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Sample records for adenosylcobalamin coenzyme b12

  1. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  2. Multiple Roles of ATP:Cob(I)alamin Adenosyltransferases in the Conversion of B12 to Coenzyme B12

    PubMed Central

    Mera, Paola E.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Our mechanistic understanding of the conversion of vitamin B12 into coenzyme B12 (a.k.a. adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) has been substantially advanced in recent years. Insights into the multiple roles played by ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ACA) enzymes have emerged through the crystallographic, spectroscopic, biochemical, and mutational analyses of wild-type and variant proteins. ACA enzymes circumvent the thermodynamic barrier posed by the very low redox potential associated with the reduction of cob(II)alamin to cob(I)alamin by generating a unique four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate that is readily converted to cob(I)alamin by physiological reductants. ACA enzymes not only synthesize AdoCbl, they deliver it to the enzymes that use it, and, in some cases, enzymes whose function is needed to maintain the fidelity of the AdoCbl delivery process have been identified. Advances in our understanding of ACA enzyme function have provided valuable insights into the role of specific residues, and into why substitutions of these residues have profound negative effects on human health. From an applied science standpoint, a better understanding of the adenosylation reaction may lead to more efficient ways of synthesizing AdoCbl. PMID:20677021

  3. Radical use of Rossmann and TIM barrel architectures for controlling coenzyme B12 chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Daniel P; Croft, Anna K; Drennan, Catherine L

    2012-01-01

    The ability of enzymes to harness free-radical chemistry allows for some of the most amazing transformations in nature, including reduction of ribonucleotides and carbon skeleton rearrangements. Enzyme cofactors involved in this chemistry can be large and complex, such as adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B(12)), simpler, such as S-adenosylmethionine and an iron-sulfur cluster (i.e., poor man's B(12)), or very small, such as one nonheme iron atom coordinated by protein ligands. Although the chemistry catalyzed by these enzyme-bound cofactors is unparalleled, it does come at a price. The enzyme must be able to control these radical reactions, preventing unwanted chemistry and protecting the enzyme active site from damage. Here, we consider a set of radical folds: the (β/α)(8) or TIM barrel, combined with a Rossmann domain for coenzyme B(12)-dependent chemistry. Using specific enzyme examples, we consider how nature employs the common TIM barrel fold and its Rossmann domain partner for radical-based chemistry.

  4. Neutron study of B 12 coenzyme at 15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquiere, J. P.

    1992-06-01

    This high resolution and low temperature study, at 15 K, of the vitamin B 12 coenzyme ( C72H100N18O17PCo) was undertaken to confirm and clarify the water networks identified at 279 K by Savage [1]. Details of the data collection and refinement of the low temperature structure are described, a comparison of the coenzyme molecule structures at 15 and 279 K is made, and that of solvent structures outlined.

  5. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions.

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of a profluorescent analogue of coenzyme B12.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, M S; Omann, G M; Leonard, N J

    1982-01-01

    We describe here the synthesis and chemical properties of linear(lin)-benzoadenosylcobalamin, a coenzyme B12 analogue that has a laterally extended nucleoside in the upper axial position. It is an effective competitive inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii. lin-Benzoadenosylcobalamin is nonfluorescent in solution but, on homolytic (light) or heterolytic (acid, cyanide) cleavage of the carbon-cobalt bond, forms fluorescent products. In addition, fluorescence is detectable on binding of the coenzyme analogue to ribonucleotide reductase, and the observed fluorescence polarization of the lin-benzoadenosyl moiety indicates that it is bound loosely to the enzyme when the coenzyme is partially dissociated. PMID:7048307

  7. Diol Dehydratase-Reactivase Is Essential for Recycling of Coenzyme B12 in Diol Dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Toraya, Tetsuo; Tanokuchi, Aya; Yamasaki, Ai; Nakamura, Takehiro; Ogura, Kenichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa

    2016-01-12

    Holoenzymes of adenosylcobalamin-dependent diol and glycerol dehydratases undergo mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol and O2 inactivation in the absence of substrate, which accompanies irreversible cleavage of the coenzyme Co-C bond. The inactivated holodiol dehydratase and the inactive enzyme·cyanocobalamin complex were (re)activated by incubation with NADH, ATP, and Mg(2+) (or Mn(2+)) in crude extracts of Klebsiella oxytoca, suggesting the presence of a reactivating system in the extract. The reducing system with NADH could be replaced by FMNH2. When inactivated holoenzyme or the enzyme·cyanocobalamin complex, a model of inactivated holoenzyme, was incubated with purified recombinant diol dehydratase-reactivase (DD-R) and an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase in the presence of FMNH2, ATP, and Mg(2+), diol dehydratase activity was restored. Among the three adenosyltransferases (PduO, EutT, and CobA) of this bacterium, PduO and CobA were much more efficient for the reactivation than EutT, although PduO showed the lowest adenosyltransfease activity toward free cob(I)alamin. These results suggest that (1) diol dehydratase activity is maintained through coenzyme recycling by a reactivating system for diol dehydratase composed of DD-R, PduO adenosyltransferase, and a reducing system, (2) the releasing factor DD-R is essential for the recycling of adenosycobalamin, a tightly bound, prosthetic group-type coenzyme, and (3) PduO is a specific adenosylating enzyme for the DD reactivation, whereas CobA and EutT exert their effects through free synthesized coenzyme. Although FMNH2 was mainly used as a reductant in this study, a natural reducing system might consist of PduS cobalamin reductase and NADH.

  8. The complete coenzyme B12 biosynthesis gene cluster of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098.

    PubMed

    Santos, Filipe; Vera, Jose L; van der Heijden, René; Valdez, Graciela; de Vos, Willem M; Sesma, Fernando; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    The coenzyme B(12) production pathway in Lactobacillus reuteri has been deduced using a combination of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches. The coenzyme B(12) gene cluster of Lb. reuteri CRL1098 has the unique feature of clustering together the cbi, cob and hem genes. It consists of 29 ORFs encoding the complete enzymic machinery necessary for de novo biosynthesis. Transcriptional analysis showed it to be expressed as two tandem transcripts of approximately 22 and 4 kb, carrying cobD, cbiABCDETFGHJ, cobA/hemD, cbiKLMNQOP, sirA, hemACBL, and cobUSC, hemD, cobT, respectively. Both transcripts appear to be similarly regulated, and under the conditions assayed are induced in the late-exponential growth phase. Evidence for a regulatory mechanism of negative feedback inhibition by vitamin B(12) itself was observed. Comparative genomics analysis of the coding sequences showed them to be most similar to those coding for the anaerobic coenzyme B(12) pathways previously characterized in a few representatives of the genera Listeria and Salmonella. This contrasts with the trusted species phylogeny and suggests horizontal gene transfer of the B(12) biosynthesis genes. G+C content and codon adaptation index analysis is suggestive that the postulated transfer of these genes was not a recent event. Additional comparative genomics and transcriptional analysis of the sequences acquired during this study suggests a functional link between coenzyme B(12) biosynthesis and reuterin production, which might be implicated in Lb. reuteri's success in colonizing the gastrointestinal tract. This information on gene organization, gene transcription and gene acquisition is relevant for the development of (fermented) foods and probiotics enriched in B(12). PMID:18174128

  9. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small.

  10. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  11. Synthesis, solution and crystal structure of the coenzyme B(12) analogue Co(β)-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Miriam; Wurst, Klaus; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Crystal structure analyses have helped to decipher the mode of binding of coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) in the active site of AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. However, the question of how such enzymes perform their radical reactions is still incompletely answered. A pioneering study by Gruber and Kratky of AdoCbl-dependent glutamate mutase (GLM) laid out a path for the movement of the catalytically active 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, in which H-bonds between the protein and the 2'- and 3'-OH groups of the protein bound AdoCbl would play a decisive role. Studies with correspondingly modified coenzyme B12-analogues are of interest to gain insights into cofactor binding and enzyme mechanism. Here we report the preparation of Coβ-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin (2'FAdoCbl), which lacks the 2'-OH group critical for the interaction in enzymes. 2'FAdoCbl was prepared by alkylation of cob(I)alamin, obtained from the electrochemical reduction of aquocobalamin. Spectroscopic data and a single crystal X-ray analysis of 2'FAdoCbl established its structure, which was very similar to that one of coenzyme B12. 2'FAdoCbl is a (19)F NMR active mimic of coenzyme B12 that may help to gain insights into binding interactions of coenzyme B12 with AdoCbl-dependent enzymes, proteins of B12 transport and of AdoCbl-biosynthesis, as well as with B12-riboswitches. PMID:25726330

  12. Synthesis, solution and crystal structure of the coenzyme B(12) analogue Co(β)-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Miriam; Wurst, Klaus; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Crystal structure analyses have helped to decipher the mode of binding of coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) in the active site of AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. However, the question of how such enzymes perform their radical reactions is still incompletely answered. A pioneering study by Gruber and Kratky of AdoCbl-dependent glutamate mutase (GLM) laid out a path for the movement of the catalytically active 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, in which H-bonds between the protein and the 2'- and 3'-OH groups of the protein bound AdoCbl would play a decisive role. Studies with correspondingly modified coenzyme B12-analogues are of interest to gain insights into cofactor binding and enzyme mechanism. Here we report the preparation of Coβ-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin (2'FAdoCbl), which lacks the 2'-OH group critical for the interaction in enzymes. 2'FAdoCbl was prepared by alkylation of cob(I)alamin, obtained from the electrochemical reduction of aquocobalamin. Spectroscopic data and a single crystal X-ray analysis of 2'FAdoCbl established its structure, which was very similar to that one of coenzyme B12. 2'FAdoCbl is a (19)F NMR active mimic of coenzyme B12 that may help to gain insights into binding interactions of coenzyme B12 with AdoCbl-dependent enzymes, proteins of B12 transport and of AdoCbl-biosynthesis, as well as with B12-riboswitches.

  13. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  14. TD-DFT Insight into Photodissociation of Co-C Bond in Coenzyme B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Kornobis, Karina; Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin B12, and continues to be a topic of active research interest. The mechanism of Co-C bond cleavage in AdoCbl, and the corresponding enzymatic reactions are however, not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to investigate the photodissociation of coenzyme B12. To reduce computational cost, while retaining the major spectroscopic features of AdoCbl, a truncated model based on ribosylcobalamin (RibCbl) was used to simulate Co-C photodissociation. Equilibrium geometries of RibCbl were obtained by optimization at the DFT/BP86/TZVP level of theory, and low-lying excited states were calculated by TD-DFT using the same functional and basis set. The calculated singlet states, and absorption spectra were simulated in both the gas phase, and water, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Both spectra were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and potential energy curves based on vertical excitations were plotted to explore the nature of Co-C bond dissociation. It was found that a repulsive 3(σCo-C → σ*Co-C) triplet state became dissociative at large Co-C bond distance, similar to a previous observation for methylcobalamin (MeCbl). Furthermore, potential energy surfaces (PESs) obtained as a function of both Co-CRib and Co-NIm distances, identify the S1 state as a key intermediate generated during photoexcitation of RibCbl, attributed to a mixture of a MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) and a σ bonding-ligand charge transfer (SBLCT) states.

  15. TD-DFT insight into photodissociation of the Co-C bond in coenzyme B12

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Kornobis, Karina; Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Kozlowski, Pawel M.

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin B12, and continues to be a topic of active research interest. The mechanism of Co-C bond cleavage in AdoCbl, and the corresponding enzymatic reactions are however, not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to investigate the photodissociation of coenzyme B12. To reduce computational cost, while retaining the major spectroscopic features of AdoCbl, a truncated model based on ribosylcobalamin (RibCbl) was used to simulate Co-C photodissociation. Equilibrium geometries of RibCbl were obtained by optimization at the DFT/BP86/TZVP level of theory, and low-lying excited states were calculated by TD-DFT using the same functional and basis set. The calculated singlet states, and absorption spectra were simulated in both the gas phase, and water, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Both spectra were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and potential energy curves based on vertical excitations were plotted to explore the nature of Co-C bond dissociation. It was found that a repulsive 3(σCo−C → σ*Co−C) triplet state became dissociative at large Co-C bond distance, similar to a previous observation for methylcobalamin (MeCbl). Furthermore, potential energy surfaces (PESs) obtained as a function of both Co-CRib and Co-NIm distances, identify the S1 state as a key intermediate generated during photoexcitation of RibCbl, attributed to a mixture of a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) and a σ bonding-ligand charge transfer (SBLCT) states. PMID:24790969

  16. Biosynthesis of the corrin macrocycle of coenzyme B12 in Pseudomonas denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Debussche, L; Thibaut, D; Cameron, B; Crouzet, J; Blanche, F

    1993-01-01

    Studies with cell-free protein preparations from a series of recombinant strains of Pseudomonas denitrificans demonstrated that precorrin-3 is converted into a further trimethylated intermediate, named precorrin-3B, along the pathway to coenzyme B12. It was then shown that the part of the pathway from precorrin-3 (called precorrin-3A hereafter) to precorrin-6x involves three intermediates, precorrin-3B, precorrin-4, and precorrin-5. Precorrin-3B was isolated in its native (reduced) as well as its oxidized (factor-IIIB) states, and precorrin-4 was isolated in its oxidized form only (factor-IV). Both factors were in vitro precursors of precorrin-6x. The synthesis of precorrin-6x from precorrin-3A was shown to be catalyzed by four enzymes, CobG, CobJ, CobM, and CobF, intervening in this order. They were purified to homogeneity. CobG, which converts precorrin-3A to precorrin-3B, was found to be an iron-sulfur protein responsible for the oxidation known to occur between precorrin-3A and precorrin-6x, and CobJ, CobM, and CobF are the C-17, C-11, and C-1 methylases, respectively. The acetate fragment is extruded after precorrin-4 formation. This study combined with our recent structural studies on factor-IV (D. Thibaut, L. Debussche, D. Fréchet, F. Herman, M. Vuilhorgne, and F. Blanche, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun. 1993:513-515, 1993) and precorrin-3B (L. Debussche, D. Thibaut, M. Danzer, F. Debu, D. Fréchet, F. Herman, F. Blanche, and M. Vuilhorgne, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun. 1993:1100-1103, 1993) provides a first step-by-step picture of the sequence of the enzymatic reactions leading to the corrin ring in P. denitrificans. PMID:8226690

  17. Evolution of Coenzyme B(12) Synthesis among Enteric Bacteria: Evidence for Loss and Reacquisition of a Multigene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. G.; Roth, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of cobalamin (coenzyme B(12)) synthetic ability and cobalamin-dependent metabolism among enteric bacteria. Most species of enteric bacteria tested synthesize cobalamin under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and ferment glycerol in a cobalamin-dependent fashion. The group of species including Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cannot ferment glycerol. E. coli strains cannot synthesize cobalamin de novo, and Salmonella spp. synthesize cobalamin only under anaerobic conditions. In addition, the cobalamin synthetic genes of Salmonella spp. (cob) show a regulatory pattern different from that of other enteric taxa tested. We propose that the cobalamin synthetic genes, as well as genes providing cobalamin-dependent diol dehydratase, were lost by a common ancestor of E. coli and Salmonella spp. and were reintroduced as a single fragment into the Salmonella lineage from an exogenous source. Consistent with this hypothesis, the S. typhimurium cob genes do not hybridize with the genomes of other enteric species. The Salmonella cob operon may represent a class of genes characterized by periodic loss and reacquisition by host genomes. This process may be an important aspect of bacterial population genetics and evolution. PMID:8770581

  18. Time-dependent density functional theory study of cobalt corrinoids: Electronically excited states of coenzyme B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniów, Tadeusz; Jaworska, Maria; Lodowski, Piotr; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Dreos, Renata; Randaccio, Lucio; Kozlowski, Pawel M.

    2009-09-01

    The analysis of the electronic spectra of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and its derivative in which the trans axial base was replaced by a water molecule (AdoCbi-H2O) has been performed by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The latter corresponds to the situation encountered in strongly acidic conditions. The TDDFT electronic transitions and oscillator strengths were calculated at the optimized B3LYP and BP86 ground state equilibrium geometries. A comparison of the orbital energy diagrams obtained with the B3LYP and BP86 functionals reveals a different orbital order and composition of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals. In B3LYP the lowest-energy transitions are of π /d→π*, π /d→σ*, and π /d→d characters while in the case of BP86 they are mainly d /π→π* and d →π*. The long range charge transfer transitions involving excitations from adenine π orbitals to antibonding corrin π* orbital can be observed at low energies, especially in BP86 results. Calculated electronic excitations were used to simulate the absorption spectra for a direct comparison with the absorption spectra recorded for AdoCbl at different pH values. As previously found for methylcobalamin [see Andruniów et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 085101 (2008)] also for AdoCbl the two-parameter scaling technique is required to obtain a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental spectra. Both functionals correctly predict the shifting of the lowest intense transition toward blue by approximately 13nm upon changing pH from 7 to 1.

  19. Bacterial acyl-CoA mutase specifically catalyzes coenzyme B12-dependent isomerization of 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Yaneva, Nadya; Schuster, Judith; Schäfer, Franziska; Lede, Vera; Przybylski, Denise; Paproth, Torsten; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H; Rohwerder, Thore

    2012-05-01

    Coenzyme B(12)-dependent acyl-CoA mutases are radical enzymes catalyzing reversible carbon skeleton rearrangements in carboxylic acids. Here, we describe 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase (HCM) found in the bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis as a novel member of the mutase family. HCM specifically catalyzes the interconversion of 2-hydroxyisobutyryl- and (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. Like isobutyryl-CoA mutase, HCM consists of a large substrate- and a small B(12)-binding subunit, HcmA and HcmB, respectively. However, it is thus far the only acyl-CoA mutase showing substrate specificity for hydroxylated carboxylic acids. Complete loss of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid degradation capacity in hcmA and hcmB knock-out mutants established the central role of HCM in A. tertiaricarbonis for degrading substrates bearing a tert-butyl moiety, such as the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its metabolites. Sequence analysis revealed several HCM-like enzymes in other bacterial strains not related to MTBE degradation, indicating that HCM may also be involved in other pathways. In all strains, hcmA and hcmB are associated with genes encoding for a putative acyl-CoA synthetase and a MeaB-like chaperone. Activity and substrate specificity of wild-type enzyme and active site mutants HcmA I90V, I90F, and I90Y clearly demonstrated that HCM belongs to a new subfamily of B(12)-dependent acyl-CoA mutases. PMID:22433853

  20. Thermophilic Coenzyme B12-Dependent Acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Mutase from Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912 Preferentially Catalyzes Isomerization of (R)-3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA and 2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA

    PubMed Central

    Weichler, Maria-Teresa; Kurteva-Yaneva, Nadya; Przybylski, Denise; Schuster, Judith; Müller, Roland H.; Harms, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of a coenzyme B12-dependent acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) mutase isomerizing 3-hydroxybutyryl- and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA in the mesophilic bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 (N. Yaneva, J. Schuster, F. Schäfer, V. Lede, D. Przybylski, T. Paproth, H. Harms, R. H. Müller, and T. Rohwerder, J Biol Chem 287:15502–15511, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M111.314690) could pave the way for a complete biosynthesis route to the building block chemical 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid from renewable carbon. However, the enzyme catalyzes only the conversion of the stereoisomer (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA at reasonable rates, which seriously hampers an efficient combination of mutase and well-established bacterial poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) overflow metabolism. Here, we characterize a new 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase found in the thermophilic knallgas bacterium Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912. Reconstituted mutase subunits revealed highest activity at 55°C. Surprisingly, already at 30°C, isomerization of (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was about 7,000 times more efficient than with the mutase from strain L108. The most striking structural difference between the two mutases, likely determining stereospecificity, is a replacement of active-site residue Asp found in strain L108 at position 117 with Val in the enzyme from strain DSM 2912, resulting in a reversed polarity at this binding site. Overall sequence comparison indicates that both enzymes descended from different prokaryotic thermophilic methylmalonyl-CoA mutases. Concomitant expression of PHB enzymes delivering (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (beta-ketothiolase PhaA and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase PhaB from Cupriavidus necator) with the new mutase in Escherichia coli JM109 and BL21 strains incubated on gluconic acid at 37°C led to the production of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid at maximal titers of 0.7 mM. Measures to improve production in E. coli, such as coexpression of the chaperone MeaH and repression of

  1. Thermophilic Coenzyme B12-Dependent Acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Mutase from Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912 Preferentially Catalyzes Isomerization of (R)-3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA and 2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Weichler, Maria-Teresa; Kurteva-Yaneva, Nadya; Przybylski, Denise; Schuster, Judith; Müller, Roland H; Harms, Hauke; Rohwerder, Thore

    2015-07-01

    The recent discovery of a coenzyme B12-dependent acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) mutase isomerizing 3-hydroxybutyryl- and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA in the mesophilic bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 (N. Yaneva, J. Schuster, F. Schäfer, V. Lede, D. Przybylski, T. Paproth, H. Harms, R. H. Müller, and T. Rohwerder, J Biol Chem 287:15502-15511, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M111.314690) could pave the way for a complete biosynthesis route to the building block chemical 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid from renewable carbon. However, the enzyme catalyzes only the conversion of the stereoisomer (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA at reasonable rates, which seriously hampers an efficient combination of mutase and well-established bacterial poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) overflow metabolism. Here, we characterize a new 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase found in the thermophilic knallgas bacterium Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912. Reconstituted mutase subunits revealed highest activity at 55°C. Surprisingly, already at 30°C, isomerization of (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was about 7,000 times more efficient than with the mutase from strain L108. The most striking structural difference between the two mutases, likely determining stereospecificity, is a replacement of active-site residue Asp found in strain L108 at position 117 with Val in the enzyme from strain DSM 2912, resulting in a reversed polarity at this binding site. Overall sequence comparison indicates that both enzymes descended from different prokaryotic thermophilic methylmalonyl-CoA mutases. Concomitant expression of PHB enzymes delivering (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (beta-ketothiolase PhaA and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase PhaB from Cupriavidus necator) with the new mutase in Escherichia coli JM109 and BL21 strains incubated on gluconic acid at 37°C led to the production of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid at maximal titers of 0.7 mM. Measures to improve production in E. coli, such as coexpression of the chaperone MeaH and repression of

  2. Entropic and Dynamical Origins of Catalysis in a B12 Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt; Wang, Miao

    2010-03-01

    The kinetics of the diffusive radical pair separation process in the adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B12) -dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase from Salmonella typhimurium at 234-248 K in a dimethylsulfoxide/water cryosolvent system [1] were determined by using time-resolved, full-spectrum electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Substrate hydrogen isotope effects show that the cofactor cobalt-carbon bond cleavage event rate is rate determining, and that catalysis (relative to solution) is almost entirely entropic. The results challenge the proposed, traditional enthalpy-based mechanisms, and show that delocalized, dynamical sources are central in bond cleavage catalysis. Changes in configurational freedom of surface residues and hydration waters are proposed as the microscopic origin. [1] M. Wang and K. Warncke, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 4846.

  3. Entropic Origin of Cobalt-Carbon Bond Cleavage Catalysis in Adenosylcobalamin-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia-Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzymes accelerate the cleavage of the cobalt-carbon (Co-C) bond of the bound coenzyme by >1011-fold. The cleavage-generated 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical initiates the catalytic cycle by abstracting a hydrogen atom from substrate. Kinetic coupling of the Co-C bond cleavage and hydrogen atom transfer steps at ambient temperatures has interfered with past experimental attempts to directly address the factors that govern Co-C bond cleavage catalysis. Here, we use time-resolved, full-spectrum electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, temperature-step reaction initiation, starting from the enzyme-coenzyme-substrate ternary complex, and 2H-labeled substrate, to study radical pair generation in ethanolamine ammonia-lyase from Salmonella typhimurium at 234-248 K in a dimethylsulfoxide/water cryosolvent system. The monoexponential kinetics of formation of the 2H- and 1H-substituted substrate radicals are the same, indicating that Co-C bond cleavage rate-limits radical pair formation. Analysis of the kinetics by using a linear, three-state model allows extraction of the microscopic rate constant for Co-C bond cleavage. Eyring analysis reveals that the activation enthalpy for Co-C bond cleavage is 32 ±1 kcal/mol, which is the same as for the cleavage reaction in solution. The origin of Co-C bond cleavage catalysis in the enzyme is, therefore, the large, favorable activation entropy of 61 ±6 cal/mol/K (relative to 7 ±1 cal/mol/K in solution). This represents a paradigm shift from traditional, enthalpy-based mechanisms that have been proposed for Co-C bond breaking in B12 enzymes. The catalysis is proposed to arise from an increase in protein configurational entropy along the reaction coordinate. PMID:24028405

  4. The PduM Protein Is a Structural Component of the Microcompartments Involved in Coenzyme B12-Dependent 1,2-Propanediol Degradation by Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sharmistha; Cheng, Shouqiang; Fan, Chenguang

    2012-01-01

    Diverse bacteria use proteinaceous microcompartments (MCPs) to optimize metabolic pathways that have toxic or volatile intermediates. MCPs consist of metabolic enzymes encased within a protein shell that provides a defined environment. In Salmonella enterica, a MCP is involved in B12-dependent 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu MCP). In this report, we show that the protein PduM is required for the assembly and function of the Pdu MCP. The results of tandem mass spectrometry and Western blot analyses show that PduM is a component of the Pdu MCP. Electron microscopy shows that a pduM deletion mutant forms MCPs with abnormal morphology. Growth tests and metabolite measurements establish that a pduM deletion mutant is unable to form functional MCPs. PduM is unrelated in sequence to proteins of known function and hence may represent a new class of MCP structural proteins. We also report a modified protocol for the purification of Pdu MCP from Salmonella which allows isolation of milligram amounts of MCPs in about 4 h. We believe that this protocol can be extended or modified for the purification of MCPs from diverse bacteria. PMID:22343294

  5. Defective adenosylcobalamin synthesis in a case of transcobalamin II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Linnell, J C; Quadros, E V; Elliott, P G; Malleson, P

    1980-01-01

    Cobalamin metabolism has been investigated in a new case of transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency. Using the chromatobioautographic technique, an abnormal distribution of cobalamins was detected in the child's erythrocytes and reduced synthesis of adenosylcobalamin but not of methylcobalamin in cultured fibroblasts. These results suggest that there may be a close link between TC II-mediated cobalamin transport and intracellular synthesis of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl). PMID:6775148

  6. Characterization of vitamin B12 in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kumudha, Anantharajappa; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of nature's complex metabolite which is industrially produced using certain bacteria. Algae could be an alternative source of vitamin B12 and in this study, vitamin B12 from a halotolerant green alga, Dunaliella salina V-101 was purified and characterized. The extract of Dunaliella was purified by passing through Amberlite XAD-2 and EASI-extract vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column. The total vitamin B12 content in purified sample fractions was 42 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as determined by the chemiluminescence method which was almost close to 49 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as estimated by microbiological method. Further quantification of total vitamin B12 using gold nanoparticle (AUNPs) based aptamer showed 40 ± 0.8/100 g dry weight. There was a good correlation among all the methods of quantification. Adenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 which is a cofactor for methylmalonyl CoA mutase was identified by HPLC. Upon quantification, Dunaliella was found to contain 34 ± 4 μg of adenosylcobalamin for 100 g dry biomass. Authenticity of adenosylcobalmin was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), selected ion recording (SIR) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) studies. PMID:26788012

  7. Characterization of vitamin B12 in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kumudha, Anantharajappa; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of nature's complex metabolite which is industrially produced using certain bacteria. Algae could be an alternative source of vitamin B12 and in this study, vitamin B12 from a halotolerant green alga, Dunaliella salina V-101 was purified and characterized. The extract of Dunaliella was purified by passing through Amberlite XAD-2 and EASI-extract vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column. The total vitamin B12 content in purified sample fractions was 42 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as determined by the chemiluminescence method which was almost close to 49 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as estimated by microbiological method. Further quantification of total vitamin B12 using gold nanoparticle (AUNPs) based aptamer showed 40 ± 0.8/100 g dry weight. There was a good correlation among all the methods of quantification. Adenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 which is a cofactor for methylmalonyl CoA mutase was identified by HPLC. Upon quantification, Dunaliella was found to contain 34 ± 4 μg of adenosylcobalamin for 100 g dry biomass. Authenticity of adenosylcobalmin was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), selected ion recording (SIR) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) studies.

  8. Acid-, base-, and lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis of methoxide from an alpha-hydroxy-beta-methoxy radical: models for reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12-dependent diol dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Libin; Newcomb, Martin

    2005-11-11

    [Reaction: see text].A model for glycol radicals was employed in laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of catalysis of the fragmentation of a methoxy group adjacent to an alpha-hydroxy radical center. Photolysis of a phenylselenylmethylcyclopropane precursor gave a cyclopropylcarbinyl radical that rapidly ring opened to the target alpha-hydroxy-beta-methoxy radical (3). Heterolysis of the methoxy group in 3 gave an enolyl radical (4a) or an enol ether radical cation (4b), depending upon pH. Radicals 4 contain a 2,2-diphenylcyclopropane reporter group, and they rapidly opened to give UV-observable diphenylalkyl radicals as the final products. No heterolysis was observed for radical 3 under neutral conditions. In basic aqueous acetonitrile solutions, specific base catalysis of the heterolysis was observed; the pK(a) of radical 3 was determined to be 12.5 from kinetic titration plots, and the ketyl radical formed by deprotonation of 3 eliminated methoxide with a rate constant of 5 x 10(7) s(-1). In the presence of carboxylic acids in acetonitrile solutions, radical 3 eliminated methanol in a general acid-catalyzed reaction, and rate constants for protonation of the methoxy group in 3 by several acids were measured. Radical 3 also reacted by fragmentation of methoxide in Lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis reactions; ZnBr2, Sc(OTf)3, and BF3 were found to be efficient catalysts. Catalytic rate constants for the heterolysis reactions were in the range of 3 x 10(4) to 2 x 10(6) s(-1). The Lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis reactions are fast enough for kinetic competence in coenzyme B12 dependent enzyme-catalyzed reactions of glycols, and Lewis-acid-catalyzed cleavages of beta-ethers in radicals might be applied in synthetic reactions.

  9. Role of vitamin B12 on methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Iñiguez, Tóshiko; García-Hernandez, Enrique; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Flores, María Elena

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is an organometallic compound with important metabolic derivatives that act as cofactors of certain enzymes, which have been grouped into three subfamilies depending on their cofactors. Among them, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) has been extensively studied. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible isomerization of L-methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA using adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor participating in the generation of radicals that allow isomerization of the substrate. The crystal structure of MCM determined in Propionibacterium freudenreichii var. shermanii has helped to elucidate the role of this cofactor AdoCbl in the reaction to specify the mechanism by which radicals are generated from the coenzyme and to clarify the interactions between the enzyme, coenzyme, and substrate. The existence of human methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) due to the presence of mutations in MCM shows the importance of its role in metabolism. The recent crystallization of the human MCM has shown that despite being similar to the bacterial protein, there are significant differences in the structural organization of the two proteins. Recent studies have identified the involvement of an accessory protein called MMAA, which interacts with MCM to prevent MCM’s inactivation or acts as a chaperone to promote regeneration of inactivated enzyme. The interdisciplinary studies using this protein as a model in different organisms have helped to elucidate the mechanism of action of this isomerase, the impact of mutations at a functional level and their repercussion in the development and progression of MMA in humans. It is still necessary to study the mechanisms involved in more detail using new methods. PMID:22661206

  10. Vitamin B-12

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vitamin B-12 Vitamin B-12 What is vitamin B-12? Vitamin B-12 is an important nutrient that is found naturally ... shellfish, meat, eggs, dairy products, and fortified foods. Vitamin B-12 helps make red blood cells and ...

  11. Vitamin B12

    MedlinePlus

    ... body to absorb vitamin B12 from food. First, hydrochloric acid in the stomach separates vitamin B12 from ... Many older adults, who do not have enough hydrochloric acid in their stomach to absorb the vitamin ...

  12. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-08-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  13. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kutta, Roger J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Johannissen, Linus O; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S; Jones, Alex R

    2015-08-12

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  14. Assay for methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase activity based on determination of succinyl coenzyme A by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kana; Nakajima, Yoko; Tajima, Go; Hotta, Yuji; Kataoka, Tomoya; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Naruji; Ito, Tetsuya; Kimura, Kazunori; Maeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is an inherited metabolic disease. In this condition, metabolism from methylmalonyl coenzyme A (CoA) to succinyl-CoA is inhibited because of either low methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) activity or adenosylcobalamin deficiency owing to altered vitamin B12 metabolism. A high-precision assay for detecting MCM activity would facilitate not only MMA diagnosis but also the ability to determine the severity of MMA. We developed an MCM assay method based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) that involves the determination of succinyl-CoA, which is formed in an enzyme reaction, using peripheral lymphocytes. Using 0.05, 0.5, and 5 μmol/L succinyl-CoA, the intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was less than 5.2% and the inter-assay CV was less than 8.7%. The MCM activities of five healthy individuals and four patients were investigated with this assay. The MCM activities of the patients were very low in relation to those of healthy individuals. Together, these results show that the UPLC-MS/MS method is useful for a detailed MCM activity assay.

  15. [Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)].

    PubMed

    Guilland, Jean-Claude; Aimone-Gastin, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    The term "vitamin B12" refers to four cobalamins (Cbl), including methyl-Cbl and adenosyl-Cbl, the two enzyme co-factors of methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Vitamin B12 deficiency produces clinical disorders that include mainly megaloblastic anaemia, peripheral and central neurological manifestations. The clinical significance of low blood B12 concentrations in the absence of manifestations of deficiency is a matter of debate. The biochemical diagnosis of the subclinical and clinical deficiency of vitamin B12 has been enriched by several parameters, including serum methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, and holo-transcobalamine, which have been evaluated over the past two decades. PMID:24298826

  16. Vitamin B-12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B-12 is a cofactor for 2 enzymes. In the cytoplasm, methionine synthase requires vitamin B-12 in the form of methylcobalamin and catalyzes the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate.This enzyme links the methylation pathway through ...

