest efficacy of platinum-based therapy. Further combination trials demonstrated enhanced efficacy for several regimen in first and second lines, including the introduction of antimetabolites, taxanes, and anti-angiogenic agents. Maintenance chemotherapy has been another novel, successful approach for management of metastatic disease. Herein, we summarize the current concepts of chemotherapy, its applicability to the different histologies, and novel concepts of therapy. PMID:27535392

  3. Current treatment options for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a difficult-to-treat malignancy, and durable long-term survival is elusive for patients with advanced-stage disease. Chemotherapy, especially with platinum-based combinations, is the mainstay of treatment, yet these regimens yield only modest response and survival rates. Outcomes of recent clinical trials have shown that histology, mutation analyses, and biomarkers have an impact on the selection and combination of chemotherapeutic agents. Oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are now part of the treatment schema. Other changes to the treatment paradigm include the duration of treatment and the use of maintenance therapy. Additionally, chemotherapy is now employed in earlier-stage disease in neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and combined-modality treatments. The aim of this article is to review the current systemic treatments for NSCLC.

  4. Resected small cell lung cancer—time for more?

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Alissa S.; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often presents with either regional or systemic metastases, but approximately 4% of patients present with a solitary pulmonary nodule. Surgical resection can be an option for these patients and is endorsed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. There are no prospective randomized clinical trials evaluating the role of adjuvant systemic therapy in these resected SCLC patients. A recent National Cancer Database analysis found that the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy alone [hazard ratio (HR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63–0.95] or with brain radiation (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36–0.75) was associated with significantly improved survival as compared to surgery alone. As it is unlikely that a randomized prospective clinical trial addressing this question will be completed, these data should assist with decision making in these patients. PMID:27620199

  5. Chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Syed Mustafa; Zekri, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is the current strategy of choice for treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Platinum containing combination regimens are superior to non-platinum regimens in limited stage-SCLC and possibly also in extensive stage-SCLC as first and second-line treatments. The addition of ifosfamide to platinum containing regimens may improve the outcome but at the price of increased toxicity. Suboptimal doses of chemotherapy result in inferior survival. Early intensified, accelerated and high-dose chemotherapy gave conflicting results and is not considered a standard option outside of clinical trials. A number of newer agents have provided promising results when used in combination regimens, for example, gemcitabine, irinotecan and topotecan. However, more studies are required to appropriately evaluate them. There is a definitive role for radiotherapy in LD-SCLC. However, timing and schedule are subject to further research. Novel approaches are currently being investigated in the hope of improving outcome. PMID:25992206

  6. Treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    De Petris, L; Crinò, L; Scagliotti, G V; Gridelli, C; Galetta, D; Metro, G; Novello, S; Maione, P; Colucci, G; de Marinis, F

    2006-03-01

    In the last decade the treatment of advanced-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer has substantially improved. If in the early 90s there was still concern about the real efficacy of chemotherapy over best suppotive care alone in the advanced setting, constant developments in clinical research have demonstrated the survival advantage of active anti-cancer drugs not only in the first-line setting, but, lately, even in patients with recurrent disease after failure of two previous chemotherapy lines. With the premises of high throughput technologies, translational research is aiming to characterize patients and tumors on a molecular basis. With pharmacogenomics it would then be possible to accurately predict patient outcome and tailor the treatment strategy according to the geno-phenotype of single patients.

  7. The tobacco-specific carcinogen-operated calcium channel promotes lung tumorigenesis via IGF2 exocytosis in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Hye-Jin; Min, Hye-Young; Jang, Hyun-Ji; Yun, Hye Jeong; Smith, John Kendal; Jin, Quanri; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Liu, Diane; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Behrens, Carmen; Lee, J. Jack; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Lee, Euni; Hong, Waun Ki; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) binding to the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces Ca2+ signalling, a mechanism that is implicated in various human cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of NNK-mediated Ca2+ signalling in lung cancer formation. We show significant overexpression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in association with IGF-1R activation in human preneoplastic lung lesions in smokers. NNK induces voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-intervened calcium influx in airway epithelial cells, resulting in a rapid IGF2 secretion via the regulated pathway and thus IGF-1R activation. Silencing nAChR, α1 subunit of L-type VDCC, or various vesicular trafficking curators, including synaptotagmins and Rabs, or blockade of nAChR/VDCC-mediated Ca2+ influx significantly suppresses NNK-induced IGF2 exocytosis, transformation and tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Publicly available database reveals inverse correlation between use of calcium channel blockers and lung cancer diagnosis. Our data indicate that NNK disrupts the regulated pathway of IGF2 exocytosis and promotes lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27666821

  8. Circadian Timing in the Lung; A Specific Role for Bronchiolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J. E.; Beesley, S.; Plumb, J.; Singh, D.; Farrow, S.; Ray, D. W.; Loudon, A. S. I.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the core circadian oscillator, located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus, numerous peripheral tissues possess self-sustaining circadian timers. In vivo these are entrained and temporally synchronized by signals conveyed from the core oscillator. In the present study, we examine circadian timing in the lung, determine the cellular localization of core clock proteins in both mouse and human lung tissue, and establish the effects of glucocorticoids (widely used in the treatment of asthma) on the pulmonary clock. Using organotypic lung slices prepared from transgenic mPER2::Luc mice, luciferase levels, which report PER2 expression, were measured over a number of days. We demonstrate a robust circadian rhythm in the mouse lung that is responsive to glucocorticoids. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to localize specific expression of core clock proteins, and the glucocorticoid receptor, to the epithelial cells lining the bronchioles in both mouse and human lung. In the mouse, these were established to be Clara cells. Murine Clara cells retained circadian rhythmicity when grown as a pure population in culture. Furthermore, selective ablation of Clara cells resulted in the loss of circadian rhythm in lung slices, demonstrating the importance of this cell type in maintaining overall pulmonary circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we demonstrate that Clara cells are critical for maintaining coherent circadian oscillations in lung tissue. Their coexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor and core clock components establishes them as a likely interface between humoral suprachiasmatic nucleus output and circadian lung physiology. PMID:18787022

  9. Non-small cell lung carcinoma metastasis to the anus.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Ramya Gowri; Anosike, Chinedum; Ganguly, Akash

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presenting with a lung mass was investigated and treated with pneumonectomy for adenocarcinoma of the lung. He re-presented 3 months later with a large perianal abscess and mass. Subsequent investigations and biopsies showed disseminated metastases from the lung primary. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the nature of the anal metastasis from the lung adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer is notorious for metastases, hence it is important to be aware of the uncommon modes of spread, which will help obtain early diagnosis and optimise treatment. PMID:27130556

  10. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  11. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Kai; Jin, Faguang

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  12. Lung cell hypoxia: role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signaling in triggering responses.

    PubMed

    Schumacker, Paul T

    2011-11-01

    Lung cells experience hypoxia during development, during travel to high altitude, and in acute and chronic lung diseases. The functional responses evoked by hypoxia are diverse and generally act to protect the cells from hypoxic injury, although some lung cell responses are counterproductive because they degrade normal function of the organ. The cellular O(2) sensor responsible for many of these responses involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Under hypoxic conditions, increased release of reactive oxygen species from the inner mitochondrial membrane to the intermembrane space leads to the activation of transcription factors, including hypoxia-inducible factor, activation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase, and internalization of the membrane Na,K-ATPase from the basolateral membrane of alveolar epithelial cells. Although the specific targets of reactive oxygen species signals are not fully understood, this signaling pathway is critical for development and for normal lung responses in the newborn and the mature lung.

  13. Subacute cytotoxicity testing with cultured human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, A; Cardona, D L; Barile, F A

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential of an in vitro cell culture method for its ability to determine subacute cytotoxicity and to compare the cytotoxic concentrations with rodent LD(50)s and clinical human toxicity data. Human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL1) were incubated in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of test chemicals for 72 h, and cell proliferation was used as a marker for toxicity. Inhibitory concentrations were extrapolated from concentration-effect curves after linear regression analysis. Comparison of the cytotoxicity data from testing 50 chemicals, with available human lethal concentrations for the same chemicals, revealed that the 72-h experimental IC(50)s are as accurate predictors of human toxicity as equivalent toxic blood concentrations derived from rodent LD(50)s. In addition, our results demonstrate that subacute 72-h exposure of HFL1 cells more accurately predicts cytotoxicity than a 24-h mitochondrial assay previously conducted in our laboratory, although the experimental IC(50) values were not statistically different in the two assays. It is anticipated that this procedure, together with a related battery of tests, may supplement or replace currently used animal protocols to screen chemicals for human risk assessment.

  14. Acute stress reduces intraparenchymal lung natural killer cells via beta-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kanemi, O; Zhang, X; Sakamoto, Y; Ebina, M; Nagatomi, R

    2005-01-01

    There are lines of evidence that natural killer (NK) cells are sensitive to physical and psychological stress. Alterations in the immune system including NK cells are known to differ among tissues and organs. The effect of stress on the lung immune system, however, has not been well documented in spite of the fact that the lungs always confront viral or bacterial attacks as well as tumour cell metastasis. In this study, we intended to investigate the effect of restraint stress on lung lymphocytes including NK cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 h restraint stress. The concentration of plasma epinephrine significantly rose immediately after the release from restraint as compared to home-cage control mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the numbers of most lymphocyte subsets including NK cells were decreased in the lungs and blood but not in the spleen, immediately after restraint stress. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the number of NK cells was decreased in the intraparenchymal region of the lungs, while the number of alveolar macrophages did not change. The decrease in the number of NK cells in the lungs and blood was reversed by the administration of propranolol, a nonselective beta adrenergic antagonist. Taken together, our findings suggest that acute stress reduces the number of intraparenchymal lung NK cells via activation of beta adrenergic receptors. PMID:15606610

  15. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  16. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. Results At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Conclusions Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers

  17. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J; Chambers, Daniel; Giangreco, Adam; Keating, Armand; Kotton, Darrell; Lelkes, Peter I; Wagner, Darcy E; Prockop, Darwin J

    2015-04-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine and the Vermont Lung Center, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cell Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 29 to August 1, 2013 at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This conference was a follow-up to four previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and Respiratory Disease Foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  18. Direct Raman imaging spectroscopy of lung cancer cells and apoptotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Furihata, Chie; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic technique enables to observe intracellular molecules without fixation or labeling procedures in situ. We demonstrated a classification of human lung cancer cells with Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis. Normal lung cell-lines and 4 pathological types of cancer cell-lines were seeded on culture dishes and examined. It was as a preliminary study for direct Raman imaging spectroscopy, which could be available for clinical use, to diagnose cancer. The result suggests that Raman spectroscopy could be a complementary method for immunohistology study. We also constructed a new direct Raman imaging system consisting of a high sensitive CCD image sensor, narrow band pass-filters, and a background-free electrically tunable Ti:Sapphire laser. The observation wavelengths can be switched immediately for the purpose of malignancy rapid diagnosis or real time measurement for apoptotic cells. The potential ability of the direct Raman imaging system is supposed to evaluate apoptosis by UV irradiation and anticancer drug-treatment for living lung cancer cells.

  19. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis after treatment of small cell carcinoma of the lung with very high-dose cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, C.W.; Joannides, T.; Harper, P.G.; Tobias, J.S.; Spiro, S.G.; Geddes, D.M.; Souhami, R.L.; Beverly, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five previously untreated patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with cyclophosphamide 160 to 200 mg/kg (with autologous bone marrow support) followed by radiotherapy (4000 cGy) to the primary site and mediastinum. No other treatment was given until relapse occurred. Nineteen patients were assessable at least 4 months after radiotherapy; of these, 15 (79%) developed radiologic evidence of fibrosis, which was symptomatic in 14 (74%). The time of onset of fibrosis was related to the volume of lung irradiated. A retrospective analysis was made of 20 consecutive patients treated with multiple-drug chemotherapy and an identical radiotherapy regimen as part of a randomized trial. Radiologic and symptomatic fibrosis was one half as frequent (35%) as in the high-dose cyclophosphamide group. Very high-dose cyclophosphamide appears to sensitize the lung to radiotherapy and promotes the production of fibrosis.

  20. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  1. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201’s cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  2. Analysis of mutational and clinicopathologic characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Shen, Xuxia; Shi, Jianxin; Chen, Haiquan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component is extremely rare and the cases reported in literature remain scarce. The biological behaviors, clinicopathologic characteristics, mutational status and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component are still uncertain. Methods Thirty-eight lung adenocarcinomas with clear cell component and 1659 lung adenocarcinomas were subjected to the study. All the corresponding clinicopathologic data, the distributions of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), and the status of gene mutations were investigated. Results Of 1697 adenocarcinomas, 38 (2.2%) had clear cell component. Fifty percent of adenocarcinomas with clear cell component (11/22) harbored EGFR mutation, 41 percent (9/22) harbored KRAS mutation and 5 percent (1/22) harbored AKT1 mutation. Univariable analysis revealed that sex, age, tumor stage, tumor size, nodal stage and pathology were all significant predictors of RFS and OS while the tumor size and nodal stage were still significant predictors in multivariable analysis. There were significantly differences in RFS and OS for lung adenocarcinomas with clear cell component compared with those lung adenocarcinomas. Conclusions Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component is a rare, malignant tumor with poor prognosis and displays more frequent EGFR and KRAS mutations. PMID:27013585

  3. Matrix modulation of compensatory lung regrowth and progenitor cell proliferation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shifren, A.; Mazan, M. R.; Gruntman, A. M.; Lascola, K. M.; Nolen-Walston, R. D.; Kim, C. F.; Tsai, L.; Pierce, R. A.; Mecham, R. P.; Ingenito, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical stress is an important modulator of lung morphogenesis, postnatal lung development, and compensatory lung regrowth. The effect of mechanical stress on stem or progenitor cells is unclear. We examined whether proliferative responses of epithelial progenitor cells, including dually immunoreactive (CCSP and proSP-C) progenitor cells (CCSP+/SP-C+) and type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII), are affected by physical factors found in the lung of emphysematics, including loss of elastic recoil, reduced elastin content, and alveolar destruction. Mice underwent single lung pneumonectomy (PNY) to modulate transpulmonary pressure (mechanical stress) and to stimulate lung regeneration. Control mice underwent sham thoracotomy. Plombage of different levels was employed to partially or completely abolish this mechanical stress. Responses to graded changes in transpulmonary pressure were assessed in elastin-insufficient mice (elastin +/−, ELN+/−) and elastase-treated mice with elastase-induced emphysema. Physiological regrowth, morphometry (linear mean intercept; Lmi), and the proliferative responses of CCSP+/SP-C+, Clara cells, and ATII were evaluated. Plombage following PNY significantly reduced transpulmonary pressure, regrowth, and CCSP+/SP-C+, Clara cell, and ATII proliferation following PNY. In the ELN+/− group, CCSP+/SP-C+ and ATII proliferation responses were completely abolished, although compensatory lung regrowth was not significantly altered. In contrast, in elastase-injured mice, compensatory lung regrowth was significantly reduced, and ATII but not CCSP+/SP-C+ proliferation responses were impaired. Elastase injury also reduced the baseline abundance of CCSP+/SP-C+, and CCSP+/SP-C+ were found to be displaced from the bronchioalveolar duct junction. These data suggest that qualities of the extracellular matrix including elastin content, mechanical stress, and alveolar integrity strongly influence the regenerative capacity of the lung, and the

  4. Protein signature for non-small cell lung cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Libo; Gao, Ling; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Kai; Song, Jena; Wang, Hongxia; Bayer, Thomas A; Glaser, Laurel; Sun, Yezhou; Zhang, Weijia; Cutaia, Michael; Zhang, David Y; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological classification and TNM staging have limited accuracy in predicting survival and stratifying patients for appropriate treatment. The goal of the study is to determine whether the expression pattern of functionally important regulatory proteins can add additional values for more accurate classification and prognostication of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of 108 proteins and phosphoproteins in 30 paired NSCLC samples were assessed using Protein Pathway Array (PPA). The differentially expressed proteins were further confirmed using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 94 NSCLC samples and were correlated with clinical data and survival. Results: Twelve of 108 proteins (p-CREB(Ser133), p-ERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), Cyclin B1, p-PDK1(Ser241), CDK4, CDK2, HSP90, CDC2p34, β-catenin, EGFR, XIAP and PCNA) were selected to build the predictor to classify normal and tumor samples with 97% accuracy. Five proteins (CDC2p34, HSP90, XIAP, CDK4 and CREB) were confirmed to be differentially expressed between NSCLC (n=94) and benign lung tumor (n=19). Over-expression of CDK4 and HSP90 in tumors correlated with a favorable overall survival in all NSCLC patients and the over-expression of p-CREB(Ser133) and CREB in NSCLC correlated with a favorable survival in smokers and those with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Finally, the four proteins (CDK4, HSP90, p-CREB and CREB) were used to calculate the risk score of each individual patient with NSCLC to predict survival. Conclusion: In summary, our data demonstrated a broad disturbance of functionally important regulatory proteins in NSCLC and some of these can be selected as clinically useful biomarkers for diagnosis, classification and prognosis. PMID:24959380

  5. Molecular mechanisms of asbestos-induced lung epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Beri, Rohinee; Mueller, Amanda; Kamp, David W

    2010-11-01

    Asbestos causes pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) and malignancies (bronchogenic lung cancer and mesothelioma) by mechanisms that are not fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence show that alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis is a crucial initiating and perpetuating event in the development of pulmonary fibrosis following exposure to a wide variety of noxious stimuli, including asbestos. We review the important molecular mechanisms underlying asbestos-induced AEC apoptosis. Specifically, we focus on the role of asbestos in augmenting AEC apoptosis by the mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways that result from the production of iron-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We summarize emerging evidence implicating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in AEC apoptosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a disease with similarities to asbestosis. Finally, we discuss a recent finding that a mitochondrial oxidative DNA repair enzyme (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase; Ogg1) acts as a mitochondrial aconitase chaperone protein to prevent oxidant (asbestos and H(2)O(2))-induced AEC mitochondrial dysfunction and intrinsic apoptosis. The coupling of mitochondrial Ogg1 to mitochondrial aconitase is a novel mechanism linking metabolism to mitochondrial DNA that may be important in the pathophysiologic events resulting in oxidant-induced toxicity as seen in tumors, aging, and respiratory disorders (e.g. asbestosis, IPF). Collectively, these studies are illuminating the molecular basis of AEC apoptosis following asbestos exposure that may prove useful for developing novel therapeutic strategies. Importantly, the asbestos paradigm is elucidating pathophysiologic insights into other more common pulmonary diseases, such as IPF and lung cancer, for which better therapy is required. PMID:20380827

  6. Comparative proteome analysis across non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Grundner-Culemann, Kathrin; Dybowski, J Nikolaj; Klammer, Martin; Tebbe, Andreas; Schaab, Christoph; Daub, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines are widely used model systems to study molecular aspects of lung cancer. Comparative and in-depth proteome expression data across many NSCLC cell lines has not been generated yet, but would be of utility for the investigation of candidate targets and markers in oncogenesis. We employed a SILAC reference approach to perform replicate proteome quantifications across 23 distinct NSCLC cell lines. On average, close to 4000 distinct proteins were identified and quantified per cell line. These included many known targets and diagnostic markers, indicating that our proteome expression data represents a useful resource for NSCLC pre-clinical research. To assess proteome diversity within the NSCLC cell line panel, we performed hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis of proteome expression data. Our results indicate that general proteome diversity among NSCLC cell lines supersedes potential effects common to K-Ras or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) oncoprotein expression. However, we observed partial segregation of EGFR or KRAS mutant cell lines for certain principal components, which reflected biological differences according to gene ontology enrichment analyses. Moreover, statistical analysis revealed several proteins that were significantly overexpressed in KRAS or EGFR mutant cell lines. PMID:26361996

  7. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): an update of a planning study.

    PubMed

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L; Brada, Michael

    2009-06-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V(20) and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung. PMID:18995919

  8. GPR171 expression enhances proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dho, So Hee; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Jeong, Dongjun; Kim, Chang-Jin; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Seon-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most significant therapeutic targets and some of them promote the growth and metastasis of cancer. Here, we show that an increase in the levels of GPR171 is crucial for lung cancer tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Immunostaining of clinical samples indicated that GPR171 was overexpressed in 46.8% of lung carcinoma tissues. Depletion of GPR171 with an anti-GPR171 antibody decreased proliferation of lung carcinoma cells and attenuated tumor progression in a mouse xenograft model. Knockdown of GPR171 also inhibited migration and invasion of the lung cancer cell lines. Notably, inhibition of GPR171 synergistically enhanced the tumoricidal activity of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor in lung cancer cells. These results indicate that GPR171 blockade is a promising antineoplastic strategy and provide a preclinical rationale for combined inhibition of GPR171 and EGFR. PMID:26760963

  9. Isolation and clonal assay of adult lung epithelial stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, Ivan; McQualter, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Adult mouse lung epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC) can be defined in vitro as epithelial colony-forming units that are capable of self-renewal, and which when co-cultured with lung mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are able to give rise to differentiated progeny comprising mature lung epithelial cells. This unit describes a protocol for the prospective isolation and in vitro propagation and differentiation of adult mouse lung EpiSPC. The strategy used for selection of EpiSPC and MSC from adult mouse lung by enzymatic digestion and flow cytometry is based on the differential expression of CD45, CD31, Sca-1, EpCAM, and CD24. The culture conditions required for the differentiation (co-culture with MSC) and expansion (stromal-free culture with FGF-10 and HGF) of EpiSPC are described.

  10. Biomarkers and targeted systemic therapies in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ernani, Vinicius; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2015-11-01

    The last decade has witnessed significant growth in therapeutic options for patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This is due in major part to our improved technological ability to interrogate the genomics of cancer cells, which has enabled the development of biologically rational anticancer agents. The recognition that lung cancer is not a single disease entity dates back many decades to the histological subclassification of malignant neoplasms of the lung into subcategories of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While SCLC continues to be regarded as a single histologic and therapeutic category, the NSCLC subset has undergone additional subcategorizations with distinct management algorithms for specific histologic and molecular subtypes. The defining characteristics of these NSCLC subtypes have evolved into important tools for prognosis and for predicting the likelihood of benefit when patients are treated with anticancer agents.

  11. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  12. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  13. Stem Cells, Cell Therapies, and Bioengineering in Lung Biology and Diseases. Comprehensive Review of the Recent Literature 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A conference, “Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases,” was held July 25 to 28, 2011 at the University of Vermont to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are rapidly expanding areas of study that provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, to discuss and debate current controversies, and to identify future research directions and opportunities for basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. The goal of this article, which accompanies the formal conference report, is to provide a comprehensive review of the published literature in lung regenerative medicine from the last conference report through December 2012. PMID:23869446

  14. XCR1 promotes cell growth and migration and is correlated with bone metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting; Han, Shuai; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Zhitao; Yan, Wangjun; Liu, Tielong; Wei, Haifeng; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Wang Yang, Xinghai Xiao, Jianru

    2015-08-21

    Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 30–40% patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the mechanism underlying this bone metastasis remains poorly understood. The chemokine super family is believed to play an important role in tumor metastasis in lung cancer. The chemokine receptor XCR1 has been identified to promote cell proliferation and migration in oral cancer and ovarian carcinoma, but the role of XCR1 in lung cancer has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that XCR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer bone metastasis as compared with that in patients with primary lung cancer. In addition, the XCR1 ligand XCL1 promoted the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells markedly, and knockdown of XCR1 by siRNA abolished the effect of XCL1 in cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we identified JAK2/STAT3 as a novel downstream pathway of XCR1, while XCL1/XCR1 increased the mRNA level of the downstream of JAK2/STAT3 including PIM1, JunB, TTP, MMP2 and MMP9. These results indicate that XCR1 is a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer bone metastasis. - Highlights: • XCR1 is overexpressed in bone metastasis compared with primary NSCLC. • XCR1 activation by XCL1 promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. • JAK2/STAT3 is a novel potential downstream pathway of XCR1.

  15. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  16. Endotoxin-induced lung alveolar cell injury causes brain cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Ramos-Nuez, Ángela; Martín-Barrasa, José Luis; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Baluja, Aurora; Álvarez, Julián; Rocco, Patricia RM; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the most common cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe lung inflammatory disorder with an elevated morbidity and mortality. Sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome involve the release of inflammatory mediators to the systemic circulation, propagating the cellular and molecular response and affecting distal organs, including the brain. Since it has been reported that sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome contribute to brain dysfunction, we investigated the brain-lung crosstalk using a combined experimental in vitro airway epithelial and brain cell injury model. Conditioned medium collected from an in vitro lipopolysaccharide-induced airway epithelial cell injury model using human A549 alveolar cells was subsequently added at increasing concentrations (no conditioned, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) to a rat mixed brain cell culture containing both astrocytes and neurons. Samples from culture media and cells from mixed brain cultures were collected before treatment, and at 6 and 24 h for analysis. Conditioned medium at 15% significantly increased apoptosis in brain cell cultures 24 h after treatment, whereas 25% and 50% significantly increased both necrosis and apoptosis. Levels of brain damage markers S100 calcium binding protein B and neuron-specific enolase, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased significantly after treating brain cells with ≥2% conditioned medium. Our findings demonstrated that human epithelial pulmonary cells stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide release inflammatory mediators that are able to induce a translational clinically relevant and harmful response in brain cells. These results support a brain-lung crosstalk during sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:25135986

  17. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  18. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  19. Pneumonia carcinomatosa from small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung presenting as reverse radiation pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, D.J.; Padhya, T.; Tomashefski, J.F. Jr.; Park, C.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a patient with recurrent small cell undifferentiated lung carcinoma after chemotherapy and mediastinal radiation therapy who presented with peripheral pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph. At autopsy the patient was found to have carcinomatous pneumonia confined to the radiographically abnormal lung. The descriptive term reverse radiation pneumonitis is applied in view of the striking nonsegmental distribution of these pulmonary infiltrates, which occurred only outside the irradiated field. In this patient, radiation therapy successfully controlled disease in the treated lung parenchyma, thus accounting for this unusual radiologic and histologic picture. Pneumonia carcinomatosa, occurring after lung irradiation, can therefore be added to the differential diagnosis of radiographic peripheral pulmonary infiltrates.

  20. Synchronous Primary Lung Cancer Presenting with Small Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Ken; Yamato, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masashi; Takamori, Hiroyuki; Karasuno, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple synchronous primary lung cancers presenting with different histologic types are uncommon. Among reported cases with different histologic findings, only a few had small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and adenocarcinoma. This unusual combination of lung cancers has not been well reported. In this report, we describe two cases of synchronous primary lung cancer presenting with lymph node metastasis of SCLC and early-stage adenocarcinoma. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation was not detected in either SCLC or adenocarcinoma in the two cases. PMID:25832826

  1. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  2. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  3. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  4. Telomere shortening and cell senescence induced by perylene derivatives in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taka, Thanachai; Huang, Liming; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong; Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Lee, T Randall; Tuntiwechapikul, Wirote

    2013-02-15

    Cancer cells evade replicative senescence by re-expressing telomerase, which maintains telomere length and hence chromosomal integrity. Telomerase inhibition would lead cancer cells to senesce and therefore prevent cancer cells from growing indefinitely. G-quadruplex ligands can attenuate telomerase activity by inducing G-quadruplex formation at the 3'-overhang of telomere and at the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; the former prevents telomerase from accessing the telomere, and the latter acts as a transcriptional silencer. The present investigation found that perylene derivatives PM2 and PIPER induced G-quadruplex formation from both telomeric DNA and the hTERT promoter region in vitro. Further, TRAP assay showed that these compounds inhibited telomerase in a dose-dependent manner. When A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with these compounds, hTERT expression was down-regulated. Moreover, the crude protein extract from these treated cells exhibited less telomerase activity. In the long-term treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with sub-cytotoxic dose of these perylenes, telomere shortening, reduction of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and cell senescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that perylene derivatives warrant further consideration as effective agents for cancer therapy.

  5. Current and future molecular diagnostics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Man; Chu, Wing Ying; Wong, Di Lun; Tsang, Hin Fung; Tsui, Nancy Bo Yin; Chan, Charles Ming Lok; Xue, Vivian Wei Wen; Siu, Parco Ming Fai; Yung, Benjamin Yat Ming; Chan, Lawrence Wing Chi; Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The molecular investigation of lung cancer has opened up an advanced area for the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer patients. Gene alterations in cancer initiation and progression provide not only information on molecular changes in lung cancer but also opportunities in advanced therapeutic regime by personalized targeted therapy. EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement are important predictive biomarkers for the efficiency of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in lung cancer patients. Moreover, epigenetic aberration and microRNA dysregulation are recent advances in the early detection and monitoring of lung cancer. Although a wide range of molecular tests are available, standardization and validation of assay protocols are essential for the quality of the test outcome. In this review, current and new advancements of molecular biomarkers for non-small-cell lung cancer will be discussed. Recommendations on future development of molecular diagnostic services will also be explored.

  6. Current and future molecular diagnostics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Man; Chu, Wing Ying; Wong, Di Lun; Tsang, Hin Fung; Tsui, Nancy Bo Yin; Chan, Charles Ming Lok; Xue, Vivian Wei Wen; Siu, Parco Ming Fai; Yung, Benjamin Yat Ming; Chan, Lawrence Wing Chi; Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The molecular investigation of lung cancer has opened up an advanced area for the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer patients. Gene alterations in cancer initiation and progression provide not only information on molecular changes in lung cancer but also opportunities in advanced therapeutic regime by personalized targeted therapy. EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement are important predictive biomarkers for the efficiency of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in lung cancer patients. Moreover, epigenetic aberration and microRNA dysregulation are recent advances in the early detection and monitoring of lung cancer. Although a wide range of molecular tests are available, standardization and validation of assay protocols are essential for the quality of the test outcome. In this review, current and new advancements of molecular biomarkers for non-small-cell lung cancer will be discussed. Recommendations on future development of molecular diagnostic services will also be explored. PMID:26153330

  7. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  8. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Berman, Abigail T; James, Sara St; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  9. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Misharin, Alexander V; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Perlman, Harris

    2013-10-01

    The lung hosts multiple populations of macrophages and dendritic cells, which play a crucial role in lung pathology. The accurate identification and enumeration of these subsets are essential for understanding their role in lung pathology. Flow cytometry is a mainstream tool for studying the immune system. However, a systematic flow cytometric approach to identify subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) accurately and consistently in the normal mouse lung has not been described. Here we developed a panel of surface markers and an analysis strategy that accurately identify all known populations of macrophages and DCs, and their precursors in the lung during steady-state conditions and bleomycin-induced injury. Using this panel, we assessed the polarization of lung macrophages during the course of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Alveolar macrophages expressed markers of alternatively activated macrophages during both acute and fibrotic phases of bleomycin-induced lung injury, whereas markers of classically activated macrophages were expressed only during the acute phase. Taken together, these data suggest that this flow cytometric panel is very helpful in identifying macrophage and DC populations and their state of activation in normal, injured, and fibrotic lungs.

  10. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown in an Ex Vivo 3D Lung Model Produce Matrix Metalloproteinases Not Produced in 2D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Sakamoto, Jason H.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the growth of human lung cancer cells in an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) lung model and 2D culture to determine which better mimics lung cancer growth in patients. A549 cells were grown in an ex vivo 3D lung model and in 2D culture for 15 days. We measured the size and formation of tumor nodules and counted the cells after 15 days. We also stained the tissue/cells for Ki-67, and Caspase-3. We measured matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in the conditioned media and in blood plasma from patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Organized tumor nodules with intact vascular space formed in the ex vivo 3D lung model but not in 2D culture. Proliferation and apoptosis were greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model compared to the 2D culture. After 15 days, there were significantly more cells in the 2D culture than the 3D model. MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10 production were significantly greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model. There was no production of MMP-9 in the 2D culture. The patient samples contained MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The human lung cancer cells grown on ex vivo 3D model form perfusable nodules that grow over time. It also produced MMPs that were not produced in 2D culture but seen in human lung cancer patients. The ex vivo 3D lung model may more closely mimic the biology of human lung cancer development than the 2D culture. PMID:23028922

  11. TCRP1 contributes to cisplatin resistance by preventing Pol β degradation in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaorong; Wang, Chengkun; Gu, Yixue; Zhang, Zhijie; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) is the first-line chemotherapy drug widely used for the treatment of lung cancer patients, whereas the majority of cancer patients will eventually show resistance to DDP. The mechanisms responsible for DDP resistance are not fully understood. Tongue cancer resistance-associated protein 1 (TCRP1) gene was recently cloned and reported to specially mediate DDP resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. However, the mechanisms of TCRP1-mediated DDP resistance are far from clear, and whether TCRP1 participates in DDP resistance in lung cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we show that TCRP1 contributes to DDP resistance in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of TCRP1 sensitizes the cells to DDP and increases the DDP-induced DNA damage. We have identified that Pol β is associated with DDP resistance, and Pol β knockdown delays the repair of DDP-induced DNA damage in A549/DDP cells. We find TCRP1 interacts with Pol β in lung cancer cells. Moreover, TCRP1 knockdown decreases the level of Pol β and increases the level of its ubiquitination. These results suggest that TCRP1 contributes to DDP resistance through the prevention of Pol β degradation in lung cancer cells. These findings provide new insights into chemoresistance and may contribute to prevention and reversal of DDP resistance in treatment of lung cancer in the future.