  17. Structural basis for gene regulation by a B12-dependent photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Marco; Fernández-Zapata, Jésus; Polanco, María Carmen; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Chen, Percival Yang-Ting; Kang, Gyunghoon; Padmanabhan, S.; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Photoreceptor proteins enable organisms to sense and respond to light. The newly discovered CarH-type photoreceptors use a vitamin B12 derivative, adenosylcobalamin, as the light-sensing chromophore to mediate light-dependent gene regulation. Here, we present crystal structures of Thermus thermophilus CarH in all three relevant states: in the dark, both free and bound to operator DNA, and after light exposure. These structures provide a visualization of how adenosylcobalamin mediates CarH tetramer formation in the dark, how this tetramer binds to the promoter −35 element to repress transcription, and how light exposure leads to a large-scale conformational change that activates transcription. In addition to the remarkable functional repurposing of adenosylcobalamin from an enzyme cofactor to a light sensor, we find that nature also repurposed two independent protein modules in assembling CarH. These results expand the biological role of vitamin B12 and provide fundamental insight into a new mode of light-dependent gene regulation. PMID:26416754

  18. Vitamin B12

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken along with other B vitamins, such as niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and magnesium. A prescription form ... and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, ...

  19. Vitamin B12 level

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause malabsorption (for example, celiac disease and Crohn disease ) Lack of intrinsic factor , a protein that helps the intestine absorb vitamin B12 Above normal heat production (for example, with ...

  20. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA.

    PubMed

    Nou, X; Kadner, R J

    2000-06-20

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 microM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  1. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA

    PubMed Central

    Nou, Xiangwu; Kadner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 μM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  2. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression. PMID:26264192

  3. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kutta, Roger J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Johannissen, Linus O; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S; Jones, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression. PMID:26264192

  4. Regulation of the vitamin B12 metabolism and transport in bacteria by a conserved RNA structural element

    PubMed Central

    VITRESCHAK, ALEXEY G.; RODIONOV, DMITRY A.; MIRONOV, ANDREY A.; GELFAND, MIKHAIL S.

    2003-01-01

    Cobalamin in the form of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-CBL) is known to repress expression of genes for vitamin B12 biosynthesis and be transported by a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism, which involves direct binding of Ado-CBL to 5′untranslated gene regions (5′UTR). Using comparative analysis of genes and regulatory regions, we identified a highly conserved RNA structure, the B12-element, which is widely distributed in 5′UTRs of vitamin B12-related genes in eubacteria. Multiple alignment of approximately 200 B12-elements from 66 bacterial genomes reveals their common secondary structure and several extended regions of sequence conservation, including the previously known B12-box motif. In analogy to the model of regulation of the riboflavin and thiamin biosynthesis, we suggest Ado-CBL-mediated regulation based on formation of alternative RNA structures including the B12-element. In Gram-negative proteobacteria, as well as in cyanobacteria, actinobacteria, and the CFB group, the cobalamin biosynthesis and vitamin B12 transport genes are predicted to be regulated by inhibition of translation initiation, whereas in the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Gram-positive bacteria, these genes seem to be regulated by transcriptional antitermination. Phylogenetic analysis of the B12-elements reveals a large number of likely duplications of B12-elements in several bacterial genomes. These lineage-specific duplications of RNA regulatory elements seem to be a major evolutionary mechanism for expansion of the vitamin B12 regulon. PMID:12923257

  5. Regulation of the vitamin B12 metabolism and transport in bacteria by a conserved RNA structural element.

    PubMed

    Vitreschak, Alexey G; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2003-09-01

    Cobalamin in the form of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-CBL) is known to repress expression of genes for vitamin B(12) biosynthesis and be transported by a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism, which involves direct binding of Ado-CBL to 5'untranslated gene regions (5'UTR). Using comparative analysis of genes and regulatory regions, we identified a highly conserved RNA structure, the B12-element, which is widely distributed in 5'UTRs of vitamin B(12)-related genes in eubacteria. Multiple alignment of approximately 200 B12-elements from 66 bacterial genomes reveals their common secondary structure and several extended regions of sequence conservation, including the previously known B12-box motif. In analogy to the model of regulation of the riboflavin and thiamin biosynthesis, we suggest Ado-CBL-mediated regulation based on formation of alternative RNA structures including the B12-element. In Gram-negative proteobacteria, as well as in cyanobacteria, actinobacteria, and the CFB group, the cobalamin biosynthesis and vitamin B(12) transport genes are predicted to be regulated by inhibition of translation initiation, whereas in the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Gram-positive bacteria, these genes seem to be regulated by transcriptional antitermination. Phylogenetic analysis of the B12-elements reveals a large number of likely duplications of B12-elements in several bacterial genomes. These lineage-specific duplications of RNA regulatory elements seem to be a major evolutionary mechanism for expansion of the vitamin B(12) regulon. PMID:12923257

  6. B12 in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M Reese; Black, Maureen M

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is necessary for development of the fetus and child. Pregnant women who are vegetarian or vegan, have Crohn's or celiac disease, or have undergone gastric bypass surgery are at increased risk of B12 deficiency. Low serum levels of B12 have been linked to negative impacts in cognitive, motor, and growth outcomes. Low cobalamin levels also may be related to depression in adults. Some studies indicate that B12 supplementation may improve outcomes in children, although more research is needed in this area. Overall, the mechanisms of B12 action in development remain unclear. Further studies in this area to elucidate the pathways of cobalamin influence on development, as well as to prevent B12 deficiency in pregnant women and children are indicated.

  7. Hooked to vitamin B12 since 1955: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gräsbeck, Ralph

    2013-05-01

    In our pioneering work in 1956, two binders of vitamin B12 (B12) alias cobalamin (Cbl) were identified in gastric juice, S with slow electrophoretic mobility, a 70 kD protein with intrinsic factor (IF) activity and another rapid (R), not IF active but probable digestion product. Numerous sources contained a protein immunologically identical to R (haptocorrin, Hc). Another IF-active component (I) was found. Isoelectric focusing showed that S, I and R were assemblies of "isoproteins" with different pI's due to varying glycosidation. Isolation of S, I and R in microquantities was achieved in 1962 using a series of ion exchange chromatographies and gel filtration. Ponderable products were obtained in 1965-1966. The B12-IF complex was a dimer, contained 13% carbohydrate and showed a different absorption spectrum than B12. Using the Schilling test, B12 absorption was shown to require Ca(++), bound in vitro to the ileal receptor and IF, but most of Ca(++) could be removed with sialidase. The receptor-substrate complex contained Ca(++) and carbohydrate. The purified receptor was shown to contain two main subunits. The Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome was discovered 1958-1960; it is caused by mutations in either of two genes, cubilin or amnionless, which form the multiligand receptor cubam. Testicular biopsies during and after B12-treated deficiency showed remarkable improvement after therapy. Studies of the turnover of radioactive B12 revealed biliary and fecal excretion, enterohepatic circulation and allowed calculation of biological half-life and daily need. The B12 coenzymes largely behaved like B12. To study whether radiocobalt in B12 was representative of the rest of the B12 molecule, (32)P and (57)Co labeled hydroxocobalamins were biosynthesized and shown to behave identically when given simultaneously to rats. The complex metabolism of B12 explains the pathogenesis of B12 deficiencies. Some of its mechanisms are not restricted to B12, e.g. the endocytosis of B12-IF

  8. Bioavailability of vitamin B12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in people of all ages who consume a low intake of animal-source foods, including populations in developing countries. It is also prevalent among the elderly, even in wealthier countries, due to their malabsorption of B12 from food. Several methods have been applied t...

  9. The Transcription Factor CarH Safeguards Use of Adenosylcobalamin as a Light Sensor by Altering the Photolysis Products.

    PubMed

    Jost, Marco; Simpson, Jeffrey H; Drennan, Catherine L

    2015-06-01

    The newly discovered light-dependent transcription factor CarH uses adenosylcobalamin as a light sensor to regulate expression of protective genes in bacteria upon exposure to sunlight. This use of adenosylcobalamin is a clever adaptation of a classic enzyme cofactor, taking advantage of its photolabile Co-C bond. However, it is also puzzling in that photolysis of adenosylcobalamin generates the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that could damage DNA. Here, using liquid chromatography and spectroscopic techniques, we demonstrate that CarH suppresses release of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and instead effects conversion to a nonreactive 4',5'-anhydroadenosine. In this manner, CarH safeguards use of adenosylcobalamin in light-dependent gene regulation.

  10. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W; Blom, Henk J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders.

  11. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W; Blom, Henk J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  12. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C.; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W.; Blom, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish tapeworm, or other problems ... may no longer be needed after Crohn disease, celiac disease, or alcohol use is properly treated. Your provider ...

  14. Plasma folate, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and risk of breast cancer in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: B vitamins such as folate, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12 are coenzymes that are important for DNA integrity and stability. Deficiency in these B vitamins may promote tumor carcinogenesis. Objective: We prospectively evaluated plasma concentrations of folate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP; ...

  15. Coenzymes as coribozymes.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vasant R; Yarus, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Coenzymes are small organic molecules that supply a varied set of reactive groups to protein enzymes, thereby diversifying catalysis beyond the chemistries of amino acid sidechains. As RNA structures begin with a more limited chemical diversity than proteins, it seems likely that RNA enzymes would also use functional groups from other molecules to support a complex RNA world metabolism. In fact, ribonucleotide moieties in many coenzymes have long been thought to be surviving vestiges of covalently bound coenzymes in an RNA world. The idea of coenzyme utilization by ribozymes can be explored by selection-amplification of coenzyme-binding RNAs and coenzyme-assisted ribozymes. Here, we review coenzyme-RNAs, and discuss their possible significance for RNA-mediated metabolism. In summary, a plausible route from prebiotic chemistry to ribozyme biochemistry exists for CoA, and via similar activities, likely exists for all the nucleotidyl coenzymes.

  16. Biochemical impedance on intracellular functions of vitamin B12 in chronic toxigenic mold exposures.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ebere C; Kanu, Ijeoma

    2007-10-12

    A majority of patients with neurological disorders with chronic exposures to toxigenic molds and mycotoxins has vitamin B12 deficiency that is unrelated to dietary insufficiency. Vitamin B12 is a source of coenzymes, and participates in intracellular recycling of methionine, and in methionine synthase reactions. The biochemical processes that lead to B12 depletion and deficiency are not fully understood. This paper examines and assesses various most likely biochemical reasons that could impede upon the normal intracellular functions of vitamin B12 that lead to neurological manifestations. By biochemical implications and derivations, it is most likely that mycotoxins interrupt the structure and function of vitamin B12 through reactive interference with the normal One-Carbon metabolism leading to the observed clinical neurological manifestations such as nerve damage and, demyelination, degeneration of PNS leading to paralysis, progressive peripheral neuropathy, and spinal degeneration.

  17. Holotranscobalamins in B12 and non B12 requiring prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Baker, H; de Angelis, B; Khalil, M; Frank, O; Baker, E R

    1996-04-01

    Transcobalamins, vitamin B12 binding proteins, deliver B12 to cell surface receptors which then permit B12 to cross cell membranes for metabolic use. There is little documentation concerning B12 binding proteins in bacteria and protists. We found that prokaryotes and eukaryotes requiring B12, as well as those protists synthesizing B12, also produce several transcobalamins for functionally transporting B12 similar to humans.

  18. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised.

  19. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised. PMID:17959839

  20. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  1. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  2. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  3. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  4. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  5. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  6. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  9. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  10. Decreased Brain Levels of Vitamin B12 in Aging, Autism and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiting; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Trivedi, Malav S; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M; Fournier, Margot; Cuenod, Michel; Do, Kim Quang; Deth, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Many studies indicate a crucial role for the vitamin B12 and folate-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) in brain development and function, but vitamin B12 status in the brain across the lifespan has not been previously investigated. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) exists in multiple forms, including methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), serving as cofactors for MS and methylmalonylCoA mutase, respectively. We measured levels of five Cbl species in postmortem human frontal cortex of 43 control subjects, from 19 weeks of fetal development through 80 years of age, and 12 autistic and 9 schizophrenic subjects. Total Cbl was significantly lower in older control subjects (> 60 yrs of age), primarily reflecting a >10-fold age-dependent decline in the level of MeCbl. Levels of inactive cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) were remarkably higher in fetal brain samples. In both autistic and schizophrenic subjects MeCbl and AdoCbl levels were more than 3-fold lower than age-matched controls. In autistic subjects lower MeCbl was associated with decreased MS activity and elevated levels of its substrate homocysteine (HCY). Low levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) have been linked to both autism and schizophrenia, and both total Cbl and MeCbl levels were decreased in glutamate-cysteine ligase modulatory subunit knockout (GCLM-KO) mice, which exhibit low GSH levels. Thus our findings reveal a previously unrecognized decrease in brain vitamin B12 status across the lifespan that may reflect an adaptation to increasing antioxidant demand, while accelerated deficits due to GSH deficiency may contribute to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Decreased Brain Levels of Vitamin B12 in Aging, Autism and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiting; Hodgson, Nathaniel W.; Trivedi, Malav S.; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Fournier, Margot; Cuenod, Michel; Do, Kim Quang; Deth, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies indicate a crucial role for the vitamin B12 and folate-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) in brain development and function, but vitamin B12 status in the brain across the lifespan has not been previously investigated. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) exists in multiple forms, including methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), serving as cofactors for MS and methylmalonylCoA mutase, respectively. We measured levels of five Cbl species in postmortem human frontal cortex of 43 control subjects, from 19 weeks of fetal development through 80 years of age, and 12 autistic and 9 schizophrenic subjects. Total Cbl was significantly lower in older control subjects (> 60 yrs of age), primarily reflecting a >10-fold age-dependent decline in the level of MeCbl. Levels of inactive cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) were remarkably higher in fetal brain samples. In both autistic and schizophrenic subjects MeCbl and AdoCbl levels were more than 3-fold lower than age-matched controls. In autistic subjects lower MeCbl was associated with decreased MS activity and elevated levels of its substrate homocysteine (HCY). Low levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) have been linked to both autism and schizophrenia, and both total Cbl and MeCbl levels were decreased in glutamate-cysteine ligase modulatory subunit knockout (GCLM-KO) mice, which exhibit low GSH levels. Thus our findings reveal a previously unrecognized decrease in brain vitamin B12 status across the lifespan that may reflect an adaptation to increasing antioxidant demand, while accelerated deficits due to GSH deficiency may contribute to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26799654

  12. Clinical chemistry of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Davis, R E

    1985-01-01

    This monograph on the clinical chemistry of vitamin B12 reviews the literature on daily requirements, methods for measurement, the effects of drugs on vitamin B12 metabolism absorption, pregnancy, clinical conditions associated with vitamin B12 deficiency, errors of metabolism, and reactions to vitamin therapy. Although only very small quantities of vitamin B12 are required to satisfy the daily requirement, a sufficient supply is stored in the liver to meet normal requirements for at least a 3-year period. A number of drugs are known to affect the absorption of vitamin B12, including neomycin, potassium chloride, p-aminosalicylic acid, and colchicine. Significantly reduced serum concentrations of vitamin B12 have been noted in users of oral contraceptives (OCs), although concentrations still remain within the limits of normal. It appears that the vitamin B12 level in OC users reestablishes itself at a different and somewhat lower level. Vitamin B12 binding protein appears to remain unchanged. A vitamin B12 deficiency is unusual in pregnant women who consume a normal, varied diet. On the other hand, lactating women whose diets are low in animal protein and dairy products may have problems providing enough vitamin B12 to meet their own and their infant's needs; supplementary oral vitamins should be considered.

  13. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  14. [Therapy of hyperhomocysteinemia with vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Blazícek, P; Sebeková, K; Valachovicová, M

    2002-11-01

    Prevalence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in vegetarians and vegans is a consequence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical study of homocysteine reduction by vitamin B12 consisted of subjective healthy adults on alternative nutrition (n = 9) with vitamin B12 deficiency and with mild hyperhomocysteinemia. Vitamin B12 treatment was implemented by 5 intramuscular cyanocobalamin injections of a total content of 2200 micrograms during two weeks. Homocysteine level was significantly reduced (from 22 mumol/l to 11.7 mumol/l; individual reduction 29-55%). Vitamin B12 concentration in blood was significantly increased (from 152 pmol/l to 277 pmol/l; individual % of increase 63-150). The results show a high effect of vitamin B12 treatment in homocysteine value reduction of subjects on alternative nutrition.

  15. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  16. Serum vitamin B12 in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, D. M.; Beckett, A. Gordon; Maxwell, Patricia

    1962-01-01

    The serum vitamin B12 level was abnormally high in 14 out of 32 cases of renal failure. This was probably due to impaired excretion of the vitamin, but the results of measurements of the rate of excretion of radioactive vitamin B12 did not provide unequivocal evidence on this point; other possible explanations are discussed. Renal failure must be added to the causes of high serum B12 levels. PMID:13933867

  17. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency: the great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Dobrozsi, Sarah; Flood, Veronica H; Panepinto, Julie; Scott, J Paul; Brandow, Amanda

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare in children, with nonspecific symptoms including failure to thrive, vomiting, anorexia, and neurologic changes with or without hematologic disturbances. The neuropathy can be severe and irreversible. We report four cases of children with B12 deficiency secondary to adult type pernicious anemia, a presumed transport protein abnormality, and a metabolic defect. All demonstrated neurologic compromise that improved after initiation of B12 therapy. Hematologic manifestations may be preceded by constitutional, gastrointestinal, or neurologic changes, and must raise concern for B12 deficiency. Therapy should be initiated promptly in this setting to prevent irreversible neuropathy. PMID:24115632

  19. Improvement of adenosylcobalamin production by metabolic control strategy in Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yunshan; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-05-01

    An efficient metabolic control approach was developed to improve the industrial anaerobic fermentation of adenosylcobalamin (ado-cbl) by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. The effects of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) on cell growth and ado-cbl biosynthesis were investigated. Subsequently, the results obtained from the batch culture showed that an important intermediate of ado-cbl separated from the cell extract was identified as adenosylcobinamide (ado-cbi) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet diode array detector and ESI mass spectrometry analysis. Ado-cbi can be converted to ado-cbl when linked to DMB, which is an essential compound for ado-cbi bioconversion. This key ado-cbi is useful not only in determining ado-cbl concentration in the fermentation process but also in serving as an effective compound to guide DMB incorporation for the harvest of the maximum ado-cbl concentration. Accordingly, with scaling up to 100 L fermentation, the experimental results showed that the discrepancy was less than 1 % using the developed prediction technique. Overall, the findings show that the method is efficient in evaluating the fermentation of ado-cbl by propionibacteria. PMID:22528650

  20. Reversible myelopathy with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Senol, M G; Sonmez, G; Ozdag, F; Saracoglu, M

    2008-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes haematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological diseases. Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord, characterised by degeneration of the lateral and posterior columns, is often found due to vitamin B12 deficiency. We report SCD occurring in a 57-year-old man who presented with a 2.5-month history of gradually progressing tingling in the fingers and toes and neck ache. Laboratory data revealed vitamin B12 deficiency and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spinal cord demonstrated abnormal hyperintense signal changes on T2-weighted imaging of the posterior columns. In our case, follow-up MR imaging findings correlated well with clinical outcome after treatment with vitamin B12 supplements. Neurological symptoms in vitamin B12 deficiency are frequent. Early spinal MR imaging assists in the early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  1. Assay for vitamin B12 absorption and method of making labeled vitamin B12

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Peter J.; Dueker, Stephen; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Roth, John; Carkeet, Colleen; Buchholz,; Bruce A.

    2012-06-19

    The invention provides methods for labeling vitamin B12 with .sup.14C, .sup.13C, tritium, and deuterium. When radioisotopes are used, the invention provides for methods of labeling B12 with high specific activity. The invention also provides labeled vitamin B12 compositions made in accordance with the invention.

  2. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions.

  3. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:27633104

  4. Novel Coenzyme B12-dependent Interconversion of Isovaleryl-CoA and Pivalyl-CoA*

    PubMed Central

    Cracan, Valentin; Banerjee, Ruma

    2012-01-01

    5′-Deoxyadenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent isomerases catalyze carbon skeleton rearrangements using radical chemistry. We have recently characterized a fusion protein that comprises the two subunits of the AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase flanking a G-protein chaperone and named it isobutyryl-CoA mutase fused (IcmF). IcmF catalyzes the interconversion of isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA, whereas GTPase activity is associated with its G-protein domain. In this study, we report a novel activity associated with IcmF, i.e. the interconversion of isovaleryl-CoA and pivalyl-CoA. Kinetic characterization of IcmF yielded the following values: a Km for isovaleryl-CoA of 62 ± 8 μm and Vmax of 0.021 ± 0.004 μmol min−1 mg−1 at 37 °C. Biochemical experiments show that an IcmF in which the base specificity loop motif NKXD is modified to NKXE catalyzes the hydrolysis of both GTP and ATP. IcmF is susceptible to rapid inactivation during turnover, and GTP conferred modest protection during utilization of isovaleryl-CoA as substrate. Interestingly, there was no protection from inactivation when either isobutyryl-CoA or n-butyryl-CoA was used as substrate. Detailed kinetic analysis indicated that inactivation is associated with loss of the 5′-deoxyadenosine moiety from the active site, precluding reformation of AdoCbl at the end of the turnover cycle. Under aerobic conditions, oxidation of the cob(II)alamin radical in the inactive enzyme results in accumulation of aquacobalamin. Because pivalic acid found in sludge can be used as a carbon source by some bacteria and isovaleryl-CoA is an intermediate in leucine catabolism, our discovery of a new isomerase activity associated with IcmF expands its metabolic potential. PMID:22167181

  5. Dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2005-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA segments that serve as ligand-responsive genetic control elements. They modulate the expression of certain genes in response to changing concentrations of metabolites. In this paper, we study the dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch in E. coli—perhaps the most widely studied and best known of all riboswitches—through a mathematical model of its regulatory pathway. To carry this out, we simulate dynamic experiments in which the bacterial B12 uptake capacity is measured after being depleted of this vitamin for a long time. The results of these simulations compare favourably with reported experimental data. The model also predicts that an overshoot of intracellular B12 should be observed if the replenishment experiments were to be carried out for longer times. This behaviour is discussed in terms of a possible evolutionary advantage for E. coli, together with the fact that regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels is almost equivalent dynamically.

  6. [Vegetarians are at high risk of vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Javid, Parva; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Since vegetarians have a lower intake of vitamin B12 (B12) than non-vegetarians, they are at increased risk of developing B12 deficiency. The less animal products the food contains the worse the B12 status. However, even lacto-ovo-vegetarians run the risk of becoming deficient in B12. Vegetarians are recommended regularly to take supplements of B12, and they should be informed of the lacking content of B12 of plant products and the hazards of B12 deficiency. Furthermore, vegetarians should routinely be checked for possible B12 deficiency.

  7. The N-Terminal Region of the Medium Subunit (PduD) Packages Adenosylcobalamin-Dependent Diol Dehydratase (PduCDE) into the Pdu Microcompartment ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chenguang; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica produces a proteinaceous microcompartment for B12-dependent 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu MCP). The Pdu MCP consists of catabolic enzymes encased within a protein shell, and its function is to sequester propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate of 1,2-propanediol degradation. We report here that a short N-terminal region of the medium subunit (PduD) is required for packaging the coenzyme B12-dependent diol dehydratase (PduCDE) into the lumen of the Pdu MCP. Analysis of soluble cell extracts and purified MCPs by Western blotting showed that the PduD subunit mediated packaging of itself and other subunits of diol dehydratase (PduC and PduE) into the Pdu MCP. Deletion of 35 amino acids from the N terminus of PduD significantly impaired the packaging of PduCDE with minimal effects on its enzyme activity. Western blotting showed that fusing the 18 N-terminal amino acids of PduD to green fluorescent protein or glutathione S-transferase resulted in the association of these fusion proteins with the MCP. Immunoprecipitation tests indicated that the fusion proteins were encapsulated inside the MCP shell. PMID:21821773

  8. Folate, vitamin B12 and human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared func...

  9. Vitamin B12 and brain development.

    PubMed

    Stollhoff, K; Schulte, F J

    1987-03-01

    This is a report of a 1 1/2-year-old male with megaloblastic anaemia and a progressive neurological disorder clinically resembling leucodystrophy. The child was exclusively breast fed and his mother had been a strict vegetarian for more than 4 years before the child was born. After Vitamin B12 therapy the anaemia disappeared and the neurological condition dramatically improved.

  10. Folate and B12 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collin, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms postulated to link folate and B12 metabolism with cancer, including genome-wide hypomethylation, gene-specific promoter hypermethylation, and DNA uracil misincorporation, have been observed in prostate tumor cells. However, epidemiological studies of prostate cancer risk, based on dietary intakes and blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 and on folate-pathway gene variants, have generated contradictory findings. In a meta-analysis, circulating concentrations of B12 (seven studies, OR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.01, 1.19; P = 0.002) and (in cohort studies) folate (five studies, OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.00, 1.40; P = 0.02) were positively associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Homocysteine was not associated with risk of prostate cancer (four studies, OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.69, 1.19; P = 0.5). In a meta-analysis of folate-pathway polymorphisms, MTR 2756A > G (eight studies, OR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.00, 1.12; P = 0.06) and SHMT1 1420C > T (two studies, OR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.22; P = 0.05) were positively associated with prostate cancer risk. There were no effects due to any other polymorphisms, including MTHFR 677C > T (12 studies, OR = 1.04; 95% CI 0.97, 1.12; P = 0.3). The positive association of circulating B12 with an increased risk of prostate cancer could be explained by reverse causality. However, given current controversies over mandatory B12 fortification, further research to eliminate a causal role of B12 in prostate cancer initiation and/or progression is required. Meta-analysis does not entirely rule out a positive association of circulating folate with increased prostate cancer risk. As with B12, even a weak positive association would be a significant public health issue, given the high prevalence of prostate cancer and concerns about the potential harms versus benefits of mandatory folic acid fortification.

  11. Cobalamin in inflammation III — glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to NG-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/NG-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the ‘base-off’ dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH4/BH3 radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  12. Cobalamin in inflammation III - glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the 'base-off' dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH(4)/BH(3) radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  13. Nutritional vitamin-B12 deficiency. Possible contributory role of subtle vitamin-B12 malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Carmel, R

    1978-05-01

    Dietary deficiency of vitamin B-12 has been reported, yet most people ingesting vitamin-B12-deficient diets even for many years appear to achieve a balance that does not lead to overt signs and symptoms of deficiency. I present the case of a vegan of 25 years' duration who developed severe neurologic abnormalities due to vitamin-B12 deficiency. His diet provided 1.2 microgram of vitamin B12 daily at most. Despite normal Schilling test findings, he absorbed subnormal amounts of vitamin B12 given with ovalbumin. This poor absorption appeared to be related to his gastritis, achlorhydria, and subnormal intrinsic-factor secretion. Probably, vitamin-B12 deficiency in this patient resulted from both dietary restriction and the subtle malabsorption, neither of which would have sufficed alone to produce the clinical problem. Possibly such malabsorption may also be present in many of those vegans developing overt vitamin-B12 deficiency in whom Schilling test findings have been normal.

  14. [N2O-induced acute funicular myelosis in latent vitamin B 12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Takács, J

    1996-10-01

    The neurotoxicity of nitrous oxide ("laughing gas") had already been observed in 1956 when using N2O in the long-term sedation of tetanus patients. In 1967 Parbrook described leukopenic effects during long-term exposure to N2O. It was only in 1978 that further studies were conducted on myeloneuropathies and myelodepression under the influence of N2O. The basic cause is vitamin B12 deficiency and the irreversible oxidation of coenzyme B12 by N2O. Between 1986 and 1995 eight cases of acute funicular myelosis associated with latent vitamin B12 deficiency subsequent to nitrous oxide anaesthesia were reported. In our hospital, two further patients now have this disease. Two observations must be emphasised when assessing the 10 patients mentioned above: 1. There was no long-term exposure to N2O (> 6 hrs); the periods of anaesthesia were between 1.5 and 3.5 hrs. 2. Vitamin B12 deficiency was not known preoperatively, and there was no marked pernicious anaemia, so that the only pointers to the risk patients were supplied by the mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of the blood picture. PMID:9019188

  15. Proteomics of vitamin B12 processing.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; DiBello, Patricia M; Jacobsen, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    The causes of cobalamin (B12, Cbl) deficiency are multifactorial. Whether nutritional due to poor dietary intake, or functional due to impairments in absorption or intracellular processing and trafficking events, the major symptoms of Cbl deficiency include megaloblastic anemia, neurological deterioration and in extreme cases, failure to thrive and death. The common biomarkers of Cbl deficiency (hyperhomocysteinemia and methylmalonic acidemia) are extremely valuable diagnostic indicators of the condition, but little is known about the changes that occur at the protein level. A mechanistic explanation bridging the physiological changes associated with functional B12 deficiency with its intracellular processers and carriers is lacking. In this article, we will cover the effects of B12 deficiency in a cblC-disrupted background (also referred to as MMACHC) as a model of functional Cbl deficiency. As will be shown, major protein changes involve the cytoskeleton, the neurological system as well as signaling and detoxification pathways. Supplementation of cultured MMACHC-mutant cells with hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) failed to restore these variants to the normal phenotype, suggesting that a defective Cbl processing pathway produces irreversible changes at the protein level.

  16. Proteomics of vitamin B12 processing.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; DiBello, Patricia M; Jacobsen, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    The causes of cobalamin (B12, Cbl) deficiency are multifactorial. Whether nutritional due to poor dietary intake, or functional due to impairments in absorption or intracellular processing and trafficking events, the major symptoms of Cbl deficiency include megaloblastic anemia, neurological deterioration and in extreme cases, failure to thrive and death. The common biomarkers of Cbl deficiency (hyperhomocysteinemia and methylmalonic acidemia) are extremely valuable diagnostic indicators of the condition, but little is known about the changes that occur at the protein level. A mechanistic explanation bridging the physiological changes associated with functional B12 deficiency with its intracellular processers and carriers is lacking. In this article, we will cover the effects of B12 deficiency in a cblC-disrupted background (also referred to as MMACHC) as a model of functional Cbl deficiency. As will be shown, major protein changes involve the cytoskeleton, the neurological system as well as signaling and detoxification pathways. Supplementation of cultured MMACHC-mutant cells with hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) failed to restore these variants to the normal phenotype, suggesting that a defective Cbl processing pathway produces irreversible changes at the protein level. PMID:23241609

  17. Vitamin B-12 radioassay in the diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    It became apparent in 1978 that some radioassays for Vitamin B-12 were falsely normal. This investigation was performed to assure the accuracy of our assay. False normal B-12 levels may result in permanent damage or delay in relieving distressful symptoms. False low levels result in no permanent sequalae. ''Normal'' values should be set with these consequences in mind. The authors reviewed clinical charts on patients with <300 pg/m1 serum B-12 in 1000 consecutive determinations and all patients newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. Simu1TRAC Radioassay, Becton Dickinson Co., modified by correction for serum nonspecific binding is used. ''Normal'' values (234-1000 pg/m1) are based on 47 outpatients. 176 of the 1000 assays resulted in levels <300 pg/m1. 87 were from other location with no clinical information. 89 assays on Marshfield Clinic patients included 2 duplicates. 45 patients were newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. 12 were diagnosed elsewhere and on therapy. 32 had assays <234 pg/m1. 1 with normal B-12 is ''possibly deficient'', a Schilling test is scheduled. The authors conclude that their B-12 assay has correctly identified 32 clinically accepted B-12 deficient patients. 1 possibly deficient patient was normal. 25 of 42 patients with levels below normal are deficient. The false positive rate is felt acceptable in view of the false negative rate and the consequences of the respective errors.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  3. One pathway can incorporate either adenine or dimethylbenzimidazole as an alpha-axial ligand of B12 cofactors in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter J; Lango, Jozsef; Carkeet, Colleen; Britten, Audrey; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hammock, Bruce D; Roth, John R

    2008-02-01

    Corrinoid (vitamin B12-like) cofactors contain various alpha-axial ligands, including 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) or adenine. The bacterium Salmonella enterica produces the corrin ring only under anaerobic conditions, but it can form "complete" corrinoids aerobically by importing an "incomplete" corrinoid, such as cobinamide (Cbi), and adding appropriate alpha- and beta-axial ligands. Under aerobic conditions, S. enterica performs the corrinoid-dependent degradation of ethanolamine if given vitamin B12, but it can make B12 from exogenous Cbi only if DMB is also provided. Mutants isolated for their ability to degrade ethanolamine without added DMB converted Cbi to pseudo-B12 cofactors (having adenine as an alpha-axial ligand). The mutations cause an increase in the level of free adenine and install adenine (instead of DMB) as an alpha-ligand. When DMB is provided to these mutants, synthesis of pseudo-B12 cofactors ceases and B12 cofactors are produced, suggesting that DMB regulates production or incorporation of free adenine as an alpha-ligand. Wild-type cells make pseudo-B12 cofactors during aerobic growth on propanediol plus Cbi and can use pseudo-vitamin B12 for all of their corrinoid-dependent enzymes. Synthesis of coenzyme pseudo-B12 cofactors requires the same enzymes (CobT, CobU, CobS, and CobC) that install DMB in the formation of coenzyme B12. Models are described for the mechanism and control of alpha-axial ligand installation.