  12. [Single-cell detection of EGFR gene mutation in circulating tumor cells in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Sun; Yuliang, Deng

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that shed from a primary tumor and enter the peripheral blood circulation. The CTCs are closely associated with tumor development and metastasis because of its high heterogeneity. However, there are still no effective methods to detect single-cell heterogeneity of the CTCs. To this end, we developed a method to detect gene mutation in CTCs at the single-cell level and applied it to the detection of EGFR gene mutation in single lung cancer CTC. Specifically, the rare CTCs were captured from blood using an integrated microfluidic system, and then were released into a microchip with thousands of nanoliter wells to isolate single CTC. The single CTC was then transferred into a PCR tube under the microscope for single-cell genome amplification and detection of EGFR gene mutation. We firstly modified chip and capillary and optimized PCR conditions (annealing temperature, number of cycles) using non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines A549, NCI-H1650 and NCI-H1975 as samples, which showed maximal amplification after 30 cycles with an annealing temperature at 59℃. We then successfully detected blood samples from NSCLC patients using this method. 5 CTCs were obtained from 2 mL patient's blood and the sequencing of EGFR exons 18, 19, 20 and 21 showed no mutations. Our results demonstrated that this method is sensitive enough to detect gene mutation in single CTC and has guiding significance in clinic research. PMID:26704950

  13. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  14. shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 inhibit lung adenocarcinoma cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiuxiang; Wang, Yifang; Zheng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunqing; Su, Benli; Nie, Huiling; Zhao, Baoxia; Zhao, Xinyu; Yang, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Bmi-1 has been implicated in cancer cell growth and metastasis in a variety of tumor types. In this study, we sought to evaluate the expression of Bmi-1 in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and to determine if a correlation exists between Bmi-1 expression and clinical features of lung cancer, such as metastasis. Our results showed that Bmi-1 expression is increased in lung cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, and is associated with clinical features of lung cancer, including clinical stage and distant metastasis. We were then interested in determining if shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 would inhibit metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells. To this end, we chose the most efficient shRNA duplexes targeting Bmi-1, and constructed two stably transfected lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549 and SPCA1). The shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 significantly reduced migration in vitro, and metastasis in vivo, of A549 and SPCA1 cells. More importantly, knockdown of Bmi-1 also upregulated PTEN expression, and downregulated p-Akt and VEGF expression. These data support the hypothesis that Bmi-1 regulates key pathways involved in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  15. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naikawadi, Ram P.; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L.; Green, Gary; La, Janet L.; Rock, Jason R.; Looney, Mark R.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin+ mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase+ lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27699234

  16. Activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Nianjun; Wu, Jun; Kang, Yani; Shen, Tingting; Kong, Hualei; Ma, Chao; Cheng, Ming; Shao, Zhifeng; Xu, Ling; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Application of cisplatin (DDP) for treating lung cancer is restricted due to its toxicity and lung cancer's drug resistance. In this study, we examined the effect of Jinfukang (JFK), an effective herbal medicine against lung cancer, on DDP-induced cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells. Morphologically, we observed that JFK increases DDP-induced pro-apoptosis in A549 cells in a synergistic manner. Transcriptome profiling analysis indicated that the combination of JFK and DDP regulates genes involved in apoptosis-related signaling pathways. Moreover, we found that the combination of JFK and DDP produces synergistic pro-apoptosis effect in other lung cancer cell lines, such as NCI-H1975, NCI-H1650, and NCI-H2228. Particularly, we demonstrated that AIFM2 is activated by the combined treatment of JFK and DDP and partially mediates the synergistic pro-apoptosis effect. Collectively, this study not only offered the first evidence that JFK promotes DDP-induced cytotoxicity, and activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress, but also provided a novel insight for improving cytotoxicity by combining JFK with DDP to treat lung cancer cells. PMID:27392435

  17. Activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Nianjun; Wu, Jun; Kang, Yani; Shen, Tingting; Kong, Hualei; Ma, Chao; Cheng, Ming; Shao, Zhifeng; Xu, Ling; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Application of cisplatin (DDP) for treating lung cancer is restricted due to its toxicity and lung cancer's drug resistance. In this study, we examined the effect of Jinfukang (JFK), an effective herbal medicine against lung cancer, on DDP-induced cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells. Morphologically, we observed that JFK increases DDP-induced pro-apoptosis in A549 cells in a synergistic manner. Transcriptome profiling analysis indicated that the combination of JFK and DDP regulates genes involved in apoptosis-related signaling pathways. Moreover, we found that the combination of JFK and DDP produces synergistic pro-apoptosis effect in other lung cancer cell lines, such as NCI-H1975, NCI-H1650, and NCI-H2228. Particularly, we demonstrated that AIFM2 is activated by the combined treatment of JFK and DDP and partially mediates the synergistic pro-apoptosis effect. Collectively, this study not only offered the first evidence that JFK promotes DDP-induced cytotoxicity, and activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress, but also provided a novel insight for improving cytotoxicity by combining JFK with DDP to treat lung cancer cells.

  18. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naikawadi, Ram P.; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L.; Green, Gary; La, Janet L.; Rock, Jason R.; Looney, Mark R.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin+ mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase+ lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction.

  19. Resident tissue-specific mesenchymal progenitor cells contribute to fibrogenesis in human lung allografts.

    PubMed

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N

    2011-06-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft-derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme-associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs.

  20. Nubp1 Is Required for Lung Branching Morphogenesis and Distal Progenitor Cell Survival in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schnatwinkel, Carsten; Niswander, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The lung is a complex system in biology and medicine alike. Whereas there is a good understanding of the anatomy and histology of the embryonic and adult lung, less is known about the molecular details and the cellular pathways that ultimately orchestrate lung formation and affect its health. From a forward genetic approach to identify novel genes involved in lung formation, we identified a mutated Nubp1 gene, which leads to syndactyly, eye cataract and lung hypoplasia. In the lung, Nubp1 is expressed in progenitor cells of the distal epithelium. Nubp1(m1Nisw) mutants show increased apoptosis accompanied by a loss of the distal progenitor markers Sftpc, Sox9 and Foxp2. In addition, Nubp1 mutation disrupts localization of the polarity protein Par3 and the mitosis relevant protein Numb. Using knock-down studies in lung epithelial cells, we also demonstrate a function of Nubp1 in regulating centrosome dynamics and microtubule organization. Together, Nubp1 represents an essential protein for lung progenitor survival by coordinating vital cellular processes including cell polarity and centrosomal dynamics. PMID:23028652

  1. Nubp1 is required for lung branching morphogenesis and distal progenitor cell survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Schnatwinkel, Carsten; Niswander, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The lung is a complex system in biology and medicine alike. Whereas there is a good understanding of the anatomy and histology of the embryonic and adult lung, less is known about the molecular details and the cellular pathways that ultimately orchestrate lung formation and affect its health. From a forward genetic approach to identify novel genes involved in lung formation, we identified a mutated Nubp1 gene, which leads to syndactyly, eye cataract and lung hypoplasia. In the lung, Nubp1 is expressed in progenitor cells of the distal epithelium. Nubp1(m1Nisw) mutants show increased apoptosis accompanied by a loss of the distal progenitor markers Sftpc, Sox9 and Foxp2. In addition, Nubp1 mutation disrupts localization of the polarity protein Par3 and the mitosis relevant protein Numb. Using knock-down studies in lung epithelial cells, we also demonstrate a function of Nubp1 in regulating centrosome dynamics and microtubule organization. Together, Nubp1 represents an essential protein for lung progenitor survival by coordinating vital cellular processes including cell polarity and centrosomal dynamics.

  2. Spatiotemporal quantification of cell dynamics in the lung following influenza virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lu; Xu, Shuoyu; Cheng, Jierong; Zheng, Dahai; Limmon, Gino V.; Leung, Nicola H. N.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu; Yu, Hanry

    2013-04-01

    Lung injury caused by influenza virus infection is widespread. Understanding lung damage and repair progression post infection requires quantitative spatiotemporal information on various cell types mapping into the tissue structure. Based on high content images acquired from an automatic slide scanner, we have developed algorithms to quantify cell infiltration in the lung, loss and recovery of Clara cells in the damaged bronchioles and alveolar type II cells (AT2s) in the damaged alveolar areas, and induction of pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SPC)-expressing bronchiolar epithelial cells (SBECs). These quantitative analyses reveal: prolonged immune cell infiltration into the lung that persisted long after the influenza virus was cleared and paralleled with Clara cell recovery; more rapid loss and recovery of Clara cells as compared to AT2s; and two stages of SBECs from Scgb1a1+ to Scgb1a1-. These results provide evidence supporting a new mechanism of alveolar repair where Clara cells give rise to AT2s through the SBEC intermediates and shed light on the understanding of the lung damage and repair process. The approach and algorithms in quantifying cell-level changes in the tissue context (cell-based tissue informatics) to gain mechanistic insights into the damage and repair process can be expanded and adapted in studying other disease models.

  3. Pluripotent Allospecific CD8+ Effector T Cells Traffic to Lung in Murine Obliterative Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Lavoie, Tera L.; Orens, Jonathan B.; Chen, Edward S.; Ye, Shui Q.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; McDyer, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-α and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-γ as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-γ was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process. PMID:16195540

  4. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  5. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  6. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  7. Gigantol Inhibits Epithelial to Mesenchymal Process in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Unahabhokha, Thitita; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Kitsongsermthon, Jutarat; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a leading public health problem as evidenced by its increasing death rate. The main cause of death in lung cancer patients is cancer metastasis. The metastatic behavior of lung cancer cells becomes enhanced when cancer cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Gigantol, a bibenzyl compound extracted from the Thai orchid, Dendrobium draconis, has been shown to have promising therapeutic potential against cancer cells, which leads to the hypothesis that gigantol may be able to inhibit the fundamental EMT process in cancer cells. This study has demonstrated for the first time that gigantol possesses the ability to suppress EMT in non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Western blot analysis has revealed that gigantol attenuates the activity of ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (AKT), thereby inhibiting the expression of the major EMT transcription factor, Slug, by both decreasing its transcription and increasing its degradation. The inhibitory effects of gigantol on EMT result in a decrease in the level of migration in H460 lung cancer cells. The results of this study emphasize the potential of gigantol for further development against lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27651818

  8. Gigantol Inhibits Epithelial to Mesenchymal Process in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Unahabhokha, Thitita; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Kitsongsermthon, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a leading public health problem as evidenced by its increasing death rate. The main cause of death in lung cancer patients is cancer metastasis. The metastatic behavior of lung cancer cells becomes enhanced when cancer cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Gigantol, a bibenzyl compound extracted from the Thai orchid, Dendrobium draconis, has been shown to have promising therapeutic potential against cancer cells, which leads to the hypothesis that gigantol may be able to inhibit the fundamental EMT process in cancer cells. This study has demonstrated for the first time that gigantol possesses the ability to suppress EMT in non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Western blot analysis has revealed that gigantol attenuates the activity of ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (AKT), thereby inhibiting the expression of the major EMT transcription factor, Slug, by both decreasing its transcription and increasing its degradation. The inhibitory effects of gigantol on EMT result in a decrease in the level of migration in H460 lung cancer cells. The results of this study emphasize the potential of gigantol for further development against lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27651818

  9. Regenerative potential of human airway stem cells in lung epithelial engineering.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Wu, Tong; Evangelista-Leite, Daniele; Mathisen, Douglas J; Ott, Harald C

    2016-11-01

    Bio-engineered organs for transplantation may ultimately provide a personalized solution for end-stage organ failure, without the risk of rejection. Building upon the process of whole organ perfusion decellularization, we aimed to develop novel, translational methods for the recellularization and regeneration of transplantable lung constructs. We first isolated a proliferative KRT5(+)TP63(+) basal epithelial stem cell population from human lung tissue and demonstrated expansion capacity in conventional 2D culture. We then repopulated acellular rat scaffolds in ex vivo whole organ culture and observed continued cell proliferation, in combination with primary pulmonary endothelial cells. To show clinical scalability, and to test the regenerative capacity of the basal cell population in a human context, we then recellularized and cultured isolated human lung scaffolds under biomimetic conditions. Analysis of the regenerated tissue constructs confirmed cell viability and sustained metabolic activity over 7 days of culture. Tissue analysis revealed extensive recellularization with organized tissue architecture and morphology, and preserved basal epithelial cell phenotype. The recellularized lung constructs displayed dynamic compliance and rudimentary gas exchange capacity. Our results underline the regenerative potential of patient-derived human airway stem cells in lung tissue engineering. We anticipate these advances to have clinically relevant implications for whole lung bioengineering and ex vivo organ repair. PMID:27622532

  10. Gigantol Inhibits Epithelial to Mesenchymal Process in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Unahabhokha, Thitita; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Kitsongsermthon, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a leading public health problem as evidenced by its increasing death rate. The main cause of death in lung cancer patients is cancer metastasis. The metastatic behavior of lung cancer cells becomes enhanced when cancer cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Gigantol, a bibenzyl compound extracted from the Thai orchid, Dendrobium draconis, has been shown to have promising therapeutic potential against cancer cells, which leads to the hypothesis that gigantol may be able to inhibit the fundamental EMT process in cancer cells. This study has demonstrated for the first time that gigantol possesses the ability to suppress EMT in non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Western blot analysis has revealed that gigantol attenuates the activity of ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (AKT), thereby inhibiting the expression of the major EMT transcription factor, Slug, by both decreasing its transcription and increasing its degradation. The inhibitory effects of gigantol on EMT result in a decrease in the level of migration in H460 lung cancer cells. The results of this study emphasize the potential of gigantol for further development against lung cancer metastasis.

  11. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders in small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark; Chapman, Caroline; Nibber, Anjan; Waters, Patrick; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Maddison, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and range of paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PNDs) and neuronal antibodies in small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Methods: Two hundred sixty-four consecutive patients with biopsy-proven SCLC were recruited at the time of tumor diagnosis. All patients underwent full neurologic examination. Serum samples were taken prior to chemotherapy and analyzed for 15 neuronal antibodies. Thirty-eight healthy controls were analyzed in parallel. Results: PNDs were quite prevalent (n = 24, 9.4%), most frequently Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (3.8%), sensory neuronopathy (1.9%), and limbic encephalitis (1.5%). Eighty-seven percent of all patients with PNDs had antibodies to SOX2 (62.5%), HuD (41.7%), or P/Q VGCC (50%), irrespective of their syndrome. Other neuronal antibodies were found at lower frequencies (GABAb receptor [12.5%] and N-type VGCC [20.8%]) or very rarely (GAD65, amphiphysin, Ri, CRMP5, Ma2, Yo, VGKC complex, CASPR2, LGI1, and NMDA receptor [all <5%]). Conclusions: The spectrum of PNDs is broader and the frequency is higher than previously appreciated, and selected antibody tests (SOX2, HuD, VGCC) can help determine the presence of an SCLC. PMID:26109714

  13. Frequent loss of Fas expression and function in human lung tumours with overexpression of FasL in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Viard-Leveugle, Isabelle; Veyrenc, Sylvie; French, Lars E; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2003-10-01

    Fas (CD95) and its ligand FasL signal apoptosis and are involved in tissue homeostasis and the elimination of target cells by cytotoxic T cells. Corruption of this signalling pathway in tumour cells, for example by reduced Fas expression or increased FasL expression, can participate in tumour development and immune escape. The present study has analysed Fas/FasL expression and Fas death signalling function in vivo in lung tumour tissues [57 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 64 neuroendocrine lung tumours including small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC)] in comparison with normal lung tissue, and in vitro in neuroendocrine tumour cell lines in comparison with normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The Fas expression score was markedly decreased compared with normal lung tissue in 90% of the 121 lung tumours and was completely lost in 24%. The Fas staining pattern suggested cytoplasmic Fas expression in tumours, whereas membrane expression was observed in normal lung tissue. Loss of Fas at the cell surface was also shown in vitro by FACS analysis of neuroendocrine tumour cell lines and was concomitant with the resistance of tumour cells to FasL-mediated apoptosis according to in vitro cell viability. The lack of cell surface Fas expression in tumour cell lines resulted from the lack of intracellular Fas protein due to impaired Fas gene transcription. The FasL expression score was also decreased in most non-small cell lung carcinomas compared with normal bronchial cells, whereas 91% of SCLCs had higher expression than normal cells. FasL overexpression was related to advanced tumour stage as well as to a Fas/FasL ratio less than 1. It is concluded that a marked decrease in Fas expression may be part of lung tumourigenesis allowing tumour cells to escape from apoptosis. FasL overexpression in the context of Fas down-regulation in SCLC predicts the ability of SCLC cells to induce paracrine killing of Fas-expressing cytotoxic T cells. In lung tumours, Fas restoration may

  14. P-selectin mediates adhesion of platelets to neuroblastoma and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J P; Wagner, D D

    1993-01-01

    Activated platelets and stimulated endothelial cells express P-selectin, an integral membrane protein receptor that binds monocytes and neutrophils. P-selectin mediates adhesion to glycoproteins with carbohydrate structures containing sialyl-Lewis X. Since many carcinoma cells also express these carbohydrate structures and are known to interact with platelets, we asked whether P-selectin may mediate this interaction. Both small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines bound to activated platelets, and this interaction was blocked with inhibitory anti-P-selectin antibodies and by pretreatment of these cancer cells with neuraminidase or trypsin. Platelet binding to the small cell lung cancer cells was not inhibited with anti-GP IIb-IIIa antibody or Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. Pretreatment of the neuroblastoma cells with inhibitors of N-linked carbohydrate biosynthesis had little effect on binding to P-selectin, indicating that relevant carbohydrate ligand(s) may be O-linked. In addition, lipospheres containing P-selectin specifically bound to cryostat sections derived from a small cell lung tumor and two neuroblastoma tumors, but not to sections of normal lung. These observations demonstrate that P-selectin mediates binding of platelets to small cell lung cancer and to neuroblastoma and suggest a possible role for this lectin in metastasis. Images PMID:7688763

  15. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  16. Middle infrared radiation induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Meng-Her; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3-5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G(2)/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression.

  17. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  18. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits cell proliferation via AKT/GSK3β/cyclinD1 pathway and induces apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kui; Li, Juan; Wang, Zhiling

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The main types of lung cancer are small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC); non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) includes squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, Non small cell lung carcinoma accounts for about 80% of the total lung cancer cases. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. The effects of DHA on cell growth and proliferation in lung cancer cells remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that DHA inhibited cell proliferation in the A549 lung cancer cell line through suppression of the AKT/Gsk-3β/cyclin D1 signaling pathway. DHA significantly inhibited cell proliferation of A549 cells in a concentration and time dependent manner as determined by MTS assay. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHA treatment of A549 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, which correlated with apparent downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of both PCNA and cyclin D1. These results suggest that DHA is a potential natural product for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25674233

  19. Alternative splicing isoform of T cell factor 4K suppresses the proliferation and metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y C; Min, L; Chen, H; Liu, Y L

    2015-10-30

    The Wnt pathway has been implicated in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of lung cancer. T cell factor 4, a member of TCF/LEF family, acts as a transcriptional factor for Wnt pathways in lung cancer. Increasing amounts of evidence have shown that TCF-4 has multiple alternative splicing isoforms with transactivation or transrepression activity toward the Wnt pathway. Here, we found the presence of multiple TCF-4 isoforms in lung cancer cell lines and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. TCF-4K isoform expression was significantly decreased in lung cancer cells compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells and was identified as a transcriptional suppressor of the Wnt pathway in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Overexpression of TCF-4K significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells. Collectively, our data indicate that TCF-4K functions as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC by down-regulating the Wnt pathway.

  20. Enhanced expression of stem cell markers and drug resistance in sphere-forming non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng-Feng; Hu, Yong-He; Xiong, Lv-Ping; Tu, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Ji-Hua; Chen, Sheng-Song; Song, Juan; Ye, Xiao-Qun

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are playing critical roles in tumor progression, metastasis and drug resistance. However, the role of CSCs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains elusive. In this study, we enriched for stem-like cells from tumor spheres derived from NSCLC cell line A549 cultured in serum-free medium. Our results showed that sphere-derived cells expressed various stem cell markers such as CD44, CD133, Sox2 and Oct4. Compared with the corresponding cells in monolayer cultures, sphere-derived cells showed marked morphologic changes and increased expression of the stem cell markers CD133. Furthermore, we found that sphere-derived cells exhibited increased proliferation, cell-cycle progression as well as drug-resistant properties as compared to A549 adherent cells. Consistently, expression of several drug resistance proteins, including lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathion-S-transferase-π (GST-π) and multidrug resistance proteins-1 (MRP1) were all significantly enhanced in sphere-derived cells. These results indicate the enrichment of CSCs in sphere cultures and support their role in regulating drug resistance in NSCLC. PMID:26261505

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields. PMID:27509163

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  3. SIAH2 antagonizes TYK2-STAT3 signaling in lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sylvia; Chen, Yuan; Ginter, Torsten; Schäfer, Claudia; Buchwald, Marc; Schmitz, Lienhard M; Klitzsch, Jana; Schütz, Alexander; Haitel, Andrea; Schmid, Katharina; Moriggl, Richard; Kenner, Lukas; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Haan, Claude; Petersen, Iver; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2014-05-30

    The Janus tyrosine kinases JAK1-3 and tyrosine kinase-2 (TYK2) are frequently hyperactivated in tumors. In lung cancers JAK1 and JAK2 induce oncogenic signaling through STAT3. A putative role of TYK2 in these tumors has not been reported. Here, we show a previously not recognized TYK2-STAT3 signaling node in lung cancer cells. We reveal that the E3 ubiquitin ligase seven-in-absentia-2 (SIAH2) accelerates the proteasomal degradation of TYK2. This mechanism consequently suppresses the activation of STAT3. In agreement with these data the analysis of primary non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples from three patient cohorts revealed that compared to lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) show significantly higher levels of SIAH2 and reduced STAT3 phosphorylation levels. Thus, SIAH2 is a novel molecular marker for SCC. We further demonstrate that an activation of the oncologically relevant transcription factor p53 in lung cancer cells induces SIAH2, depletes TYK2, and abrogates the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3. This mechanism appears to be different from the inhibition of phosphorylated JAKs through the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins. Our study may help to identify molecular mechanisms affecting lung carcinogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24833526

  4. Clear Cell “Sugar” Tumor of the Lung: Benign or Malignant?

    PubMed Central

    Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H.; Rodriguez, Abraham Elias

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell “sugar” tumors of the lung are rare pulmonary tumors. This case study illustrates a patient who was found to have a persistent nodule in the left-upper lobe of the lung. Positron emission tomographic scanning showed mild-moderate 18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. Based on these findings, a video-assisted resection of the tumor was undertaken. The mass was identified histologically, as a clear cell “sugar” tumor of the lung. This case report discusses the benign versus malignant nature of this rare tumor. PMID:26011217

  5. Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Mock, Jason R.; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Florez, Marcus A.; Chau, Eric; Gibbs, Kevin W.; Mandke, Pooja; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; King, Landon S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and often fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild-type (WT) mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs from DAC-treated WT mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1–null mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3DTR) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 2 × 105 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. In addition, in WT mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:25295995

  6. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. Unbiased Selection of Peptide-Peptoid Hybrids Specific for Lung Cancer Compared to Normal Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Matharage, Jaya M; Minna, John D; Brekken, Rolf A; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika

    2015-12-18

    To develop widely applicable diagnostic and potentially therapeutic approaches overcoming protein heterogeneity in human cancer, we have developed a technology to unbiasedly select high specificity compound(s) that bind any biomolecule (e.g., proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) presented on the cancer cell surface but not on normal cells. We utilized a peptidomimetic based on-bead two-color (OBTC) combinatorial cell screen that can detect differences between two cell surfaces at high accuracy by looking for beads (where each bead in the library had one peptide-peptoid hybrid on the surface) that only bound cancer but not normal cells. We screened a library of 393 216 compounds targeting HCC4017 lung adenocarcinoma cells (labeled in red) in the presence of HBEC30KT normal bronchial epithelial cells (labeled in green) derived from the same tissue of the same patient. This screen identified a peptide-peptoid hybrid called PPS1 which displayed high specific binding for HCC4017 cancer cells over HBEC30KT cells. Specificity was validated through on-bead, ELISA-like and magnetic bead pulldown studies, while a scrambled version of PPS1 did not show any binding. Of interest, the simple dimeric version (PPS1D1) displayed cytotoxic activity on HCC4017 cells, but not on normal HBEC30KT cells. PPS1D1 also strongly accumulated in HCC4017 lung cancer xenografts in mice over control constructs. We conclude that such combinatorial screens using tumor and normal cells from the same patient have significant potential to develop new reagents for cancer biology, diagnosis, and potentially therapy.

  8. Video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic lung resections. The initial Hong Kong experience.

    PubMed

    Yim, A P; Ko, K M; Chau, W S; Ma, C C; Ho, J K; Kyaw, K

    1996-01-01

    We report our combined experience on video-assisted thoracoscopic (VAT) anatomic lung resections from two major hospitals in Hong Kong over a 17-month period. From August 1993 to December 1994, 82 cases of major lung resections were attempted using the VATS approach, of which 60 were successfully completed (55 lobectomies, 2 bilobectomies, 2 pneumonectomies, and 1 segmentectomy). Of these 60 cases, there were 43 men and 17 women with a mean age of 66 years (range, 37 to 85 years). The final pathologies were 52 primary lung cancers (37 adenocarcinoma, 11 squamous cell carcinoma, 2 bronchoalveolar carcinoma, 1 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 1 undifferentiated carcinoma); 1 pulmonary metastasis (from nasopharyngeal carcinoma); and 7 benign lesions (3 tuberculosis, 1 bronchiectasis, 1 sclerosing hemangioma, 2 organizing pneumonia). There was one postoperative death (mortality rate, 1.8%). Complications include persistent air leak over 10 days (four), wound infection (two), supraventricular tachycardia (three), and recurrence of tumor over the utility thoracotomy scar (one). All the patients were followed up from 8 weeks to 19 months (mean, 10 months). The mean duration of chest drainage was 5.4 days (range, 2 to 25 days). The mean hospital stay was 7.2 days (range, 4 to 35 days). The average postoperative parenteral narcotic (meperidine hydrochloride [Pethidine]) requirement by patient-controlled analgesia was 275 mg (range, 75 to 800 mg). This compared favorably with an age- and sex-matched historic group of patients who underwent posterolateral thoracotomy and had a hospital stay of 10.4 days (statistically non-significant) and narcotic requirement of 950 mg (statistically significant by paired t test). We conclude that VAT anatomic lung resection is technically feasible. However, there are some specific complications associated with major lung resection through minimal access. Refinement of our present technique and attention to details are important to improve our

  9. Autologous endothelial progenitor cells improve allograft survival in porcine lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yi-Ting; Roan, Jun-Neng; Fang, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Shi-Wei; Tseng, Yau-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background As endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) attenuated acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbit model, we hypothesized that autologous EPCs preserved lung graft function during the acute reperfusion period of lung transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of EPCs in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged graft ischemia. Methods Day-7 EPCs isolated from the recipient subjects or plain culture media were administered into the left pulmonary artery immediately before restoration of pulmonary blood flow in a porcine lung allotransplantation model, with the transplantation surgeons blinded to the content of injection. Hemodynamics and arterial blood gas were recorded, and the right pulmonary artery was occluded 30 min after reperfusion to evaluate the lung graft function. The lung grafts were sectioned for histological examination at the end of experiments. The total ischemic time for lung graft was approximately 14 h. Results All animals receiving plain medium died within 40 min after reperfusion, but 3 out of 5 (60%) piglets receiving EPCs survived up to 4 h after diversion of the entire cardiac output into the lung graft (P<0.01). The donor body weight, recipient body weight, cold ischemic time, and time for anastomosis were comparable between the EPC and control group (P=0.989, 0.822, 0.843, and 0.452, respectively). The mean aortic pressure decreased, and the cardiac output and mean pulmonary artery pressure elevated after right pulmonary artery occlusion. All these parameters were gradually compensated in the EPC group but decompensated in the control group. Better preservation of gas exchange function, reduced thrombi formation in the terminal pulmonary arterioles, and attenuated interstitial hemorrhage of the lung graft were observed in the EPC group. Conclusions We concluded autologous EPCs significantly enhanced the function of lung allograft and improved survival in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

  10. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  11. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  12. Dysfunctional resident lung mesenchymal stem cells contribute to pulmonary microvascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kelsey; Fessel, Joshua P; Kaoriihida-Stansbury; Schmidt, Eric P; Gaskill, Christa; Alvarez, Diego; Graham, Brian; Harrison, David G; Wagner, David H; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; West, James D; Klemm, Dwight J; Majka, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and oxidative stress are common to many adult lung diseases. However, little is known about the relevance of lung mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in these processes. We tested the hypothesis that dysfunctional lung MSCs directly participate in remodeling of the microcirculation. We employed a genetic model to deplete extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) in lung MSCs coupled with lineage tracing analysis. We crossed (floxp)sod3 and mT/mG reporter mice to a strain expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the ABCG2 promoter. We demonstrated In vivo that depletion of EC-SOD in lung MSCs resulted in their contribution to microvascular remodeling in the smooth muscle actin positive layer. We further characterized lung MSCs to be multipotent vascular precursors, capable of myofibroblast, endothelial and pericyte differentiation in vitro. EC-SOD deficiency in cultured lung MSCs accelerated proliferation and apoptosis, restricted colony-forming ability, multilineage differentiation potential and promoted the transition to a contractile phenotype. Further studies correlated cell dysfunction to alterations in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which were more evident under conditions of oxidative stress. Our data establish that lung MSCs are a multipotent vascular precursor population, a population which has the capacity to participate in vascular remodeling and their function is likely regulated in part by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These studies highlight an important role for microenviromental regulation of multipotent MSC function as well as their potential to contribute to tissue remodeling.

  13. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  14. Differential expression of Dickkopf-1 among non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiao Jun; Liu, Ya Wen; Chen, Dian Dian; Yu, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is expressed in various human cancers. It was hypothesized that DKK1 was oncogenic and involved in invasive growth in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The present study aimed to investigate whether DKK1 gene expression levels differ among various NSCLC cells. The DKK1 expression pattern was analyzed in various human NSCLC cell lines and tissues. The DKK1 protein and gene expression levels were quantified using immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry. The majority of the lung cancer cell lines analyzed revealed increased expression levels of DKK1. Furthermore, DKK1 expression was highly transactivated in the majority of these cancer cell lines. Clinical samples were obtained from 98 NSCLC patients for immunohistochemical analysis. Of the 98 samples analyzed, 62 (63.3%) demonstrated positive staining for DKK1, whereas the remaining 36 (37%) exhibited negative staining. However, no immunohistopathological staining was detected in normal tissues. The relative effects of DKK1 were assessed in a high-expression cell line (LTEP-a-2) and a low-expression cell line (95D). The differential expression of genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling pathway, invasion and metastasis were evaluated, relative to DKK1 levels. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that DKK1 functioned as a key regulator in the progression of NSCLC. The results confirmed the differential expression of DKK1 in NSCLC cells, which may present a potential therapeutic target for cancer prevention.

  15. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  16. Combinations of differentiation markers distinguish subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells in adult lung.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Janice M; Marconett, Crystal N; Juul, Nicholas; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Yixin; Flodby, Per; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Minoo, Parviz; Zhou, Beiyun

    2016-01-15

    Distal lung epithelium is maintained by proliferation of alveolar type II (AT2) cells and, for some daughter AT2 cells, transdifferentiation into alveolar type I (AT1) cells. We investigated if subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) exist that represent various stages in transdifferentiation from AT2 to AT1 cell phenotypes in normal adult lung and if they can be identified using combinations of cell-specific markers. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that, in distal rat and mouse lungs, ∼ 20-30% of NKX2.1(+) (or thyroid transcription factor 1(+)) cells did not colocalize with pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SP-C), a highly specific AT2 cell marker. In distal rat lung, NKX2.1(+) cells coexpressed either pro-SP-C or the AT1 cell marker homeodomain only protein x (HOPX). Not all HOPX(+) cells colocalize with the AT1 cell marker aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and some AQP5(+) cells were NKX2.1(+). HOPX was expressed earlier than AQP5 during transdifferentiation in rat AEC primary culture, with robust expression of both by day 7. We speculate that NKX2.1 and pro-SP-C colocalize in AT2 cells, NKX2.1 and HOPX or AQP5 colocalize in intermediate or transitional cells, and HOPX and AQP5 are expressed without NKX2.1 in AT1 cells. These findings suggest marked heterogeneity among cells previously identified as exclusively AT1 or AT2 cells, implying the presence of subpopulations of intermediate or transitional AEC in normal adult lung. PMID:26545903

  17. Clara cell adenomas of the mouse lung. Interaction with alveolar type 2 cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, K C

    1985-09-01

    Multiple pulmonary adenomas were induced in the offspring of pregnant Swiss-Webster mice by transplacental exposure to ethylnitrosourea (ENU) on the 15th day of gestation. Development and growth of tumors were followed for up to a year after birth. Morphologic assessment indicated that the majority of adenomas were of Clara-cell origin and were relatively normal on the basis of structural features. Histochemical studies, utilizing nitroblue tetrazolium reductase activity as a marker for normal Clara cells demonstrated that the Clara-cell-derived tumors possessed nearly normal enzyme activity. Microscopic studies of the tumors and adjacent parenchyma revealed a unique Type 2 cell response to the presence of Clara-cell adenomas occurring in the alveoli beyond the margins of the tumor. Otherwise normal-appearing Type 2 cells, in a narrow zone around the Clara-cell tumors, accumulated large amounts of surfactantlike osmiophilic lamellar material within cytoplasmic vacuoles as early as 30 days after birth. These changes were clearly a Clara-cell-tumor-related response, and not seen in association with other non-Clara-cell adenomas of the same lung. Furthermore, the alterations occurred exclusively in Type 2 cells. The extent of Type 2 cell change was correlated with tumor size and age. Autoradiographic studies with tritiated choline showed marked incorporation of the labeled precursor by the altered Type 2 cells. By electron microscopy, these inclusions were membrane-limited and contained osmiophilic lamellar structures similar to lamellar bodies in normal Type 2 cells. Because these Clara cell adenomas may act as a concentrated focus of normal Clara cells, the alterations seen in Type 2 cells may reflect an amplification of a normal interaction between bronchiolar Clara cells and alveolar Type 2 cells in the centriacinar and juxtabronchiolar alveoli.

  18. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  19. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Glatstein, Eli; Stevenson, James P; Sterman, Daniel H; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is increasingly being utilized to treat thoracic malignancies. For patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy is primarily employed as an endobronchial therapy to definitely treat endobronchial, roentgenographically occult, or synchronous primary carcinomas. As definitive monotherapy, photodynamic therapy is most effective in treating bronchoscopically visible lung cancers ≤1 cm with no extracartilaginous invasion. For patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy can be used to palliate obstructing endobronchial lesions, as a component of definitive multi-modality therapy, or to increase operability or reduce the extent of operation required. A review of the available medical literature detailing all published studies utilizing photodynamic therapy to treat at least 10 patients with non-small cell lung cancer is performed, and treatment recommendations and summaries for photodynamic therapy applications are described.