  4. One Pathway Can Incorporate either Adenine or Dimethylbenzimidazole as an α-Axial Ligand of B12 Cofactors in Salmonella enterica▿

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter J.; Lango, Jozsef; Carkeet, Colleen; Britten, Audrey; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hammock, Bruce D.; Roth, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Corrinoid (vitamin B12-like) cofactors contain various α-axial ligands, including 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) or adenine. The bacterium Salmonella enterica produces the corrin ring only under anaerobic conditions, but it can form “complete” corrinoids aerobically by importing an “incomplete” corrinoid, such as cobinamide (Cbi), and adding appropriate α- and β-axial ligands. Under aerobic conditions, S. enterica performs the corrinoid-dependent degradation of ethanolamine if given vitamin B12, but it can make B12 from exogenous Cbi only if DMB is also provided. Mutants isolated for their ability to degrade ethanolamine without added DMB converted Cbi to pseudo-B12 cofactors (having adenine as an α-axial ligand). The mutations cause an increase in the level of free adenine and install adenine (instead of DMB) as an α-ligand. When DMB is provided to these mutants, synthesis of pseudo-B12 cofactors ceases and B12 cofactors are produced, suggesting that DMB regulates production or incorporation of free adenine as an α-ligand. Wild-type cells make pseudo-B12 cofactors during aerobic growth on propanediol plus Cbi and can use pseudo-vitamin B12 for all of their corrinoid-dependent enzymes. Synthesis of coenzyme pseudo-B12 cofactors requires the same enzymes (CobT, CobU, CobS, and CobC) that install DMB in the formation of coenzyme B12. Models are described for the mechanism and control of α-axial ligand installation. PMID:17981976

  5. Structural Basis of the Stereospecificity of Bacterial B12-dependent 2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Kurteva-Yaneva, Nadya; Zahn, Michael; Weichler, M.-Teresa; Starke, Robert; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H.; Sträter, Norbert; Rohwerder, Thore

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial coenzyme B12-dependent 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase (HCM) is a radical enzyme catalyzing the stereospecific interconversion of (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl- and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA. It consists of two subunits, HcmA and HcmB. To characterize the determinants of substrate specificity, we have analyzed the crystal structure of HCM from Aquincola tertiaricarbonis in complex with coenzyme B12 and the substrates (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl- and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA in alternative binding. When compared with the well studied structure of bacterial and mitochondrial B12-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM), HCM has a highly conserved domain architecture. However, inspection of the substrate binding site identified amino acid residues not present in MCM, namely HcmA IleA90 and AspA117. AspA117 determines the orientation of the hydroxyl group of the acyl-CoA esters by H-bond formation, thus determining stereospecificity of catalysis. Accordingly, HcmA D117A and D117V mutations resulted in significantly increased activity toward (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. Besides interconversion of hydroxylated acyl-CoA esters, wild-type HCM as well as HcmA I90V and I90A mutant enzymes could also isomerize pivalyl- and isovaleryl-CoA, albeit at >10 times lower rates than the favorite substrate (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. The nonconservative mutation HcmA D117V, however, resulted in an enzyme showing high activity toward pivalyl-CoA. Structural requirements for binding and isomerization of highly branched acyl-CoA substrates such as 2-hydroxyisobutyryl- and pivalyl-CoA, possessing tertiary and quaternary carbon atoms, respectively, are discussed. PMID:25720495

  6. A patient with an inborn error of vitamin B12 metabolism (cblF) detected by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Armour, Christine M; Brebner, Alison; Watkins, David; Geraghty, Michael T; Chan, Alicia; Rosenblatt, David S

    2013-07-01

    A neonate, who was found to have an elevated C3/C2 ratio and minimally elevated propionylcarnitine on newborn screening, was subsequently identified as having the rare cblF inborn error of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) metabolism. This disorder is characterized by the retention of unmetabolized cobalamin in lysosomes such that it is not readily available for cellular metabolism. Although cultured fibroblasts from the patient did not show the expected functional abnormalities of the cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, they did show reduced synthesis of the active cobalamin cofactors adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin. Mutation analysis of LMBRD1 established that the patient had the cblF disorder. Treatment was initiated promptly, and the patient showed a robust response to regular injections of cyanocobalamin, and she was later switched to hydroxocobalamin. Currently, at 3 years of age, the child is clinically well, with appropriate development. Adjusted newborn screening cutoffs in Ontario allowed detection of a deficiency that might not have otherwise been identified, allowing early treatment and perhaps preventing the adverse sequelae seen in some untreated patients.

  7. The entropic contributions in vitamin B12 enzymes still reflect the electrostatic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schopf, Patrick; Mills, Matthew J L; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic power of enzymes containing coenzyme B12 has been, in some respects, the "last bastion" for the strain hypothesis. Our previous study of this system established by a careful sampling that the major part of the catalytic effect is due to the electrostatic interaction between the ribose of the ado group and the protein and that the strain contribution is very small. This finding has not been sufficiently appreciated due to misunderstandings of the power of the empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations and the need of sufficient sampling. Furthermore, some interesting new experiments point toward entropic effects as the source of the catalytic power, casting doubt on the validity of the electrostatic idea, at least, in the case of B12 enzymes. Here, we focus on the observation of the entropic effects and on analyzing their origin. We clarify that our EVB approach evaluates free energies rather than enthalpies and demonstrate by using the restraint release (RR) approach that the observed entropic contribution to the activation barrier is of electrostatic origin. Our study illustrates the power of the RR approach by evaluating the entropic contributions to catalysis and provides further support to our paradigm for the origin of the catalytic power of B12 enzymes. Overall, our study provides major support to our electrostatic preorganization idea and also highlights the basic requirements from ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations of activation free energies of enzymatic reactions. PMID:25805820

  8. Ferrocene analogues of sandwich B12·Cr·B12: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Longjiu

    2013-01-14

    The bowl B(12) cluster was previously reported to be analogous to benzene and predicted to be one of the best candidates to be new inorganic ligands. The structural stability and electronic properties of a new sandwich compound Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) have been investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the sandwich Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) is a stable complex with large binding energy (-5.93 eV) and HOMO-LUMO gap (2.37 eV), as well as Fe(C(5)H(5))(2) and Cr(C(6)H(6))(2), following the 18-electron principle. The detailed molecular orbitals and aromaticity analyses indicate that the sandwich compound Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) is electronically very stable. The natural bond orbital analysis suggests that spd-π interaction plays an important role in the sandwich compounds. PMID:23320677

  9. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B 12..

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12.. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B 12.. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and....1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88CoN14O14P, CAS Reg. No. 68-0919... exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may be used in infant formula in...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aromatic compound clusters of the B12 all-boron benzene: B12Au- and B12(BO)-.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-28

    We report a photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory study of the B12Au(-) and B13O(-) clusters and their neutrals, which are shown to be six π electron aromatic compounds between the quasi-planar all-boron B12 benzene-analogue and a monovalent Au or BO ligand. Electron affinities of B12Au and B13O are measured to be 3.48 ± 0.04 and 3.90 ± 0.04 eV, respectively. Structural searches are performed for B12Au(-) and B13O(-), which are compared with the isovalent B12H(-) cluster. The global minima of B12Au(-) and B13O(-) both feature an almost intact B12 cluster with the Au and BO ligands bonded to its periphery, respectively. For B12Au(-), a low-lying isomer is also identified, which is only 0.4 kcal mol(-1) above the global minimum, in agreement with the experimental observation of a weakly populated isomer in the cluster beam of B12Au(-). These aromatic compound clusters provide new examples for the Au/H isolobal analogy and the boronyl (BO) chemistry. PMID:23666408

  15. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Bopp-Kistler, I; Rüegger-Frey, B; Grob, D; Six, P

    1999-11-01

    Cobalamin deficiency increases with advancing age. The cut-off point of serum concentration should be raised, because many elderly people with "normal" serum vitamin B12 concentrations are metabolically deficient in cobalamin. The measurement of the metabolites homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid is recommended. Cobalamin deficiency may result in a variety of atypical symptoms. Hematological changes typical of megaloblastic anemia are absent in a majority of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Generally underlying pernicious anemia is not the main cause of cobalamin deficiency in the elderly. Protein-bound cobalamin malabsorption due to atrophic gastritis with hypo- or achlorhydria is a common cause of cobalamin deficiency in elderly people. An important manifestation of cobalamin deficiency is cognitive impairment. Much controversy exists on the subject of the association of dementia of the Alzheimer type with cobalamin deficiency. In several studies dementia has been related to low serum cobalamin levels. Physicians should be liberal of cobalamin therapy. The window of opportunity for effective intervention may be as short as one year from the onset of medical symptoms. At last a compilation of recommendations is given.

  1. Radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanchi, X.; Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.

    2000-03-01

    Research on the radiolysis of vitamins is of considerable interest since these compounds are important nutritional constituents in foods and in dietetic supplements. In spite of these considerations there are few data and very often difficult to compare for the radiolytic behavior of vitamins. In this work we focused our attention on to the study of the radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12) in solid state and in aqueous solutions. The procedure was followed by HPLC and UV-spectroscopy. The results obtained in aqueous solutions showed a dependence of the decomposition as a linear function of the dose. The G of decomposition for a 1×10 -5 M solution was 3.3. In the solid state the vitamin was very stable towards the irradiation in the conditions used in this study with a G=2.1×10 -3. A study made with Serratia marcescens as a microbiological contaminant showed that at the sterilization dose there is a destruction of the vitamin in aqueous solution. In the solid state the degree of decomposition was 7%.

  2. Thermotoga lettingae Can Salvage Cobinamide To Synthesize Vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Nicholas C.; Secinaro, Michael A.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that the Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquisition of genes from two distantly related lineages, Archaea and Firmicutes (K. S. Swithers et al., Genome Biol. Evol. 4:730–739, 2012). Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that the cobinamide salvage gene cluster was present in the Thermotogales' most recent common ancestor. We also predicted that Thermotoga lettingae could not synthesize B12 de novo but could use the cobinamide salvage pathway to synthesize B12. In this study, these hypotheses were tested, and we found that Tt. lettingae did not synthesize B12 de novo but salvaged cobinamide. The growth rate of Tt. lettingae increased with the addition of B12 or cobinamide to its medium. It synthesized B12 when the medium was supplemented with cobinamide, and no B12 was detected in cells grown on cobinamide-deficient medium. Upstream of the cobinamide salvage genes is a putative B12 riboswitch. In other organisms, B12 riboswitches allow for higher transcriptional activity in the absence of B12. When Tt. lettingae was grown with no B12, the salvage genes were upregulated compared to cells grown with B12 or cobinamide. Another gene cluster with a putative B12 riboswitch upstream is the btuFCD ABC transporter, and it showed a transcription pattern similar to that of the cobinamide salvage genes. The BtuF proteins from species that can and cannot salvage cobinamides were shown in vitro to bind both B12 and cobinamide. These results suggest that Thermotogales species can use the BtuFCD transporter to import both B12 and cobinamide, even if they cannot salvage cobinamide. PMID:24014541

  3. Vitamin B(12) metabolism during pregnancy and in embryonic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garcia, Maira A; Rosenblatt, David S; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A

    2013-09-01

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin, Cbl) is required for cellular metabolism. It is an essential coenzyme in mammals for two reactions: the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by the enzyme methionine synthase and the conversion of methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA by the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. Symptoms of Cbl deficiency are hematological, neurological and cognitive, including megaloblastic anaemia, tingling and numbness of the extremities, gait abnormalities, visual disturbances, memory loss and dementia. During pregnancy Cbl is essential, presumably because of its role in DNA synthesis and methionine synthesis; however, there are conflicting studies regarding an association between early pregnancy loss and Cbl deficiency. We here review the literature about the requirement for Cbl during pregnancy, and summarized what is known of the expression pattern and function of genes required for Cbl metabolism in embryonic mouse models. PMID:24025485

  4. 4-Ethylphenyl-Cobalamin Impairs Tissue Uptake of Vitamin B12 and Causes Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Elena; Ruetz, Markus; Birn, Henrik; Kräutler, Bernhard; Nexo, Ebba

    2013-01-01

    Coβ-4-ethylphenyl-cob(III) alamin (EtPhCbl) is an organometallic analogue of vitamin B12 (CNCbl) which binds to transcobalamin (TC), a plasma protein that facilitates the cellular uptake of cobalamin (Cbl). In vitro assays with key enzymes do not convert EtPhCbl to the active coenzyme forms of Cbl suggesting that administration of EtPhCbl may cause cellular Cbl deficiency. Here, we investigate the in vivo effect of EtPhCbl in mice and its ability, if any, to induce Cbl deficiency. We show that EtPhCbl binds to mouse TC and we examined mice that received 3.5 nmol/24h EtPhCbl (n=6), 3.5 nmol/24h CNCbl (n=7) or NaCl (control group) (n=5) through osmotic mini-pumps for four weeks. We analyzed plasma, urine, liver, spleen, submaxillary glands and spinal cord for Cbl and markers of Cbl deficiency including methylmalonic acid (MMA) and homocysteine (tHcy). Plasma MMA (mean±SEM) was elevated in animals treated with EtPhCbl (1.01±0.12 µmol/L) compared to controls (0.30±0.02 µmol/L) and CNCbl (0.29±0.01 µmol/L) treated animals. The same pattern was observed for tHcy. Plasma total Cbl concentration was higher in animals treated with EtPhCbl (128.82±1.87 nmol/L) than in CNCbl treated animals (87.64±0.93 nmol/L). However, the organ levels of total Cbl were significantly lower in animals treated with EtPhCbl compared to CNCbl treated animals or controls, notably in the liver (157.07±8.56 pmol/g vs. 603.85±20.02 pmol/g, and 443.09±12.32 pmol/g, respectively). Differences between the three groups was analysed using one-way ANOVA and, Bonferroni post-hoc test. EtPhCbl was present in all tissues, except the spinal cord, accounting for 35-90% of total Cbl. In conclusion, treatment with EtPhCbl induces biochemical evidence of Cbl deficiency. This may in part be caused by a compromised tissue accumulation of Cbl. PMID:24073261

  5. Neuro-regression in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sanwar; Nathani, Shweta

    2009-01-01

    Neuroregression in infants has varied aetiology and vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the uncommon causes. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency is encountered in malnourished infants or in offspring of strict vegan mothers. We present two cases, both infants of 10 and 8 months of age, whose mothers had vitamin B12 deficiency. On admission, the patients were apathic, hypotonic and lethargic. Serum vitamin B12 levels were below normal limits. On cranial MRI, T2-weighted images revealed frontoparietal cortical atrophy. Both the infants responded to vitamin B12 treatment.

  6. Selective vitamin B12 malabsorption in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Khakee, Sam; Stachewitsch, Andrew; Katz, Max

    1974-01-01

    Two siblings with megaloblastic anemia responsive to parenteral vitamin B12 were studied to elucidate the cause of the B12 deficiency. Gastric juice from both contained acid and functional intrinsic factor. Serum contained transcobalamin II and lacked antibodies to intrinsic factor. Schilling tests showed vitamin B12 malabsorption uncorrected by hog intrinsic factor or pancreatic extract. Other parameters of small intestinal function were normal. Proteinuria was initially present in both but cleared in one following treatment with B12. These patients with “familial selective vitamin B12 malabsorption” are the first reported from Canada. Only 37 cases have been reported in the world literature to date. PMID:4817548

  7. Membrane reactors for continuous coenzyme regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandrey, C.; Wichmann, R.

    1982-12-01

    The importance of continuous coenzyme regeneration is discussed with respect to chemical reaction engineering. The benefit of coenzymes covalently bound to water soluble polymers is especially stressed. The performance of membrane reactors for coenzyme regeneration is discussed in comparison with other reactor concepts. The coenzyme dependent production of L-amino acids from the corresponding alpha-keto acids is used to illustrate how precise turnover numbers as a function of enzyme/coenzyme ratio, initial substrate concentration, and conversion are obtained. Thus, it becomes possible to develop a concept for optimal operating points with respect to enzyme, coenzyme, and substrate costs per unit weight of product.

  8. Coenzyme q10 therapy.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2014-07-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:25126052

  10. A single regulatory gene integrates control of vitamin B12 synthesis and propanediol degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, T A; Ailion, M; Roth, J R

    1992-01-01

    The cob operon of Salmonella typhimurium encodes enzymes required for synthesis of adenosyl-cobalamin (vitamin B12). The pdu operon encodes enzymes needed for use of propanediol as a carbon source, including an adenosyl-cobalamin-dependent enzyme, propanediol dehydratase. These two operons both map near min 41 of the S. typhimurium linkage map and are transcribed divergently. Here we report that the cob and pdu operons form a single regulon. Transcription of this regulon is induced by either glycerol or propanediol. The metabolism of these compounds is not required for induction. Propanediol induces the regulon either aerobically or anaerobically during growth on poor carbon sources. Aerobically glycerol induces only if its metabolism is prevented by a mutational block such as a glpK mutation. Under anaerobic conditions, glycerol induces in both glpK+ and glpK mutant strains during growth on poor carbon sources. A new class of mutations, pocR, prevents induction of the cob/pdu regulon by either propanediol or glycerol and causes a Cob- Pdu- phenotype. The pocR gene is located between the cob and pdu operons and appears to encode a trans-acting protein that acts as a positive regulator of both operons. Transcription of the pocR regulatory gene is induced, even without the PocR protein, during aerobic growth on poor carbon sources and during anaerobic respiration. With the functional PocR protein, transcription of the pocR gene is autoinduced by propanediol but not by glycerol. The growth conditions that increase pocR gene expression correlate with growth conditions that allow high induction of the cob/pdu regulon. A model for control of this regulon suggests that the PocR protein is a transcriptional activator of both the cob and pdu operons and that both glycerol and propanediol can individually serve as effectors of the PocR protein. We suggest that global control mechanisms cause variation in the level of the PocR protein; an increased level of the PocR protein

  11. A vitamin B12 transporter in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Krishnamoorthy; Venclovas, Česlovas; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; McKinney, John D.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12-dependent enzymes function in core biochemical pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate pathogen whose metabolism in vivo is poorly understood. Although M. tuberculosis can access vitamin B12 in vitro, it is uncertain whether the organism is able to scavenge B12 during host infection. This question is crucial to predictions of metabolic function, but its resolution is complicated by the absence in the M. tuberculosis genome of a direct homologue of BtuFCD, the only bacterial B12 transport system described to date. We applied genome-wide transposon mutagenesis to identify M. tuberculosis mutants defective in their ability to use exogenous B12. A small proportion of these mapped to Rv1314c, identifying the putative PduO-type ATP : co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase as essential for B12 assimilation. Most notably, however, insertions in Rv1819c dominated the mutant pool, revealing an unexpected function in B12 acquisition for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type protein previously investigated as the mycobacterial BacA homologue. Moreover, targeted deletion of Rv1819c eliminated the ability of M. tuberculosis to transport B12 and related corrinoids in vitro. Our results establish an alternative to the canonical BtuCD-type system for B12 uptake in M. tuberculosis, and elucidate a role in B12 metabolism for an ABC protein implicated in chronic mycobacterial infection. PMID:23407640

  12. Vitamin B12 assays compared by use of patients sera with low vitamin B12 content

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, B.L.; Pearce, L.C.

    1985-05-01

    The authors compared four radioisotope dilution (RD) methods and a microbiological assay for measuring concentrations of vitamin B12 in a selected panel of serum samples from patients known to be deficient in the vitamin. Low (less than 100 ng/L) and borderline (100-180 ng/L) results were similar between methods, but use of the manufacturers recommended ranges for borderline results would have changed the diagnostic classifications for 22 of 38 samples. Results of all the RD methods inter-correlated well, but less so with the microbiological assay. Borderline, nondiagnostic results were common to all methods, and no apparent advantage was gained from using the microbiological assay.

  13. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Karli, R; Gül, A; Uğur, B

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between otoacoustic emission (OAE) values and cochlear function in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss. Two groups were studied: Group 1: patients with vitamin B12 deficiency; Group 2: a matched control group of patients with normal vitamin B12 levels. There was no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss in either group. Transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAEs) and spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) were recorded. A comparative analysis of the studied parameters revealed that results at TEOAE 1000, SOAEs 1500 and SOAEs 4000 Hz were somewhat lower in the vitamin B12 deficient group compared with the control group. According to our findings, there was a significant association between vitamin B12 deficiency and cochlear dysfunction. We recommend that routine vitamin B12 serum levels be determined when evaluating patients for symptomatic hearing loss.

  14. Congenital B12 deficiency following maternal gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Celiker, M Y; Chawla, A

    2009-09-01

    Here we present a case of severe B12 deficiency in an exclusively breastfed infant, born to a mother who had undergone gastric bypass 6 years earlier. At 4 months of age, the infant presented with pancytopenia and developmental delay. Our evaluation revealed physical and neurological developmental delay, pancytopenia with macrocytosis, with head imaging showing cortical and subcortical atrophy. Serum studies showed low B12, normal folate and iron. Treatment with parenteral B12 led to the resolution of the pancytopenia, steady weight gain and improved neurological status. The child is currently 16 months old with normal anthropometric and hematological parameters and normal B12 levels on a regular diet. Gross motor and speech developments are significantly delayed. This case illustrates that maternal B12 deficiency following gastric bypass surgery may lead to severe B12 deficiency with long-term neurological sequelae in their infants. Screening and prompt treatment of these deficiencies both during pregnancy and during infancy are important.

  15. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups. PMID:24803097

  16. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding methylmalonyl-coenzyme A mutase from Streptomyces cinnamonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, A; Leiser, A; Robinson, J A

    1993-01-01

    In streptomycetes, the conversion of succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) into methylmalonyl-CoA, catalyzed by methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, most likely represents an important source of building blocks for polyketide antibiotic biosynthesis. In this work, the structural gene for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Streptomyces cinnamonensis was cloned by using a heterologous gene probe encoding the mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii. A 5,732-bp fragment was sequenced, within which four open reading frames were identified on one DNA strand. The two largest (mutA and mutB) overlap by 1 nucleotide and encode proteins of 616 and 733 residues showing high amino acid sequence similarities to each other and to methylmalonyl-CoA mutases from P. shermanii and mammalian sources. The transcriptional start of the mutA-mutB message, determined by S1 mapping, coincides with the first nucleotide of the translational start codon. Evidence that these two open reading frames encode a functional mutase in S. cinnamonensis was obtained by subcloning and expression in Streptomyces lividans TK64. The mutA and mutB gene products were detected in Western blots (immunoblots) with mutase-specific antibodies and by direct detection of mutase activity with a newly developed assay method. The methylmalonyl-CoA mutase was unable to catalyze the conversion of isobutyryl-CoA into n-butyryl-CoA, another closely related adenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangement known to occur in S. cinnamonensis. Images PMID:8099072

  17. Vitamin B12 deficiency after irradiation for bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kinn, A.C.; Lantz, B.

    1984-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 10 of 41 patients who underwent radiotherapy before cystectomy with Bricker urinary diversion for carcinoma of the bladder. Of 13 patients given full irradiation because of inoperable bladder cancer 5 had malabsorption of vitamin B12. Serum folic acid was normal in these patients, indicating predominantly ileal irradiation sequelae. Routine evaluation of serum vitamin B12 after radiotherapy is recommended so that appropriate medication can be given, if possible before neurological symptoms appear.

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast fed infant.

    PubMed

    McPhee, A J; Davidson, G P; Leahy, M; Beare, T

    1988-08-01

    We report the case of a 5 month old breast fed infant who presented with a history of vomiting, pallor, and failure to thrive. Investigations showed severe nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency with a megaloblastic pancytopenia. This deficiency was due to low vitamin B12 concentrations in the maternal breast milk, and subsequent investigations showed maternal pernicious anaemia. Treatment of the infant with vitamin B12 resulted in a rapid clinical and haematological improvement. This case represents an unusual presentation of pernicious anaemia.

  19. Vitamin B12 Deficiency due to Chlorofluorocarbon: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Hemlata; Chaudhary, Rekha

    2010-01-01

    Background. Vitamin B12 is vital for optimal functioning of various organ systems but more importantly the central nervous system and the hematological system. Deficiency of vitamin B12 clinically manifests as excessive daytime fatigue, memory difficulties, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and optic neuropathy. In occupational medicine, vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported with exposure to nitrous oxide in health care workers. However, not much is known about exposure to Freons in other industries and vitamin B12 deficiency. Aim. We are reporting a case of vitamin B12 deficiency in the setting of exposure to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. Case Report. A 55-year-old male refrigerator mechanic experienced recurrent visual symptoms, which included diplopia and blurring. A complete workup was done and was significant of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, his B12 levels were refractory to supplementation. Appropriate precautions at workplace improved patient's symptoms and were associated with significant improvement in B12 levels. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of vitamin B12 deficiency (that remains refractory to supplementation) in the setting of exposure to Freon gases. PMID:21461374

  20. [Treatable Dementia due to Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin deficiency is one of the major causes of treatable dementia. Specifically, patients suffering from dementia frequentry display low serum levels of vitamin B(12). There is a close metabolic interaction between folate and vitamin B(12). Folate deficiency causes various neuropsychiatric symptoms, which resemble those observed in vitamin B(12) deficiency. This review summarizes, the basic pathophysiology of vitamin B(12) and folate deficiency, its clinical diagnosis, associated neuropsychiatric symptoms such as subacute combined degeneration and dementia, and epidemiological studies of cognitive decline and brain atrophy.

  1. Unusual neurological presentations of vitamin B(12) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T-B; Cho, J-W; Jeon, B S

    2004-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) deficiency (B(12)D) has a wide variety of neurological symptoms and signs. However, cerebellar dysfunction and cranial neuropathies other than optic neuropathy have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe two cases of unusual neurological manifestations of B(12)D. One patient showed prominent hoarseness with vocal cord paralysis, myelopathy, and peripheral neuropathy. The other had gait disturbance, lateral gaze limitation and cerebellar dysfunction in addition to the typical manifestations of subacute combined degeneration. Vitamin B(12) deficiency can rarely affect cerebellum and cranial nerves other than optic nerve.

  2. Further Studies on the Binding of Vitamin B12 to the Cell Wall of a B12-Requiring Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takashi

    1972-01-01

    The vitamin B12-binding property of Lactobacillus leichmannii ATCC 7830 has been studied. The organism could bind 0.52 μg of B12 per mg of cells. With regard to the cellular site for B12 accumulation, three-quarters of the B12 bound to the cell was found in the crude cell wall fraction, and the remaining one-quarter was found in the particulate (ribosome) fraction. After receiving enzymatic treatments with ribonuclease, lipase, and trypsin, the wall fraction retained three-fifths of the initial B12. The possibility of cross-contamination of the wall and particulate fractions was excluded by measuring the contents of ribonucleic acid and hexosamines in each fraction. The B12-binding activity of the wall was destroyed by pretreatment of the wall with pepsin, Pronase, or trypsin. However, once bound to the wall, the B12 was not released by the same treatments. These facts suggest that B12 is bound to a polypeptide in the wall on which these enzymes act and that, once bound, B12 somehow inhibits the enzymatic actions as described earlier with L. delbrueckii no. 1. A B12-polypeptide complex was isolated by treatment with 0.2 n HCl from walls to which B12 had been bound. The complex was then purified. The complex moves as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular weight was estimated around 21,500 with microheterogeneity on a Sephadex G-75 column. The mode of B12 binding was found to be similar to that of L. delbrueckii. Images PMID:4550659

  3. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  4. Vegan diet, subnormal vitamin B-12 status and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kam S; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Celermajer, David S

    2014-08-19

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases.

  5. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  6. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  7. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  8. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  9. Nature and nurture in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zschocke, J; Schindler, S; Hoffmann, G F; Albani, M

    2002-07-01

    We report on a child in whom severe nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency was exacerbated by a genetic impairment of the folate cycle, causing reduced CSF concentrations of the methyl group donor 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Some patients with vitamin B12 deficiency may benefit from high dose folic acid supplementation, even if plasma concentrations are high.

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency: issues in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Meiner, Sue E

    2004-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a relatively common occurrence with potentially devastating consequences. The wide range of etiologies and symptoms makes it imperative for the nurse to use a comprehensive approach to assessing and managing the patient with vitamin B12 deficiency.

  11. Vegan diet, subnormal vitamin B-12 status and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kam S; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Celermajer, David S

    2014-08-01

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases. PMID:25195560

  12. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  13. Brain damage in infancy and dietary vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wighton, M C; Manson, J I; Speed, I; Robertson, E; Chapman, E

    1979-07-14

    A case of the exclusively breast-fed infant of a vegetarian mother is reported. Neurological deterioration commenced between three and six months of age, and progressed to a comatose premoribund state by the age of nine months. Investigations revealed a mild nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in the mother, and a very severe nutritional B12 deficiency in the infant, with severe megaloblastic anaemia. Treatment of the infant with vitamin B12 resulted in a rapid clinical and haematological improvement, but neurological recovery was incomplete. Evidence is presented that dietary B12 deficiency was the sole cause of the infant's deterioration, and the literature relating to the condition is reviewed. It is recommended that all strict vegetarians (vegans), especially women in the child-bearing age group, take vitamin B12 supplements.

  14. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency.

  15. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in hospitalized young children.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Feyzullah; Yildirmak, Yildiz; Kutluk, Gunsel; Erdem, Ela

    2007-01-01

    The authors sought to determine prevalence, social, economic, and dietary patterns of young children (n = 20) identified as having vitamin B12 deficiency anemia after admission to their hospital in the last 3 years. The diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency was based on symptoms and clinical findings, findings on peripheral blood films and bone marrow aspirates, and serum levels of vitamin B12. The children had been exclusively breast-fed without any animal food supplementation. Serum vitamin B12 levels were also measured in the sera of mothers and found to be low. The authors concluded that vitamin B12 deficiency might be an important health problem among children of mothers who do not consume animal foods adequately.

  16. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology. PMID:26884697

  17. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology.

  18. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  19. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  20. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (<5 μm) phytoplankton varied independently of B12 concentrations. These observations were corroborated by field-based nutrient amendment experiments, in which B12 additions stimulated growth of large phytoplankton taxa 6-fold over unamended controls. In contrast, small taxa (<5 μm) were largely unaffected. This study provides the first evidence of vitamin B12's influence on phytoplankton field population dynamics based on direct chemical measurements of cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  1. Considering the case for vitamin B12 fortification of flour.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H; Rosenberg, Irwin H; Oakley, Godfrey P; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2010-03-01

    Reasons to fortify flour with vitamin B12 are considered, including the high prevalence of depletion and deficiency of this vitamin that occurs in persons of all ages in resource-poor countries and in the elderly in wealthier countries, and the adverse functional consequences of poor vitamin B12 status. From a global perspective, the main cause of inadequate intake and status is a low intake of animal-source foods; even lacto-ovo vegetarians have lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations than omnivores, and for various reasons many populations have limited consumption of animal-source foods. Infants are vitamin B12-depleted from early infancy if their mothers' vitamin B12 status and intake are poor during pregnancy and lactation. Even in the United States, more than 20% of the elderly have serum vitamin B12 concentrations that indicate depletion, and an additional 6% have deficiency, primarily due to gastric atrophy, which impairs the absorption of the vitamin from food but usually not from supplements or fortified foods. Although the evidence is limited, it shows that fortified flour, consumed as bread, can improve vitamin B12 status. Where vitamin B12 fortification is implemented, the recommendation is to add 20 microg/kg flour, assuming consumption of 75 to 100 g flour per day, to provide 75% to 100% of the Estimated Average Requirement; the amount of the vitamin that can be added is limited by its cost. The effectiveness of this level of addition for improving vitamin B12 status in programs needs to be determined and monitored. In addition, further research should evaluate the bioavailability of the vitamin from fortified flour by elderly people with food cobalamin malabsorption and gastric atrophy.

  2. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period.

  3. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period. PMID:19852900

  4. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  5. Parallel computing and first-principles calculations: Applications to complex ceramics and Vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    that the Co-OH bond was weak. This, together with the ongoing projects studying different Vitamin B12 derivatives, might help us to answer questions about the Co-C cleavage of the B12 coenzyme, which is involved in many important B12 enzymatic reactions.

  6. Vitamin B12 absorption capacity in healthy children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.; Krasilnikoff, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    B12 absorption was investigated in 47 healthy children aged 7 months to 15.8 years (median 4.9 years). The patients had either recovered from giardiasis, the post-gastroenteritis syndrome, or had celiac disease in remission (treated with a gluten-free diet). The B12 absorption was measured by a double-isotope technique using /sup 57/CoB12 and /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/, the latter being the inabsorbable marker. The radiation dose was minimal. The results were presented as fractional absorption of B12 (FAB12). Within the different age groups, the absorption test was performed by means of the following oral amounts of B12: 0- less than 1 year, 0.5 microgram; 1-3 years: 1.7 micrograms, 4-6 years, 2.5 micrograms; 7-10 years; 3.3 micrograms; and 11-15 years, 4.5 micrograms. When using these oral amounts of B12, the medians (and ranges) of FAB12 were found to be: 1-3 years (n = 18), 37% (16-80%); 4-6 years (n = 10), 27% (19-40%); 7-10 years (n = 9), 32% (21-44%); and 11-15 years (n = 8), 27% (19-59%). The FAB12 in two children aged 7 and 11 months was 31% and 32%, respectively. These results may be interpretated as reference values for B12 absorption in children. Further absorption tests were performed in seven children representing the four age groups from 1 to 15 years. When a high oral amount of B12 was given (i.e., three times the saturation dose), the FAB12 ranged from 0 to 20% (median 9%), whereas a low amount (i.e., one-ninth of the saturation dose) produced fractional absorptions from 65 to 82% (median 74%).

  7. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  8. A rare case of vitamin B12 deficiency with ascites.

    PubMed

    Rajsekhar, Putta; Reddy, Mugannagari Maheshwar; Vaddera, Sameeraja; Rajini, G; Tikeli, Vinil

    2014-07-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widespread than assumed in population. At risk are older people, pregnant women, vegans, patients with renal and intestinal diseases. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. In the population, the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in younger people is 5% to 7% which is less compared to elderly people. In developing countries, deficiency is much more common, starting in early life and persisting across the life span. Here, we present a 16-year-old female patient presenting with ascites since 2 months who was subsequently investigated and diagnosed to have nutritional megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency after exclusion of other infective, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inspite, patient was treated with antitubercular drugs but she did not respond. After supplementation of Vitamin B12, ascites responded well. Inadequate intake due to low consumption of animal source foods is the main cause of low serum vitamin B12 in younger adults and likely the main cause in poor population worldwide.

  9. Structural Characterization of a Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase Confirms That Coenzyme B[subscript 12] Is Synthesized through a Four-Coordinate Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    St. Maurice, Martin; Mera, Paola; Park, Kiyoung; Brunold, Thomas C.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2008-11-18

    ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the 5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl moiety from ATP to the upper axial ligand position of cobalamin in the synthesis of coenzyme B{sub 12}. For the ACA-catalyzed reaction to proceed, cob(II)alamin must be reduced to cob(I)alamin in the enzyme active site. This reduction is facilitated through the generation of a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate on the enzyme. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of a human-type ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri with a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin bound in the enzyme active site and with the product, adenosylcobalamin, partially occupied in the active site. The assembled structures represent snapshots of the steps in the ACA-catalyzed formation of the cobalt-carbon bond of coenzyme B{sub 12}. The structures define the corrinoid binding site and provide visual evidence for a base-off, four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. The complete structural description of ACA-mediated catalysis reveals the molecular features of four-coordinate cob(II)alamin stabilization and provides additional insights into the molecular basis for dysfunction in human patients suffering from methylmalonic aciduria.