  20. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  1. Circulating Tumor Cells as an Indicator of Postoperative Lung Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Taiji; Yoneda, Kazue; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Oyama, Rintarou; Matumiya, Hiroki; Shinohara, Shuichi; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Soichi; Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Inanishi, Naoko; Kuroda, Koji; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are shed from primary tumors and circulate in the peripheral blood. CTCs, as a surrogate of micro-metastasis, can be a useful clinical marker, but their clinical significance remains unclear in lung cancer. We now report a case of lung cancer in which the count of CTCs was useful in monitoring postoperative recurrence. CASE REPORT A 50-year-old man had undergone right upper lobectomy for lung cancer (pT1bN2M0, stage IIIA adenocarcinoma), followed by cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. After the patient's operation, we initiated monitoring of CTCs using CellSearch, and documented the change in the CTC count along with the development of cancer recurrence and response or progression to chemotherapy given for recurrent disease. CONCLUSIONS The CTC count may be useful in monitoring blood of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27629545

  2. Small cell lung cancer with metastasis to the thyroid in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Ozgu, Eylem Sercan; Gen, Ramazan; Ilvan, Ahmet; Ozge, Cengiz; Polat, Ayşe; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid metastasis of lung cancer is rarely observed in clinical practice. The primary cancers which metastasize to the thyroid gland are mostly renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Transient destructive thyrotoxicosis is caused by massive metastasis of extrathyroid tumors. We herein present a case report of a patient with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. A 66-year-old man complained of swelling around the right side of the neck, dyspnea, progressive weight loss, and palpitation starting since 3 months before his admission. The patient was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. The case report presented here illustrates the challenge of making a definitive and adequate diagnosis, particularly if the patient presents with 2 potential causes of thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid scintigraphy is an important tool for differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23172496

  3. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  4. Expression of Transcription Factor GATA-6 in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Is Linked to Neonatal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vähätalo, Riika; Asikainen, Tiina M.; Karikoski, Riitta; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; White, Carl W.; Andersson, Sture; Heikinheimo, Markku; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2011-01-01

    Background Premature birth and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are risk factors for disturbed lung development and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The molecular mechanisms related to prematurity and BPD remain largely unknown. Epithelial expression of the transcription factor GATA-6 has been implicated in normal and abnormal murine lung development. Objectives The possible involvement of GATA-6 in the normal development and in RDS and BPD was investigated in the human and baboon lung. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of GATA-6 and thyroid transcription factor 1 in lung specimens from different age groups of human and baboon fetuses and newborns with lung disease. Furthermore, the regulatory role of TGF-β1 in GATA-6 expression was investigated in human pulmonary epithelial cell lines using RT-PCR. Results GATA-6 expression increased in the developing human airway epithelium along with advancing gestation, but diminished to negligible at birth. In RDS, GATA-6 expression was enhanced at 5–7 days after birth, and decreased thereafter. In BPD, the expression of GATA-6 in alveolar epithelial cells was low. These results were confirmed and extended using an established baboon model of prematurity. The in vitro experiments revealed that TGF-β1 induces GATA-6 and thyroid transcription factor 1 expression in lung epithelial cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the expression of GATA-6 at the early stages of the preterm lung may be related to impaired postnatal alveolar development. PMID:21071980

  5. Regulation of IL-33 by Oncostatin M in Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izakelian, Laura; Dubey, Anisha; Zhang, Grace; Wong, Steven; Kwofie, Karen; Qureshi, Aatif; Botelho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    IL-33 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses at tissue sites including lung and may play critical roles in inflammatory lung disease. Although IL-33 expression can be altered upon NF-Kappa B activation, here we examine regulation by Oncostatin M, a gp130 cytokine family member, in mouse lung tissue. Responses were assessed in BALB/c mouse lung at day 7 of transient overexpression using endotracheally administered adenovirus encoding OSM (AdOSM) or empty vector (AdDel70). Whole lung extracts showed induction of IL-33 mRNA (>20-fold) and protein (10-fold increase in immunoblots) by AdOSM relative to AdDel70. Immunohistochemistry for IL-33 indicated a marked induction of nuclear staining in alveolar epithelial cells in vivo. Oncostatin M stimulated IL-33 mRNA and IL-33 full length protein in C10 mouse type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in culture in time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion, whereas IL-6, LIF, IL-31, IL-4, or IL-13 did not, and TGFβ repressed IL-33. IL-33 induction was associated with activation of STAT3, and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 ameliorated IL-33 levels. These results indicate Oncostatin M as a potent inducer of IL-33 in mouse lung epithelial cells and suggest that an OSM/IL-33 axis may participate in innate immunity and inflammatory conditions in lung. PMID:27703303

  6. Identification of somatic mutations in non-small cell lung carcinomas using whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyuan; Morrison, Carl; Wang, Liang; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Cui, Peng; Hua, Xing; Ding, Feng; Lu, Yan; James, Michael; Ebben, John D; Xu, Haiming; Adjei, Alex A; Head, Karen; Andrae, Jaime W; Tschannen, Michael R; Jacob, Howard; Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Van den Bergh, Francoise; Xiao, Haijie; Lo, Ken C; Patel, Jigar; Richmond, Todd; Watt, Mary-Anne; Albert, Thomas; Selzer, Rebecca; Anderson, Marshall; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Yian; Starnes, Sandra; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) being the predominant form of the disease. Most lung cancer is caused by the accumulation of genomic alterations due to tobacco exposure. To uncover its mutational landscape, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 31 NSCLCs and their matched normal tissue samples. We identified both common and unique mutation spectra and pathway activation in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, two major histologies in NSCLC. In addition to identifying previously known lung cancer genes (TP53, KRAS, EGFR, CDKN2A and RB1), the analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. Notably, a novel gene CSMD3 was identified as the second most frequently mutated gene (next to TP53) in lung cancer. We further demonstrated that loss of CSMD3 results in increased proliferation of airway epithelial cells. The study provides unprecedented insights into mutational processes, cellular pathways and gene networks associated with lung cancer. Of potential immediate clinical relevance, several highly mutated genes identified in our study are promising druggable targets in cancer therapy including ALK, CTNNA3, DCC, MLL3, PCDHIIX, PIK3C2B, PIK3CG and ROCK2. PMID:22510280

  7. miR-411 contributes the cell proliferation of lung cancer by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiju; Qin, Limei; Li, Shu

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; the study of microRNAs gives new hope for lung cancer treatment. miR-411 has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor for lung adenocarcinoma, but the role and regulatory mechanism are largely unknown. In the present study, we found miR-411 was overexpressed in the lung cancer cells; overexpression of miR-411 promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growths of lung cancer, while miR-411 knockdown reduced this effect. Further study showed forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) was a target of miR-411. Overexpression of miR-411 suppressed the expression of FOXO1; the effect of suppression was abrogated when the mutation occurred in the 3'UTR of FOXO1. Knockdown of FOXO1 in cells which miR-411 was inhibited recapitulated the phenotype of miR-411 overexpression. Taken together, our study revealed miR-411 promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer by targeting tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 and miR-411 might be a potential target for lung cancer therapy.

  8. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  9. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  10. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Unresectable Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Surgical Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hiroshi Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takao, Motoshi; Taguchi, Osamu; Yamada, Tomomi; Takeda, Kan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective evaluation was done of clinical utility of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation in recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical intervention. Methods: During May 2003 to October 2010, 44 consecutive patients (26 male and 18 female) received curative lung RF ablation for 51 recurrent NSCLC (mean diameter 1.7 {+-} 0.9 cm, range 0.6 to 4.0) after surgical intervention. Safety, tumor progression rate, overall survival, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated. Prognostic factors were evaluated in multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 55 lung RF sessions were performed. Pneumothorax requiring pluerosclerosis (n = 2) and surgical suture (n = 1) were the only grade 3 or 4 adverse events (5.5%, 3 of 55). During mean follow-up of 28.6 {+-} 20.3 months (range 1 to 98), local tumor progression was found in 5 patients (11.4%, 5 of 44). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 97.7, 72.9, and 55.7%, respectively. The 1- and 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 76.7 and 41.1%, respectively. Tumor size and sex were independent significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. The 5-year survival rates were 73.3% in 18 women and 60.5% in 38 patients who had small tumors measuring {<=}3 cm. Conclusion: Our results suggest that lung RF ablation is a safe and useful therapeutic option for obtaining long-term survival in treated patients.

  11. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  12. Repression of Igf1 expression by Ezh2 prevents basal cell differentiation in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Laura A.; Holik, Aliaksei Z.; Short, Kieran M.; Pasquet, Julie; Lun, Aaron T. L.; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Smyth, Ian M.; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the establishment of lung epithelial cell lineage identities during development are largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 during lung lineage determination. Loss of Ezh2 in the lung epithelium leads to defective lung formation and perinatal mortality. We show that Ezh2 is crucial for airway lineage specification and alveolarization. Using optical projection tomography imaging, we found that branching morphogenesis is affected in Ezh2 conditional knockout mice and the remaining bronchioles are abnormal, lacking terminally differentiated secretory club cells. Remarkably, RNA-seq analysis revealed the upregulation of basal genes in Ezh2-deficient epithelium. Three-dimensional imaging for keratin 5 further showed the unexpected presence of a layer of basal cells from the proximal airways to the distal bronchioles in E16.5 embryos. ChIP-seq analysis indicated the presence of Ezh2-mediated repressive marks on the genomic loci of some but not all basal genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action of Ezh2. We found that loss of Ezh2 de-represses insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression and that modulation of IGF1 signaling ex vivo in wild-type lungs could induce basal cell differentiation. Altogether, our work reveals an unexpected role for Ezh2 in controlling basal cell fate determination in the embryonic lung endoderm, mediated in part by repression of Igf1 expression. PMID:25790853

  13. Response of lung γδ T cells to experimental sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Dyugovskaya, Larissa; Kaplan, Viktoria; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    γδ T cells link innate and adaptive immune systems and may regulate host defence. Their role in systemic inflammation induced by trauma or infection (sepsis) is still obscured. The present study was aimed to investigate functions of lung γδ T cells and their response to experimental sepsis. Mice were subjected to caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis and acute lung injury (ALI), or to the sham operation. Animals were killed 1, 4, and 7 days postoperatively; lungs were examined by histology, and isolated cells were studied by flow cytometry. Absolute number of γδ T cells progressively increased in lungs during sepsis, and reached a seven-fold increase at day 7 after CLP (3·84 ± 0·41 × 105/lung; P = 0·0002 versus sham). A cellular dysfunction was revealed one day after CLP, as manifested by low cytolytic activity (22·3 ± 7·1%; P < 0·05 versus sham), low interferon-γ (IFN-γ; 8·5 ± 2·5%; P < 0·05 versus control) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression, and high tumour necrosis factor-α expression (19·5 ± 1·7%; P < 0·05 versus control). The restoration of cytotoxicity, and increase in IFN-γ and IL-10 expression was observed at day 7 of CLP-induced sepsis. In summary, our results demonstrate significant progressive accumulation of γδ T cells in lungs during CLP-induced ALI. The temporary functional suppression of lung γδ T cells found early after CLP may influence the outcome of sepsis, possibly being associated with uncontrolled inflammatory lung damage. PMID:15096194

  14. Cepharanthine induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Peiyan; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Guangxin; Zhang, Yifan; Tian, Xin; Li, Xin; Cui, Ranji; Zhang, Xingyi

    2015-05-01

    Cepharanthine is a medicinal plant-derived natural compound which possesses potent anti-cancer properties. However, there is little report about its effects on lung cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of cepharanthine on the cell viability and apoptosis in human non-small-cell lung cancer H1299 and A549 cells. It was found that cepharanthine inhibited the growth of H1299 and A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner which was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species(ROS) and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). These effects were markedly abrogated when cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor, indicating that the apoptosis-inducing effect of cepharanthine in lung cancer cells was mediated by ROS. In addition, cepharanthine triggered apoptosis in non-small lung cancer cells via the upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2 and significant activation of caspase-3 and PARP. These results provide the rationale for further research and preclinical investigation of cepharanthine's anti-tumor effect against human non-small-cell lung cancer.

  15. Autophagy inhibition enhances isorhamnetin-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    RUAN, YUSHU; HU, KE; CHEN, HONGBO

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (ISO) is a flavonoid from plants of the Polygonaceae family and is also an immediate metabolite of quercetin in mammals. To date, the anti-tumor effects of ISO and the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated in lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of ISO on the growth of human lung cancer A549 cells. Treatment of the lung cancer cells with ISO significantly suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation. ISO treatment also resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic cell death of A549 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation showed that the apoptosis proceeded via the mitochondria-dependent pathway as indicated by alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome C and caspase activation. Of note, treatment with ISO also induced the formation of autophagosomes and light chain 3-II protein in A549 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and hydroxychloroquine significantly inhibited the ISO-induced autophagy and enhanced the ISO-induced apoptotic cell death in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, the results of the present study suggested that ISO is a potential anti-lung cancer agent. In addition, the results indicated that the inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect of ISO on lung cancer cells. PMID:26238746

  16. Targeted therapies and immunotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, D; Abbate, M; Bidoli, P; Capici, S; Canova, S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is still considered a difficult disease to manage because of its aggressiveness and resistance to common therapies. Chemotherapy remains the gold standard in nearly 80% of lung cancers, but clinical outcomes are discouraging, and the impact on median overall survival (OS) barely reaches 12 months. At the end of the last century, the discovery of oncogene-driven tumours completely changed the therapeutic landscape in lung cancers, harbouring specific gene mutations/translocations. Epidermal growth factors receptor (EGFR) common mutations first and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations later led new insights in lung cancer biology knowledge. The use of specific tyrosine kinases inhibitors overturned the biological behaviour of EGFR mutation positive tumours and became a preclinical model to understand the heterogeneity of lung cancers and the mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarise the employment of targeted agents against the most representative biomolecular alterations and provide some criticisms of the therapeutic strategies. PMID:27433281

  17. Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Cecilia; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27413711

  18. Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27413711

  19. Cell Therapy for Lung Diseases. Report from an NIH–NHLBI Workshop, November 13–14, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Matthay, Michael A.; Anversa, Piero; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Burnett, Bruce K.; Chapman, Harold A.; Hare, Joshua M.; Hei, Derek J.; Hoffman, Andrew M.; Kourembanas, Stella; McKenna, David H.; Ortiz, Luis A.; Ott, Harald C.; Tente, William; Thébaud, Bernard; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health convened the Cell Therapy for Lung Disease Working Group on November 13–14, 2012, to review and formulate recommendations for future research directions. The workshop brought together investigators studying basic mechanisms and the roles of cell therapy in preclinical models of lung injury and pulmonary vascular disease, with clinical trial experts in cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases and experts from the NHLBI Production Assistance for Cell Therapy program. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the current status of basic investigations in lung cell therapy, to identify some of the scientific gaps in current knowledge regarding the potential roles and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of lung diseases, and to develop recommendations to the NHLBI and the research community on scientific priorities and practical steps that would lead to first-in-human trials of lung cell therapy. PMID:23713908

  20. Transferrin synthesis by small cell lung cancer cells acts as an autocrine regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Vostrejs, M; Moran, P L; Seligman, P A

    1988-01-01

    Since transferrin is required for cellular proliferation, we investigated transferrin synthesis by a small cell lung cancer line (NCI-H510) that survives in serum-free media without added transferrin. Immunoassays for human transferrin demonstrated that these cells contained immunoreactive human transferrin. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the protein is expressed on the surface of cells, presumably bound to transferrin receptor. Media conditioned by NCI-H510 cells support proliferation of human leukemic cells that would not survive in media lacking transferrin. [35S]Methionine incorporation documented transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells as well as three other small cell lines. Transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells increased more than 10-fold when cells entered active phases of the cell cycle, and this increase was seen before large increases in transferrin-receptor expression. Further experiments examining the effects of agents that affect iron metabolism show that the addition of transferrin-iron or hemin to the media is associated with a more rapid initial rate of proliferation and lower rates of transferrin synthesis than control cells. Gallium salts, which inhibit iron uptake, inhibited proliferation of these cells. If the cells recovered from this effect, transferrin synthesis remained greatly increased compared to control. We conclude that transferrin synthesis by these malignant cells is ultimately related to an iron requirement for cellular proliferation. It appears that this synthesized transferrin acts as part of an important autocrine mechanism permitting proliferation of these cells, and perhaps permitting tumor cell growth in vivo in areas not well vascularized. Images PMID:2839550

  1. KRAS Mutation in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Extrapulmonary Small Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kodaz, Hilmi; Taştekin, Ebru; Erdoğan, Bülent; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tozkır, Hilmi; Gürkan, Hakan; Türkmen, Esma; Demirkan, Bora; Uzunoğlu, Sernaz; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. It is mainly classified into 2 groups: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC) are very rare. The Ras oncogene controls most of the cellular functions in the cell. Overall, 21.6% of human cancers contain a Kirsten Ras (KRAS) mutation. SCLC and EPSCC have several similar features but their clinical course is different. Aims: We investigated the KRAS mutation status in SCLC and EPSCC. Study design: Mutation research. Methods: Thirty-seven SCLC and 15 EPSCC patients were included in the study. The pathological diagnoses were confirmed by a second pathologist. KRAS analysis was performed in our medical genetic department. DNA isolation was performed with primary tumor tissue using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) in all patients. The therascreen KRAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) was used for KRAS analyses. Results: Thirty-four (91.9%) of the SCLC patients were male, while 11 (73.3%) of the EPSCC l patients were female. SCLC was more common in males, and EPSCC in females (p=0.001). A KRAS mutation was found in 6 (16.2%) if SCLC patients. The most common mutation was Q61R (CAA>CGA). Among the 15 EPSCC patients, 2 had a KRAS mutation (13.3%). When KRAS mutant and wild type patients were compared in the SCLC group, no difference was found for overall survival (p=0.6). Conclusion: In previous studies, the incidence of KRAS mutation in SCLC was 1–3%; however, it was 16.2% in our study. Therefore, there may be ethnic and geographical differences in the KRAS mutations of SCLC. As a result, KRAS mutation should not be excluded in SCLC.