  10. The EGG 57-CO B-12 absorption test, in the evaluation of patients with low serum B-12

    SciTech Connect

    Sinow, R.M.; Carmel, R.; Siegel, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The Schilling Test (ST) is the standard test for diagnosing vitamin B-12 malabsorption (MA). However, patients with subtle gastric dysfunction may have normal ST, but impaired absorption of B-12 given with food. The authors have adapted an Egg B-12 Absorption Test (EBAT) in which 57-Co cyanocobalamin (57-Co B-12) is mixed with scrambled egg to evaluate this phenomenon in patients with low serum B-12, normal ST and possible subtle MA. Lyophilized egg yolk is reconstituted and mixed with 57-Co- B-12 of equal dose to that of ST. The authors studied 46 individuals: 13 controls, 5 patients with known pernicious anemia (PA), in addition to 28 patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST. ST/EBAT ratios were calculated. Twenty-eight test patients excreted 13.3% on ST and 3.5% on EBAT. Mean ST/EBAT ratio was 8.2 (1.4-35.9). Five had EBAT results in the PA range (<1%) and ST/EBAT ratios (14.4-35.9) that were significantly elevated. This group is also evaluated with pepsinogen I/II ratios, gastric analysis, deoxyuridine suppression tests, anti intrinsic factor, and antiparietal cell antibodies. The authors' results indicate that the EBAT can differentiate between PA and non PA patients, and that some patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST may, in fact, have subtle MA. The EBAT, combined with ST/EBAT ratio, may provide a means for identifying this group of patients.

  11. Stabilization of HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 under Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Li, Rebecca L; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-16

    Alloys of metal dodecaborides-YB12 with HfB12-were prepared via arc-melting in order to stabilize the metastable HfB12 high-pressure phase under ambient pressure. Previously, HfB12 had been synthesized only under high-pressure (6.5 GPa). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to confirm the purity and phase composition of the prepared samples. The solubility limit for HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 (cubic UB12 structure type) was determined to be ∼35 at. % Hf by PXRD and EDS analysis. The value of the cubic unit cell parameter (a) changed from 7.505 Å (pure YB12) to 7.454 Å across the solid solution range. Vickers hardness increased from 40.9 ± 1.6 GPa for pure YB12 to 45.0 ± 1.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N for the Y1-xHfxB12 solid solution composition with ∼28 at. % Hf, suggesting both solid solution hardening and extrinsic hardening due to the formation of secondary phases of hafnium. PMID:27115173

  12. Causes of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H

    2008-06-01

    This review describes current knowledge of the main causes of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. The most common explanations for poor vitamin B12 status are a low dietary intake of the vitamin (i.e., a low intake of animal-source foods) and malabsorption. Although it has long been known that strict vegetarians (vegans) are at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, evidence now indicates that low intakes of animal-source foods, such as occur in some lacto-ovo vegetarians and many less-industrialized countries, cause vitamin B12 depletion. Malabsorption of the vitamin is most commonly observed as food-bound cobalamin malabsorption due to gastric atrophy in the elderly, and probably as a result of Helicobacter pylori infection. There is growing evidence that gene polymorphisms in transcobalamins affect plasma vitamin B12 concentrations. The primary cause of folate deficiency is low intake of sources rich in the vitamin, such as legumes and green leafy vegetables, and the consumption of these foods may explain why folate status can be adequate in relatively poor populations. Other situations in which the risk of folate deficiency increases include lactation and alcoholism.

  13. Neurological consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Christel; Faesch, Sabine; Anthoine-Milhomme, Marie-Constance; Fulla, Yvonne; Dulac, Olivier; Chéron, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    In developed countries, the vitamin B12 deficiency usually occurs in children exclusively breast-fed, whose mothers are vegetarians, causing low stores of vitamin B12. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency appear during the second trimester of life and include failure to thrive, lethargy, hypotonia, and arrest or regression of developmental skills. A megaloblastic anemia can be present. One half of the infants exhibit abnormal movements before the start of treatment with intramuscular cobalamin, which disappear 1 or 2 days after. More rarely, movement disorders appear a few days after treatment, whereas neurological symptoms are improving. These abnormal movements can last for 2 to 6 weeks. If not treated, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause lasting neurodisability. Therefore, efforts should be directed to preventing deficiency in pregnant and breast-feeding women on vegan diets and their infants by giving them vitamin B12 supplements. When preventive supplementation has failed, one should recognize and treat quickly an infant presenting with failure to thrive and delayed development.

  14. Involuntary movements due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron; Moloi, M W

    2014-12-01

    Deficiency of vitamin B12 produces protean effects on the nervous system, most commonly neuropathy, myelopathy, cognitive and behavioural symptoms, and optic atrophy. Involuntary movements comprise a relatively rare manifestation of this readily treatable disorder. Both adults and infants deficient in vitamin B12 may present with chorea, tremor, myoclonus, Parkinsonism, dystonia, or a combination of these, which may precede diagnosis or become apparent only a few days after parenteral replacement therapy has begun. The pathogenesis of these movement disorders shows interesting parallels to certain neurodegenerative conditions. The clinical syndrome responds well to vitamin B12 supplementation in most cases, and an early diagnosis is essential to reverse the haematological and neurological dysfunction characteristic of this disorder. In this article, we elucidate the association of vitamin B12 deficiency with movement disorders in adults and in infants, discuss the pathogenesis of this association, review previously reported cases, and present a young adult male with severe generalized chorea that showed a salutary response to vitamin B12 supplementation. PMID:24852503

  15. Deficiency or dementia? Exploring B12 deficiency after urostomy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle; Bryan, Sandra; Dukes, Suzie

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can be misdiagnosed as a variety of other illnesses, and if left untreated can lead to irreversible damage to the brain and nervous system. This article discusses the case of a 70-year-old female with a urostomy, well known to the stoma care department, who shortly after a routine parastomal hernia repair developed severe confusion, immobility and was unable to communicate. Subsequent investigations ruled out a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and a diagnosis of rapidly progressing vascular dementia was made. An incidental finding of a low vitamin B12 level was identified and treatment commenced. She was transferred to a community hospital and her family were told to 'prepare for the worst'. It was, in fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency that was causing her symptoms of vascular dementia, and once treatment was established she underwent a 'miraculous' improvement, returning to normal life. This article discusses vitamin B12 deficiency and why patients with a urostomy are at risk of developing it; highlights the key role of the stoma care nurse and his or her knowledge of the patient; explores the importance of testing vitamin B12 levels in this group of patients; and discusses key learning and recommendations for practice.

  16. Isolation and analysis of vitamin B12 from plant samples.

    PubMed

    Nakos, M; Pepelanova, I; Beutel, S; Krings, U; Berger, R G; Scheper, T

    2017-02-01

    Based on increased demands of strict vegetarians, an investigation of vitamin B12 content in plant sources, was carried out. The vitamin B12 concentration was determined by RP-HPLC with UV detection, after prior matrix isolation by immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC). Vitamin B12 was extracted in the presence of sodium cyanide, to transform all forms of cobalamin into cyanocobalamin. Diode array detector was used to monitor vitamin B12, after its chromatographic separation under gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid 0.025% (w/v). The method demonstrated excellent linearity with a limit of detection 0.004μg/ml. The method precision was evaluated for plant samples and it was below 0.7% (n=6). Significant amounts of vitamin B12 in plants were detected in Hippophae rhamnoides (37μg/100g dry weight), in Elymus (26μg/100g dry weight) and in Inula helenium (11μg/100g dry weight). PMID:27596424

  17. Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfers Involving Tetrahydrofolate and B12

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the reaction mechanism of enzymes that use B12 and tetrahydrofolate (THF) to catalyze methyl group transfers. It also covers the related reactions that use B12 and tetrahydromethanopterin (THMPT), which is a THF analog used by archaea. In the past decade, our understanding of the mechanisms of these enzymes has increased greatly because the crystal structures for three classes of B12-dependent methyltransferases have become available and because biophysical and kinetic studies have elucidated the intermediates involved in catalysis. These steps include binding of the cofactors and substrates, activation of the methyl donors and acceptors, the methyl transfer reaction itself, and product dissociation. Activation of the methyl donor in one class of methyltransferases is achieved by an unexpected proton transfer mechanism. The cobalt (Co) ion within the B12 macrocycle must be in the Co(I) oxidation state to serve as a nucleophile in the methyl transfer reaction. Recent studies have uncovered important principles that control how this highly reducing active state of B12 is generated and maintained. PMID:18804699

  18. Understanding the mechanism of B(12)-dependent diol dehydratase: a synergistic retro-push--pull proposal.

    PubMed

    Smith, D M; Golding, B T; Radom, L

    2001-02-28

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is used to investigate the coenzyme B(12)-dependent reactions catalyzed by diol dehydratase. The key step in such reactions is believed to be a 1,2-hydroxyl migration, which occurs within free-radical intermediates. The barrier for this migration, if unassisted, is calculated to be too high to be consistent with the observed reaction rate. However, we find that "pushing" the migrating hydroxyl, through interaction with a suitable acid, is able to provide significant catalysis. This is denoted retro-push catalysis, the retro prefix signifying that the motion of the migrating group is in the direction opposite to the electron motion. Similarly, the "pulling" of the migrating group, through interaction of the spectator hydroxyl with an appropriate base, is found to substantially reduce the rearrangement barrier. Importantly, the combination of these two effects results in a barrier reduction that is notably greater than additive. This synergistic interplay of the push and the pull provides an attractive means of catalysis. Our proposed retro-push--pull mechanism leads to results that are consistent with isotope-labeling experiments, with experimental rate data, and with the crystal structure of the enzyme.

  19. Cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) in subacute combined degeneration and beyond: traditional interpretations and novel theories.

    PubMed

    Scalabrino, Giuseppe

    2005-04-01

    Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) is a neuropathy due to cobalamin (Cbl) (vitamin B(12)) deficiency acquired in adult age. Hitherto, the theories advanced to explain the pathogenesis of SCD have postulated a causal relationship between SCD lesions and the impairment of either or both of two Cbl-dependent reactions. We have identified a new experimental model, the totally gastrectomized rat, to reproduce the key morphological features of the disease [spongy vacuolation, intramyelinic and interstitial edema of the white matter of the central nervous system (CNS), and astrogliosis], and found new mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of SCD: the neuropathological lesions in TGX rats are not only due to mere vitamin withdrawal but also to the overproduction of the myelinolytic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and the reduced synthesis of the two neurotrophic agents, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and interleukin-6. This deregulation of the balance between TNF-alpha and EGF synthesis induced by Cbl deficiency has been verified in the sera of patients with pernicious anemia (but not in those with iron-deficient anemia), and in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of SCD patients. These new functions are not linked to the coenzyme functions of the vitamin, but it is still unknown whether they involve genetic or epigenetic mechanisms. Low Cbl levels have also been repeatedly observed in the sera and/or CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis, but whether Cbl deficit plays a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases is still unclear.

  20. Serum vitamin B12 and blood cell values in vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Dong, A; Scott, S C

    1982-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12 and complete blood count values were determined for 83 volunteer subjects from an American vegetarian society conference (USA). Among subjects who did not supplement their diets with vitamin B12 or multiple vitamin tablets, 92% of the vegans (total vegetarians), 64% of the lactovegetarians, 47% of the lacto-ovovegetarians and 20% of the semivegetarians had serum vitamin B12 levels less than 200 pg/ml (normal = 200-900 pg/ml). However, their complete blood count values did not deviate greatly from those found for nonvegetarians, even though some had been vegans or lactovegetarians for over 10 years. Macrocytosis among the vegetarians was minimal; none had mean corpuscular volume greater than 103 fl.

  1. Oral contraceptives: effect of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Women who use oral contraceptives have impaired folate metabolism as shown by slightly but significantly lower levels of folate in the serum and the erythrocytes and an increased urinary excretion of formiminoglutamic acid. The vitamin B12 level in their serum is also significantly lower than that of control groups. However, there is no evidence of tissue depletion of vitamin B12 associated with the use of oral contraceptives. The causes and clinical significance of the impairment of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism in these women is discussed in this review of the literature. Clinicians are advised to ensure that women who shop taking "the pill" because they wish to conceive have adequate folate stores before becoming pregnant. PMID:7037144

  2. Nitrous oxide misuse and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Massey, Thomas H; Pickersgill, Trevor T; J Peall, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented to hospital with a 5-week history of ascending limb paraesthesiae and balance difficulties. He had no medical or travel history of note, but admitted habitual nitrous oxide (N2O) inhalation. Neurological examination revealed a sensory ataxia with pseudoathetosis in the upper limbs and reduced vibration sensation to the hips bilaterally. Significant investigation results included a low serum vitamin B12 concentration, mild macrocytosis and raised serum homocysteine concentration. T2 MRI of the spinal cord demonstrated increased signal extending from C1 to T11 in keeping with a longitudinal myelitis. The patient was diagnosed with a myeloneuropathy secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting from heavy N2O inhalation. He was treated with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections and received regular physiotherapy. At discharge, he was able to mobilise short distances with the aid of a zimmer frame, and was independently mobile 8 weeks later. PMID:27247211

  3. Vitamin B12 deficit and development of geriatric syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Chaparro, José Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency or cyanocobalamin is a common condition in the elderly. It is repeatedly overlooked due to multiple clinical manifestations that can affect the blood, neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems, skin and mucous membranes. The various presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency are related to the development of geriatric syndromes like frailty, falls, cognitive impairment, and geriatric nutritional syndromes like protein-energy malnutrition and failure to thrive, in addition to enhancing aging anorexia and cachexia. Therefore, interventions must be developed to include their screening and diagnosis to make early and appropriate treatment to prevent its complications before they become irreversible.

  4. Involuntary movements misdiagnosed as seizure during vitamin B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Carman, Kursat Bora; Belgemen, Tugba; Yis, Uluc

    2013-11-01

    Seizures and epilepsy are a common problem in childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events are conditions that can mimic seizure and frequent in early childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events can be due to physiological or exaggerated physiological responses, parasomnias, movement disorders, behavioral or psychiatric disturbances, or to hemodynamic, respiratory, or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of failure to thrive and developmental regression, involuntary movements, and anemia. Involuntary movements rarely may appear a few days after the initiation of vitamin B12 treatments and might be misdiagnosed as seizure. Here, we report 2 patients who presented with involuntary movements with his video image.

  5. Melting of B12P2 boron subphosphide under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Mukhanov, Vladimir A.; Sokolov, Petr S.; Le Godec, Yann; Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Konôpková, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    Melting of boron subphosphide (B12P2) to 26 GPa has been studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and by quenching and electrical resistance measurements in a toroid-type high pressure apparatus. B12P2 melts congruently, and the melting curve has a positive slope of 23(6) K/GPa. No solid-state phase transition was observed up to the melting in the whole pressure range under study.

  6. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days. PMID:23834987

  7. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Amrita B; Han, Andrew W; Mehta, Angad P; Mok, Kenny C; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P; Taga, Michiko E

    2015-08-25

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism.

  8. Vitamin-B12 deficiency following therapy in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, L.C.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Vitamin-B12 deficiency results from inadequate absorption of the vitamin by the distal ileum and depletion of available stores. Both radiotherapy and intestinal resection can contribute to development of this condition. The significance of this problem in gynecologic oncology is discussed and two patients are described.

  9. [Psychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report].

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Mary, S; Brazo, P; Dollfus, S

    2003-01-01

    Psychiatric manifestations are frequently associated with pernicious anemia including depression, mania, psychosis, dementia. We report a case of a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency, who has presented severe depression with delusion and Capgras' syndrome, delusion with lability of mood and hypomania successively, during a period of two Months. Case report - Mme V., a 64-Year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of confusion. She had no history of psychiatric problems. She had history of diabetes, hypertension and femoral prosthesis. The red blood count revealed a normocytosis with anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl). At admission she was uncooperative, disoriented in time and presented memory and attention impairment and sleep disorders. She seemed sad and older than her real age. Facial expression and spontaneous movements were reduced, her speech and movements were very slow. She had depressed mood, guilt complex, incurability and devaluation impressions. She had a Capgras' syndrome and delusion of persecution. Her neurologic examination, cerebral scanner and EEG were postponed because of uncooperation. Further investigations confirmed anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl) and revealed vitamin B12 deficiency (52 pmol/l) and normal folate level. Antibodies to parietal cells were positive in the serum and antibodies to intrinsic factor were negative. An iron deficiency was associated (serum iron=7 micromol/l; serum ferritin concentration=24 mg/l; serum transferrin concentration=3,16 g/l). This association explained normocytocis anemia. Thyroid function, hepatic and renal tests, glycemia, TP, TCA, VS, VDRL-TPHA were normal. Vitamin B12 replacement therapy was started with hydroxycobalamin 1 000 ng/day im for 10 days and iron replacement therapy. Her mental state improved dramatically within a few days. After one week of treatment the only remaining symptoms were lability of mood, delusion of persecution, Capgras' syndrome but disappeared totally 9 days after the

  10. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days.

  11. Folate–vitamin B-12 interaction in relation to cognitive impairment, anemia, and biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports on pernicious anemia treatment suggested that high folic acid intake adversely influences the natural history of vitamin B-12 deficiency, which affects many elderly individuals. However, experimental investigation of this hypothesis is unethical, and the few existing observational d...

  12. Dietary Sources of Vitamin B-12 and Their Association with Vitamin B-12 Status Markers in Healthy Older Adults in the B-PROOF Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin B-12 concentrations are frequently observed among older adults. Malabsorption is hypothesized to be an important cause of vitamin B-12 inadequacy, but serum vitamin B-12 may also be differently affected by vitamin B-12 intake depending on food source. We examined associations between dietary sources of vitamin B-12 (meat, fish and shellfish, eggs, dairy) and serum vitamin B-12, using cross-sectional data of 600 Dutch community-dwelling adults (≥65 years). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Vitamin B-12 concentrations were measured in serum. Associations were studied over tertiles of vitamin B-12 intake using P for trend, by calculating prevalence ratios (PRs), and splines. Whereas men had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intakes than women (median (25th–75th percentile): 4.18 (3.29–5.38) versus 3.47 (2.64–4.40) μg/day), serum vitamin B-12 did not differ between the two sexes (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 275 ± 104 pmol/L versus 290 ± 113 pmol/L). Higher intakes of dairy, meat, and fish and shellfish were significantly associated with higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations, where meat and dairy—predominantly milk were the most potent sources. Egg intake did not significantly contribute to higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Thus, dairy and meat were the most important contributors to serum vitamin B-12, followed by fish and shellfish. PMID:26389945

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  15. Forms of vitamin B12 in radioisotope dilution assays.

    PubMed Central

    Begley, J A; Hall, C A

    1981-01-01

    Since the presence of analogues of vitamin B12 (B12, cobalamin, Cbl) has been postulated as the basis for the high values obtained by some radioisotope dilution assays (RIDA) of serum Cbl we examined serum for analogues. None could be demonstrated in the extracts of serum prepared for RIDA as sought by both direct and indirect techniques. The natural forms of serum Cbl were converted to cyanocobalamin (CN Cbl) by this process of extraction which included cyanide (CN). The correctly performed RIDA for Cbl based on R binder gave higher values than a RIDA based on intrinsic factor or than by bioassay. By exclusion, the difference appeared to be due to unidentified factors rather than the presence of analogues. Images PMID:7019262

  16. Self-Incorporation of Coenzymes by Ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    RNA molecules that are assembled from the four standard nucleotides contain a limited number of chemical functional groups, a characteristic that is generally thought to restrict the potential for catalysis by ribozymes. Although polypeptides carry a wider range of functional groups, many contemporary protein-based enzymes employ coenzymes to augment their capabilities. The coenzymes possess additional chemical moieties that can participate directly in catalysis and thereby enhance catalytic function. In this work, we demonstrate a mechanism by which ribozymes can supplement their limited repertoire of functional groups through RNAcatalyzed incorporation of various coenzymes and coenzyme analogues. The group I ribozyme of Tetrahymena thermophila normally mediates a phosphoester transfer reaction that results in the covalent attachment of guanosine to the ribozyme. Here, a shortened version of the ribozyme is shown to catalyze the self-incorporation of coenzymes and coenzyme analogues, such as NAD+ and dephosphorylated CoA-SH. Similar ribozyme activities may have played an important role in the "RNA world," when RNA enzymes are thought to have maintained a complex metabolism in the absence of proteins and would have benefited from the inclusion of additional functional groups.

  17. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of icosahedral boron subcarbides (B12C3, B13C2), subnitride B12N2, and suboxide B12O2 from data of SCC-DFTB calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyashin, A. N.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2011-08-01

    The structural, elastic, and electronic properties of a series of icosahedral phases, such as boron subcarbides B12C3 and B13C2, subnitride B12N2, and suboxide B12O2, have been studied in the framework of the SCC-DFTB method. It has been found that the B12C2 and B13C2 phases manifest metal-like properties, while B12C3 and B12O2 are semiconductors. The estimates have shown that the insertion of 2 p atoms (C, N, or O) into intericosahedral pores of elemental boron can cause both a decrease in its elastic modulus (an increase in the compressibility of B12N2) and a sharp increase in the modulus B (in subcarbides B12C3 and B12BCC). On the other hand, the insertion of 2 p atoms into α-B12 will favor an increase in its hardness (suboxide B12O2 will have a maximum hardness).

  18. Vitamin B12 Status in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I.; Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Study Design Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 yrs) and categorized as elevated (Hi-B12) or within reference range (RR-B12) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index Z scores, pulmonary function, energy, dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. Results 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years participated. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/ml, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intake were both high representing 376% and 667% Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the RR-B12 group (1000 vs. 583% RDA, p<0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased risk for Hi-B12, while higher FEV1 decreased risk (Pseudo-R2=0.18, P<0.001). Conclusions Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and FEV1. PMID:24445504

  19. [Stability of folic acid and vitamin B12 in TPN].

    PubMed

    Almodóvar, M J; Hernández Jaras, M V; León-Sanz, M; Ortuño, B; Estenoz, J; Negro Vega, E; Marfagón, N; Herreros de Tejada, A

    1991-01-01

    The stability of folic acid (FA) in mixtures of Total Parenteral Nutrition has been and is a controversial subject, with discussion concerning the influence of factors such as temperature, light and storage time. As regards the stability of the vitamin B12, there are few studies in scientific literature. For all those reasons, we consider it necessary to make a proper study to evaluate the influence of different factors in the stability of both vitamins. The study was made on 3 liter TPN bags of the EVA type, the composition of which was as follows: AA (85g), glucosa (225g), fat (50g), Na (86mEq), K (60 mEq), Ca (15 mEq), Cl (90 mEq), P (17 mmol) acetate (149 mEq) and 10 ml of MVI-12 which contain 400 micrograms of PA and 5 micrograms of Vitamin B 12. Consideration was also given to the stability of these two vitamins in the same diet, to which were added 10 ml of a commercial preparation of oligo-elements. Six TPN bags were prepared (without oligo-elements); two of them were kept in a fridge and protected from the light, two were kept at room temperature and protected from the light and the other two at room temperature without protection from the light. Samples were taken from all the bags immediately after their preparation and after 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. The same process was carried with other TPN bags which did contain oligo-elements. The method for determining FA and Vitamin B12 was by radioassay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1764534

  20. [Rare Case of Strongyloides stercoralis with Vitamin B12 Deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kadılar, Özlem; Bozkurt, Berna; Karakeçe, Engin; Kaya, Tezcan; Çiftçi, İhsan Hakkı; Tamer, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Strongyloidiyasis is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, and mostly soil transmitted nematode disease that is seen as sporadic cases in Turkey. As may be asymptomatic in healthy individuals, it may even cause death in immunosuppressive people. We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient, 29 years old young male was admitted to our institution with diarrhea who has got vitamin B12 deficiency and eosinophilia. The case represents an extremely rare and in our knowledge, it is the first case in Sakarya. PMID:26470934

  1. Effect of a Klamath algae product ("AFA-B12") on blood levels of vitamin B12 and homocysteine in vegan subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Luciana; Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Serena; Bonetto, Chiara; Pagliarani, Silvia; Benedetti, Yanina; Rocchi, Marco; Canestrari, Franco

    2009-03-01

    Vitamin B12 is a critical nutrient that is often inadequate in a plant-based (vegan) diet, thus the inclusion of a reliable vitamin B12 source in a vegan diet is recommended as essential. Unfortunately, many natural sources of vitamin B12 have been proven to contain biologically inactive vitamin B12 analogues, inadequate for human supplementation. The aim of this non-randomized open trial was to determine whether supplementation with a natural Klamath algae-based product ("AFA-B12", Aphanizomenon flos-aquae algae plus a proprietary mix of enzymes) could favorably affect the vitamin B12 status of a group of 15 vegan subjects. By assessing blood concentration of vitamin B12, folate, and more importantly homocysteine (Hcy, a reliable marker in vegans of their B12 absorption), the vitamin B12 status of the participants at the end of the 3-month intervention period, while receiving the Klamath-algae supplement (T2), was compared with their vitamin B12 status at the end of the 3-month control period (T1), when they were not receiving any supplement, having stopped taking their usual vitamin B12 supplement at the beginning of the study (T0). Compared to the control period, in the intervention period participants improved their vitamin B12 status, significantly reducing Hcy blood concentration (p=0.003). In conclusion, the Klamath algae product AFA-B12 appears to be, in a preliminary study, an adequate and reliable source of vitamin B12 in humans.

  2. Role and Function of LitR, an Adenosyl B12-Bound Light-Sensitive Regulator of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, in Regulation of Carotenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Kou; Hagiwara, Kenta; Hirata, Naoya; Watanabe, Shoko; Toriyabe, Minami; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Ueda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The LitR/CarH family of proteins is a light-sensitive MerR family of transcriptional regulators that contain an adenosyl B12 (coenzyme B12 or AdoB12)-binding domain at the C terminus. The genes encoding these proteins are found in phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera; however, the biochemical properties of these proteins from Gram-positive bacteria remain poorly understood. We performed genetic and biochemical analyses of a homolog of the LitR protein from Bacillus megaterium QM B1551, a Gram-positive endospore-forming soil bacterium. Carotenoid production was induced by illumination in this bacterium. In vivo analysis demonstrated that LitR plays a central role in light-inducible carotenoid production and serves as a negative regulator of the light-inducible transcription of crt and litR itself. Biochemical evidence showed that LitR in complex with AdoB12 binds to the promoter regions of litR and the crt operon in a light-sensitive manner. In vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that AdoB12-LitR inhibited the specific transcription of the crt promoter generated by a σA-containing RNA polymerase holoenzyme under dark conditions. Collectively, these data indicate that the AdoB12-LitR complex serves as a photoreceptor with DNA-binding activity in B. megaterium QM B1551 and that its function as a transcriptional repressor is fundamental to the light-induced carotenoid production. IMPORTANCE Members of the LitR/CarH family are AdoB12-based photosensors involved in light-inducible carotenoid production in nonphototrophic Gram-negative bacteria. Our study revealed that Bacillus LitR in complex with AdoB12 also serves as a transcriptional regulator with a photosensory function, which indicates that the LitR/CarH family is generally involved in the light-inducible carotenoid production of nonphototrophic bacteria. PMID:25917914

  3. Propionyl-CoA and Adenosylcobalamin Metabolism in C. elegans : Evidence for a Role of Methylmalonyl-CoA Epimerase in Intermediary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Randy J.; Aswani, Vijay; Tsai, Matthew S.; Falk, Marni; Wehrli, Natasha; Stabler, Sally; Allen, Robert; Sedensky, Margaret; Kazazian, Haig H.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    We have utilized Caenorhabditis elegans to study human methylmalonic acidemia. Using bioinformatics, a full complement of mammalian homologues for the conversion of propionyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA in the genome of C. elegans, including propionyl-CoA carboxylase subunits A and B (pcca-1, pccb-1), methylmalonic acidemia cobalamin A complementation group (mmaa-1), co(I)balamin adenosyltransferase (mmab-1), MMACHC (cblc-1), methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase (mce-1) and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mmcm-1) were identified. To verify predictions that the entire intracellular adenosylcobalamin metabolic pathway existed and was functional, the kinetic properties of the C. elegans mmcm-1 were examined. RNA interference against mmcm-1, mmab-1, mmaa-1 in the presence of propionic acid revealed a chemical phenotype of increased methylmalonic acid; deletion mutants of mmcm-1, mmab-1 and mce-1 displayed reduced 1-[14C]-propionate incorporation into macromolecules. The mutants produced increased amounts of methylmalonic acid in the culture medium, proving that a functional block in the pathway caused metabolite accumulation. Lentiviral delivery of the C. elegans mmcm-1 into fibroblasts derived from a patient with muto class methylmalonic acidemia could partially restore propionate flux. The C. elegans mce-1 deletion mutant demonstrates for the first time that a lesion at the racemase step of methylmalonyl-CoA metabolism can functionally impair flux through the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase pathway and suggests that malfunction of MCEE may cause methylmalonic acidemia in humans. The C. elegans system we describe represents the first lower metazoan model organism of mammalian propionate spectrum disorders and demonstrates that mass spectrometry can be employed to study a small molecule chemical phenotype in C. elegans RNAi and deletion mutants. PMID:16843692

  4. Coenzymes, viruses and the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Prieto, Fabián; Hernández-Morales, Ricardo; Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The results of a detailed bioinformatic search for ribonucleotidyl coenzyme biosynthetic sequences in DNA- and RNA viral genomes are presented. No RNA viral genome sequence available as of April 2011 appears to encode for sequences involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In both single- and double-stranded DNA viruses a diverse array of coenzyme biosynthetic genes has been identified, but none of the viral genomes examined here encodes for a complete pathway. Although our conclusions may be constrained by the unexplored diversity of viral genomes and the biases in the construction of viral genome databases, our results do not support the possibility that RNA viruses are direct holdovers from an ancient RNA/protein world. Extrapolation of our results to evolutionary epochs prior to the emergence of DNA genomes suggest that during those early stages living entities may have depended on discontinuous genetic systems consisting of multiple small-size RNA sequences.

  5. Cobalamin coenzyme forms are not likely to be superior to cyano- and hydroxyl-cobalamin in prevention or treatment of cobalamin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, Rima; Fedosov, Sergey N; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    Methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) are coenzymes for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Hydroxylcobalamin (HOCbl) and cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) are frequently used for supplementation. MeCbl and AdoCbl have recently emerged as alternative forms in supplements. In the light of metabolic transformation of Cbl into its cofactor forms, this review discusses current evidence on efficacy and utility of different Cbl forms in preventing or treating Cbl deficiency. Cbl-transporting proteins bind and mediate the uptake of all aforementioned forms of Cbl. After internalization and lysosomal release, Cbl binds to the cytosolic chaperon MMACHC that is responsible for (i) flavin-dependent decyanation of [CN-Co3+]Cbl to [Co2+]Cbl; (ii) glutathione-dependent dealkylation of MeCbl and AdoCbl to [Co2+/1+]Cbl; and (iii) glutathione-dependent decyanation of CNCbl or reduction of HOCbl under anaerobic conditions. MMACHC shows a broad specificity for Cbl forms and supplies the Cbl2+ intermediate for synthesis of MeCbl and AdoCbl. Cobalamin chemistry, physiology, and biochemistry suggest that MeCbl and AdoCbl follow the same route of intracellular processing as CNCbl does. We conclude that supplementing MeCbl or AdoCbl is unlikely to be advantageous compared to CNCbl. On the other hand, there are obvious advantages of high parenteral doses (1–2 mg) of HOCbl in treating inborn errors of Cbl metabolism. PMID:25820384

  6. Cobalamin coenzyme forms are not likely to be superior to cyano- and hydroxyl-cobalamin in prevention or treatment of cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Fedosov, Sergey N; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-07-01

    Methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) are coenzymes for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Hydroxylcobalamin (HOCbl) and cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) are frequently used for supplementation. MeCbl and AdoCbl have recently emerged as alternative forms in supplements. In the light of metabolic transformation of Cbl into its cofactor forms, this review discusses current evidence on efficacy and utility of different Cbl forms in preventing or treating Cbl deficiency. Cbl-transporting proteins bind and mediate the uptake of all aforementioned forms of Cbl. After internalization and lysosomal release, Cbl binds to the cytosolic chaperon MMACHC that is responsible for (i) flavin-dependent decyanation of [CN-Co(3+) Cbl to [Co(2+)]Cbl; (ii) glutathione-dependent dealkylation of MeCbl and AdoCbl to [Co(2+/1+)]Cbl; and (iii) glutathione-dependent decyanation of CNCbl or reduction of HOCbl under anaerobic conditions. MMACHC shows a broad specificity for Cbl forms and supplies the Cbl(2+) intermediate for synthesis of MeCbl and AdoCbl. Cobalamin chemistry, physiology, and biochemistry suggest that MeCbl and AdoCbl follow the same route of intracellular processing as CNCbl does. We conclude that supplementing MeCbl or AdoCbl is unlikely to be advantageous compared to CNCbl. On the other hand, there are obvious advantages of high parenteral doses (1-2 mg) of HOCbl in treating inborn errors of Cbl metabolism.