  2. Lung dendritic cells induce migration of protective T cells to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Brane, Lucas; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Cheong, Cheolho; Poles, Jordan; Do, Yoonkyung; Zhu, Hongfa; Velinzon, Klara; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Studt, Natalie; Mayer, Lloyd; Lavelle, Ed C.; Steinman, Ralph M.; Mucida, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Developing efficacious vaccines against enteric diseases is a global challenge that requires a better understanding of cellular recruitment dynamics at the mucosal surfaces. The current paradigm of T cell homing to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involves the induction of α4β7 and CCR9 by Peyer’s patch and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) dendritic cells (DCs) in a retinoic acid–dependent manner. This paradigm, however, cannot be reconciled with reports of GI T cell responses after intranasal (i.n.) delivery of antigens that do not directly target the GI lymphoid tissue. To explore alternative pathways of cellular migration, we have investigated the ability of DCs from mucosal and nonmucosal tissues to recruit lymphocytes to the GI tract. Unexpectedly, we found that lung DCs, like CD103+ MLN DCs, up-regulate the gut-homing integrin α4β7 in vitro and in vivo, and induce T cell migration to the GI tract in vivo. Consistent with a role for this pathway in generating mucosal immune responses, lung DC targeting by i.n. immunization induced protective immunity against enteric challenge with a highly pathogenic strain of Salmonella. The present report demonstrates novel functional evidence of mucosal cross talk mediated by DCs, which has the potential to inform the design of novel vaccines against mucosal pathogens. PMID:23960190

  3. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  4. TUCAN/CARDINAL/CARD8 and apoptosis resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Checinska, Agnieszka; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Hoogeland, Bas SJ; Ferreira, Carlos G; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kruyt, Frank AE

    2006-01-01

    Background Activation of caspase-9 in response to treatment with cytotoxic drugs is inhibited in NSCLC cells, which may contribute to the clinical resistance to chemotherapy shown in this type of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of caspase-9 inhibition, with a focus on a possible role of TUCAN as caspase-9 inhibitor and a determinant of chemosensitivity in NSCLC cells. Methods Caspase-9 processing and activation were investigated by Western blot and by measuring the cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate LEHD-AFC. Proteins interaction assays, and RNA interference in combination with cell viability and apoptosis assays were used to investigate the involvement of TUCAN in inhibition of caspase-9 and chemosensitivity NSCLC. Results Analysis of the components of the caspase-9 activation pathway in a panel of NSCLC and SCLC cells revealed no intrinsic defects. In fact, exogenously added cytochrome c and dATP triggered procaspase-9 cleavage and activation in lung cancer cell lysates, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor. The reported inhibitor of caspase-9, TUCAN, was exclusively expressed in NSCLC cells. However, interactions between TUCAN and procaspase-9 could not be demonstrated by any of the assays used. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of TUCAN did not restore cisplatin-induced caspase-9 activation or affect cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC cells. Conclusion These results indicate that procaspase-9 is functional and can undergo activation and full processing in lung cancer cell extracts in the presence of additional cytochrome c/dATP. However, the inhibitory protein TUCAN does not play a role in inhibition of procaspase-9 and in determining the sensitivity to cisplatin in NSCLC. PMID:16796750

  5. Downregulated TIPE2 is associated with poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuexia; Li, Xiaohui; Liu, Gang; Sun, Rongqing; Wang, Lirui; Wang, Jing; Wang, Hongmin

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • TIPE2 is down-regulated in NSCLC tissues. • TIPE2 inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • TIPE2 reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. - Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the expression pattern of TIPE2 protein and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated the expression levels of TIPE2 in 96 NSCLC tumor samples by immunohistochemistry and then analyzed its clinical significance. Furthermore, the role of TIPE2 on the biological properties of the NSCLC cell line H1299 and A549 was experimentally tested in vitro and in vivo. We found that the expression level of TIPE2 was significantly higher in normal lung tissues compared with NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), and TIPE2 downregulation was significantly correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006). TIPE2 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TIPE2 plasmid was performed in H1299 and A549 cells. TIPE2 overexpression inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasive in vitro, and prevented lung tumor growth in vivo. In addition, TIPE2 transfection reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TIPE2 might serve as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC progression.

  6. Assessment of Metal Contaminants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by EDX Microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Scimeca, M.; Orlandi, A.; Terrenato, I.; Bischetti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human cardio-respiratory diseases are strongly correlated to concentrations of atmospheric elements. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals is strictly monitored, because of its possible toxic effects. In this work, we utilized the EDX microanalysis in order to identify the potential heavy metal accumulation in the lung tissue. To this aim, we enrolled 45 human lung biopsies: 15 non-small cell lung cancers, 15 lung benign lesions and 15 control biopsies. Lung samples were both paraffin embedded for light microscopy study and epon-epoxid embedded for transmission electron microscopy. EDX microanalysis was performed on 100 nm thick unstained ultrathin-sections placed on specific copper grids. Our results demonstrated that the EDX technology was particularly efficient in the study of elemental composition of lung tissues, where we found heavy metals, such as Cobalt (Co), Chromium (Cr), Manganese (Mn) and Lead (Pb). Furthermore, in malignant lesions we demonstrated the presence of multiple bio-accumulated elements. In fact, a high rate of lung cancers was associated with the presence of 3 or more bio-accumulated elements compared to benign lesions and control tissue (91.7%, 0%, 8.3%, respectively). The environmental impact on pulmonary carcinogenesis could be better clarified by demonstrating the presence of polluting agents in lung tissues. The application of EDX microanalysis on biological tissues could shed new light in the study of the possible bioaccumulation of polluting agents in different human organs and systems. PMID:25308844

  7. Delivering nanoparticles to lungs while avoiding liver and spleen through adsorption on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gupta, Vivek; Zern, Blaine J; Pan, Daniel; Zakrewsky, Michael; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-12-23

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are one of the most widely investigated approaches for developing novel therapies for a variety of diseases. However, rapid clearance and poor targeting limit their clinical utility. Here, we describe an approach to harness the flexibility, circulation, and vascular mobility of red blood cells (RBCs) to simultaneously overcome these limitations (cellular hitchhiking). A noncovalent attachment of nanoparticles to RBCs simultaneously increases their level in blood over a 24 h period and allows transient accumulation in the lungs, while reducing their uptake by liver and spleen. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited ∼3-fold increase in blood persistence and ∼7-fold higher accumulation in lungs. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles improved lung/liver and lung/spleen nanoparticle accumulation by over 15-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Accumulation in lungs is attributed to mechanical transfer of particles from the RBC surface to lung endothelium. Independent tracing of both nanoparticles and RBCs in vivo confirmed that RBCs themselves do not accumulate in lungs. Attachment of anti-ICAM-1 antibody to the exposed surface of NPs that were attached to RBCs led to further increase in lung targeting and retention over 24 h. Cellular hitchhiking onto RBCs provides a new platform for improving the blood pharmacokinetics and vascular delivery of nanoparticles while simultaneously avoiding uptake by liver and spleen, thus opening the door for new applications.

  8. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2016-06-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However, the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs, costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were analyzed. During infection, the DCs showed significant elevation of CD80 and CD86 expression in both the lungs and the regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, the percentage of CD86-positive cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD80-positive cells in the lymph nodes. In addition, cytokine production from Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs was analyzed demonstrating elevated production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12. However, production of IL-12 was suppressed earlier than IL-6 and IL-10. These results support that DCs are involved in skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance in CF and may be a possible treatment target. PMID:27009697

  9. Akt and PTEN: new diagnostic markers of non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    David, O

    2001-01-01

    We are particularly interested in testing the principles of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the microenvironment of human lung cancers with respect to the cell survival protein Akt 1 and PTEN 2. Akt is a cytosolic protein which promotes cell survival by phosphorylative inactivation of targets in apoptotic pathways. Akt has been found to play a role in the survival of experimental cancer cell lines in breast, prostate, ovary, lung and brain tissue. PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose protein product is expressed in inverse proportion to phosphorylated Akt in endometrial and breast cancer cell lines. No studies of the diagnostic significance of Akt and PTEN in human lung cancers have been reported.

  10. Gastrin releasing peptide is a selective mitogen for small cell lung carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, S; Zuckerman, J E; Bostwick, D G; Bensch, K G; Sikic, B I; Raffin, T A

    1985-01-01

    Human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells have been shown to contain significant levels of a bombesin-immunoreactive peptide. The 27-amino acid peptide, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), has recently been shown to be responsible for the bombesin-like immunoreactivity found in SCLC cells. Among four lung cancer cell lines examined in vitro, GRP exhibited mitogenic activity for two SCLC subtypes, but not for a squamous carcinoma or adenocarcinoma lung cell line. The mitogenicity of the GRP molecule has been isolated to the carboxyterminal fragment, designated GRP 14-27, which is in part homologous to bombesin. The aminoterminal fragment, GRP 1-16, is no homologous to bombesin and exhibits no mitogenic activity. Thus, GRP may be an important growth regulating or autocrine factor in human SCLC. PMID:2981251

  11. Cytotoxic Effect of a Novel Synthesized Carbazole Compound on A549 Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Molatlhegi, Refilwe P.; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M.; Tiloke, Charlette; Chuturgoon, Anil A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased death rates due to lung cancer have necessitated the search for potential novel anticancer compounds such as carbazole derivatives. Carbazoles are aromatic heterocyclic compounds with anticancer, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. The study investigated the ability of the novel carbazole compound (Z)-4-[9-ethyl-9aH-carbazol-3-yl) amino] pent-3-en-2-one (ECAP) to induce cytotoxicity of lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. ECAP was synthesized as a yellow powder with melting point of 240-247 °C. The 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lipid peroxidation and comet assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of the compound on A549 lung cancer cells. Protein expression was determined using western blots, apoptosis was measured by luminometry (caspase-3/7, -8 and -9) assay and flow cytometry was used to measure phosphatidylserine (PS) externalisation. ECAP induced a p53 mediated apoptosis of lung cancer cells due to a significant reduction in the expression of antioxidant defence proteins (Nrf2 and SOD), Hsp70 (p < 0.02) and Bcl-2 (p < 0.0006), thereby up-regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This resulted in DNA damage (p < 0.0001), up-regulation of Bax expression and caspase activity and induction of apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The results show the anticancer potential of ECAP on lung cancer. PMID:26134408

  12. Paracrine Factors of Multipotent Stromal Cells Ameliorate Lung Injury in an Elastase-induced Emphysema Model

    PubMed Central

    Katsha, Ahmed M; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Xin, Hong; Kanehira, Masahiko; Sun, Ruowen; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Saijo, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) ameliorate several types of lung injury. The differentiation of MSCs into specific cells at the injury site has been considered as the important process in the MSC effect. However, although MSCs reduce destruction in an elastase-induced lung emphysema model, MSC differentiation is relatively rare, suggesting that MSC differentiation into specific cells does not adequately explain the recuperation observed. Humoral factors secreted by MSCs may also play an important role in ameliorating emphysema. To confirm this hypothesis, emphysema was induced in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice by intratracheal elastase injection 14 days before intratracheal MSC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) administration. Thereafter, lungs were collected at several time points and evaluated. Our results showed that MSCs reduced the destruction in elastase-induced emphysema. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence staining revealed infrequent MSC engraftment and differentiation into epithelial cells. Real-time PCR showed increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Real-time PCR and western blotting showed enhanced production of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in the lung. In-vitro coculture studies confirmed the in vivo observations. Our findings suggest that paracrine factors derived from MSCs is the main mechanism for the protection of lung tissues from elastase injury. PMID:20842104

  13. EZH2 promotes progression of small cell lung cancer by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murai, Fumihiko; Koinuma, Daizo; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Fukayama, Masashi; Miyaozono, Kohei; Ehata, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces apoptosis in many types of cancer cells and acts as a tumor suppressor. We performed a functional analysis of TGF-β signaling to identify a molecular mechanism that regulated survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Here, we found low expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in most small cell lung cancer cells and tissues compared to normal lung epithelial cells and normal lung tissues, respectively. When wild-type TβRII was overexpressed in small cell lung cancer cells, TGF-β suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo through induction of apoptosis. Components of polycomb repressive complex 2, including enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2), were highly expressed in small cell lung cancer cells; this led to epigenetic silencing of TβRII expression and suppression of TGF-β-mediated apoptosis. Achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1 (ASCL1; also known as ASH1), a Smad-dependent target of TGF-β, was found to induce survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Thus, EZH2 promoted small cell lung cancer progression by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway.

  14. Intussusception of small intestine due to metastasis of large cell carcinoma of the lung with a rhabdoid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Otera, H; Ikeda, F; Nakagawa, S; Kono, Y; Sakurai, T; Tada, K; Hashimoto, K; Ikeda, A

    2010-09-01

    Large cell carcinoma of the lung with a rhabdoid phenotype is a rare type of lung cancer, and does not commonly metastasize to the small intestine. Herein we describe a 63-yr-old Japanese male with ileus resulting from small intestinal metastasis from lung cancer. Tumour enlargement was rapid and could not be treated with chemotherapy.

  15. Overexpression of TRPV3 Correlates with Tumor Progression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qianhui; Fan, Kai; Li, Baiyan; Li, Huifeng; Qi, Hanping; Guo, Jing; Cao, Yonggang; Sun, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP channels family of Ca2+-permeant channels. The proteins of some TRP channels are highly expressed in cancer cells. This study aimed to assess the clinical significance and biological functions of TRPV3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); (2) Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of TRPV3 in NSCLC tissues and adjacent noncancerous lung tissues. Western blot was used to detect the protein expressions of TRPV3, CaMKII, p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD, CyclinE1, CDK2, CDK4, and P27. Small interfering RNA was used to deplete TRPV3 expression. A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle; (3) Results: TRPV3 was overexpressed in 65 of 96 (67.7%) human lung cancer cases and correlated with differentiation (p = 0.001) and TNM stage (p = 0.004). Importantly, TRPV3 expression was associated with short overall survival. In addition, blocking or knockdown of TRPV3 could inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, TRPV3 inhibition could decrease [Ca2+]i of lung cancer cells and arrest cell cycle at the G1/S boundary. Further results revealed that TRPV3 inhibition decreased expressions of p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD1, CyclinE, and increased P27 level; (4) Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that TRPV3 was overexpressed in NSCLC and correlated with lung cancer progression. TRPV3 activation could promote proliferation of lung cancer cells. TRPV3 might serve as a potential companion drug target in NSCLC. PMID:27023518

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 enhances radioresistance and aggressiveness of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, HyeSook; Kim, Joong Sun; Youn, BuHyun

    2016-01-01

    Acquired resistance of tumor cells during treatment limits the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy. Recent studies to investigate acquired resistance under treatment have focused on intercellular communication because it promotes survival and aggressiveness of tumor cells, causing therapy failure and tumor relapse. Accordingly, a better understanding of the functional communication between subpopulations of cells within a tumor is essential to development of effective cancer treatment strategies. Here, we found that conditioned media (CM) from radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells increased survival of radiosensitive cells. Comparative proteomics analysis revealed plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a key molecule in the secretome that acts as an extracellular signaling trigger to strengthen resistance to radiation. Our results revealed that expression and secretion of PAI-1 in radioresistant cells was increased by radiation-induced transcription factors, including p53, HIF-1α, and Smad3. When CM from radioresistant cells was applied to radiosensitive cells, extracellular PAI-1 activated the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathway and inhibited caspase-3 activity. Our study also proposed that PAI-1 activates the signaling pathway in radiosensitive cells via extracellular interaction with its binding partners, not clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, secreted PAI-1 increased cell migration capacity and expression of EMT markers in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PAI-1 secreted from radioresistant NSCLC cells reduced radiosensitivity of nearby cells in a paracrine manner, indicating that functional inhibition of PAI-1 signaling has therapeutic potential because it prevents sensitive cells from acquiring radioresistance. PMID:27004408

  17. Epithelial interactions and local engraftment of lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Badri, Linda; Walker, Natalie M; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Wang, Zhuo; Delmar, Mario; Flint, Andrew; Peters-Golden, Marc; Toews, Galen B; Pinsky, David J; Krebsbach, Paul H; Lama, Vibha N

    2011-10-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells, termed "mesenchymal stem cells" (MSCs), have been demonstrated to reside in human adult lungs. However, there is little information regarding the associations of these local mesenchymal progenitors with other resident somatic cells and their potential for therapeutic use. Here we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the ability of human adult lung-resident MSCs (LR-MSCs) to interact with the local epithelial cells. The in vivo retention and localization of human LR-MSCs in an alveolar microenvironment was investigated by placing PKH-26 or DsRed lentivirus-labeled human LR-MSCs in the lungs of immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 3 weeks after intratracheal administration, 19.3 ± 3.21% of LR-MSCs were recovered, compared with 3.47 ± 0.51% of control fibroblasts, as determined by flow cytometry. LR-MSCs were found to persist in murine lungs for up to 6 months and demonstrated preferential localization to the corners of the alveoli in close proximity to type II alveolar epithelial cells, the progenitor cells of the alveolar epithelium. In vitro, LR-MSCs established gap junction communications with lung alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells and demonstrated an ability to secrete keratinocyte growth factor, an important modulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. Gap junction communications were also demonstrable between LR-MSCs and resident murine cells in vivo. This study demonstrates, for the first time, an ability of tissue-specific MSCs to engraft in their organ of origin and establishes a pathway of bidirectional interaction between these mesenchymal progenitors and adult somatic epithelial cells in the lung.