  7. The role of Vitamin B12 in the critically ill--a review.

    PubMed

    Romain, M; Sviri, S; Linton, D M; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin B12 is an essential micronutrient, as humans have no capacity to produce the vitamin and it needs to be ingested from animal proteins. The ingested Vitamin B12 undergoes a complex process of absorption and assimilation. Vitamin B12 is essential for cellular function. Deficiency affects 15% of patients older than 65 and results in haematological and neurological disorders. Low levels of Vitamin B12 may also be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. High levels of Vitamin B12 are associated with inflammation and represent a poor outlook for critically ill patients. Treatment of Vitamin B12 deficiency is simple, but may be lifelong. PMID:27456173

  8. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Loukili, Noureddine Henoun; Noel, Esther; Kaltenbach, Georges; Abdelgheni, Maher Ben; Perrin, Anne Elisabeth; Noblet-Dick, Marie; Maloisel, Frédéric; Schlienger, Jean-Louis; Blicklé, Jean-Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    VITAMIN B12 OR COBALAMIN DEFICIENCY occurs frequently (> 20%) among elderly people, but it is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; they are also potentially serious, particularly from a neuropsychiatric and hematological perspective. Causes of the deficiency include, most frequently, food-cobalamin malabsorption syndrome (> 60% of all cases), pernicious anemia (15%–20% of all cases), insufficent dietary intake and malabsorption. Food-cobalamin malabsorption, which has only recently been identified as a significant cause of cobalamin deficiency among elderly people, is characterized by the inability to release cobalamin from food or a deficiency of intestinal cobalamin transport proteins or both. We review the epidemiology and causes of cobalamin deficiency in elderly people, with an emphasis on food-cobalamin malabsorption syndrome. We also review diagnostic and management strategies for cobalamin deficiency. PMID:15289425

  9. Vitamin B12 as a modulator of gut microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Taga, Michiko E; Goodman, Andrew L

    2014-11-01

    The microbial mechanisms and key metabolites that shape the composition of the human gut microbiota are largely unknown, impeding efforts to manipulate dysbiotic microbial communities toward stability and health. Vitamins, which by definition are not synthesized in sufficient quantities by the host and can mediate fundamental biological processes in microbes, represent an attractive target for reshaping microbial communities. Here, we discuss how vitamin B12 (cobalamin) impacts diverse host-microbe symbioses. Although cobalamin is synthesized by some human gut microbes, it is a precious resource in the gut and is likely not provisioned to the host in significant quantities. However, this vitamin may make an unrecognized contribution in shaping the structure and function of human gut microbial communities. PMID:25440056

  10. Vitamin B12 is the active corrinoid produced in cultivated white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang-Chul; Cho, Kai Yip; Pang, Gerald

    2009-07-22

    Analysis of vitamin B(12) in freshly harvested white button mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus ) from five farms was performed by affinity chromatography and HPLC-ESI-MS techniques. The vitamin B(12) concentrations obtained varied from farm to farm, with higher concentrations of vitamin B(12) detected in outer peel than in cap, stalk, or flesh, suggesting that the vitamin B(12) is probably bacteria-derived. High concentrations of vitamin B(12) were also detected in the flush mushrooms including cups and flats. HPLC and mass spectrometry showed vitamin B(12) retention time and mass spectra identical to those of the standard vitamin B(12) and those of food products including beef, beef liver, salmon, egg, and milk but not of the pseudovitamin B(12), an inactive corrinoid in humans. The results suggest that the consumer may benefit from the consumption of mushroom to increase intake of this vitamin in the diet.

  11. Vitamin B12 is the active corrinoid produced in cultivated white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang-Chul; Cho, Kai Yip; Pang, Gerald

    2009-07-22

    Analysis of vitamin B(12) in freshly harvested white button mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus ) from five farms was performed by affinity chromatography and HPLC-ESI-MS techniques. The vitamin B(12) concentrations obtained varied from farm to farm, with higher concentrations of vitamin B(12) detected in outer peel than in cap, stalk, or flesh, suggesting that the vitamin B(12) is probably bacteria-derived. High concentrations of vitamin B(12) were also detected in the flush mushrooms including cups and flats. HPLC and mass spectrometry showed vitamin B(12) retention time and mass spectra identical to those of the standard vitamin B(12) and those of food products including beef, beef liver, salmon, egg, and milk but not of the pseudovitamin B(12), an inactive corrinoid in humans. The results suggest that the consumer may benefit from the consumption of mushroom to increase intake of this vitamin in the diet. PMID:19552428

  12. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  13. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  14. Requirement for Coenzyme Q in Plasma Membrane Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, I. L.; Sun, E. E.; Crane, F. L.; Morre, D. J.; Lindgren, A.; Low, H.

    1992-12-01

    Coenzyme Q is required in the electron transport system of rat hepatocyte and human erythrocyte plasma membranes. Extraction of coenzyme Q from the membrane decreases NADH dehydrogenase and NADH:oxygen oxidoreductase activity. Addition of coenzyme Q to the extracted membrane restores the activity. Partial restoration of activity is also found with α-tocopherylquinone, but not with vitamin K_1. Analogs of coenzyme Q inhibit NADH dehydrogenase and oxidase activity and the inhibition is reversed by added coenzyme Q. Ferricyanide reduction by transmembrane electron transport from HeLa cells is inhibited by coenzyme Q analogs and restored with added coenzyme Q10. Reduction of external ferricyanide and diferric transferrin by HeLa cells is accompanied by proton release from the cells. Inhibition of the reduction by coenzyme Q analogs also inhibits the proton release, and coenzyme Q10 restores the proton release activity. Trans-plasma membrane electron transport stimulates growth of serum-deficient cells, and added coenzyme Q10 increases growth of HeLa (human adenocarcinoma) and BALB/3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cells. The evidence is consistent with a function for coenzyme Q in a trans-plasma membrane electron transport system which influences cell growth.

  15. Vitamin B-12 Supplementation during Pregnancy and Early Lactation Increases Maternal, Breast Milk, and Infant Measures of Vitamin B-12 Status12

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Samuel, Tinu; Rajendran, Ramya; Muthayya, Sumithra; Finkelstein, Julia L.; Lukose, Ammu; Fawzi, Wafaie; Allen, Lindsay H.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Kurpad, Anura V.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women in resource-poor areas are at risk of multiple micronutrient deficiencies, and indicators of low vitamin B-12 status have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including anemia, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation. To evaluate whether daily oral vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy increases maternal and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status, we performed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pregnant women <14 wk of gestation in Bangalore, India, were randomly assigned to receive daily oral supplementation with vitamin B-12 (50 μg) or placebo through 6 wk postpartum. All women were administered iron and folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy. One hundred eighty-three women were randomly assigned to receive vitamin B-12 and 183 to receive placebo. Compared with placebo recipients, vitamin B-12–supplemented women had significantly higher plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations at both the second (median vitamin B-12 concentration: 216 vs. 111 pmol/L, P < 0.001) and third (median: 184 vs. 105 pmol/L, P < 0.001) trimesters. At 6 wk postpartum, median breast milk vitamin B-12 concentration was 136 pmol/L in vitamin B-12–supplemented women vs. 87 pmol/L in the placebo group (P < 0.0005). Among vitamin B-12–supplemented women, the incidence of delivering an infant with intrauterine growth retardation was 33 of 131 (25%) vs. 43 of 125 (34%) in those administered placebo (P = 0.11). In a subset of infants tested at 6 wk of age, median plasma vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L in those born to supplemented women vs. 139 pmol/L in the placebo group (P = 0.01). Infant plasma methylmalonic acid and homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in the vitamin B-12 group as well. Oral supplementation of urban Indian women with vitamin B-12 throughout pregnancy and early lactation significantly increases vitamin B-12 status of mothers and infants. It is important to determine whether there are

  16. Vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy and early lactation increases maternal, breast milk, and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Samuel, Tinu; Rajendran, Ramya; Muthayya, Sumithra; Finkelstein, Julia L; Lukose, Ammu; Fawzi, Wafaie; Allen, Lindsay H; Bosch, Ronald J; Kurpad, Anura V

    2014-05-01

    Pregnant women in resource-poor areas are at risk of multiple micronutrient deficiencies, and indicators of low vitamin B-12 status have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including anemia, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation. To evaluate whether daily oral vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy increases maternal and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status, we performed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pregnant women <14 wk of gestation in Bangalore, India, were randomly assigned to receive daily oral supplementation with vitamin B-12 (50 μg) or placebo through 6 wk postpartum. All women were administered iron and folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy. One hundred eighty-three women were randomly assigned to receive vitamin B-12 and 183 to receive placebo. Compared with placebo recipients, vitamin B-12-supplemented women had significantly higher plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations at both the second (median vitamin B-12 concentration: 216 vs. 111 pmol/L, P < 0.001) and third (median: 184 vs. 105 pmol/L, P < 0.001) trimesters. At 6 wk postpartum, median breast milk vitamin B-12 concentration was 136 pmol/L in vitamin B-12-supplemented women vs. 87 pmol/L in the placebo group (P < 0.0005). Among vitamin B-12-supplemented women, the incidence of delivering an infant with intrauterine growth retardation was 33 of 131 (25%) vs. 43 of 125 (34%) in those administered placebo (P = 0.11). In a subset of infants tested at 6 wk of age, median plasma vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L in those born to supplemented women vs. 139 pmol/L in the placebo group (P = 0.01). Infant plasma methylmalonic acid and homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in the vitamin B-12 group as well. Oral supplementation of urban Indian women with vitamin B-12 throughout pregnancy and early lactation significantly increases vitamin B-12 status of mothers and infants. It is important to determine whether there are

  17. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy.

  18. 12 CFR 261b.12 - Procedures for inspection and obtaining copies of transcriptions and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... available to the public upon request under the provisions of 12 CFR part 261 (Rules Regarding Availability... of transcriptions and minutes. 261b.12 Section 261b.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... § 261b.12 Procedures for inspection and obtaining copies of transcriptions and minutes. (a) Any...

  19. VITAMIN B-12 SUPPLEMENTATION OF DEFICIENT LACTATING GUATEMALAN WOMEN IMPROVES MATERNAL BUT NOT INFANT STATUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency is common in mothers and infants where maternal intake of animals source foods is low. The first six months post-partum is a critical period of neurological development requiring vitamin B-12. A pilot study was designed to determine the dose of B-12 to the mothers that would ...

  20. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods. PMID:23782218

  1. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods.

  2. Structural basis for mammalian vitamin B12 transport by transcobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Wuerges, Jochen; Garau, Gianpiero; Geremia, Silvano; Fedosov, Sergey N.; Petersen, Torben E.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) serves for two essential cofactors in mammals. The pathway for its intestinal absorption, plasma transport, and cellular uptake uses cell surface receptors and three Cbl-transporting proteins, haptocorrin, intrinsic factor, and transcobalamin (TC). We present the structure determination of a member of the mammalian Cbl-transporter family. The crystal structures of recombinant human and bovine holo-TCs reveal a two-domain architecture, with an N-terminal α6-α6 barrel and a smaller C-terminal domain. One Cbl molecule in base-on conformation is buried inside the domain interface. Structural data combined with previous binding assays indicate a domain motion in the first step of Cbl binding. In a second step, the weakly coordinated ligand H2O at the upper axial side of added H2O-Cbl is displaced by a histidine residue of the α6-α6 barrel. Analysis of amino acid conservation on TC’s surface in orthologous proteins suggests the location of the TC-receptor-recognition site in an extended region on the α6-α6 barrel. The TC structure allows for the mapping of sites of amino acid variation due to polymorphisms of the human TC gene. Structural information is used to predict the overall fold of haptocorrin and intrinsic factor and permits a rational approach to the design of new Cbl-based bioconjugates for diagnostic or therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:16537422

  3. Vitamin B-12 supplementation of rural Mexican women changes biochemical B-12 status indicators but does not affect hematology or a bone turnover marker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on the high prevalence of low serum vitamin B-12 concentrations and low dietary intake of the vitamin in Latin American studies including research in Mexico, it appears that vitamin B-12 deficiency is common. Whether this is associated with adverse effects on human function is unknown. To eval...

  4. Enhancing the vitamin B12 production and growth of Propionibacterium freudenreichii in tofu wastewater via a light-induced vitamin B12 riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Zhu, Xuan; Shen, Yubiao; Yao, Huanghong; Wang, Peiheng; Ye, Kun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch is a crucial factor that regulates gene transcription to mediate the growth of and vitamin B12 synthesis by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In this study, the effect of various wavelengths of light on the growth rate and vitamin B12 synthesis was studied. Red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were selected, and a dark condition was used as the control. The microorganism growth rate was measured using a spectrophotometer and plate counting, while the vitamin B12 content was determined using an HPLC-based method. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) values indicated that P. freudenreichii grew better under the continuous and discontinuous blue light conditions. Moreover, under the blue light condition, P. freudenreichii tended to have a higher growth rate (0.332 h(-1)) and vitamin B12 synthesis (ca. 10 μg/mL) in tofu wastewater than in dark conditions. HPLC analysis also showed that more methylcobalamin was produced under the blue light conditions than in the other conditions. The cbiB gene transcription results showed that blue light induced the synthesis of this vitamin B12 synthesis enzyme. Moreover, the results of inhibiting the expression of green fluorescent protein indicated that blue light removed the inhibition by the vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch. This method can be used to reduce fermentation time and produce more vitamin B12 in tofu wastewater. PMID:26373724

  5. Enhancing the vitamin B12 production and growth of Propionibacterium freudenreichii in tofu wastewater via a light-induced vitamin B12 riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Zhu, Xuan; Shen, Yubiao; Yao, Huanghong; Wang, Peiheng; Ye, Kun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch is a crucial factor that regulates gene transcription to mediate the growth of and vitamin B12 synthesis by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In this study, the effect of various wavelengths of light on the growth rate and vitamin B12 synthesis was studied. Red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were selected, and a dark condition was used as the control. The microorganism growth rate was measured using a spectrophotometer and plate counting, while the vitamin B12 content was determined using an HPLC-based method. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) values indicated that P. freudenreichii grew better under the continuous and discontinuous blue light conditions. Moreover, under the blue light condition, P. freudenreichii tended to have a higher growth rate (0.332 h(-1)) and vitamin B12 synthesis (ca. 10 μg/mL) in tofu wastewater than in dark conditions. HPLC analysis also showed that more methylcobalamin was produced under the blue light conditions than in the other conditions. The cbiB gene transcription results showed that blue light induced the synthesis of this vitamin B12 synthesis enzyme. Moreover, the results of inhibiting the expression of green fluorescent protein indicated that blue light removed the inhibition by the vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch. This method can be used to reduce fermentation time and produce more vitamin B12 in tofu wastewater.

  6. Association Between Serum B12 and Serum Homocysteine Levels in Diabetic Patients on Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nitin; Shah, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and metformin both can lower serum B12 (s.B12). Raised serum Homocysteine (s.Hcy) is considered as an early marker of B12 deficiency. Aim The study aimed to check whether homocysteine levels are more sensitive indicator of s. B12 deficiency or not among diabetics using metformin. Materials and Methods Mean s.B12 and s.Hcy levels of 30 cases (diabetics on metformin <5years) were compared with 30 diabetic controls not on metformin and 31 nondiabetic controls and statistically analysed by ANOVA and post-hoc tests. Results No significant differences in either s.B12 mean or s.Hcy mean were found between cases and diabetic controls. s.B12 mean did not differ significantly but s.Hcy mean was significantly higher among nondiabetics as compared to diabetic control. s. B12 level of Nondiabetic group was in borderline category while mean s. B12 levels of cases and diabetic control groups was in normal category but nearer to the lower cut off. Mean s.Hcy values in all the groups were high. Pearson correlation showed strong association between s.B12 and s.Hcy in all the groups. Additionally equation based on linear regression was derived to calculate either of the s.B12 or s.Hcy. On Receiver Operative Characteristic (ROC) curve, area under curve value was 0.842 for the value of s.Hcy. Conclusion In this study neither metformin nor T2DM could be identified as a cause for s.B12 lowering and raised s.Hcy in the scenario of low normal levels of s.B12 (<300pmol/L). If B12 deficiency recognized early using s. Hcy, consequences due to B12 deficiency can be prevented or delayed among nondiabetics as well as among diabetics and metformin users. PMID:27190787

  7. Vitamin B12 and folate levels in long-term vegans.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sella, P; Rakover, Y; Ratner, D

    1990-06-01

    Serum vitamin B12, serum folate and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels were examined among 36 strict vegans of 5-35 years' duration. Vitamin B12 levels among the vegans were generally lower than in a control population. Most of the vegans had vitamin B12 values less than 200 pg/ml. RBC folate levels were normal but serum folate levels among the vegans were higher than among the controls. None of the vegans had any hematologic evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency, however four of them had neurologic complaints. Long-standing vegans should be monitored for vitamin B12 levels.

  8. Vitamin B12 supplementation during pregnancy and postpartum improves B12 status of both mothers and infants but vaccine response in mothers only: a randomized clinical trial in Bangladesh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose Poor vitamin B12 (B12) status is associated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy and infancy. Little is known about effects of B12 supplementation on immune function. The present study aimed to evaluate effects of pre- and postnatal B12 supplementation on biomarkers of B12 status and vaccine-s...

  9. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the institutionalized elderly: A regional study.

    PubMed

    Wong, C W; Ip, C Y; Leung, C P; Leung, C S; Cheng, J N; Siu, C Y

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age and is suggested to be even higher in the elderly living in institutions. This retrospective study evaluated the vitamin B12 and folate status of 1996 institutionalized elderly residents aged over 65years. Among them, 34.9% had vitamin B12 deficiency (serum vitamin B12 <150pmol/L), 11.8% had folate deficiency (serum folate <6.8nmol/L), and 4.9% had both. The majority of vitamin B12 deficient residents (68%) had serum vitamin B12 between 100pmol/L and 149pmol/L. Macrocytosis was found in 24.2% of vitamin B12 deficient residents. A significant increase in macrocytosis was associated with a decrease in serum vitamin B12 below 100pmol/L. Macrocytosis was most common in those with vitamin B12 ≦69pmol/L (50.9%). Overall, vitamin B12 deficiency is common in the institutionalized elderly, however macrocytosis cannot predict deficiency. More liberal testing for vitamin B12 status in the institutionalized elderly may be warranted.

  10. Biochemistry, function, and deficiency of vitamin B12 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a nematode that has been widely used as an animal for investigation of diverse biological phenomena. Vitamin B12 is essential for the growth of this worm, which contains two cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase. A full complement of gene homologs encoding the enzymes associated with the mammalian intercellular metabolic processes of vitamin B12 is identified in the genome of C elegans However, this worm has no orthologs of the vitamin B12-binders that participate in human intestinal absorption and blood circulation. When the worm is treated with a vitamin B12-deficient diet for five generations (15 days), it readily develops vitamin B12 deficiency, which induces worm phenotypes (infertility, delayed growth, and shorter lifespan) that resemble the symptoms of mammalian vitamin B12 deficiency. Such phenotypes associated with vitamin B12 deficiency were readily induced in the worm.

  11. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The postflight photograph shows little change of the exposed surfaces when compared with the prelaunch photograph. Although not noticable in the photograph, a light coating of contamination was seen on all experiment surfaces in this location. The difference in colors of the IDE detectors, located on the right hand mounting plate, is a result of the reflected surroundings and not related to space exposure. A close observation of the detector surfaces reveal that some damage has occured from meteroid and/or debris impacts. One impact crater can be seen, upper right quadrant, on the detector located in the sixth (6th) row down from the top and the fifth (5th) row from the right. Other impacts, smaller in size, show as small white dots on the detector surface. The solar sensor seems to have changed little, if any. However, the color of the solar array baseplate, showing indications of contamination, appears to be darker than the detector mounting plate. The center section cover plate shows little change when compared with the pre-launch photograph. However, during inspection, a light coat of the brown contamination has been observed on all surfaces. The color of the bonding material (RTV) used to secure several thin specimen, sapphire, to individual mounting plates has changed from pink to gold. At one location, that of a single specimen, the bonding material is more gray than gold in color. This has been attributed to the specimen being considerably thicker. The EPDS thermal cover in the right hand side of the tray shows a light coating of brown contamination on the Chemglaze II A-276 white paint.

  12. Hydrogen tunneling in adenosylcobalamin-dependent glutamate mutase: evidence from intrinsic kinetic isotope effects measured by intra-molecular competition †

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miri; Song, Hangtian; Håkansson, Kristina; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions between substrate and coenzyme are a key mechanistic feature of all AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. For one of these enzymes, glutamate mutase, we have investigated whether hydrogen tunneling makes a significant contribution to the mechanism by examining the temperature-dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect associated with hydrogen atom transfer from methylaspartate to the coenzyme. To do this we designed a novel intra-molecular competition experiment that allowed us to measure the intrinsic kinetic isotope effect, even though hydrogen transfer may not be rate determining. From the Arrhenius plot of the kinetic isotope effect, the ratio of the pre-exponential factors AH/AD was 0.17 ± 0.04 and the isotope effect on the activation energy, ΔEa(D – H) was 1.94 ± 0.13 kcal/mol. The results imply that significant degree of hydrogen tunneling occurs in glutamate mutase, even though the intrinsic kinetic isotope effects are well within the semi-classical limit and are much smaller than those measured for other AdoCbl enzymes and model reactions for which hydrogen tunneling has been implicated. PMID:20225826

  13. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tanja; Paul, Caroline E; Levy, Colin W; de Vries, Simon; Mutti, Francesco G; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-01-27

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the "ene" reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. "Better-than-Nature" biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost.

  14. Synthesis and antioxidant activities of Coenzyme Q analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Li, Shuo; Yang, Tao; Yang, Jian

    2014-10-30

    A series of 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinones (Coenzyme Q) substituted at the C-6 position with various groups were designed and synthesized based on the Coenzyme Q10 as potent antioxidant. In vitro antioxidant activities of these compounds were evaluated and compared with commercial antioxidant Coenzyme Q10 employing DPPH assay. All these synthesized Coenzyme Q analogues are found to exhibit good antioxidant activities. Of which Compound 8b bearing a N-benzoylpiperazine group at the C-6 position showed more potent inhibition of DPPH radical than Coenzyme Q10. All these results suggested the applicability of the Coenzyme Q analogues as potent antioxidants for combating oxidative stress.

  15. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tanja; Paul, Caroline E; Levy, Colin W; de Vries, Simon; Mutti, Francesco G; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-01-27

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the "ene" reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. "Better-than-Nature" biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost. PMID:26727612

  16. Mechanical and electronic properties of B12-based ternary crystals of orthorhombic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Jijun; Wu, Aimin; Bai, Yizhen; Jiang, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of the experimentally synthesized B12-based ternary crystals (AlMgB14, AlNaB14, AlLiB14, Mg2B14, MgSi2B12, MgC2B12, Li2Si2B12 and Li2C2B12) have been investigated. The theoretical equilibrium lattice constants of these crystals agree with the experimental values. The Vickers hardness (Hv) estimated from the theoretical Young's moduli ranges from 20 to 30 GPa, and the MgC2B12 compound (Hv = 31.4 GPa) is harder than α-boron. Based on the electron density of states and Mulliken population analysis, the origination of hardness and interaction between the interstitial atoms and the B12 framework were discussed. Scaled bond order of the B-B bonds was used to interpret the hardness of these B12-based ternary compounds. The crystal hardness is primarily determined by the B12 icosahedral skeleton, whereas the contributions of metal atoms manifest as the electron transfer from metal to B atoms. We also calculated the ideal tensile strength of AlMgB14 and MgC2B12 and found that the lang001rang and lang010rang directions are their cleavage directions under tensile strains, respectively.

  17. Vitamin B12 transport from food to the body's cells--a sophisticated, multistep pathway.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marianne J; Rasmussen, Mie R; Andersen, Christian B F; Nexø, Ebba; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) (B(12); also known as cobalamin) is a cofactor in many metabolic processes; deficiency of this vitamin is associated with megaloblastic anaemia and various neurological disorders. In contrast to many prokaryotes, humans and other mammals are unable to synthesize B(12). Instead, a sophisticated pathway for specific uptake and transport of this molecule has evolved. Failure in the gastrointestinal part of this pathway is the most common cause of nondietary-induced B(12) deficiency disease. However, although less frequent, defects in cellular processing and further downstream steps in the transport pathway are also known culprits of functional B(12) deficiency. Biochemical and genetic approaches have identified novel proteins in the B(12) transport pathway--now known to involve more than 15 gene products--delineating a coherent pathway for B(12) trafficking from food to the body's cells. Some of these gene products are specifically dedicated to B(12) transport, whereas others embrace additional roles, which explains the heterogeneity in the clinical picture of the many genetic disorders causing B(12) deficiency. This Review describes basic and clinical features of this multistep pathway with emphasis on gastrointestinal transport of B(12) and its importance in clinical medicine.

  18. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: I. Cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The reaction of NH3 and SO3(2-) with ethylene sulfide is shown to be a prebiotic synthesis of cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M). A similar reaction with ethylene imine would give cysteamine and taurine. Ethylene oxide would react with NH3 and N(CH3)3 to give the phospholipid components ethanolamine and choline. The prebiotic sources of ethylene sulfide, ethylene imine and ethylene oxide are discussed. Cysteamine itself is not a suitable thioester for metabolic processes because of acyl transfer to the amino group, but this can be prevented by using an amide of cysteamine. The use of cysteamine in coenzyme A may have been due to its prebiotic abundance. The facile prebiotic synthesis of both cysteamine and coenzyme M suggests that they were involved in very early metabolic pathways.

  19. Characterization of Protein Contributions to Cobalt-Carbon Bond Cleavage Catalysis in Adenosylcobalamin-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia-Lyase by using Photolysis in the Ternary Complex†

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Wesley D.; Wang, Miao; Warncke, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Protein contributions to the substrate-triggered cleavage of the cobalt-carbon (Co-C) bond and formation of the cob(II)alamin-5′-deoxyadenosyl radical pair in the adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase (EAL) from Salmonella typhimurium have been studied by using pulsed-laser photolysis of AdoCbl in the EAL-AdoCbl-substrate ternary complex, and time-resolved probing of the photoproduct dynamics by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy on the 10−7 − 10−1 s time scale. Experiments were performed in a fluid dimethylsulfoxide/water cryosolvent system at 240 K, under conditions of kinetic competence for thermal cleavage of the Co-C bond in the ternary complex. The static ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra of holo-EAL and ternary complex are comparable, indicating that the binding of substrate does not labilize the cofactor cobalt-carbon (Co-C) bond by significantly distorting the equilibrium AdoCbl structure. Photolysis of AdoCbl in EAL at 240 K leads to cob(II)alamin-5′-deoxyadenosyl radical pair quantum yields of <0.01 at 10−6 s in both holo-EAL and ternary complex. Three photoproduct states are populated following a saturating laser pulse, and labeled, Pf, Ps, and Pc. The relative amplitudes and first-order recombination rate constants of Pf (0.4-0.6; 40-50 s−1), Ps, (0.3-0.4; 4 s−1) and Pc (0.1-0.2; 0) are comparable in holo-EAL and in the ternary complex. Time-resolved, full-spectrum electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy shows that visible irradiation alters neither the kinetics of thermal cob(II)alamin-substrate radical pair formation, nor the equilibrium between ternary complex and cob(II)alamin-substrate radical pair, at 246 K. The results indicate that substrate binding to holo-EAL does not “switch” the protein to a new structural state, which promptly stabilizes the cob(II)alamin-5′-deoxyadenosyl radical pair photoproduct, either through an increased barrier to recombination, a

  20. Elucidation of methanogenic coenzyme biosyntheses: from spectroscopy to genomics.

    PubMed

    Graham, David E; White, Robert H

    2002-04-01

    Methanogenesis, the anaerobic production of methane from CO2 or simple carbon compounds, requires seven organic coenzymes. This review describes pathways for the biosynthesis of methanofuran, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydromethanopterin, coenzyme F420, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoyl-L-threonine phosphate). Spectroscopic evidence for the pathways is reviewed and recent efforts are described to identify and characterize the biosynthetic enzymes from methanogenic archaea. The literature from 1971 to September 2001 is reviewed, and 169 references are cited. PMID:12013276

  1. Vitamin B12-binding proteins of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G M; Shigeura, H T; Liu, L Y

    1985-04-16

    Vitamin B12-binding proteins were detected in the body fluids and/or tissues of horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus), clams and sponges. Among the biological specimens tested the Limulus plasma was especially rich in free B12-binding proteins. Gel filtration experiments revealed that Limulus plasma contains two classes of B12-binding proteins. One class of proteins, molecular weight in excess of 100,000, bind B12 preferentially with affinity constant of 5 X 10(11)M-1. The second type of proteins, molecular weights around 50,000, bind B12 with specificity approaching that of mammalian intrinsic factors. The binding constant of these proteins for B12 is around 10(11)M-1.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly: is it worth screening?

    PubMed

    Wong, C W

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common among the elderly. Elderly people are particularly at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency because of the high prevalence of atrophic gastritis-associated food-cobalamin (vitamin B12) malabsorption, and the increasing prevalence of pernicious anaemia with advancing age. The deficiency most often goes unrecognised because the clinical manifestations are highly variable, often subtle and non-specific, but if left undiagnosed the consequences can be serious. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency, however, is not straightforward as laboratory tests have certain limitations. Setting a cut-off level to define serum vitamin B12 deficiency is difficult; though homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are more sensitive for vitamin B12 deficiency, it may give false result in some conditions and the reference intervals are not standardised. At present, there is no consensus or guideline for diagnosis of this deficiency. It is most often based on the clinical symptoms together with laboratory assessment (low serum vitamin B12 level and elevated serum homocysteine or methylmalonic acid level) and the response to treatment to make definitive diagnosis. Treatment and replacement with oral vitamin B12 can be as effective as parenteral administration even in patients with pernicious anaemia. The suggested oral vitamin B12 dose is 1 mg daily for a month, and then maintenance dose of 125 to 250 µg for patients with dietary insufficiency and 1 mg daily for those with pernicious anaemia. Vitamin B12 replacement is safe and without side-effects, but prompt treatment is required to reverse the damage before it becomes extensive or irreversible. At present, there is no recommendation for mass screening for vitamin B12 in the elderly. Nevertheless, the higher prevalence with age, increasing risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly, symptoms being difficult to recognise, and availability of safe treatment options make screening a favourable option. However, the

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly: is it worth screening?

    PubMed

    Wong, C W

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common among the elderly. Elderly people are particularly at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency because of the high prevalence of atrophic gastritis-associated food-cobalamin (vitamin B12) malabsorption, and the increasing prevalence of pernicious anaemia with advancing age. The deficiency most often goes unrecognised because the clinical manifestations are highly variable, often subtle and non-specific, but if left undiagnosed the consequences can be serious. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency, however, is not straightforward as laboratory tests have certain limitations. Setting a cut-off level to define serum vitamin B12 deficiency is difficult; though homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are more sensitive for vitamin B12 deficiency, it may give false result in some conditions and the reference intervals are not standardised. At present, there is no consensus or guideline for diagnosis of this deficiency. It is most often based on the clinical symptoms together with laboratory assessment (low serum vitamin B12 level and elevated serum homocysteine or methylmalonic acid level) and the response to treatment to make definitive diagnosis. Treatment and replacement with oral vitamin B12 can be as effective as parenteral administration even in patients with pernicious anaemia. The suggested oral vitamin B12 dose is 1 mg daily for a month, and then maintenance dose of 125 to 250 µg for patients with dietary insufficiency and 1 mg daily for those with pernicious anaemia. Vitamin B12 replacement is safe and without side-effects, but prompt treatment is required to reverse the damage before it becomes extensive or irreversible. At present, there is no recommendation for mass screening for vitamin B12 in the elderly. Nevertheless, the higher prevalence with age, increasing risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly, symptoms being difficult to recognise, and availability of safe treatment options make screening a favourable option. However, the

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy as a cause of developmental regression.

    PubMed

    Casella, Erasmo Barbante; Valente, Marcelo; de Navarro, Jessie Medeiros; Kok, Fernando

    2005-12-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause serious developmental regression, hypotonia and cerebral atrophy in infants. We report a 6-month-old infant, with insidious developmental regression and brain atrophy showed by CT scan, secondarily to vitamin B12 deficiency. His mother was a strict vegetarian and the patient was exclusively breastfed. The clinical symptoms and the brain CT were normalized after vitamin B12 administration.

  5. Developmental regression as an early manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, P D; Livingston, A; Cavanaugh, R M

    1986-07-01

    Loss of previously attained developmental milestones in an infant is often associated with central nervous system tumor, neuromuscular disease, or an inborn metabolic error. An infant with developmental regression and involuntary movements who was found to be vitamin B12 deficient on the basis of unrecognized maternal vitamin B12 deficiency is described. The infant had a dramatic neurologic recovery after receiving vitamin B12. The case and a review of similar cases is presented.

  6. Effects of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency on brain development in children.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M

    2008-06-01

    Folate deficiency in the periconceptional period contributes to neural tube defects; deficits in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) have negative consequences on the developing brain during infancy; and deficits of both vitamins are associated with a greater risk of depression during adulthood. This review examines two mechanisms linking folate and vitamin B12 deficiency to abnormal behavior and development in infants: disruptions to myelination and inflammatory processes. Future investigations should focus on the relationship between the timing of deficient and marginal vitamin B12 status and outcomes such as infant growth, cognition, social development, and depressive symptoms, along with prevention of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:18709887

  7. [Therapeutic and clinical implications of elevated levels of vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Rochat, M Cosma; Vollenweider, P; Waeber, G

    2012-10-31

    In general practice, vitamin B12 levels are measured when searching an origin for an anemic status (usually megaloblastic anemia), for various neurological disorders (usually polyneuropathy) or for neurocognitive disorders. Although the pathologies associated with vitamin B12 deficiency are well known, hypervitaminemic B12 status is often fortuitous and frequent finding. The aim of this article is to present the disease entities associated with hypervitaminemia B12, the clinical implications of this dysvitaminosis and a practical approach when this laboratory abnormality is found. PMID:23185929

  8. Characterization of vitamin B12 compounds from Korean purple laver (Porphyra sp.) products.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Emi; Yabuta, Yukinori; Kwak, Chung Shil; Enomoto, Toshiki; Watanabe, Fumio

    2009-04-01

    Vitamin B(12) contents of various Korean purple laver products were determined with the microbiological vitamin B(12) assay method. Although a substantial amount (133.8 microg/100 g) of vitamin B(12) was found in dried purple laver, seasoned and toasted laver products contained lesser vitamin B(12) contents (about 51.7 microg/100 g). The decreased vitamin B(12) contents in the seasoned and toasted laver products, however, were not due to loss or destruction of vitamin B(12) during the toasting process. Silica gel 60 thin layer chromatography-bioautogram analysis indicated that all Korean laver products tested contain true vitamin B(12), but not inactive corrinoid compounds. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion experiments indicated that digestion rate of vitamin B(12) from the dried Korean purple laver was estimated to be 50% under pH 2.0 conditions (as a model of normal gastric function). These results suggest that Korean purple laver products would be excellent vitamin B(12) sources for humans, especially vegetarians.