  18. Regulation of miRNAs affects radiobiological response of lung cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-mei; Liao, Xing-yun; Chen, Xie-wan; Li, De-zhi; Sun, Jian-guo; Liao, Rong-xia

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a key therapeutic strategy for lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, but radioresistance often occurs and leads to failure of RT. It is therefore important to clarify the mechanism underlying radioresistance in lung cancer. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered the fundamental reason for radioresistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been regarded as important regulatory molecules of CSCs, carcinogenesis, and treatment response of cancers. It is crucial to clarify how regulation of miRNAs affects repair of DNA damage, redistribution, repopulation, reoxygenation, and radiosensitivity (5R) of lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs). A thorough understanding of the regulation of miRNAs affecting 5R of LCSCs has potential impact on identifying novel targets and thus may improve the efficacy of lung cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Fractal geometry-based classification approach for the recognition of lung cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Deshen; Gao, Wenqing; Li, Hua

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a new fractal geometry based classification approach for the recognition of lung cancer cells, which is used in the health inspection for lung cancers, because cancer cells grow much faster and more irregularly than normal cells do, the shape of the segmented cancer cells is very irregular and considered as a graph without characteristic length. We use Texture Energy Intensity Rn to do fractal preprocessing to segment the cells from the image and to calculate the fractal dimention value for extracting the fractal features, so that we can get the figure characteristics of different cancer cells and normal cells respectively. Fractal geometry gives us a correct description of cancer-cell shapes. Through this method, a good recognition of Adenoma, Squamous, and small cancer cells can be obtained.

  20. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  1. Repair and regeneration of the respiratory system: complexity, plasticity, and mechanisms of lung stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Barkauskas, Christina E.; Chapman, Harold A.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Jain, Rajan; Hsia, Connie C. W.; Niklason, Laura; Calle, Elizabeth; Le, Andrew; Randell, Scott H.; Rock, Jason; Snitow, Melinda; Krummel, Matthew; Stripp, Barry R.; Vu, Thiennu; White, Eric S.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disease is the third leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Consequently, the trachea, lungs, and cardiopulmonary vasculature have been the focus of extensive investigations. Recent studies have provided new information about the mechanisms driving lung development and differentiation. However, there is still much to learn about the ability of the adult respiratory system to undergo repair and to replace cells lost in response to injury and disease. This review highlights the multiple stem/progenitor populations in different regions of the adult lung, the plasticity of their behavior in injury models, and molecular pathways that support homeostasis and repair. PMID:25105578

  2. Manipulations in HIWI level exerts influence on the proliferation of human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUGUANG; LIU, JIA; WU, GUANGYAO; YANG, FANG

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide, although molecular imaging techniques, including fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, have markedly improved the diagnosis of lung cancer. HIWI is a member of the human piwi family, members of which are known for their roles in RNA silencing. HIWI has been shown to serve a crucial function in stem cell self-renewal, and previous studies have reported HIWI overexpression in lung cancers. Furthermore, HIWI has been proposed to regulate the maintenance of cancer stem cell populations in lung cancers. The present study investigated the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIWI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens harvested from 57 patients, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Subsequently, the HIWI expression level was manipulated using gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies, and the role of HIWI in the proliferation of human A549 NSCLC cells was investigated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and colony formation assays. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HIWI were significantly upregulated in the intratumor NSCLC specimens, as compared with the peritumor specimens. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIWI in A549 cells were successfully manipulated using the two strategies. Overexpression and knockout of HIWI were associated with the promotion and inhibition of A549 cell proliferation, respectively. The results of the present study suggested that HIWI is overexpressed in NSCLC tissues and demonstrated that upregulation of HIWI may promote the growth of lung cancer cells; thus suggesting that HIWI may have an oncogenic role in lung cancer. PMID:27168836

  3. Inhibition of CK2α down-regulates Notch1 signalling in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shulin; Long, Hao; Yang, Yi-Lin; Wang, Yucheng; Hsieh, David; Li, Weiming; Au, Alfred; Stoppler, Hubert J; Xu, Zhidong; Jablons, David M; You, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is frequently elevated in a variety of human cancers. The Notch1 signalling pathway has been implicated in stem cell maintenance and its aberrant activation has been shown in several types of cancer including lung cancer. Here, we show, for the first time, that CK2α is a positive regulator of Notch1 signalling in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299. We found that Notch1 protein level was reduced after CK2α silencing. Down-regulation of Notch1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated after the silencing of CK2α in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, small-molecule CK2α inhibitor CX-4945 led to a dose-dependent inhibition of Notch1 transcriptional activity. Conversely, forced overexpression of CK2α resulted in an increase in Notch1 transcriptional activity. Finally, the inhibition of CK2α led to a reduced proportion of stem-like CD44 + /CD24− cell population. Thus, we report that the inhibition of CK2α down-regulates Notch1 signalling and subsequently reduces a cancer stem-like cell population in human lung cancer cells. Our data suggest that CK2α inhibitors may be beneficial to the lung cancer patients with activated Notch1 signalling. PMID:23651443

  4. Unique uptake of acid-prepared mesoporous spheres by lung epithelial and mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Blumen, Steven R; Cheng, Kai; Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Taatjes, Douglas J; Weiss, Daniel J; Landry, Christopher C; Mossman, Brooke T

    2007-03-01

    Lung cancers, malignant mesotheliomas (MM), and fibrosis are devastating diseases with limited treatment strategies, in part due to poorly-effective drug delivery to affected areas of lung. We hypothesized that acid-prepared mesoporous spheres (APMS) (1-2 microm diameter, 40 A pore size) might be effective vehicles for pulmonary chemotherapeutic drug delivery. To assess this, APMS, chemically modified with different surface molecules (lipid, a linker having a terminal amine group, a thiol group, or tetraethylene glycol [TEG]), were evaluated for uptake and possible cytotoxic effects after in vitro administration to murine alveolar epithelial Type II (C10) and human mesothelioma (MM) cells and after intrapleural or intranasal administration to C57Bl/6 mice. APMS coated with TEG (APMS-TEG) were most efficiently taken up by C10 and MM cells. The mechanism of cell uptake was rapid, actin-dependent, and did not involve clathrin- or caveolae-mediated mechanisms nor fusion of membrane-bound APMS with lysosomes. When injected intrapleurally in mice, APMS-TEG were taken up by both CD45-positive and -negative cells of the diaphragm, lung, and spleen, whereas APMS administered by the intranasal route were predominantly in lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. After intrapleural or intranasal administration, APMS were nonimmunogenic and nontoxic as evaluated by differential cell counts and lactate dehydrogenase levels in bronchoalveolar and pleural lavage fluids. In the treatment of lung and pleural diseases, APMS-TEG may be useful tools to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs or molecular constructs.

  5. Hinokitiol Induces DNA Damage and Autophagy followed by Cell Cycle Arrest and Senescence in Gefitinib-Resistant Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Hui; Wu, Ping; Lee, Jen-Yi; Li, Pei-Rong; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Ho, Chen-Lung; Chen, Wan-Jiun; Wang, Chien-Chun; Yen, Muh-Yong; Yang, Shun-Min; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Despite good initial responses, drug resistance and disease recurrence remain major issues for lung adenocarcinoma patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations taking EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). To discover new strategies to overcome this issue, we investigated 40 essential oils from plants indigenous to Taiwan as alternative treatments for a wide range of illnesses. Here, we found that hinokitiol, a natural monoterpenoid from the heartwood of Calocedrus formosana, exhibited potent anticancer effects. In this study, we demonstrated that hinokitiol inhibited the proliferation and colony formation ability of lung adenocarcinoma cells as well as the EGFR-TKI-resistant lines PC9-IR and H1975. Transcriptomic analysis and pathway prediction algorithms indicated that the main implicated pathways included DNA damage, autophagy, and cell cycle. Further investigations confirmed that in lung cancer cells, hinokitiol inhibited cell proliferation by inducing the p53-independent DNA damage response, autophagy (not apoptosis), S-phase cell cycle arrest, and senescence. Furthermore, hinokitiol inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in association with DNA damage and autophagy but exhibited fewer effects on lung stromal fibroblasts. In summary, we demonstrated novel mechanisms by which hinokitiol, an essential oil extract, acted as a promising anticancer agent to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance in lung cancer cells via inducing DNA damage, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, and senescence in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25105411

  6. G4-Tetra DNA Duplex Induce Lung Cancer Cell Apoptosis in A549 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobo; Zhao, YiZhuo; Lu, Hu; Fu, Cuiping; Li, Xiao; Jiang, Liyan; Li, Shanqun

    2016-10-01

    The specific DNA is typically impermeable to the plasma membrane due to its natural characters, but DNA tetra structures (DTNs) can be readily uptake by cells in the absence of transfection agents, providing a new strategy to deliver DNA drugs. In this research, the delivery efficiency of tetrahedral DNA nanostructures was measured on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells via delivering AS1411 (G4). The DNA tetra-AS1411 complex was rapidly and abundantly uptake by A549 cells, and the induced apoptosis was enhanced. Furthermore, biodistribution in mouse proved the rapid clearance from non-targeted organs in vivo. This study improved the understanding of potential function in DNA-based drug delivery and proved that DTNs-AS1411 could be potentially useful for the treatment of lung cancer.

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinase expression of circulating tumor cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis and is found disseminated at first presentation in the majority of cases. The cell biological mechanisms underlying metastasis and drug resistance are not clear. SCLC is characterized by high numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and we were able to expand several CTC lines ex vivo and to relate chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) as marker. Availability of expanded SCLC CTC cells allowed for a screening of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) expressed. The metastatic CHI3L1-negative SCLC cell line SCLC26A, established from a pleural effusion was used for comparison. The CTC cell line BHGc10 was found to exhibit increased expression of RYK, AXL, Tie-1, Dtk, ROR1/2, several ephrins (Eph) and FGF/EGF receptors compared to SCLC26A. All of these RTKs have been associated with cell motility, invasion and poor prognosis in diverse cancer entities without knowledge of their association with CTCs. The identification of RYK, AXL and ROR1/2 as pseudokinases, lacking activity, seems to be related to the observed failure of RTK inhibitors in SCLC. These kinases are involved in the noncanonical WNT pathway and their expression in SCLC CTCs represents a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:26328272

  8. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  9. TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells mediate bleomycin-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Takenaka, Miki; Kage, Yukiko; Negoro, Takaharu; Toda, Takahiro; Ohbayashi, Masayuki; Numata, Tomohiro; Nakano, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Mori, Yasuo; Ishii, Masakazu; Shimizu, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Lung inflammation is a major adverse effect of therapy with the antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM). Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel that is activated by oxidative stress through the production of ADP-ribose. We herein investigated whether TRPM2 channels contributed to BLM-induced lung inflammation. The intratracheal instillation of BLM into wild-type (WT) mice increased the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and inflammatory cytokine levels in the lung. Increases in inflammatory markers in WT mice were markedly reduced in trpm2 knockout (KO) mice, which demonstrated that the activation of TRPM2 channels was involved in BLM-induced lung inflammation. The expression of TRPM2 mRNA was observed in alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells, and lung fibroblasts. Actually, TRPM2 protein was expressed in lung tissues. Of these, TRPM2 channels in epithelial cells were activated by the addition of H2O2 following a BLM pretreatment, resulting in the secretion of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The H2O2-induced activation of TRPM2 by the BLM pretreatment was blocked by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors PJ34 and 3-aminobenzamide. The accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the nucleus, a marker for ADP-ribose production, was strongly induced by H2O2 following the BLM pretreatment. Furthermore, administration of PRAP inhibitors into WT mice markedly reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells and MIP-2 secretion induced by BLM instillation. These results suggest that the induction of MIP-2 secretion through the activation of TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells is an important mechanism in BLM-induced lung inflammation, and the TRPM2 activation is likely to be mediated by ADP-ribose production via PARP pathway. TRPM2 channels may be new therapeutic target for BLM-induced lung inflammation.

  10. Vaccine therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Albright, Carol; Garst, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. First-line therapy is based on stage at diagnosis and can include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Despite advances, the prognosis for advanced-stage lung cancer is very poor. Vaccines with the capability to activate the host immune system may have a role in second-line therapy. Advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular immunology are forming the basis for improving vaccine therapy. Most trials to date have demonstrated safety but inconsistent efficacy. Further research is needed to enhance this potential. PMID:17588347

  11. Diverse Profiles of Ricin-Cell Interactions in the Lung Following Intranasal Exposure to Ricin

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-01-01

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication. PMID:26593946

  12. Diverse profiles of ricin-cell interactions in the lung following intranasal exposure to ricin.

    PubMed

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-11-01

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication. PMID:26593946

  13. Osteoactivin (GPNMB) ectodomain protein promotes growth and invasive behavior of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O.; Manickavasagam, Dharani; Novak, Kimberly; Wehrung, Daniel; Paulic, Nikola; Moussa, Fouad M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of GPNMB/OA as a therapeutic target for lung cancer will require a greater understanding of the impact of GPNMB/OA ectodomain (ECD) protein shedding into tumor tissues. Thus, in this work we characterized GPNMB/OA expression and extent of shedding of its ECD protein while evaluating the impact on lung cancer progression using three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, SK-MES-1 and calu-6. We observed a direct correlation (R2 = 0.89) between GPNMB/OA expression on NSCLC cells and the extent of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding. Meanwhile, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPNMB/OA in cancer cells significantly reduced GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding, migration, invasion and adhesion to extracellular matrix materials. Also, exogenous treatment of cancer cells (expressing low GPNMB/OA) with recombinant GPNMB/OA protein (rOA) significantly facilitated cell invasion and migration, but the effects of rOA was negated by inclusion of a selective RGD peptide. Further studies in athymic (nu/nu) mice-bearing calu-6 showed that intratumoral supplementation with rOA effectively facilitated in vivo tumor growth as characterized by a high number of proliferating cells (Ki67 staining) coupled with a low number of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results accentuate the relevance of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding to progression of lung cancer. Thus, strategies that suppress GPNMB/OA expression on lung cancer cells as well as negate shedding of GPNMB/OA ECD protein are worthy of consideration in lung cancer therapeutics. PMID:26883195

  14. Enhancement of antitumor immunity in lung cancer by targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cell pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Schafer, Cara C.; Jin, Tong Huan; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Tse, Hubert M.; Roth, Justin; Sun, Zhihuan; Siegal, Gene P.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Grant, Stefan C.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemoresistance due to heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment (TME) hampers the long-term efficacy of frontline therapies for lung cancer. Current combination therapies for lung cancer provide only modest improvement in survival, implicating necessity for novel approaches that suppress malignant growth and stimulate long-term anti-tumor immunity. Oxidative stress in the TME promotes immunosuppression by tumor infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which inhibit host protective anti-tumor immunity. Using a murine model of lung cancer, we demonstrate that a combination treatment with gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic targets immunosuppressive MDSC in the TME and enhances the quantity and quality of both effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses. At the effector cell function level, the unique combination therapy targeting MDSC and redox signaling greatly enhanced cytolytic CD8+ T cell response and further decreased T regulatory cell infiltration. For long-term anti-tumor effects, this therapy altered the metabolism of memory cells with self-renewing phenotype and provided a preferential advantage for survival of memory subsets with long-term efficacy and persistence. Adoptive transfer of memory cells from this combination therapy prolonged survival of tumor-bearing recipients. Furthermore, the adoptively-transferred memory cells responded to tumor re-challenge exerting long-term persistence. This approach offers a new paradigm to inhibit immunosuppression by direct targeting of MDSC function, generate effector and persistent memory cells for tumor eradication, and prevent lung cancer relapse. PMID:24085788

  15. In vitro cultured lung cancer cells are not suitable for animal-based breath biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Schallschmidt, Kristin; Becker, Roland; Zwaka, Hanna; Menzel, Randolf; Johnen, Dorothea; Fischer-Tenhagen, Carola; Rolff, Jana; Nehls, Irene

    2015-06-01

    In vitro cultured lung cancer cell lines were investigated regarding the possible identification of volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers. Gas samples from the headspace of pure culture medium and from the cultures of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 and Lu7466 were exposed to polypropylene fleece in order to absorb odour components. Sniffer dogs were trained with loaded fleeces of both cell lines, and honey bees were trained with fleeces exposed to A549. Afterwards, their ability to distinguish between cell-free culture medium odour and lung cancer cell odour was tested. Neither bees nor dogs were able to discriminate between odours from the cancer cell cultures and the pure culture medium. Solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography with mass selective detection produced profiles of volatiles from the headspace offered to the animals. The profiles from the cell lines were largely similar; distinct differences were based on the decrease of volatile culture medium components due to the cells' metabolic activity. In summary, cultured lung cancer cell lines do not produce any biomarkers recognizable by animals or gas chromatographic analysis. PMID:25667342

  16. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts. PMID:26851257

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Inhalable Flavonoid Nanoparticle for Lung Cancer Cell Targeting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Ong, Hui-Xin; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2016-02-01

    Current cancer treatments are not adequate to cure cancer disease, as most chemotherapeutic drugs do not differentiate between cancerous and non-cancerous cells; which lead to systemic toxicity and adverse effects. We have developed a promising approach to deliver a potential anti-cancer compound (curcumin) for lung cancer treatment through pulmonary delivery. Three different sizes of curcumin micellar nanoparticles (Cur-NPs) were fabricated and their cytotoxicity effects (proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression) were evaluated against non-small-cell lung cancer, human lung carcinoma (A549) and human lung adenocarcinoma (Calu-3). The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that Cur-NPs were more effective to kill lung cancer cells compared to DMSO-solubilised raw curcumin. The potency of the anti-cancer killing activities was size-dependent. Both raw curcumin and Cur-NPs were not toxic to healthy lung cells (BEAS-2B). Smaller Cur-NPs accumulated within nucleus, membrane and cytoplasm. Cur-NPs also induced apoptosis and caused G2/M arrest in both A549 and Calu-3 cell lines. Compared to raw curcumin, Cur-NPs were more effective in suppressing the expression of the inflammatory marker, Interleukin-8 (IL8). The aerosol performance of Cur-NPs was characterized using the next generation impactor (NGI). All Cur-NPs showed promising aerosolization property with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) ranging between 4.8-5.2 and 2.0-2.1, respectively. This study suggests that inhaled curcumin nanoparticles could potentially be used for lung cancer treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:27305771

  18. Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tao; Lu Heng; Shang Xuan; Tian Yihao; Zheng Congyi; Wang Shiwen; Cheng Hanhua . E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia . E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

    2006-04-14

    Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-{kappa}B was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-{kappa}B resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-{kappa}B inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer.