  9. Influence of Co and B12 on the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of varying cobalt (Co) and B12 concentrations to growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium, a major diazotroph in the tropical and subtropical oligotrophic ocean. Here we show that sufficient inorganic Co, 20 pmol L-1, sustains the growth of Trichodesmium either with or without an additional B12 supply. We also found that in these culture conditions, nitrogen levels fixed by Trichodesmium were higher in treatments with insufficient B12 than in treatments with higher B12 availability. Under limited inorganic Co availability, ranging from 0.2 to 2 pmol L-1, Trichodesmium growth was significantly compromised in cultures without B12. In these low Co concentrations, addition of 400 pmol L-1 of B12 supported phytoplankton growth indicating that B12 supply augmented for the low Co concentrations. Our study demonstrates that Trichodesmium has an absolute Co requirement, which is not replaceable with Zn, and that B12 supply alleviates stress in cases where Co is limiting. These results show that the interlocking availabilities of Co and B12 may influence the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium in the ocean. PMID:26150813

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency in children: a treatable cause of neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Singh, Archana; Mittal, Medha; Talukdar, Bibek

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency in children can rarely cause neurologic manifestations. In this series, 14 pediatric cases (median age 11 months) have been described in whom association of vitamin B12 deficiency with developmental delay or regression was observed. Severe to profound delay was present in 8 (57%) patients. All the patients were exclusively or predominantly breast-fed and 10 of 12 mothers had low serum vitamin B12 levels. Three to 6 months after treatment, a mean gain of development quotient of 38.8 points was seen in 7 follow-ups. In settings with a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, this association should be actively searched for.

  11. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency: two cases detected by routine newborn urinary screening.

    PubMed

    Michaud, J L; Lemieux, B; Ogier, H; Lambert, M A

    1992-03-01

    We describe two asymptomatic newborns with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in whom increased urinary methylmalonic acid was detected by routine neonatal screening at 3 weeks of age. Both infants were exclusively breast-fed. One mother suffered from pernicious anaemia, and the other was a strict vegetarian. Both mothers had no clinical or haematological abnormality, aside from a borderline mean corpuscular volume for the vegetarian mother. This report illustrates the early appearance of functional vitamin B12 deficiency in breast-fed infants of vitamin B12-depleted mothers. It also demonstrates that urinary methylmalonic acid measurement is a sensitive indicator of tissue vitamin B12 deficiency.

  12. Temperature dependence of methyl-coenzyme M reductase activity and of the formation of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase red2 state induced by coenzyme B.

    PubMed

    Goenrich, Meike; Duin, Evert C; Mahlert, Felix; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2005-06-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyses the formation of methane from methyl-coenzyme M (CH(3)-S-CoM) and coenzyme B (HS-CoB) in methanogenic archaea. The enzyme has an alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2) subunit structure forming two structurally interlinked active sites each with a molecule F(430) as a prosthetic group. The nickel porphinoid must be in the Ni(I) oxidation state for the enzyme to be active. The active enzyme exhibits an axial Ni(I)-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 385 nm. This state is called the MCR-red1 state. In the presence of coenzyme M (HS-CoM) and coenzyme B the MCR-red1 state is in part converted reversibly into the MCR-red2 state, which shows a rhombic Ni(I)-based EPR signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 420 nm. We report here for MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis that the MCR-red2 state is also induced by several coenzyme B analogues and that the degree of induction by coenzyme B is temperature-dependent. When the temperature was lowered below 20 degrees C the percentage of MCR in the red2 state decreased and that in the red1 state increased. These changes with temperature were fully reversible. It was found that at most 50% of the enzyme was converted to the MCR-red2 state under all experimental conditions. These findings indicate that in the presence of both coenzyme M and coenzyme B only one of the two active sites of MCR can be in the red2 state (half-of-the-sites reactivity). On the basis of this interpretation a two-stroke engine mechanism for MCR is proposed.

  13. Methylmalonic Acid and Homocysteine as Indicators of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Pankaj; Edwin, Persis; Popiel, Brenten; Lammersfeld, Carolyn; Gupta, Digant

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Normal or high serum vitamin B-12 levels can sometimes be seen in a B-12 deficient state, and can therefore be misleading. High levels of Methymalonic Acid (MMA) and Homocysteine (HC) have been identified as better indicators of B-12 deficiency than the actual serum B-12 level itself. We evaluated the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency using appropriate cut-off levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC, and determined the relationship between serum levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC in cancer. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using a consecutive case series of 316 cancer patients first seen at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between April 2014 and June 2014. All patients were evaluated at baseline for vitamin B-12 (pg/mL), MMA (nmol/L) and HC (μmol/L) levels. In accordance with previously published research, the following cut-offs were used to define vitamin B-12 deficiency: <300 pg/mL for vitamin B-12, >260 nmol/L for MMA and >12 μmol/L for HC. The relationship between B-12, MMA and HC was evaluated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient and cross-tabulation analysis. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vitamin B-12 using Fedosov quotient as the "gold standard". Results Mean age at presentation was 52.5 years. 134 (42.4%) patients were males while 182 (57.6%) were females. Median vitamin B-12, MMA and HC levels were 582.5 pg/mL, 146.5 nmol/L and 8.4 μmol/L respectively. Of 316 patients, 28 (8.9%) were vitamin B-12 deficient based on vitamin B-12 (<300pg/mL), 34 (10.8%) were deficient based on MMA (>260 nmol/L) while 55 (17.4%) were deficient based on HC (>12 μmol/L). Correlation analysis revealed a significant weak negative correlation between vitamin B-12 and MMA (rho = -0.22) as well as B-12 and HC (rho = -0.35). ROC curves suggested MMA to have the best discriminatory power in

  14. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: II. Pantoic acid, pantothenic acid, and the composition of coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    Pantoic acid can by synthesized in good prebiotic yield from isobutyraldehyde or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid + H2CO + HCN. Isobutyraldehyde is the Strecker precursor to valine and alpha-ketoisovaleric acid is the valine transamination product. Mg2+ and Ca2+ as well as several transition metals are catalysts for the alpha-ketoisovaleric acid reaction. Pantothenic acid is produced from pantoyl lactone (easily formed from pantoic acid) and the relatively high concentrations of beta-alanine that would be formed on drying prebiotic amino acid mixtures. There is no selectivity for this reaction over glycine, alanine, or gamma-amino butyric acid. The components of coenzyme A are discussed in terms of ease of prebiotic formation and stability and are shown to be plausible choices, but many other compounds are possible. The gamma-OH of pantoic acid needs to be capped to prevent decomposition of pantothenic acid. These results suggest that coenzyme A function was important in the earliest metabolic pathways and that the coenzyme A precursor contained most of the components of the present coenzyme.

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency & levels of metabolites in an apparently normal urban south Indian elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Shobha, Vineeta; Tarey, Subhash D.; Singh, Ramya G.; Shetty, Priya; Unni, Uma S.; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is no published literature on the extent of vitamin B12 deficiency in elderly Indians as determined by plasma vitamin B12 levels and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels. Vitamin B12 deficiency is expected to be higher in elderly Indians due to vegetarianism, varied socio-economic strata and high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. We therefore, studied the dietary habits of south Indian urban elderly population and measured vitamin B12, MMA red cell folate and homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: Healthy elderly urban subjects (175, >60 yr) were recruited. Detailed history, physical examination and neurological assessment were carried out. Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary analysis for daily intake of calories, vitamin B12, folate and detailed psychological assessment for cognitive functions was carried out. Blood samples were analyzed for routine haematology and biochemistry, vitamin B12, red cell folate, MMA and Hcy. Results: The mean age of the study population was 66.3 yr. Median values for daily dietary intake of vitamin B12 and folate were 2.4 and 349.2 μg/day respectively. Sixty two (35%) participants consumed multivitamin supplements. Plasma vitamin B12 level and the dietary intake of vitamin B12 was significantly correlated (P=0.157). Plasma vitamin B12 and Hcy were inversely correlated (P= -0.509). Red cell folate was inversely correlated with Hcy (P= -0.550). Significant negative correlation was observed between plasma vitamin B12 and MMA in the entire study population (P= -0.220). Subjects consuming vitamin supplements (n=62) had significantly higher plasma vitamin B12 levels, lower MMA levels and lower Hcy levels. There was no significant correlation between plasma vitamin B12, MMA, Hcy and red cell folate and any of the 10 cognitive tests including Hindi Mental Status Examination (HMSE). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study is indicative of higher vitamin B12 (2.4 μg/day) intakes in urban south

  16. VITAMIN B12 LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS ON METFORMIN

    PubMed Central

    Akinlade, K.S.; Agbebaku, S.O.; Rahamon, S.K.; Balogun, W.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the clinical benefits of metformin, its associated side effects such as vitamin B12 deficiency are usually overlooked and rarely investigated. Objective: This study was carried out to determine the serum level of vitamin B12 in Nigerian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on metformin. Methods: Serum vitamin B12 level was determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 81 T2DM patients who have been on metformin for 5 years or more. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as serum concentration of <200 pg/dl, borderline deficiency as 200 - 300 pg/dl and >300 pg/dl as normal. Differences in vitamin B12 levels between different groups were assessed using Mann Whitney U test and P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Vitamin B12 deficiency and borderline deficiency were recorded in 8.6% and 26.0% of the patients respectively. Vitamin B12 level was significantly lower in patients who have been on metformin for ≥10 years compared with patients with <10 years history of metformin use. Similarly, patients who were on metformin at a dose of >1000 mg/day had significantly lower vitamin B12 level when compared with patients on ≤1000 mg/day. Conclusion: Low serum vitamin B12 level is associated with longer duration and higher dose of metformin use. Therefore, routine determination of vitamin B12 level in patients with T2DM on high dose of metformin and those with prolonged use of metformin might help in identifying patients that would benefit from vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:27162518

  17. Distributions of dissolved vitamin B 12 and Co in coastal and open-ocean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeca, Caterina; Beck, Aaron J.; Tovar-Sanchez, Antonio; Segovia-Zavala, Jose; Taylor, Gordon T.; Gobler, Christopher J.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2009-11-01

    Distributions of dissolved vitamin B 12 and total dissolved Co were measured to gain an understanding of the cycling of these interdependent micronutrients in six marine settings including; an upwelling location, a semi-enclosed bay, two urban coastal systems, and two open ocean locations. Along the coast of Baja California, Mexico, concentrations of B 12 and dissolved Co varied from 0.2 to 11 pM and 180 to 990 pM, respectively. At a nearby upwelling station, vitamin B 12 and Co concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 7.0 pM and 22 to 145 pM, and concentrations did not correlate with upwelling intensity. Concentrations of B 12 were highest within Todos Santos Bay, a semi-enclosed bay off the coast of Baja California, Mexico, during a dinoflagellate bloom, ranging from 2 to 61 pM, while Co concentrations varied between 61 and 194 pM. In the anthropogenically impacted Long Island Sound, NY, U.S.A., B 12 levels were between 0.1 and 23 pM and Co concentrations varied from 60 to 1900 pM. However, anthropogenic inputs were not evident in B 12 levels in the San Pedro Basin, located outside Los Angeles, Ca, U.S.A., where concentrations of B 12 were 0.2-1.8 pM, approximating observed open ocean B 12 concentrations. In the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean, B 12 levels were 0.4-4 pM and 0.2-2 pM, respectively. Total Co concentrations in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic tended to be low; measuring 26-59 pM and 15-80 pM, respectively. These low Co concentrations may limit B 12 synthesis and its availability to B 12-requiring phytoplankton because the total dissolved Co pool is not necessarily entirely bioavailable.

  18. Vitamin B(12) Immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010: Effects of High Excess Concentration of Serum Vitamin B(12) in CKD Patients on Parenteral Administration.

    PubMed

    Basu, Surupa; Chaudhuri, Subimal

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) being water soluble is excreted in the urine when administered in excess. The probability of finding an abnormally excess serum concentration would be almost surreal. We report a peculiar clinical situation that may impact the vitamin B(12) immunoassay on the Roche Elecsys 2010 due to excess analyte concentration. In separate episodes (Feb and June 2010), the Biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary-care hospital, Kolkata, India, encountered two critically ill patients with background chronic kidney disease (CKD), low urine output, and on cyanocoabalamin supplementation, who had serum vitamin B(12) concentrations far exceeding expected values; even post dialysis. The B(12) assays (pmol/l) were performed using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010, the assay validity confirmed by concomitant quality control runs. The immunoassays failed to deliver results, flagged with "signal level below limit". Biotin therapy was ruled out as a possible interferent. In the first episode, re-assay of a repeat draw yielded same outcome; outsourcing on Immulite provided concentration of >738 pmol/l. Serial dilution gave result of >29520 pmol/l on Elecsys 2010. In the second, we gained from past experience. Vitamin B(12) concentration >59040 pmol/l was conveyed to the treating nephrologist the very day. The B(12) immunoassay on the Elecsys 2010 employs sequential incubation steps for competitive binding that is compromised in the event of abnormally excess B(12) concentration in patient sera akin to the prozone effect. This knowledge may be beneficial while assaying sera of CKD patients to avoid financial loss due unnecessary repeats and delay in turnaround time. PMID:23024480

  19. Endogenous Synthesis of Coenzyme Q in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2007-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) functions in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as a lipophilic antioxidant. There is increasing interest in the use of Q as a nutritional supplement. Although the physiological significance of Q is extensively investigated in eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to human, the eukaryotic Q biosynthesis pathway is best characterized in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At least ten genes (COQ1-COQ10) have been shown to be required for Q biosynthesis and function in respiration. This review highlights recent knowledge about the endogenous synthesis of Q in eukaryotes, with emphasis on S. cerevisiae as a model system. PMID:17482885

  20. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  1. EPR determination of the Co(II)-free radical magnetic geometry of the "doublet" species arising in a coenzyme B-12-enzyme reaction.

    PubMed

    Buettner, G R; Coffman, R E

    1977-02-01

    The physical significance of the observed structure of the EPR signal, commonly known as the "doublet" spectrum, is that it contains information not only about the exchange coupling but also about the geometry of the magnetic dipole-dipole spin-spin coupling. We can show this because we have developed a general method of analysis applicable to this type of system and because we demand a quantitative fit of theory to experiment at two microwave frequencies. We have chosen the "doublet" free radical signal, which arises in the ribonucleotide reductase-5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin system (from Lactobacillus leichmannii, see Hamilton et al., Biochemistry 11, 4696--4705 (1972)), for study, for the particular reason that the 35 GHz "doublet" spectrum has three components (in this case) rather than two, which provides an important test of the recently proposed model of isotropic exchange coupling by Schepler et al. ((1975) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 397, 510--518). We find that a quantitative fit to the EPR "doublet" lineshape can be obtained with a model of isotropic exchange, and a "point" magnetic dipole-dipole interaction acting over a distance of 9.9 A with the radical located approx. 34 degrees off the principal gzz axis and less than 1 degree off the principal gxx axis of the Co(II) in the corrin ring. Quantitative fits of the doublet portion of the observed lineshape at both 9 and 35 GHz were achieved with this model, assuming an axially symmetric free radical signal and a Gaussian spin-packet lineshape with isotropic linewidth.

  2. Interventions with vitamins B6, B12 and C in pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water-soluble vitamins B6, B12 and C play important roles in maternal health as well as fetal development and physiology during gestation. This systematic review evaluates the risks and benefits of interventions with vitamins B6, B12 and C during pregnancy on maternal, neonatal and child health ...

  3. False-normal vitamin B12 results in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P; Narayanan, S; Cook, P

    2015-12-01

    Pernicious anaemia is a common autoimmune disorder with a prevalence of approximately 4% amongst Europeans. If untreated, it can result in permanent neurological disability or death. Central to the diagnosis is establishing the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Concern has been raised recently regarding false-normal results obtained with competitive-binding vitamin B12 assays performed on automated biochemistry platforms in patients with pernicious anaemia due to the presence of interfering anti-intrinsic factor antibodies in the patient sample. We report a case in which diagnosis of pernicious anaemia was delayed due to false-normal vitamin B12 results. Questioning the results in light of high pre-test probability, and knowledge of the role of functional markers of vitamin B12 deficiency enabled the correct diagnosis to be made so that effective treatment could be initiated. It is crucial that those who frequently request vitamin B12 are aware of the potential problems with the available assays and how these problems can be addressed. We suggest that all patients with normal vitamin B12 levels where there is a high clinical suspicion for deficiency such as a macrocytic anaemia, neurological symptoms or megaloblastic bone marrow should have a functional assay of vitamin B12 (plasma homocysteine or methylmalonic acid) checked to further investigate for vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26277634

  4. Prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency among patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aryn B; Pawlak, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the non-specificity of symptoms and possibly severe consequences of untreated vitamin B-12 deficiency, screening is important for at-risk patients to ensure the prompt delivery of treatment. In this review, studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction are evaluated to determine whether regular vitamin B-12 screening is necessary. A literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. Only original studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction that reported their findings as percentages of the sample were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 7091 manuscripts generated, 6 were included in this review. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism was reported as 10, 18.6, and 40.5% in three separate studies. The prevalence of deficiency in autoimmune thyroid disease was reported as 6.3, 28, and 55.5% in three studies. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease are reflective of the nutrition status of the population. Autoimmune thyroid disease is also associated with the autoimmune disorders pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis which may lead to malabsorption of vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 screening is recommended upon initial diagnosis with autoimmune thyroid disease and then periodically thereafter. There is not enough evidence to recommend regular screening for patients with hypothyroidism unless the underlying cause is autoimmune thyroid disease.

  5. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... report or any portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of...

  6. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... report or any portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of...

  7. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of the Commission,...

  8. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options. PMID:27602354

  9. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good.... (d) The body of all printed registration statements and reports and all notes to financial...

  10. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in a breastfed infant following maternal gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Grange, D K; Finlay, J L

    1994-01-01

    Breastfed infants of women who have had gastric or intestinal bypass procedures may develop nutritional deficiencies. We describe a 10-month-old exclusively breastfed white male infant who presented with vomiting, failure to thrive, and megaloblastic anemia. He was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency. His mother had undergone a gastric bypass procedure for morbid obesity 2 years prior to her pregnancy with this child. She had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency, with an abnormal Schilling test that corrected with the addition of intrinsic factor. Therefore, we believe that the mother's gastric bypass had caused a decrease in available intrinsic factor, resulting in subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency and decreased breast milk B12. Although she was asymptomatic, her breastfed infant developed symptomatic B12 deficiency. This is the first reported case of a maternal gastric bypass resulting in vitamin B12 deficiency in an infant. These mothers should receive vitamin supplements, including vitamin B12, during and after pregnancy, and may require parenterally administered vitamin B12.

  11. Prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency among patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aryn B; Pawlak, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the non-specificity of symptoms and possibly severe consequences of untreated vitamin B-12 deficiency, screening is important for at-risk patients to ensure the prompt delivery of treatment. In this review, studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction are evaluated to determine whether regular vitamin B-12 screening is necessary. A literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. Only original studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction that reported their findings as percentages of the sample were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 7091 manuscripts generated, 6 were included in this review. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism was reported as 10, 18.6, and 40.5% in three separate studies. The prevalence of deficiency in autoimmune thyroid disease was reported as 6.3, 28, and 55.5% in three studies. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease are reflective of the nutrition status of the population. Autoimmune thyroid disease is also associated with the autoimmune disorders pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis which may lead to malabsorption of vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 screening is recommended upon initial diagnosis with autoimmune thyroid disease and then periodically thereafter. There is not enough evidence to recommend regular screening for patients with hypothyroidism unless the underlying cause is autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:27222404

  12. Folate and vitamin B12 status in Latin America and the Caribbean: An update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The current magnitude of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean is uncertain. Objective: To summarize data on plasma or serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations in Latin America and the Caribbean reported since 1990, a period that covers the era before an...

  13. Loss of vitamin B(12) in fish (round herring) meats during various cooking treatments.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Michiko; Kanosue, Fuki; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The loss of vitamin B(12) in round herring meats during various cooking treatments was evaluated. Although amounts of vitamin B(12) were three times greater in the viscera (37.5 ± 10.6 µg/100 g fresh weight) than in the meats, about 73% of total vitamin B(12) found in the whole fish body (except for head and bones) were recovered in the meats (5.1 ± 1.0 µg of vitamin B(12)). The vitamin B(12) contents of the round herring's meats were significantly decreased up to ~62% during cooking by grilling, boiling, frying, steaming, and microwaving. There was, however, no loss of vitamin B(12) during vacuum-packed pouch cooking. Model experiment using hydroxocobalamin suggest that loss of vitamin B(12) is dependent on the degree of temperature and time used in conventional cooking, and is further affected by the concomitant ingredients of food. Retention of vitamin B(12) was not dependent on vacuum or temperature (or both) used in the vacuum-packed pouch cooking.

  14. Serum Vitamin B12 and thyroid hormone levels in Saudi patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khamis, Fahd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients with MS were recruited for this study after Institutional Review Board approval. All patients signed a written informed consent form and donated a single blood sample. Plasma Vitamin B12 levels, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) hormone levels were measured. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results: Analysis of Vitamin B12 levels in 110 patients with MS revealed that 65% had normal levels of Vitamin B12 (200–900 pg/ml), 30% had low levels of Vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml), and 5% high levels of Vitamin B12 (higher than 900 pg/ml). Further analysis of patients with low levels of Vitamin B12 revealed that this cohort exhibited a significantly high number of patients with low levels of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) (P < 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones. This opens the possibility that the use of therapies that increase triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels might be beneficial to patients with MS.

  15. Serum Vitamin B12 and thyroid hormone levels in Saudi patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khamis, Fahd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients with MS were recruited for this study after Institutional Review Board approval. All patients signed a written informed consent form and donated a single blood sample. Plasma Vitamin B12 levels, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) hormone levels were measured. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results: Analysis of Vitamin B12 levels in 110 patients with MS revealed that 65% had normal levels of Vitamin B12 (200–900 pg/ml), 30% had low levels of Vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml), and 5% high levels of Vitamin B12 (higher than 900 pg/ml). Further analysis of patients with low levels of Vitamin B12 revealed that this cohort exhibited a significantly high number of patients with low levels of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) (P < 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones. This opens the possibility that the use of therapies that increase triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels might be beneficial to patients with MS. PMID:27625581

  16. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options.

  17. An all-purpose building block: B12N12 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. L.; He, T.; Yang, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We have theoretically shown that the boron nitride fullerene cage B12N12 is an all-purpose building block for fabricating multifarious BN nanotubes. Firstly, we investigated the stability and structural of the boron nitride fullerene cage B12N12 and the polymerized derivatives obtained from it. Interestingly we found out that two B12N12 cages can spontaneously form one BN nanotube with two closed ends through the structural transformation when one cage meets another. These results indicated that the fullerene B12N12 can be polymerized to build various remarkable polymers through the spontaneous structural transformation when they are together, which all have planer or tridimensional shapes with a hollow tubular structure, even at the juncture of the coalesced B12N12. Simultaneously, after the structure optimization, the quadrangles at the juncture of the coalesced B12N12 disappear to form a perfect surface only composed of hexagons. Then, we calculated the energy of all the considered nanostructures. The polymerization of the fullerene B12N12 is exothermic and thus can form very stable derivative polymers. These theoretical conclusions stimulate us to use the fullerene B12N12 as an all-purpose building block to construct various BN nanostructures for purpose of fundamental research and potential applications.

  18. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options. PMID:27602354

  19. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and reports shall be in the English language. If any exhibit or other paper or document filed with a... English language. (f) Where a registration statement or report is distributed through an electronic medium..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...

  20. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND Few accurate data exist on the concentration of vitamin B12 in human milk. Binding of the vitamin to haptocorrin (HC) can interfere with the assay if not removed by pretreatment, and very low values can occur in women with poor B12 status. This study evaluated two competitive enzyme bind...

  1. Serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in Korean patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, Y K; Hann, S K

    1999-06-01

    The association of vitiligo and pernicious anemia has been previously documented. The low levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 were thought to be related to vitiligo. To date, there have been very few reports about the serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in patients with vitiligo. Using radioimmunoassay, we measured the serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in 100 Korean patients with vitiligo. The mean serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 were 6.31 +/- 2.82 ng/ml and 630.25 +/- 230.94 pg/ml, respectively, in patients with vitiligo. These levels showed no significant difference compared to the normal control group, suggesting that folic acid and vitamin B12 do not appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

  2. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome: a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sumant; Jha, Sneh Kumar; Pandey, Suchit; Shukla, Rakesh

    2015-10-16

    We report a case of bilateral useless hand syndrome, a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A 38-year-old man, a strict vegetarian and a teacher by occupation, presented with acute onset clumsiness of both hands while performing fine movements. Detailed history-taking, examination of the patient and relevant investigations (complete blood count, serum vitamin B12 and MRI of the cervical spinal cord) were carried out. Laboratory analysis was suggestive of vitamin B12 deficiency and MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the posterior columns of the cervical cord. The patient was diagnosed as a case of non-compressive cervical myelopathy predominantly involving the posterior column due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome can be a rare presenting feature of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  3. Serum vitamin B12 levels in young vegans who eat brown rice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H

    1995-12-01

    A nutritional analysis was conducted on the dietary intake of a group of 6 vegan children aged 7 to 14 who had been living on a vegan diet including brown rice for from 4 to 10 years, and on that of an age-matched control group. In addition, their serum vitamin B12 levels and other data (red blood cell count, hematocrit, hemoglobin, etc.) were determined in the laboratory. In vegans' diets, 2-4 g of nori (dried laver), which contained B12, were consumed daily. Not a single case of symptoms due to B12 deficiency was found. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to any of the examination data, including B12 levels (p < 0.05). Therefore, consumption of nori may keep vegans from suffering B12 deficiency.

  4. An appraisal of the value of vitamin B12 in the prevention of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Lacey, C. L.; Homick, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin B12 given by intramuscular injection can significantly reduce the occurrence of motion sickness in susceptible individuals (Banks, 1980). Since it is known that B12 influences the metabolism of histidine and choline, dietary precursors to neurotransmitters with established roles in motion sickness, an experimental evaluation has been undertaken of the efficacy of B12 in the prevention of motion sickness induced by controlled coriolis simulation. Subjects executed standardized head movements at successively higher rpm until a malaise III endpoint was reached. Following two baseline tests with this motion stressor, subjects received a B12 injection, a second injection two weeks later, and a final motion sickness test three weeks later. No significant differences in the susceptibility to motion sickness were noted after B12.

  5. Delayed auditory conduction in diabetes: is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, Sri Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Summary The present study aims to evaluate the functional integrity of the auditory pathway in patients with diabetes taking metformin. A further aim is to assess its association with vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls were enrolled. Stimulus-related potentials and vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in all the subjects. The diabetics showed deficient vitamin B12 levels and delayed wave III latency and III–V interpeak latency in the right ear and delayed Na and Pa wave latencies in the left ear compared with the controls. The dose and duration of metformin showed no association with the stimulus-related potentials. Therefore, although vitamin B12 levels were deficient and auditory conduction impairment was present in the diabetics on metformin, this impairment cannot be attributed to the vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:27358222

  6. Study on methane fermentation and production of vitamin B12 from alcohol waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenya; Quan, Taisheng; Li, Pomin; Zhang, Yansheng; Sugiura, Norio; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    We studied biogas fermentation from alcohol waste fluid to evaluate the anaerobic digestion process and the production of vitamin B12 as a byproduct. Anaerobic digestion using acclimated methanogens was performed using the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and fixed-bed reactor packed with rock wool as carrier material at 55 degrees C. We also studied the effects of metal ions added to the culture broth on methane and vitamin B12 formation. Vitamin B12 production was 2.92 mg/L in the broth of the fixed-bed reactor, twice that of the CSTR. The optimum concentrations of trace metal ions added to the culture liquid for methane and vitamin B12 production were 1.0 and 8 mL/L for the CSTR and fixed-bed reactor, respectively. Furthermore, an effective method for extracting and purifying vitamin B12 from digested fluid was developed.

  7. Vitamin B-12 treatment of asymptomatic, deficient, elderly Chileans improves conductivity in myelinated periphreal nerves, but high serum folate impairs vitamin B-12 status response assessed by the combined indicator of..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2005 the National Feeding Program for the Elderly (PACAM) in Chile has provided a B12 fortified milk drink (1.7 µg B12/d) which is insufficient to ensure B12 adequacy in many individuals. The objective was to evaluate effects of adding 1 mg B12/d to PACAM vs 1 mg B12/d as a pill with PACAM on ...

  8. Is it time for vitamin B-12 fortification? What are the questions?1234

    PubMed Central

    Green, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of folic acid fortification of flour 10 y ago, an initiative to consider fortifying flour with vitamin B-12 has gained momentum in the United States. The impetus for this move stems from several considerations, including some evidence that a proportion of neural tube defect pregnancies may be the result of vitamin B-12 rather than folate deficiency. However, no interventional trials have taken place to show the efficacy of vitamin B-12 supplementation or fortification in the primary prevention or recurrence of neural tube defect pregnancies, as was the case with folic acid. Other reasons put forward for the institution of vitamin B-12 fortification include the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in certain demographic groups, including the elderly and the young in some countries. Much of this deficiency, however, is subclinical and not associated with manifest morbidity. Moreover, individuals affected by the most severe cases of vitamin B-12 deficiency that are associated with morbidity would not benefit from the concentrations of vitamin B-12 fortification that are practical or that are being considered, because such individuals suffer from malabsorption of vitamin B-12 rather than from an inadequacy of intake of the vitamin. In addition to the well-recognized complications of vitamin B-12 deficiency, such as macrocytic anemia and neurological complications affecting sensory and motor function, more subtle effects have also been described, including osteopenia, neurocognitive impairment, and increased vascular disease risk associated with elevated homocysteine. This analysis focuses on the research questions that are pertinent to the consideration of whether or not to introduce mandatory vitamin B-12 fortification in the United States. PMID:19141694

  9. Efficacy and safety of fortification and supplementation with vitamin B12: biochemical and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-06-01

    Long known as an uncommon but serious medical disorder requiring medical management, vitamin B12 deficiency is now seen to be common worldwide, but it is in a quite different form than traditionally envisioned. Most of the newly recognized deficiency is subclinical in nature, its health impact and natural history are uncertain, and its prevalence has been greatly inflated by also including persons with "low-normal" vitamin B12 levels, few of whom are deficient. The spread of folic acid fortification has also introduced concerns about folate's potentially adverse neurologic consequences in persons with undetected vitamin B12 deficiency. Fortification with vitamin B12 may prove more complicated than fortification with folic acid, however, because the bioavailability of vitamin B12 is limited. Bioavailability for those who need the vitamin B12 the most is especially poor, because they often have malabsorption affecting either classical intrinsic factor-mediated absorption or food-vitamin B12 absorption. Moreover, new evidence shows that many elderly persons respond poorly to daily oral doses under 500 microg (1 microg = 0.74 nmol), even if they do not have classical malabsorption, which suggests that proposed fortification with 1 to 10 microg may be ineffective. Those least in need of vitamin B12 usually have normal absorption and are thus at greatest risk for whatever unknown adverse effects of high-dose fortification might emerge, such as the effects of excess accumulation of cyanocobalamin. Studies are needed to define the still unproven health benefits of vitamin B12 fortification, the optimal levels of fortification, the stability of such fortification, interactions with other nutrients, and any possible adverse effects on healthy persons. The answers will permit formulation of appropriately informed decisions about mandatory fortification or (because fortification may prove a poor choice) about targeted supplementation in subpopulations with special needs for

  10. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  11. Vitamin B12 intake and status in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Tinu Mary; Duggan, Christopher; Thomas, Tinku; Bosch, Ronald; Rajendran, Ramya; Virtanen, Suvi M; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the vitamin B12 status of South Indian women in early pregnancy and its relationship with sociodemographic, anthropometry and dietary intake. Methods Cross-sectional study among 366 pregnant urban South Indian women ≤14 weeks of gestation with outcome variables defined as low vitamin B12 blood concentration (<150 pmol/L) and impaired vitamin B12 status [low vitamin B12 plus elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) >0.26 μmol/L)]. Results Low plasma vitamin B12 concentration was observed in 51.1% of the women, while 42.4% had impaired B12 status. Elevated MMA, elevated homocysteine ( >10 μmol/L) and low erythrocyte folate (<283 nmol/L) was observed among 75.8%, 43.3% and 22.2% of women, respectively. The median (25th, 75th percentile) dietary intake of vitamin B12 was 1.25 (0.86, 1.96) μg/day. Lower maternal body weight was associated with higher vitamin B12 concentration [prevalence ratios (PR) (95% CI) 0.57 (0.39, 0.84)). The predictors of impaired vitamin B12 status were non-use of yoghurt [PR (95%CI) 1.63 (1.03, 2.58)], non-use of fish [PR (95% CI) 1.32 (1.01, 1.71)] and primiparity [PR (95% CI) 1.41 (1.05, 1.90)]. Conclusion A high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women was related to primiparity and to a low consumption of yoghurt and fish. PMID:23344013

  12. The Folate-Vitamin B12 Interaction, Low Hemoglobin, and the Mortality Risk from Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Min, Jin-Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2016-03-21

    Abnormal hemoglobin levels are a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the mechanism underlying these associations is elusive, inadequate micronutrients, particularly folate and vitamin B12, may increase the risk for anemia, cognitive impairment, and AD. In this study, we investigated whether the nutritional status of folate and vitamin B12 is involved in the association between low hemoglobin levels and the risk of AD mortality. Data were obtained from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the NHANES (1999-2006) Linked Mortality File. A total of 4,688 participants aged ≥60 years with available baseline data were included in this study. We categorized three groups based on the quartiles of folate and vitamin B12 as follows: Group I (low folate and vitamin B12); Group II (high folate and low vitamin B12 or low folate and high vitamin B12); and Group III (high folate and vitamin B12). Of 4,688 participants, 49 subjects died due to AD. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, education, smoking history, body mass index, the presence of diabetes or hypertension, and dietary intake of iron, significant increases in the AD mortality were observed in Quartile1 for hemoglobin (HR: 8.4, 95% CI: 1.4-50.8), and the overall risk of AD mortality was significantly reduced with increases in the quartile of hemoglobin (p for trend = 0.0200), in subjects with low levels of both folate and vitamin B12 at baseline. This association did not exist in subjects with at least one high level of folate and vitamin B12. Our finding shows the relationship between folate and vitamin B12 levels with respect to the association between hemoglobin levels and AD mortality. PMID:27003215

  13. Is it time for vitamin B-12 fortification? What are the questions?

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of folic acid fortification of flour 10 y ago, an initiative to consider fortifying flour with vitamin B-12 has gained momentum in the United States. The impetus for this move stems from several considerations, including some evidence that a proportion of neural tube defect pregnancies may be the result of vitamin B-12 rather than folate deficiency. However, no interventional trials have taken place to show the efficacy of vitamin B-12 supplementation or fortification in the primary prevention or recurrence of neural tube defect pregnancies, as was the case with folic acid. Other reasons put forward for the institution of vitamin B-12 fortification include the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in certain demographic groups, including the elderly and the young in some countries. Much of this deficiency, however, is subclinical and not associated with manifest morbidity. Moreover, individuals affected by the most severe cases of vitamin B-12 deficiency that are associated with morbidity would not benefit from the concentrations of vitamin B-12 fortification that are practical or that are being considered, because such individuals suffer from malabsorption of vitamin B-12 rather than from an inadequacy of intake of the vitamin. In addition to the well-recognized complications of vitamin B-12 deficiency, such as macrocytic anemia and neurological complications affecting sensory and motor function, more subtle effects have also been described, including osteopenia, neurocognitive impairment, and increased vascular disease risk associated with elevated homocysteine. This analysis focuses on the research questions that are pertinent to the consideration of whether or not to introduce mandatory vitamin B-12 fortification in the United States.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency in resettled Bhutanese refugees--United States, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    2011-03-25

    Since 2008, approximately 30,000 Bhutanese refugees have been resettled in the United States. Routine medical examinations of refugees after arrival in resettlement states indicated hematologic and neurologic disorders caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. These cases were reported by examining physicians and state health departments to CDC, which initiated an investigation. This report summarizes the results of that investigation. Sera from overseas medical examinations, postarrival examinations in three state health departments (Minnesota, Utah, and Texas), and medical records and interviews at a health clinic in St. Paul, Minnesota, were evaluated. Vitamin B12 deficiency, defined as serum vitamin B12 concentration <203 pg/mL, was found in 64% (63 of 99) of overseas specimens, 27% (17 of 64) of postarrival medical screenings, and 32% (19 of 60) of Bhutanese refugees screened for vitamin B12 deficiency at the St. Paul clinic. Although the deficiencies might be multifactorial, the main cause is thought to be the diet consumed by these refugees for nearly two decades in Nepal, which lacked meat, eggs, and dairy products, the major dietary sources of vitamin B12. Additionally, infection with Helicobacter pylori might play a role. Clinicians should be aware of the risk for vitamin B12 deficiency in Bhutanese refugees. All Bhutanese refugees should be given nutrition advice and should receive supplemental vitamin B12 upon arrival in the United States. In addition, refugees with clinical manifestations suggestive of deficiency should be tested for adequate serum vitamin B12 concentrations and, if found to have a B12 deficiency, screened for underlying causes, treated with parenteral vitamin B12 or high-dose oral supplements, and evaluated for response to therapy. PMID:21430638

  15. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms of IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site. PMID:25675500

  16. Vitamin B12 Synthesis and Salvage Pathways Were Acquired by Horizontal Gene Transfer to the Thermotogales

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Kristen S.; Petrus, Amanda K.; Secinaro, Michael A.; Nesbø, Camilla L.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Noll, Kenneth M.; Butzin, Nicholas C.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of genome sequences of Thermotogales species from across the order allows an examination of the evolutionary origins of phenotypic characteristics in this lineage. Several studies have shown that the Thermotogales have acquired large numbers of genes from distantly related lineages, particularly Firmicutes and Archaea. Here, we report the finding that some Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquiring the requisite genes from these distant lineages. Thermosipho species, uniquely among the Thermotogales, contain genes that encode the means to synthesize vitamin B12 de novo from glutamate. These genes are split into two gene clusters: the corrinoid synthesis gene cluster, that is unique to the Thermosipho and the cobinamide salvage gene cluster. The corrinoid synthesis cluster was acquired from the Firmicutes lineage, whereas the salvage pathway is an amalgam of bacteria- and archaea-derived proteins. The cobinamide salvage gene cluster has a patchy distribution among Thermotogales species, and ancestral state reconstruction suggests that this pathway was present in the common Thermotogales ancestor. We show that Thermosipho africanus can grow in the absence of vitamin B12, so its de novo pathway is functional. We detected vitamin B12 in the extracts of T. africanus cells to verify the synthetic pathway. Genes in T. africanus with apparent B12 riboswitches were found to be down-regulated in the presence of vitamin B12 consistent with their roles in B12 synthesis and cobinamide salvage. PMID:22798452

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Glutathione Status in Type 2 Diabetics with Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Karamshetty, Varun; Acharya, Jhankar D.; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Goel, Pranay

    2016-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamin B12 and glutathione (GSH) are associated with a number of diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus. We tested newly diagnosed Indian diabetic patients for correlation between their vitamin B12 and GSH, and found it to be weak. Here we seek to examine the theoretical dependence of GSH on vitamin B12 with a mathematical model of 1-carbon metabolism due to Reed and co-workers. We study the methionine cycle of the Reed-Nijhout model by developing a simple “stylized model” that captures its essential topology and whose kinetics are analytically tractable. The analysis shows—somewhat counter-intuitively—that the flux responsible for the homeostasis of homocysteine is, in fact, peripheral to the methionine cycle. Elevation of homocysteine arises from reduced activity of methionine synthase, a vitamin B12-dependent enzyme, however, this does not increase GSH biosynthesis. The model suggests that the lack of vitamin B12–GSH correlation is explained by suppression of activity in the trans-sulfuration pathway that limits the synthesis of cysteine and GSH from homocysteine. We hypothesize this “cysteine-block” is an essential consequence of vitamin B12 deficiency. It can be clinically relevant to appreciate that these secondary effects of vitamin B12 deficiency could be central to its pathophysiology. PMID:27047940

  18. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities. PMID:26861098

  19. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements.

  20. Neurology of Nutritional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Infants: Case Series From India and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Sukhjot; Mehra, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    We studied 27 infants aged 6 to 27 months with vitamin B12 deficiency also known as "infantile tremor syndrome" in India. All were exclusively breast-fed by vegetarian mothers. Developmental delay or regression, pallor, skin hyperpigmentation, and sparse brown hair were present in all. Majority were hypotonic and involuntary movements were encountered in 18. Anemia and macrocytosis was found in 83% and 71% infants, respectively. Low serum vitamin B12 was present in 12 of 21 infants. Seven of the 9 infants with normal serum vitamin B12 had received vitamin B12 before referral. Twelve mothers had low serum vitamin B12. Cerebral atrophy was present in all the 9 infants who underwent neuroimaging. Treatment with vitamin B12 resulted in dramatic improvement in general activity and appetite within 48 to 72 hours followed by return of lost milestones. Tremors resolved in all by 3 to 4 weeks. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of neurologic dysfunction in infants.

  1. An appraisal of the value of vitamin B 12 in the prevention of motion sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Randall L.; Lacey, Carol L.; Homick, Jerry L.

    Unpublished reports have suggested that hydroxycobalamin (B 12, i.m.) prevents motion sickness. Some biomedical evidence supports this contention in that B 12 influences the metabolism of histidine and choline; dietary precursors to neurotransmitters with established roles in motion sickness. Susceptibility to motion sickness was evaluated after B 12 (1000 μg, i.m.). Subjects initially completed vestibular function and motion sickness susceptibility tests to establish normal vestibular function. The experimental motion stressor was a modified coriolis sickness susceptibility test. Subjects executed standardized head movements at successively higher RPM until a malaise III endpoint was reached. Following two baseline tests with this motion stressor, subjects received a B 12 injection, a second injection two weeks later, and a final motion sickness test three weeks later. No significant differences in susceptibility were noted after B 12. Hematological parameters revealed no B 12 deficiency before injection. The possibility that patients with B 12 deficiencies are more susceptible to motion sickness cannot be ruled out.

  2. Vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine and urinary methylmalonic acid levels in infants.

    PubMed

    Karademir, F; Suleymanoglu, S; Ersen, A; Aydinoz, S; Gultepe, M; Meral, C; Ozkaya, H; Gocmen, I

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12 and folate, and their functional markers, plasma homocysteine and urinary methylmalonate (uMMA) were measured in 204 healthy, term infants at birth, and at 2 and 6 months. Compared with infants receiving formula food, those fed mother's milk had lower vitamin B12 and folate at 2 and 6 months. In infants receiving mother's milk, vitamin B12 levels were similar at birth (238 pg/ml) and 2 months (243 pg/ml), whereas with formula milk the level was significantly higher at 2 months (558 pg/ml) than at birth (257 pg/ml). Vitamin B12 was negatively correlated with homocysteine at birth and 6 months. The level of uMMA (mmol/mol creatinine) was higher at 2 (mother's milk, 25.5; formula, 23.97) and 6 months (19.77; 15) than at birth (11.97; 10.88), and was not correlated with vitamin B12 levels. Homocysteine may be a reliable marker of vitamin B12 status in neonates and infants; however, uMMA is not suitable as a marker of vitamin B12 status.

  3. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities.

  4. Intestinal synthesis and absorption of vitamin B-12 in channel catfish

    SciTech Connect

    Limsuwan, T.; Lovell, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    A feeding experiment conducted in a controlled environment and using a vitamin B12-deficient, but otherwise nutritionally complete, purified diet revealed that intestinal microorganisms in channel catfish synthesized approximately 1.4 ng of vitamin B12 per gram of bodyweight per day. Removal of cobalt from the diet or supplementation with an antibiotic (succinylsulfathiazole) significantly reduced the rate of intestinal synthesis and liver stores of vitamin B12. Radiolabeled vitamin B12 in the blood, liver, kidneys, and spleen of fish fed 60Co in the diet indicated that the intestinally synthesized vitamin was absorbed by the fish. The primary route of absorption was directly from the digestive tract into the blood because coprophagy was prevented in the rearing aquariums and the amount of vitamin B12 dissolved in the aquarium water was too low for gill absorption. Dietary supplementation of vitamin B12 was not necessary for normal growth and erythrocyte formation in channel catfish in a 24-week feeding period. A longer period, however, may have caused a vitamin deficiency since liver-stored vitamin B 12 decreased between the 2nd and 24th weeks.

  5. Vitamin B(12) deficiency stimulates osteoclastogenesis via increased homocysteine and methylmalonic acid.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Bart L T; Lute, Carolien; Blom, Henk J; Bravenboer, Nathalie; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A; Müller, Michael; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2009-05-01

    The risk of nutrient deficiencies increases with age in our modern Western society, and vitamin B(12) deficiency is especially prevalent in the elderly and causes increased homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels. These three factors have been recognized as risk factors for reduced bone mineral density and increased fracture risk, though mechanistic evidence is still lacking. In the present study, we investigated the influence of B(12), Hcy, and MMA on differentiation and activity of bone cells. B(12) deficiency did not affect the onset of osteoblast differentiation, maturation, matrix mineralization, or adipocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). B(12) deficiency caused an increase in the secretion of Hcy and MMA into the culture medium by osteoblasts, but Hcy and MMA appeared to have no effect on hMSC osteoblast differentiation. We further studied the effect of B(12), Hcy, and MMA on the formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts from mouse bone marrow. We observed that B(12) did not show an effect on osteoclastogenesis. However, Hcy as well as MMA were found to induce osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. On the basis of these results, we conclude that B(12) deficiency may lead to decreased bone mass by increased osteoclast formation due to increased MMA and Hcy levels.

  6. Folate and Vitamin B12 Transport Systems in the Developing Infant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B vitamin transport systems in infants are not as well studied as those for amino acids and glucose. For most B vitamins, a 2-step process allows for digestion of coenzyme forms of the vitamins in food, followed by specific transport systems for the free vitamin in the intestine. Folate and vitamin ...

  7. Unraveling Vitamin B12-Responsive Gene Regulation in Algae1[W

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, Katherine E.; Scaife, Mark A.; Sasso, Severin; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian; Purton, Saul; Smith, Alison G.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae play a vital role in primary productivity and biogeochemical cycling in both marine and freshwater systems across the globe. However, the growth of these cosmopolitan organisms depends on the bioavailability of nutrients such as vitamins. Approximately one-half of all microalgal species requires vitamin B12 as a growth supplement. The major determinant of algal B12 requirements is defined by the isoform of methionine synthase possessed by an alga, such that the presence of the B12-independent methionine synthase (METE) enables growth without this vitamin. Moreover, the widespread but phylogenetically unrelated distribution of B12 auxotrophy across the algal lineages suggests that the METE gene has been lost multiple times in evolution. Given that METE expression is repressed by the presence of B12, prolonged repression by a reliable source of the vitamin could lead to the accumulation of mutations and eventually gene loss. Here, we probe METE gene regulation by B12 and methionine/folate cycle metabolites in both marine and freshwater microalgal species. In addition, we identify a B12-responsive element of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii METE using a reporter gene approach. We show that complete repression of the reporter occurs via a region spanning −574 to −90 bp upstream of the METE start codon. A proteomics study reveals that two other genes (S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase2) involved in the methionine-folate cycle are also repressed by B12 in C. reinhardtii. The strong repressible nature and high sensitivity of the B12-responsive element has promising biotechnological applications as a cost-effective regulatory gene expression tool. PMID:24627342

  8. The effects of exercise training and acute exercise duration on plasma folate and vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Nam; Hwang, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Energy production and the rebuilding and repair of muscle tissue by physical activity require folate and vitamin B12 as a cofactor. Thus, this study investigated the effects of regular moderate exercise training and durations of acute aerobic exercise on plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations in moderate exercise trained rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Fifty rats underwent non-exercise training (NT, n = 25) and regular exercise training (ET, n = 25) for 5 weeks. The ET group performed moderate exercise on a treadmill for 30 min/day, 5 days/week. At the end of week 5, each group was subdivided into 4 groups: non-exercise and 3 exercise groups. The non-exercise group (E0) was sacrificed without exercising and the 3 exercise groups were sacrificed immediately after exercising on a treadmill for 0.5 h (E0.5), 1 h (E1), and 2 h (E2). Blood samples were collected and plasma folate and vitamin B12 were analyzed. RESULTS After exercise training, plasma folate level was significantly lower and vitamin B12 concentration was significantly higher in the ET group compared with the NT group (P < 0.05). No significant associations were observed between plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations. In both the NT and ET groups, plasma folate and vitamin B12 were not significantly changed by increasing duration of aerobic exercise. Plasma folate concentration of E0.5 was significantly lower in the ET group compared with that in the NT group. Significantly higher vitamin B12 concentrations were observed in the E0 and E0.5 groups of the ET group compared to those of the NT group. CONCLUSION Regular moderate exercise training decreased plasma folate and increased plasma vitamin B12 levels. However, no significant changes in plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were observed by increasing duration of acute aerobic exercise. PMID:27087899

  9. Therapeutic role of Vitamin B12 in patients of chronic tinnitus: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charu; Kawatra, Rahul; Gupta, Jaya; Awasthi, Vishnu; Dungana, Homnath

    2016-01-01

    True tinnitus is a phantom auditory perception arising from a source or trigger in the cochlea, brainstem, or at higher centers and has no detectable acoustic generator. The most accepted is the famous neurophysiologic model of Jastreboff, which stresses that tinnitus, is a subcortical perception and results from the processing of weak neural activity in the periphery. The aim of this study is to determine the role of Vitamin B12 in treatment of chronic tinnitus. In this randomized, double-blind pilot study, total 40 patients were enrolled, of which 20 in Group A (cases) received intramuscular therapy of 1 ml Vitamin B12 (2500 mcg) weekly for a period of 6 weeks and Group B (20) patients received placebo isotonic saline 01 ml intramuscular. The patients were subjected to Vitamin B12 assay and audiometry pre- and post-therapy. Of the total patients of tinnitus, 17 were Vitamin B12 deficient that is 42.5% showed deficiency when the normal levels were considered to be 250 pg/ml. A paired t-test showed that in Group A, patients with Vitamin B12 deficiency showed significant improvement in mean tinnitus severity index score and visual analog scale (VAS) after Vitamin B12 therapy. This pilot study highlights the significant prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in North Indian population and improvement in tinnitus severity scores and VAS in cobalamin-deficient patients receiving intramuscular Vitamin B12 weekly for 6 weeks further provides a link between cobalamin deficiency and tinnitus thereby suggestive of a therapeutic role of B12 in cobalamin-deficient patients of tinnitus. PMID:26960786

  10. STM investigations of Au(1 1 1) electrodes coated with vitamin B 12 derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőcs, E.; Durrer, L.; Luginbühl, R.; Simic, N.; Viana, A. S.; Abrantes, L. M.; Keese, R.; Siegenthaler, H.

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin B 12 derivatives immobilized at flame-annealed Au(1 1 1) electrode surfaces have been investigated in close correlation with their structural properties and spatial arrangement at the electrode substrate by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in air and in aqueous 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution. The investigated compounds were symmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10B 12) and nonsymmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10) dialkyl disulfide derivatives of vitamin B 12, attached to the electrode surfaces by the S-Au bond. The ex situ and in situ STM experiments show the formation of a surface layer, whose packing density and structure is presumably controlled by the spatial arrangement of the large cobyrinate head groups. In presence of the symmetrical B 12 compound, a disordered surface layer is observed. Voltammetric investigations show that, in 0.1 M NaClO 4, this layer becomes unstable at potentials approximately ⩽ -1000 mV vs. MSE and is almost completely removed at more negative potentials. The STM imaging properties of the nonsymmetrical B 12 surface layer show a significant dependence on the tunneling distance. In particular, at small tunneling distances, a highly regular hexagonal surface pattern is observed that suggests strongly the presence of an ordered surface assembly. Modeling of the B 12 head group has been performed to provide information for a structure-related interpretation of the high-resolution STM images. The investigations are first STM results obtained at such B 12 modified electrodes.

  11. Coenzyme Q and the Respiratory Chain: Coenzyme Q Pool and Mitochondrial Supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, José Antonio; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Two alternative models of organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) have been alternatively favored or questioned by the accumulation evidences of different sources, the solid model or the random collision model. Both agree in the number of respiratory complexes (I-IV) that participate in the mETC, but while the random collision model proposes that Complexes I-IV do not interact physically and that electrons are transferred between them by coenzyme Q and cytochrome c, the solid model proposes that all complexes super-assemble in the so-called respirasome. Recently, the plasticity model has been developed to incorporate the solid and the random collision model as extreme situations of a dynamic organization, allowing super-assembly free movement of the respiratory complexes. In this review, we evaluate the supporting evidences of each model and the implications of the super-assembly in the physiological role of coenzyme Q. PMID:25126045

  12. Coenzyme q and the respiratory chain: coenzyme q pool and mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, José Antonio; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    Two alternative models of organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) have been alternatively favored or questioned by the accumulation evidences of different sources, the solid model or the random collision model. Both agree in the number of respiratory complexes (I-IV) that participate in the mETC, but while the random collision model proposes that Complexes I-IV do not interact physically and that electrons are transferred between them by coenzyme Q and cytochrome c, the solid model proposes that all complexes super-assemble in the so-called respirasome. Recently, the plasticity model has been developed to incorporate the solid and the random collision model as extreme situations of a dynamic organization, allowing super-assembly free movement of the respiratory complexes. In this review, we evaluate the supporting evidences of each model and the implications of the super-assembly in the physiological role of coenzyme Q.

  13. Pernicious anemia presenting as catatonia: correlating vitamin B12 levels and catatonic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bram, Damien; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Durand, Jean-Paul; Lefevre, Guillaume; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Vaiva, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia has been associated with various psychiatric manifestations, such as depression, mania and psychosis. Psychiatric symptoms can sometimes occur without hematological and neurological abnormalities and can be prodromal of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case of autoimmune B12 deficiency presenting as catatonia without signs of anemia or macrocytosis, in which a correlation was found between the patient's B12 blood levels and catatonic symptoms over time. This catatonic episode was successfully treated with only lorazepam and adequate doses of cyanocobalamin. PMID:25774050

  14. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study on Icosahedral Boron Arsenide (B12As2)

    SciTech Connect

    J Wu; H Zhu; D Hou; C Ji; C Whiteley; J Edgar; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    The high pressure properties of icosahedral boron arsenide (B12As2) were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at pressures up to 25.5 GPa at room temperature. B12As2 retains its rhombohedral structure; no phase transition was observed in the pressure range. The bulk modulus was determined to be 216 GPa with the pressure derivative 2.2. Anisotropy was observed in the compressibility of B12As2-c-axis was 16.2% more compressible than a-axis. The boron icosahedron plays a dominant role in the compressibility of boron-rich compounds.

  15. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy: three case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J J; Langevin, A M; Zipursky, A

    1989-01-01

    Three cases of vitamin B12 deficiency that occurred during infancy are presented. These cases appeared to be the result of pre-existing maternal deficiency. All three infants demonstrated evidence of neurodevelopmental delay at presentation, and one had sustained loss of milestones and developed involuntary motor movements. Prior to the initiation of therapy, all three infants were anemic: one was thrombocytopenic and one pancytopenic. In all three cases the hematologic and neurologic abnormalities were corrected with vitamin B12 therapy. The literature is reviewed and discussed with respect to the mechanism of the infants' vitamin B12 deficiency and neurodevelopmental manifestations.

  16. Long-term neurologic consequences of nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infants.

    PubMed

    Graham, S M; Arvela, O M; Wise, G A

    1992-11-01

    A review of the clinical findings in six infants with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency seen during the last 10 years was undertaken and an attempt made to obtain long-term neurologic follow-up. There was a consistent clinical pattern in vitamin B12-deficient infants; irritability, anorexia, and failure to thrive were associated with marked developmental regression and poor brain growth. Two of the four patients who qualified for long-term review had a poor intellectual outcome. Although early response to treatment is satisfying, the long-term consequences of nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infants emphasize the need for prevention or early recognition of this syndrome.

  17. Transcobalamins I and II as natural transport proteins of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Hall, C A

    1975-11-01

    There are two conflicting theories of how plasma vitamin B12 (B12) is transported in man: (a) by two distinct transport proteins, transcobalamins I and II (TC I and II), each having a specific role and time of function; and (b) by three active transport proteins, TC I, II, and III, that take up B12 randomly in proportion to the unsaturated amounts of each. To test these theories a man was given 1.12 mug, 229 muCi, of [57Co]B12 mixed with food. Blood samples were taken several times on the 1st day and at lengthening intervals up to day 51. The amount of TC II-B12 was measured in each sample by: gel filtration and by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. Total serum R-B12 was then separated into TC I and TC III by: (a) a single step anion exchange system and (b) isoelectric focusing (IEF). As the B12 was being absorbed, 92-95% of that in venous blood was carried by TC II. Absolute and percentage transport by TC II declined sharply during the first 24 h; between days 7 and 51 20-33% of the label was on TC II, and the rest was carried by R-type binders. Absolute transport by TC I did not reach a maximum until after day 1 and before day 3. Transport by an alpha2 R-type binder, TC III, could not be demonstrated. TC I was isoelectrically heterogenous, with the components focusing between pH 2.9 and 3.35. It was concluded that (a) TC II is the dominant carrier of B12 immediately after absorption; (b) maximum transport by TC I requires the passage of time after absorption; (c) after the absorbed B12 reaches equilibrium with the total body B12, about one fourth of the plasma B12 is carried by TC II and three fourth by TC I; and (d) TC I and TC II are the only functional transport proteins of plasma B12.

  18. Pernicious anemia presenting as catatonia: correlating vitamin B12 levels and catatonic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bram, Damien; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Durand, Jean-Paul; Lefevre, Guillaume; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Vaiva, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia has been associated with various psychiatric manifestations, such as depression, mania and psychosis. Psychiatric symptoms can sometimes occur without hematological and neurological abnormalities and can be prodromal of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case of autoimmune B12 deficiency presenting as catatonia without signs of anemia or macrocytosis, in which a correlation was found between the patient's B12 blood levels and catatonic symptoms over time. This catatonic episode was successfully treated with only lorazepam and adequate doses of cyanocobalamin.

  19. Transcobalamins I and II as natural transport proteins of vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C A

    1975-01-01

    There are two conflicting theories of how plasma vitamin B12 (B12) is transported in man: (a) by two distinct transport proteins, transcobalamins I and II (TC I and II), each having a specific role and time of function; and (b) by three active transport proteins, TC I, II, and III, that take up B12 randomly in proportion to the unsaturated amounts of each. To test these theories a man was given 1.12 mug, 229 muCi, of [57Co]B12 mixed with food. Blood samples were taken several times on the 1st day and at lengthening intervals up to day 51. The amount of TC II-B12 was measured in each sample by: gel filtration and by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. Total serum R-B12 was then separated into TC I and TC III by: (a) a single step anion exchange system and (b) isoelectric focusing (IEF). As the B12 was being absorbed, 92-95% of that in venous blood was carried by TC II. Absolute and percentage transport by TC II declined sharply during the first 24 h; between days 7 and 51 20-33% of the label was on TC II, and the rest was carried by R-type binders. Absolute transport by TC I did not reach a maximum until after day 1 and before day 3. Transport by an alpha2 R-type binder, TC III, could not be demonstrated. TC I was isoelectrically heterogenous, with the components focusing between pH 2.9 and 3.35. It was concluded that (a) TC II is the dominant carrier of B12 immediately after absorption; (b) maximum transport by TC I requires the passage of time after absorption; (c) after the absorbed B12 reaches equilibrium with the total body B12, about one fourth of the plasma B12 is carried by TC II and three fourth by TC I; and (d) TC I and TC II are the only functional transport proteins of plasma B12. PMID:1184739

  20. [Hplc estimation of coenzyme Q(10) redox status in plasma after intravenous coenzyme Q(10) administration].

    PubMed

    Kalenikova, E I; Kharitonova, E V; Gorodetskaya, E A; Tokareva, O G; Medvedev, O S

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) (Co(10)), its oxidized (ubiquinone) and reduced (ubiquinol, CoQ(10)H₂) forms have been investigated in rats plasma during 48 h after a single intravenous injection of a solution of solubilized CoQ(10) (10 mg/kg) to rats. Plasma levels of CoQ(10) were determined by HPLC with spectrophotometric and coulometric detection. In plasma samples taken during the first minutes after the CoQ(10) intravenous injection, the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) and proportion of CoQ(10)H₂ remained unchanged during two weeks of storage at -20°C. The kinetic curve of the total pool of coenzyme Q(10) corresponds to a one-part model (R² = 0.9932), while the corresponding curve of its oxidized form fits to the two-part model. During the first minutes after the injection a significant portion of plasma ubiquinone undergoes reduction, and after 7 h the concentration of ubiquinol predominates. The decrease in the total plasma coenzyme Q(10) content was accompanied by the gradual increase in plasma ubiquinol, which represented about 90% of total plasma CoQ(10) by the end of the first day. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of the organism to transform high concentrations of the oxidized form of CoQ(10) into the effective antioxidant (reduced) form and justify prospects of the development of parenteral dosage forms of CoQ(10) for the use in the treatment of acute pathological conditions.

  1. A comparative study on the B12N12, Al12N12, B12P12 and Al12P12 fullerene-like cages.

    PubMed

    Beheshtian, Javad; Bagheri, Zargham; Kamfiroozi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Ali

    2012-06-01

    The stability, geometry and electronic structure of the title nanoclusters were compared by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Their electrical property analysis showed that the relative magnitude of the HOMO-LUMO gaps (eV) that are average values from the calculated results with five different DFT functionals is as follows: B12N12(7:02)>Al12N12(4.09)>B12P12(3.80)>Al12P12(3.39). Computing the standard enthalpy and the Gibbs free energy of formation, it was found that the B(12)N(12) structure is thermodynamically stable at 298 K and 1 atmosphere of pressure, while the Al(12)N(12) structure may be stable at low temperatures. Due to positive values of change of enthalpy and entropy of formation for both the B(12)P(12) and Al(12)P(12) clusters, it seems that their formation from the consisting atoms is not spontaneous at any temperature.

  2. Cerebral atrophy in a vitamin B12-deficient infant of a vegetarian mother.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Celebi; Akin, Fatih; Caksen, Hüseyin; Böke, Saltuk Buğra; Arslan, Sükrü; Aygün, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    In developed countries, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency usually occurs in children, exclusively breastfed ones whose mothers are vegetarian, causing low body stores of vitamin B12. The haematologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency is pernicious anaemia. It is a megaloblastic anaemia with high mean corpuscular volume and typical morphological features, such as hyperlobulation of the nuclei of the granulocytes. In advanced cases, neutropaenia and thrombocytopaenia can occur, simulating aplastic anaemia or leukaemia. In addition to haematological symptoms, infants may experience weakness, fatigue, failure to thrive, and irritability. Other common findings include pallor, glossitis, vomiting, diarrhoea, and icterus. Neurological symptoms may affect the central nervous system and, in severe cases, rarely cause brain atrophy. Here, we report an interesting case, a 12-month old infant, who was admitted with neurological symptoms and diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:25076673

  3. Neglect-induced pseudo-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Kaizu, Kiyohiko; Matsukawa, Shouhei; Takema-Tochikubo, Yuki; Fujii, Shuichi; Saitoh, Nobuyuki; Mashiko, Kunihiko; Fujino, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Although thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is rare, early diagnosis and treatment are important for decreasing the mortality rate. Acquired vitamin B12 deficiency is frequently overlooked because of its rarity in developed countries, particularly in children and adolescents. The hematological changes in vitamin B12 deficiency present as megaloblastic anemia, increased lactate dehydrogenase, vasoconstriction, increased platelet aggregation, and abnormal activation of the coagulation followed by microangiopathy as well as neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. We report herein the case of a 15-year-old girl who had been neglected, which might have caused pseudo-TTP through malnutrition, particularly vitamin B12 deficiency. When we encounter cases of TTP in children, clinicians must be aware of the possibility of malnutrition, particularly with vitamin B12 deficiency, even in developed countries, and investigate the cause of malnutrition including neglect. PMID:26387768

  4. How Nature Builds the Pigments of Life: The Conquest of Vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Alan R.

    1994-06-01

    In part because humans cannot synthesize vitamin B12 and must obtain it from organisms that produce it and because B12 deficiency leads to pernicious anemia, it has been important to understand how microorganisms build this quite complex substance. As shown here, an interdisciplinary attack was needed, which combined the strengths of genetics, molecular biology, enzymology, chemistry, and spectroscopy. This allowed the step-by-step synthetic pathway of B12 to be elucidated, and this approach has acted as a model for future research on the synthesis of substances in living organisms. One practical outcome of such an approach has been the improved availability of B12 for animal feedstuffs and human health.

  5. New derivatives of vitamin B12 show preferential targeting of tumors.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Robert; Treichler, Hansjörg; Schaefer, Niklaus G; van Staveren, Dave R; Mundwiler, Stefan; Kunze, Susanne; Küenzi, Martin; Alberto, Roger; Nüesch, Jakob; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Schibli, Roger; Schubiger, Pius August

    2008-04-15

    Rapidly growing cells show an increased demand for nutrients and vitamins. The objective of our work is to exploit the supply route of vitamin B12 to deliver new derivatives of this vital vitamin to hyperproliferative cells. To date, radiolabeled ((57)Co and (111)In) vitamin B12 derivatives showed labeling of tumor tissue but also undesired high accumulation of radioactivity in normal tissue. By abolishing the interaction of a tailored vitamin B12 derivative to its transport protein transcobalamin II and therefore interrupting transcobalamin II receptor and megalin mediated uptake in normal tissue, preferential accumulation of a radiolabeled vitamin in cancer tissue could be accomplished. We identified transcobalamin I on tumors as a possible new receptor for this preferential accumulation of vitamin-mediated targeting. The low systemic distribution of radioactivity and the high tumor to blood ratio opens the possibility of a more successful clinical application of vitamin B12 for imaging or therapy.

  6. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha Jm

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild.

  7. Cerebral atrophy in a vitamin B12-deficient infant of a vegetarian mother.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Celebi; Akin, Fatih; Caksen, Hüseyin; Böke, Saltuk Buğra; Arslan, Sükrü; Aygün, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    In developed countries, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency usually occurs in children, exclusively breastfed ones whose mothers are vegetarian, causing low body stores of vitamin B12. The haematologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency is pernicious anaemia. It is a megaloblastic anaemia with high mean corpuscular volume and typical morphological features, such as hyperlobulation of the nuclei of the granulocytes. In advanced cases, neutropaenia and thrombocytopaenia can occur, simulating aplastic anaemia or leukaemia. In addition to haematological symptoms, infants may experience weakness, fatigue, failure to thrive, and irritability. Other common findings include pallor, glossitis, vomiting, diarrhoea, and icterus. Neurological symptoms may affect the central nervous system and, in severe cases, rarely cause brain atrophy. Here, we report an interesting case, a 12-month old infant, who was admitted with neurological symptoms and diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency.

  8. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Results: Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Conclusions: Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them. PMID:27570337

  9. Coordination chemistry and biological activity of 5'-OH modified quinoline-B12 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Karel; Brandl, Helmut; Spingler, Bernhard; Zelder, Felix

    2011-10-14

    The consequences of structural modifications at the 5'-OH ribofuranotide moiety of quinoline modified B12 derivatives are discussed in regard of the coordination chemistry, the electrochemical properties and the biological behaviour of the compound.

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency in persons with intellectual disability in a vegetarian residential care community.

    PubMed

    Morad, Mohammed; Gringols, Mark; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among intellectually disabled persons in a vegetarian remedial community in Israel. In this community, 47 individuals with intellectual disability (ID) live in 7 enlarged families in a kibbutz style agricultural setting. These 47 individuals and 17 of their caregivers were screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. There were 25.5% of the disabled vs. 11.8% of the caregivers found to have levels of vitamin B12 lower than 157 pg/ml. It is concluded that persons with ID in this vegetarian residential care community seemed to be at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  11. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. VIEW FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. VIEW FROM RIGHT SIDE SHOWING GUARD TOWER S83 ON RIDGE BEHIND MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. FRONT ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. FRONT ELEVATION WITH RANGE POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. VIEW FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. VIEW FROM LEFT SIDE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on neurodevelopment in infants: current knowledge and possible mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe vitamin B12 deficiency produces a cluster of neurological symptoms in infants, including irritability, failure to thrive, apathy, anorexia, and developmental regression, which respond remarkably rapidly to supplementation. The underlying mechanisms may involve delayed myelination or demyelina...