  19. Gallbladder Metastasis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as Acute Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yu-Sook; Han, Hye-Suk; Lim, Sung-Nam; Kim, Mi-Jin; Han, Joung-Ho; Kang, Min-Ho; Ryu, Dong-Hee; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lee, Ki-Hyeong; Kim, Seung-Taik

    2012-09-01

    Although non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can metastasize to almost any organ, metastasis to the gallbladder with significant clinical manifestation is relatively rare. Here, we report a case of gallbladder metastasis of NSCLC presenting as acute cholecystitis. A 79-year-old man presented with pain in the right upper quadrant and fever. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen showed a cavitary mass in the right lower lobe of the lung and irregular wall thickening of the gallbladder. Open cholecystectomy and needle biopsy of the lung mass were performed. Histological examination of the gallbladder revealed a moderately-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma displaying the same morphology as the lung mass assessed by needle biopsy. Subsequent immunohistochemical examination of the gallbladder and lung tissue showed that the tumor cells were positive for P63 but negative for cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20 and thyroid transcription factor-1. A second primary tumor of the gallbladder was excluded by immunohistochemical methods, and the final pathological diagnosis was gallbladder metastasis of NSCLC. Although the incidence is extremely rare, acute cholecystitis can occur in association with lung cancer metastasis to the gallbladder. PMID:23358590

  20. From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vizuete, William; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Nguyen, Hang; Smeester, Lisa; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Shope, Cynthia; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James H.; Alvarez, Sergio; Erickson, Mathew H.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field. PMID:26917966

  1. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Spring-Giusti, Clémentine; Bellon, Nadine; Ancian, Philippe; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccines are different from the well-known prophylactic vaccines in that they are designed to treat patients already suffering from a disease instead of preventing the disease in healthy individuals. Several therapeutic vaccines are today in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. These vaccines use different approaches including peptides, cell lines and viral vectors, and explore different settings within the pathology. Some are given in monotherapy while others are combined with the classic therapies used with non-small-cell lung cancer. This review gives a summary of the therapeutic vaccines currently in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:23496666

  2. From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Vizuete, William; Sexton, Kenneth G; Nguyen, Hang; Smeester, Lisa; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Shope, Cynthia; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James H; Alvarez, Sergio; Erickson, Mathew H; Fry, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field.

  3. Inhibition of bleomycin-induced cell death in rat alveolar macrophages and human lung epithelial cells by ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun Sik; Ko, Hyun Hee; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-10-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition is recognized to be involved in toxic and oxidative forms of cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ambroxol against the cytotoxicity of bleomycin (BLM) by looking at the effect on the mitochondrial membrane permeability in alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells exposed to BLM revealed the loss of cell viability and increase in caspase-3 activity. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) reduced the 75 mU/mL BLM-induced cell death and activation of caspase-3 in macrophages or epithelial cells. It reduced the condensation and fragmentation of nuclei caused by BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol alone did not significantly cause cell death. Treatment of alveolar macrophages with BLM resulted in the decrease in transmembrane potential in mitochondria, cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c, increase in formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of GSH. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) inhibited the increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability, ROS formation and decrease in GSH contents due to BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol exerted a scavenging effect on hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide and reduced the iron-mediated formation of malondialdehyde and carbonyls in liver mitochondria. It prevented cell death due to SIN-1 in lung epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that ambroxol attenuates the BLM-induced viability loss in alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells. This effect may be due to inhibition of mitochondrial damage and due to the scavenging action on free radicals.

  4. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew S; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2016-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  5. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew S.; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; van Driel, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  6. 76 FR 35450 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Clinical Trial Endpoints for the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics.'' This draft guidance provides recommendations to applicants on... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Clinical Trial Endpoints for the Approval of Non-Small Cell...

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma lung: Presented with bilateral lower limb deep venous thrombosis with gangrene formation

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kaushik; Sengupta, Amitabha; Patra, Anupam; Jash, Debraj

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral venous thrombosis due to underlying malignancy is a rare entity. It is worthy to search for malignancy in patients of bilateral venous gangrene. Our patient presented with severe bilateral leg pain as a result of venous gangrene. There was associated left sided massive pleural effusion with scalp nodule. Fine needle aspiration cytology of scalp nodule revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma and fiber optic bronchoscopy guided biopsy from growth at left upper lobe bronchus confirmed the case as squamous cell carcinoma lung. It was rare for squamous cell carcinoma lung to present as bilateral venous gangrene with anticardiolipin antibody negative. PMID:24455526

  8. Chronic exposure to particulate chromate induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2006-11-01

    One of the hallmarks of lung cancer is chromosome instability (CIN), particularly a tetraploid phenotype, which is normally prevented by the spindle assembly checkpoint. Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is an established human lung carcinogen, and Cr(VI) induces tumors at lung bifurcation sites where Cr(VI) particles impact and persist. However, the effects of Cr(VI) on the spindle assembly checkpoint are unknown and little is known about prolonged exposure to particulate Cr(VI). Accordingly, we investigated particulate Cr(VI)-induced bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint after several days of exposure in WHTBF-6 cells. We found that lead chromate indeed induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells, as 72, 96, and 120 h treatments with 0.5 or 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate induced significant increases in the percentage of cells with aberrant mitotic figures. For example, treatment with 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate for 96 h induced 11, 12.3, and 14% of cells with premature anaphase, centromere spreading and premature centromere division, respectively. In addition, we found a disruption of mitosis with more cells accumulating in anaphase; cells treated for 96 h increased from 18% in controls to 31% in cells treated with lead chromate. To confirm involvement of the spindle assembly checkpoint, Mad2 expression was used as a marker. Mad2 expression was decreased in cells exposed to chronic treatments of lead chromate, consistent with disruption of the checkpoint. We also found concentration- and time-dependent increases in tetraploid cells, which continued to grow and form colonies. When cells were treated with chronic lead alone there was no increase in aberrant mitotic cells or polyploidy; however, chronic exposure to a soluble Cr(VI) showed an increase in aberrant mitotic cells and polyploidy. These data suggest that lead chromate does induce CIN and may be one mechanism in the development of Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. PMID:17112237

  9. Duodeno-colic fistula as a rare presentation of lung cancer — surgical treatment of a stage IV oligometastatic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Vitor; Santiago, Inês; Marinho, Rui; Pires, David; Theias, Rita; Gomes, António; Pignatelli, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rare adenosquamous carcinomas have no defined standard approach given their low incidence. They present with nonspecific imaging characteristics and are described as having worse prognosis than other lung malignancies, with greater likelihood of local invasion and early metastasis. Presentation of case Male caucasian patient, 43 years, 26 pack-year smoking history, presented with watery diarrhea, early emesis and loss of 25% body weight (20 kg) in four weeks. Colonoscopy identified a left colonic mass. Abdominal CT/ultrasound showed a large fistulous lesion between the 4th portion of the duodenum and left colon. CT showed a solid mass in the right upper lung lobe. Endoscopy and transthoracic biopsy were inconclusive. En bloc D3 and D4 duodenectomy, proximal enterectomy and left hemicolectomy were performed, with inconclusive histology of the specimen. Three months later, a right upper lung lobectomy with lymphadenectomy was performed, revealing an adenosquamous carcinoma of lung origin, R0, staged as pT2pN0pM1b. Six months later, a single dural metastasis in the left cerebellopontine angle was detected and resected, with subsequent holocranial radiotherapy and systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient is currently with 18 months follow-up, in good general health and with no evidence of recurrent disease. Discussion There are no specific guidelines to treat oligometastatic adenosquamous lung carcinoma. Our approach was abdominal surgery as a life-saving procedure and, months later, oncological resection of primary lung tumor and metachronous metastasis to the brain. Conclusion A systematic, patient-oriented, patient-shared, multidisciplinary approach is particularly relevant when dealing with atypical presentations of rare diseases in young patients. PMID:26197095

  10. Pazopanib diminishes non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and metastases in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wang; Wang, Yuli; Li, Xuebing; You, Jiacong; Zhou, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis has been demonstrated to have a critical role in lung cancer pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods NSCLC cells were tested for viability and migration after incubation with varying concentrations of pazopanib. Further, the phosphorylation status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and MEK were assessed in vitro. For in vivo testing, mice grafted with NSCLC cell lines L9981 and A549 were treated orally with pazopanib. Results Pazopanib inhibits signaling pathways in tumor cells, thus blocking NSCLC cell growth and migration in vitro and inducing tumor cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. We show that pazopanib could inhibit tumor cell growth, decrease metastases, and prolong survival in two mouse xenograft models of human NSCLC. Conclusion These preclinical studies of pazopanib show the possibility of clinical application and, ultimately, improvement in patient outcome. PMID:26273349

  11. Aptamer based electrochemical sensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachna; Varun Agrawal, Ved; Sharma, Pradeep; Varshney, R.; Sinha, R. K.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2012-04-01

    We report results of the studies relating to development of an aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The aminated 85-mer DNA aptamer probe specific for the A549 cells has been covalently immobilized onto silane self assembled monolayer (SAM) onto ITO surface using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The results of cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry studies reveal that the aptamer functionalized bioelectrode can specifically detect lung cancer cells in the concentration range of 103 to 107 cells/ml with detection limit of 103 cells/ml within 60 s. The specificity studies of the bioelectrode have been carried out with control KB cells. No significant change in response is observed for control KB cells as compared to that of the A549 target cells.

  12. Monitoring the spreading stage of lung cells by silicon nanowire electrical cell impedance sensor for cancer detection purposes.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Hamed; Abdolahad, Mohammad; Gharooni, Milad; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Azimi, Soheil; Hosseini, Mohammad; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2015-06-15

    We developed a silicon nanowire based electrical cell impedance sensor (SiNW-ECIS) as an instrument that detects cancerous cultured living lung cells by monitoring their spreading state at which the cells stretched and become extended on nanowires. Further current penetration into the extended membrane of malignant cells in respect to normal ones (In the first 6h after cells interaction with surface) are the key mechanism in our diagnosis procedure. The developed device applied to monitor the spreading-induced electrical differences between cancerous and normal lung cells in an integral fashion. Detection was performed so faster than the time required to complete cells mitosis. Morphology and architecture of doped Si nanowires covered microelectrodes observably enhance the contact area between cells and electrodes which support accurate signal recording from stretched cells as indicated by SEM and florescent images.

  13. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression.

  14. Radiotherapy induced Lewis lung cancer cell apoptosis via inactivating β-catenin mediated by upregulated HOTAIR

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianxiang; Shen, Zhuping; Zheng, Yuanda; Wang, Shengye; Mao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HOTAIR, a long intervening non-coding Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA, negatively regulates transcription on another chromosome and is reported to reprogram chromatin organization and promote tumor progression. Nevertheless, little is known about its roles in the development of radiation therapy of lung cancer. In this study, we established a xenografed model of Lewis lung carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice and investigated the possible involvement of HOTAIR in this radiotherapy. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells and locally irradiated followed by measurement in tumor volume. Levels of HOTAIR and WIF-1 mRNA expression were determined by using Quantitative Real-Time PCR. Levels of WIF-1 and β-catenin were determined by using western blot assay. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was examined by using TUNEL assay. Results: In mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor, local radiotherapy suppressed tumor growth and it also reduced level of HOTAIR but increased WIF-1 expression. When HOTAIR was overexpressed, radio-sensitivity was reduced. In vitro experiments, irradiation inhibited HOTAIR transportation to the nucleus. However, it was reversed by over-expressed HOTAIR. Cells transfected with pcDNA-HOTAIR or siRNA-HOTAIR resulted in decline or increase in radiosensitivity, which was abrogated by co-tansfected with siRNA-β-catenin. Conclusion: Radiotherapy induced Lewis lung cancer cell apoptosis via inactivating β-catenin mediated by upregulated HOTAIR. PMID:26339352

  15. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  16. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marani, Marina; Paone, Alessio; Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-26

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types.

  17. Lipidomic Profiling of Lung Pleural Effusion Identifies Unique Metabotype for EGFR Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ying Swan; Yip, Lian Yee; Basri, Nurhidayah; Chong, Vivian Su Hui; Teo, Chin Chye; Tan, Eddy; Lim, Kah Ling; Tan, Gek San; Yang, Xulei; Yeo, Si Yong; Koh, Mariko Si Yue; Devanand, Anantham; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng Huat; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon

    2016-01-01

    Cytology and histology forms the cornerstone for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but obtaining sufficient tumour cells or tissue biopsies for these tests remains a challenge. We investigate the lipidome of lung pleural effusion (PE) for unique metabolic signatures to discriminate benign versus malignant PE and EGFR versus non-EGFR malignant subgroups to identify novel diagnostic markers that is independent of tumour cell availability. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we profiled the lipidomes of the PE of 30 benign and 41 malignant cases with or without EGFR mutation. Unsupervised principal component analysis revealed distinctive differences between the lipidomes of benign and malignant PE as well as between EGFR mutants and non-EGFR mutants. Docosapentaenoic acid and Docosahexaenoic acid gave superior sensitivity and specificity for detecting NSCLC when used singly. Additionally, several 20- and 22- carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids and phospholipid species were significantly elevated in the EGFR mutants compared to non-EGFR mutants. A 7-lipid panel showed great promise in the stratification of EGFR from non-EGFR malignant PE. Our data revealed novel lipid candidate markers in the non-cellular fraction of PE that holds potential to aid the diagnosis of benign, EGFR mutation positive and negative NSCLC. PMID:27739449

  18. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-10-13

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression.

  19. ANGPTL2/LILRB2 signaling promotes the propagation of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoye; Yu, Xiaoting; Xie, Jingjing; Zhan, Mengna; Yu, Zhuo; Xie, Li; Zeng, Hongxiang; Zhang, Feifei; Chen, Guoqiang; Yi, Xianghua; Zheng, Junke

    2015-08-28

    Immune inhibitory receptors expressed on various types of immune cells deliver inhibitory signals that maintain the homeostasis of the immune system. Recently we demonstrated that leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 2 (LILRB2) and its murine homolog, paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIRB), are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells and acute myeloid leukemia stem cells and function in maintenance of stemness. Herein, we determined that both LILRB2 and its soluble ligand ANGPTL2 are highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples, and levels are adversely related to patient prognosis. Inhibition of LILRB2 expression in NSCLC cell lines, such as A549 cells, resulted in a dramatic decrease in proliferation, colony formation, and migration. Mechanistic analyses indicated that ANGPTL2 binds LILRB2 to support the growth of lung cancer cells and that the SHP2/CaMK1/CREB axis controls the proliferation of lung cancer cell lines. Our results suggest that signaling involving ANGPTL2 and LILRB2 is important for lung cancer development and represents a novel target for treatment of this type of cancer.

  20. Neuroendocrine (NE) cells in rat neonatal lungs. A histochemical and immunocytochemical study.