  15. Rare sensory and autonomic disturbances associated with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Puntambekar, Preeti; Basha, Maysaa M; Zak, Imad T; Madhavan, Ramesh

    2009-12-15

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is an important nutritional disorder causing neurological manifestations of myelopathy, neuropathy and dementia. Sub-acute combined degeneration (SCD) with involvement of the posterior columns in the cervical and thoracic cord is a common presentation of this disorder. In this case report, we describe a 43 year old woman with pernicious anemia and myelopathy with atypical clinical features. The patient presented with motor symptoms, a sensory level and bladder dysfunction. She had severe autonomic disturbances including an episode of unexplained bronchospasm, which has not been previously reported as a manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. We review the literature regarding these rarely reported features of vitamin B12 deficiency, and discuss aspects of management of this reversible condition. We emphasize the importance of awareness of autonomic disturbances in B12 deficient individuals.

  16. Combined indicator of vitamin B 12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A novel approach to determine vitamin B 12 status is to combine four blood markers: total B 12 (B 12 ), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). This combined indicator of B 12 status is expressed as cB 12 = log 10 [(holoTC · B 12 )/ (MMA · Hcy...

  17. Combined indicator of vitamin B12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status, and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We propose a novel approach to diagnose B12 status by combining four blood markers: total B12 (B12), holo-transcobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). Combined B12 status is expressed as cB12=log10[(holoTC•B12)/(MMA•Hcy)]–(reference, age function). Her...

  18. AB156. Homocysteine and vitamin B12: risk factors for erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Mo, Zengnan

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing levels of homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with cardiovascular disease, and erectile dysfunction (ED) has close relation with cardiovascular disease, therefore, high homocysteine may be one of the risk factors of ED. During the metabolism of homocysteine, vitamin B12 plays an important role and could be the main factor in causing erectile dysfunction as well. Purpose To investigate the relationship between Hcy, vitamin B12 and ED in sample. Methods The study included 1,457 men aged 20-69 who participated in a series of physical examination at the Medical Centre in Fangchenggang First People’s Hospital from September 2009 to December 2009. ED was identified by the five-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. All participants were measured for plasma Hcy, vitamin B12, folic acid, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL). Smoking, alcoholic drinking and physical activity were collected by face to face communication. Results A total of 691 (47.4%) men were identified as ED in this study, participants with ED were older or more likely to drink alcohol than the non-ED. It was higher Hcy (P=0.032), vitamin B12 (P=0.008) and fasting plasma glucose (P=0.014) in the participants with ED. There were significant positive correlation between ED status (none, mile, moderate and severe) and Hcy (P=0.024), vitamin B12 (P=0.015) and fasting plasma glucose (P=0.002). Logistic regression analysis showed that age, Hcy and vitamin B12 were the main determinants in ED. Hcy was positively associated with ED in the men more than 45, but vitamin B12 was positively related with ED in the men less than 45. Conclusions Hcy was positively associated with ED in elder, however, vitamin B12 was positively related with ED in younger.

  19. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development. PMID:26109103

  20. Insights into the evolution of vitamin B12 auxotrophy from sequenced algal genomes.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Katherine E; Wheeler, Glen L; Leptos, Kyriacos C; Goldstein, Raymond E; Smith, Alison G

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) is a dietary requirement for humans because it is an essential cofactor for two enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase (METH). Land plants and fungi neither synthesize or require cobalamin because they do not contain methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, and have an alternative B(12)-independent methionine synthase (METE). Within the algal kingdom, approximately half of all microalgal species need the vitamin as a growth supplement, but there is no phylogenetic relationship between these species, suggesting that the auxotrophy arose multiple times through evolution. We set out to determine the underlying cellular mechanisms for this observation by investigating elements of B(12) metabolism in the sequenced genomes of 15 different algal species, with representatives of the red, green, and brown algae, diatoms, and coccolithophores, including both macro- and microalgae, and from marine and freshwater environments. From this analysis, together with growth assays, we found a strong correlation between the absence of a functional METE gene and B(12) auxotrophy. The presence of a METE unitary pseudogene in the B(12)-dependent green algae Volvox carteri and Gonium pectorale, relatives of the B(12)-independent Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, suggest that B(12) dependence evolved recently in these lineages. In both C. reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, growth in the presence of cobalamin leads to repression of METE transcription, providing a mechanism for gene loss. Thus varying environmental conditions are likely to have been the reason for the multiple independent origins of B(12) auxotrophy in these organisms. Because the ultimate source of cobalamin is from prokaryotes, the selective loss of METE in different algal lineages will have had important physiological and ecological consequences for these organisms in terms of their dependence on bacteria. PMID:21551270

  1. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development.

  2. Charles Bonnet syndrome and vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Valérie; Desbordes, Marie; Follet, Mathieu; Haouzir, Sadeq; Guillin, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition associated with complex visual hallucinations occurring in the elderly in patients with visual impairment and normal mental health. Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old woman who has a limited visual acuity with a CBS that we postulated to be in relationship to a vitamin B12 deficiency. This case is the first report of vitamin B12 deficiency-associated CBS.

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia, deep vein thrombosis and vitamin B12 deficiency in a metformin-treated diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsuan-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Shyong; Wang, Ming-Lun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Shen, Ming-Ching

    2007-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may be induced by long-term use of metformin, which may in turn lead to hyperhomocysteinemia. Thus, hyperhomocysteinemia may increase the risk of vascular thrombosis in diabetic patients, when metformin is used and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation is present. We report a 65-year-old Taiwanese diabetic woman who was treated with metformin for 6 years and who had suffered from swelling of the left lower extremity for 3 months. Ascending venography confirmed the diagnosis of proximal deep vein thrombosis, while hyperhomocysteinemia, megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and a homozygous C677T mutation of the MTHFR gene were also found. She had no identifiable venous thrombotic risk factors other than hyperhomocysteinemia, which seemed to be caused by both MTHFR C677T homozygous mutation and vitamin B12 deficiency. With the substitution of insulin injection for metformin, short-term supplement of vitamin B12, and anticoagulant therapy for the deep vein thrombosis, her anemia and hyperhomocysteinemia recovered rapidly. The deep vein thrombosis also responded well. Our findings highly suggested the role of metformin in causing vitamin B12 deficiency, which may serve as an additional risk factor for venous thrombosis in diabetic patients. Our report also highlights the need to check vitamin B12 levels during metformin treatment. PMID:17908667

  4. Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B-12) status in Seventh-day Adventist ministers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hokin, B D; Butler, T

    1999-09-01

    As part of the Adventist Ministers' Health Study, a series of cross-sectional surveys conducted in 1992, 1994, and 1997, the serum vitamin B-12 status of 340 Australian Seventh-day Adventist ministers was assessed in 1997. The ministers in the study participated voluntarily. Of this group, 245 were either lactoovovegetarians or vegans who were not taking vitamin B-12 supplements. Their mean vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L (range: 58-538 pmol/L), 53% of whom had values below the reference range for the method used (171-850 pmol/L) and 73% of whom had values <221 pmol/L, the lower limit recommended by Herbert. Dual-isotope Schillings test results in 36 lactoovovegetarians with abnormally low vitamin B-12 concentrations indicated that dietary deficiency was the cause in 70% of cases. Data from the dietary questionnaires supported dietary deficiency as the cause of low serum vitamin B-12 in this population of lactoovovegetarians and vegans, 56 (23%) of whom consumed sufficient servings of vitamin B-12-containing foods to obtain the minimum daily maintenance allowance of the vitamin (1 microg). PMID:10479234

  5. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions.

  6. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Patil, Pradnya D.; Riley, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Charlene K.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  7. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = −0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = −0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = −0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = −0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet. PMID:26927168

  8. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patil, Pradnya D; Riley, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Charlene K

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  9. Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae Use Different Chemical Variants of Vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, Katherine Emma; Lawrence, Andrew David; Holzer, Andre; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Sasso, Severin; Kräutler, Bernhard; Scanlan, David John; Warren, Martin James; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic microalgae and prokaryotic cyanobacteria are the major components of the phytoplankton. Determining factors that govern growth of these primary producers, and how they interact, is therefore essential to understanding aquatic ecosystem productivity. Over half of microalgal species representing marine and freshwater habitats require for growth the corrinoid cofactor B12, which is synthesized de novo only by certain prokaryotes, including the majority of cyanobacteria. There are several chemical variants of B12, which are not necessarily functionally interchangeable. Cobalamin, the form bioavailable to humans, has as its lower axial ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we show that the abundant marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus synthesizes only pseudocobalamin, in which the lower axial ligand is adenine. Moreover, bioinformatic searches of over 100 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes for B12 biosynthesis genes, including those involved in nucleotide loop assembly, suggest this is the form synthesized by cyanobacteria more broadly. We further demonstrate that pseudocobalamin is several orders of magnitude less bioavailable than cobalamin to several B12-dependent microalgae representing diverse lineages. This indicates that the two major phytoplankton groups use a different B12 currency. However, in an intriguing twist, some microalgal species can use pseudocobalamin if DMB is provided, suggesting that they are able to remodel the cofactor, whereas Synechococcus cannot. This species-specific attribute implicates algal remodelers as novel and keystone players of the B12 cycle, transforming our perception of the dynamics and complexity of the flux of this nutrient in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27040778

  10. Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae Use Different Chemical Variants of Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Katherine Emma; Lawrence, Andrew David; Holzer, Andre; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Sasso, Severin; Kräutler, Bernhard; Scanlan, David John; Warren, Martin James; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-04-25

    Eukaryotic microalgae and prokaryotic cyanobacteria are the major components of the phytoplankton. Determining factors that govern growth of these primary producers, and how they interact, is therefore essential to understanding aquatic ecosystem productivity. Over half of microalgal species representing marine and freshwater habitats require for growth the corrinoid cofactor B12, which is synthesized de novo only by certain prokaryotes, including the majority of cyanobacteria. There are several chemical variants of B12, which are not necessarily functionally interchangeable. Cobalamin, the form bioavailable to humans, has as its lower axial ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we show that the abundant marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus synthesizes only pseudocobalamin, in which the lower axial ligand is adenine. Moreover, bioinformatic searches of over 100 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes for B12 biosynthesis genes, including those involved in nucleotide loop assembly, suggest this is the form synthesized by cyanobacteria more broadly. We further demonstrate that pseudocobalamin is several orders of magnitude less bioavailable than cobalamin to several B12-dependent microalgae representing diverse lineages. This indicates that the two major phytoplankton groups use a different B12 currency. However, in an intriguing twist, some microalgal species can use pseudocobalamin if DMB is provided, suggesting that they are able to remodel the cofactor, whereas Synechococcus cannot. This species-specific attribute implicates algal remodelers as novel and keystone players of the B12 cycle, transforming our perception of the dynamics and complexity of the flux of this nutrient in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27040778

  11. High doses of oral folate and sublingual vitamin B12 in dialysis patients with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra; Sarvari, Gholam-Reza; Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Azarfar, Anoush; Rasouli, Zahra; Moeenolroayaa, Giti; Jahanshahi, Shohre; Farhadi, Simin; Heydari, Zohreh; Sagheb-Taghipoor, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Folic acid and vitamin B12, alone or in combination have been used to reduce homocysteine (Hcy) levels in dialysis patients. Objectives: We aimed to assess the efficacy of high doses of oral folate and vitamin B12 in reducing plasma Hcy levels after a 12-week treatment. Patients and Methods: Thirty-two dialysis patients aged 10-324 months screened for hyperhomocysteinuria. Then cases with hyperhomocysteinemia received oral folate 10 mg/day with sublingual methylcobalamin 1 mg/day for 12 weeks. In pre- and post-intervention phases plasma Hcy concentration, serum folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Changes in plasma Hcy, serum folate, and vitamin B12 concentrations were analyzed by paired t tests, and P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Eighteen (56.2%) patients had hyperhomocysteinuria. Vitamin B12 and folate levels were normal or high in all cases. Two patients were lost due to transplant or irregular drugs consumption. Plasma Hcy levels were reduced in all, and reached normal values in 50%. A statistically significant differences between first Hcy levels with levels after intervention was found (95% CI, 5.1–8.9, P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Oral folate 10 mg/day in combination with sublingual vitamin B12, 1 mg/day can be considered as a favorable treatment for hyperhomocysteinemia in dialysis patients. PMID:27689109

  12. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid levels and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Ali; Gunduz, Kamer; Onur, Ece; Calkan, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine serum vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as MTHFR (C677, A1298C) gene polymorphisms in patients with vitiligo, and to compare the results with healthy controls. Forty patients with vitiligo and 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects were studied. Serum vitamin B12 and folate levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma Hcy levels and MTHFR polymorphisms were determined by chemiluminescence and real time PCR methods, respectively. Mean serum vitamin B12 and Hcy levels were not significantly different while folic acid levels were significantly lower in the control group. There was no significant relationship between disease activity and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocystein levels. No significant difference in C677T gene polymorphism was detected. Heterozygote A1298C gene polymorphism in the patient group was statistically higher than the control group. There was no significant relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine levels. In conclusion, vitamin B12, folate and Hcy levels are not altered in vitiligo and MTHFR gene mutations (C677T and A1298C) do not seem to create susceptibility for vitiligo. PMID:22846211

  13. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-02-26

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤ 250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = -0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = -0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = -0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = -0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet.

  14. Vitamin B12: one carbon metabolism, fetal growth and programming for chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Rush, E C; Katre, P; Yajnik, C S

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together human and animal studies and reviews that examine the possible role of maternal vitamin B12 (B12) on fetal growth and its programming for susceptibility to chronic disease. A selective literature review was undertaken to identify studies and reviews that investigate these issues, particularly in the context of a vegetarian diet that may be low in B12 and protein and high in carbohydrate. Evidence is accumulating that maternal B12 status influences fetal growth and development. Low maternal vitamin B12 status and protein intake are associated with increased risk of neural tube defect, low lean mass and excess adiposity, increased insulin resistance, impaired neurodevelopment and altered risk of cancer in the offspring. Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient associated with one carbon metabolic pathways related to substrate metabolism, synthesis and stability of nucleic acids and methylation of DNA which regulates gene expression. Understanding of factors regulating maternal-fetal one carbon metabolism and its role in fetal programming of non communicable diseases could help design effective interventions, starting with maternal nutrition before conception.

  15. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤ 250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = -0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = -0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = -0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = -0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet. PMID:26927168

  16. Folate and vitamin B12: function and importance in cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Troen, Aron M

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the B vitamins folate and vitamin B12 for healthy neurological development and function is unquestioned. Folate and vitamin B12 are required for biological methylation and DNA synthesis. Vitamin B12 also participates in the mitochondrial catabolism of odd-chain fatty acids and some amino acids. Inborn errors of their metabolism and severe nutritional deficiencies cause serious neurological and hematological pathology. Poor folate and vitamin B12 status short of clinical deficiency is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment, depression, Alzheimer's disease and stroke among older adults and increased risk of neural tube defects among children born to mothers with low folate status. Folate supplementation and food fortification are known to reduce incident neural tube defects, and B vitamin supplementation may have cognitive benefit in older adults. Less is known about folate and vitamin B12 requirements for optimal brain development and long-term cognitive health in newborns, children and adolescents. While increasing suboptimal nutritional status has observed benefits, the long-term effects of high folate intake are uncertain. Several observations of unfavorable health indicators in children and adults exposed to high folic acid intake make it imperative to achieve a more precise definition of folate and B12 requirements for brain development and function.

  17. Metabolic engineering of cobalamin (vitamin B12) production in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Malten, Marco; Barg, Heiko; Bunk, Boyke; Martens, Jan-Henning; Deery, Evelyne; Leech, Helen; Warren, Martin J; Jahn, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) production in Bacillus megaterium has served as a model system for the systematic evaluation of single and multiple directed molecular and genetic optimization strategies. Plasmid and genome-based overexpression of genes involved in vitamin B(12) biosynthesis, including cbiX, sirA, modified hemA, the operons hemAXCDBL and cbiXJCDETLFGAcysG(A)cbiYbtuR, and the regulatory gene fnr, significantly increased cobalamin production. To reduce flux along the heme branch of the tetrapyrrole pathway, an antisense RNA strategy involving silencing of the hemZ gene encoding coproporphyrinogen III oxidase was successfully employed. Feedback inhibition of the initial enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, HemA, by heme was overcome by stabilized enzyme overproduction. Similarly, the removal of the B(12) riboswitch upstream of the cbiXJCDETLFGAcysG(A)cbiYbtuR operon and the recombinant production of three different vitamin B(12) binding proteins (glutamate mutase GlmS, ribonucleotide triphosphate reductase RtpR and methionine synthase MetH) partly abolished B(12)-dependent feedback inhibition. All these strategies increased cobalamin production in B. megaterium. Finally, combinations of these strategies enhanced the overall intracellular vitamin B(12) concentrations but also reduced the volumetric cellular amounts by placing the organism under metabolic stress. PMID:21255303

  18. High doses of oral folate and sublingual vitamin B12 in dialysis patients with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra; Sarvari, Gholam-Reza; Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Azarfar, Anoush; Rasouli, Zahra; Moeenolroayaa, Giti; Jahanshahi, Shohre; Farhadi, Simin; Heydari, Zohreh; Sagheb-Taghipoor, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Folic acid and vitamin B12, alone or in combination have been used to reduce homocysteine (Hcy) levels in dialysis patients. Objectives: We aimed to assess the efficacy of high doses of oral folate and vitamin B12 in reducing plasma Hcy levels after a 12-week treatment. Patients and Methods: Thirty-two dialysis patients aged 10-324 months screened for hyperhomocysteinuria. Then cases with hyperhomocysteinemia received oral folate 10 mg/day with sublingual methylcobalamin 1 mg/day for 12 weeks. In pre- and post-intervention phases plasma Hcy concentration, serum folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Changes in plasma Hcy, serum folate, and vitamin B12 concentrations were analyzed by paired t tests, and P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Eighteen (56.2%) patients had hyperhomocysteinuria. Vitamin B12 and folate levels were normal or high in all cases. Two patients were lost due to transplant or irregular drugs consumption. Plasma Hcy levels were reduced in all, and reached normal values in 50%. A statistically significant differences between first Hcy levels with levels after intervention was found (95% CI, 5.1–8.9, P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Oral folate 10 mg/day in combination with sublingual vitamin B12, 1 mg/day can be considered as a favorable treatment for hyperhomocysteinemia in dialysis patients.

  19. Clinical B12 deficiency in one case of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Candito, Mirande; Magnaldo, Sarah; Bayle, Jacques; Dor, Jean-François; Gillet, Yves; Bongain, André; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2003-08-01

    Moderate hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy) and the homozygous mutation C677T in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with increased risk of recurrent pregnancy loss. This HHcy is currently reported as a consequence of folate rather than of vitamin B12-deficient status. We describe one case of recurrent early pregnancy loss with HHcy caused by B12 deficiency. A 38-year old woman had four episodes of early spontaneous pregnancy loss. Biological data: no haemostasis disorders, HHcy (25.9 micromol/l), normal folate (5 ng/ml), B12 deficiency (< 150 pg/ml) and the MTHFR C677T homozygote genotype. A bone marrow biopsy gave evidence of moderate megaloblastosis. Parenteral B12 therapy led to normal homocysteine level within 2 months and to a successful pregnancy. In conclusion, vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss associated with HHcy, and serum B12 should be measured systematically in this circumstance. PMID:12964808

  20. Potential cobalt limitation of vitamin B12 synthesis in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeca, C.; Beck, A. J.; Leblanc, K.; Taylor, G. T.; Hutchins, D. A.; SañUdo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2008-06-01

    While recent studies have confirmed the ecological importance of vitamin B12, it is unclear whether the production of this vitamin could be limited by dissolved Co, a trace metal required for B12 biosynthesis, but found at only subnanomolar concentrations in the open ocean. Herein, we demonstrate that the spatial distribution of dissolved B12 (range: 0.13-5 pmol L-1) in the North Atlantic Ocean follows the abundance of total dissolved Co (range: 15-81 pmol L-1). Similar patterns were observed for bacterial productivity (range: 20-103 pmol 3H leucine L-1 hr-1) and algal biomass (range: 0.4-3.9 μg L-1). In contrast, vitamin B1 concentrations (range: 0.7-30 pM) were decoupled from both Co and B12 concentrations. Cobalt amendment experiments carried out in low-dissolved Co waters (˜20 pmol L-1) enhanced B12 production two-fold over unamended controls. This study provides evidence that B12 synthesis could be limited by the availability of Co in some regions of the world ocean.

  1. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  2. Converting molecular information of redox coenzymes via self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2012-11-21

    β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its reduced form NADH specifically interact with a cyanine dye in aqueous media, giving distinct spectral and nanostructural characteristics to which molecular information of constituent coenzymes are converted via self-assembly.

  3. High prevalence of suboptimal vitamin B12 status in young adult women of South Asian and European ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Quay, Teo A W; Schroder, Theresa H; Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta; Li, Wangyang; Devlin, Angela M; Barr, Susan I; Lamers, Yvonne

    2015-12-01

    Suboptimal vitamin B12 (B12) status has been associated with an increased risk of congenital anomalies, preterm birth, and childhood insulin resistance. South Asians - Canada's largest minority group - and women of reproductive age are vulnerable to B12 deficiency. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with B12 deficiency and suboptimal B12 status in a convenience sample of young adult women of South Asian and European descent in Metro Vancouver. We measured serum B12, holotranscobalamin, plasma methylmalonic acid, red blood cell and plasma folate, and hematologic parameters in 206 nonpregnant, healthy women aged 19-35 years. Categorization for B12 status adhered to serum B12 cutoffs for deficiency (<148 pmol/L) and suboptimal B12 status (148-220 pmol/L). We collected demographic, lifestyle, and dietary intake data and conducted genotyping for common genetic variants linked to B-vitamin metabolism. The prevalence of deficiency and suboptimal B12 status were 14% and 20%, respectively. Serum vitamin B12 concentrations were negatively associated with oral contraceptive use and first-generation immigrant status, and positively with dietary B12 intake and B12 supplement use. The prevalence of B12 inadequacy in this sample of highly educated women is higher than in the general Canadian population. In light of maternal and fetal health risks associated with B12 inadequacy in early-pregnancy, practitioners should consider monitoring B12 status before and during early pregnancy, especially in immigrants and women with low dietary B12 intakes including non-users of vitamin supplements. PMID:26579949

  4. High prevalence of suboptimal vitamin B12 status in young adult women of South Asian and European ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Quay, Teo A W; Schroder, Theresa H; Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta; Li, Wangyang; Devlin, Angela M; Barr, Susan I; Lamers, Yvonne

    2015-12-01

    Suboptimal vitamin B12 (B12) status has been associated with an increased risk of congenital anomalies, preterm birth, and childhood insulin resistance. South Asians - Canada's largest minority group - and women of reproductive age are vulnerable to B12 deficiency. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with B12 deficiency and suboptimal B12 status in a convenience sample of young adult women of South Asian and European descent in Metro Vancouver. We measured serum B12, holotranscobalamin, plasma methylmalonic acid, red blood cell and plasma folate, and hematologic parameters in 206 nonpregnant, healthy women aged 19-35 years. Categorization for B12 status adhered to serum B12 cutoffs for deficiency (<148 pmol/L) and suboptimal B12 status (148-220 pmol/L). We collected demographic, lifestyle, and dietary intake data and conducted genotyping for common genetic variants linked to B-vitamin metabolism. The prevalence of deficiency and suboptimal B12 status were 14% and 20%, respectively. Serum vitamin B12 concentrations were negatively associated with oral contraceptive use and first-generation immigrant status, and positively with dietary B12 intake and B12 supplement use. The prevalence of B12 inadequacy in this sample of highly educated women is higher than in the general Canadian population. In light of maternal and fetal health risks associated with B12 inadequacy in early-pregnancy, practitioners should consider monitoring B12 status before and during early pregnancy, especially in immigrants and women with low dietary B12 intakes including non-users of vitamin supplements.

  5. The usefulness of holotranscobalamin in predicting vitamin B12 status in different clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima; Schorr, Heike; Geisel, Jürgen

    2005-02-01

    Serum concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) become increased in B12-deficient subjects and are therefore, considered specific markers of B12 deficiency. Serum level of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) becomes decreased before the development of the metabolic dysfunction. We investigated the usefulness of holoTC in diagnosing B12 deficiency in some clinical settings. We measured serum concentrations of holoTC, MMA, Hcy and total B12 in omnivores, vegetarians, elderly people and haemodialysis patients. Our results indicated that the incidence of holoTC <35 pmol/L was highest in the vegans (76%). Low holoTC and elevated MMA were detected in 64% of the vegans and 43% of the lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians. An elevated MMA and a low holoTC were found in subjects with total serum B12 as high as 300 pmol/L. The distribution of holoTC in elderly people was similar to that in younger adults (median holoTC 55 pmol/L in both groups). A low holoTC and an elevated MMA were found in 16% of the elderly group. An elevated MMA and a normal holoTC were found in 20% of the elderly group who had a relatively high median serum concentration of creatinine (106.1 micromol/L). Serum concentrations of holoTC in dialysis patients were considerably higher than all other groups (median 100 pmol/L). This was also associated with severely increased serum levels of MMA (median 987 nmol/L). From these results it can be concluded that serum concentration of holoTC is a much better predictor of B12 status than total B12. This was particularly evident in case of dietary B12 deficiency. Serum concentrations of holoTC as well as MMA can be affected by renal dysfunction. Elevated MMA and normal holoTC in patients with renal insufficiency may not exclude vitamin B12 deficiency. HoloTC seems not to be a promising marker in predicting B12 status in renal patients.

  6. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the “ene” reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. “Better-than-Nature” biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost. PMID:26727612

  7. [Peculiar features of the effect of cobalamines on the metabolism of vitamin B 12 and pantothenic acid in B 12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Bud'ko, T N; Moiseenok, A G

    1980-01-01

    A single parenteral administration to B12-deficient rats of cyan cobalamine (CN-Cbl), oxycobalamine (OH-Cbl), methyl cobalamine (CH3-Cbl) and adenosyl cobalamine (Ado-Cbl) at a dose of 100 microgram/kg body weight increased the lowered level of total cobalamines in the liver to reach or exceed the norm. The study of cobalamine-protein complexes (CPC) in the liver of B12-deficient rats showed that the content of free cobalamines and CPC was decreased, the level of CPC degrading at 80 degrees C being particularly low. An administration of OH-Cbl and CH3-Cbl raised significantly the content of CPC degrading at 80 degrees C and presumably containing Ado-Cbl. Under the influence of cobalamines the increased activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in hepatocytes returned to the normal and the CoA level declined only after administration of CN-Cbl and CH3-Cbl. PMID:7433432

  8. Vitamin B-12 concentrations in breast milk are low and are not associated with reported household hunger, recent animal source food or vitamin B-12 intake among women in rural Kenya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Breastmilk vitamin B-12 concentration may be inadequate in mothers living in regions where animal source food consumption is low or infrequent. Vitamin B-12 deficiency causes megaloglastic anemia and impairs growth and development in children. Objective: To measure vitamin B-12 in breast...

  9. Lifestyle and genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 levels in a general adult population.

    PubMed

    Thuesen, Betina H; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Ovesen, Lars; Jørgensen, Torben; Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-04-01

    Danish legislation regarding food fortification has been very restrictive resulting in few fortified food items on the Danish market. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiency is thought to be common due to inadequate intakes but little is known about the actual prevalence of low serum folate and vitamin B12 in the general population. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the folate and vitamin B12 status of Danish adults and to investigate associations between vitamin status and distinct lifestyle and genetic factors. The study included a random sample of 6784 individuals aged 30-60 years. Information on lifestyle factors was obtained by questionnaires and blood samples were analysed for serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations and several genetic polymorphisms. The overall prevalence of low serum folate ( < 6.8 nmol/l) was 31.4 %. Low serum folate was more common among men than women and the prevalence was lower with increasing age. Low serum folate was associated with smoking, low alcohol intake, high coffee intake, unhealthy diet, and the TT genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-C677T polymorphism. The overall prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 ( < 148 pmol/l) was 4.7 %. Low serum vitamin B12 was significantly associated with female sex, high coffee intake, low folate status, and the TT genotype of the MTHFR-C677T polymorphism. In conclusion, low serum folate was present in almost a third of the adult population in the present study and was associated with several lifestyle factors whereas low serum concentrations of vitamin B12 were less common and only found to be associated with a few lifestyle factors.

  10. Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective vitamin B12 malabsorption with proteinuria)

    PubMed Central

    Gräsbeck, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective vitamin B12 (cobalamin) malabsorption with proteinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency commonly resulting in megaloblastic anemia, which is responsive to parenteral vitamin B12 therapy and appears in childhood. Other manifestations include failure to thrive and grow, infections and neurological damage. Mild proteinuria (with no signs of kidney disease) is present in about half of the patients. Anatomical anomalies in the urinary tract were observed in some Norwegian patients. Vitamin B12 absorption tests show low absorption, not corrected by administration of intrinsic factor. The symptoms appear from 4 months (not immediately after birth as in transcobalamin deficiency) up to several years after birth. The syndrome was first described in Finland and Norway where the prevalence is about 1:200,000. The cause is a defect in the receptor of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex of the ileal enterocyte. In most cases, the molecular basis of the selective malabsorption and proteinuria involves a mutation in one of two genes, cubilin (CUBN) on chromosome 10 or amnionless (AMN) on chromosome 14. Both proteins are components of the intestinal receptor for the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the receptor mediating the tubular reabsorption of protein from the primary urine. Management includes life-long vitamin B12 injections, and with this regimen, the patients stay healthy for decades. However, the proteinuria persists. In diagnosing this disease, it is important to be aware that cobalamin deficiency affects enterocyte function; therefore, all tests suggesting general and cobalamin malabsorption should be repeated after abolishment of the deficiency. PMID:16722557

  11. [Critical analysis of 1000 systematic assays of serum levels of vitamin B12 and folates].

    PubMed

    Najean, Y; Legrand, M; Sénéchal, A; Leroy, M; Rain, J D

    1989-04-29

    Between January 15 and April 30, 1988, one thousand assays of serum vitamin B12 and folates were performed, and the reasons why they were requested as well as their clinical usefulness are discussed. In 50 cases these assays were requested for a suspected myeloproliferative syndrome; in some of the patients with polycythaemia vera an excess of B12 was observed without hyperleukocytosis, an argument for keeping the B12 assay as an element of initial evaluation. In numerous cases the assays were performed for aetiological evaluation of a macrocytosis of suspected alcoholic origin in most patients; more than 50 per cent of the patient had folate deficiency and only a few had low B12 values. Folate levels were frequently low and B12 levels generally normal in patients with gastrointestinal disease, but many of them had been supplemented with folate and/or B12 prior to the assay. More than 20 per cent of the 1,000 assays were performed in patients aged 80 years or more, and more than 50 per cent of them had a low folate level; this has no consequences for individual subjects, but it may be of epidemiological or sociological interest. It must be mentioned that too many blood samples (more than 40 per cent) were sent to the laboratory without adequate information and after supplementation in 20 per cent of the cases. Very few patients with very low B12 levels were subjected to Schilling's test, so that the clinical usefulness of this assay, as currently utilized, is questionable in a large number of cases.

  12. Studies on vitamin B12 status in the elderly--prophylactic and therapeutic consequences.

    PubMed

    Loew, D; Wanitschke, R; Schroedter, A

    1999-05-01

    Because of the large liver stores (about 5 mg), low turnover rate (0.143%) and small daily requirement (3 micrograms), vitamin B12 deficiency does not occur under normal circumstances. This is not the case in individuals with chronic inflammatory or trophic changes at vitamin B12 absorption sites. Without supplementation, vitamin B12 deficiency can be expected within 5 years of gastrectomy. Characteristic features of type A gastritis are hyposecretion and mucosal atrophy in the fundus and body of the stomach, with absent intrinsic factor. In the small intestine, active and/or passive absorption is impaired by extensive ileal resection, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease. Definitive plasma concentrations cannot be quoted for vitamin B12 deficiency. Dietary habits, subjective symptoms, hematological laboratory results, function tests and gastrointestinal endoscopic and histological findings must all be taken into account in the diagnosis. Modern diagnostic parameters, such as methylmalonic acid and homocysteine serum assays, are useful for achieving early diagnosis and hence optimal treatment. With their assured availability, parenteral vitamin B12 preparations remain the treatment of choice. Results from vitamin B12 bioavailability studies in healthy subjects suggest that > 300 micrograms probably suffices as an oral maintenance dose after parenteral loading. Further well-documented cases are needed in order to establish whether these doses are adequate in malabsorption syndromes and gastrointestinal diseases. Various case reports indicate the value of prophylactic and therapeutic oral vitamin B12 administration, especially in disorders of homocysteine metabolism, a substance postulated as a further important risk factor for atherosclerosis.

  13. Measured Electron Spin Relaxation Rates in Frozen Solutions of Azurin, VITAMIN-B12R, and Nitrosyl Ferrous Myoglobin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, Philip James

    Rates in frozen glycerin/water solutions at temperatures between 1.4 K and 20 K are reported for a copper-containing protein, azurin, and a cobalt-containing biomolecular complex, vitamin B_{rm 12r}, the paramagnetic product of the photolysis of coenzyme B_{12}. Results are interpreted in terms of a spectral dimensionality. Rates are also reported for nitrosyl ferrous myoglobin in frozen water solution, which exhibits a dominant one-phonon relaxation process up to 20 K and thus does not reveal spectral dimensionality. The anomalous variation of rate with temperature observed in several iron-containing proteins is not conspicuous here. In a model two-phonon mechanism of relaxation, temperature dependence is fixed by a spectral dimensionality, m, which specifies the variation of vibrational density of states with frequency rho(nu ) ~ nu ^{rm m-1} and is named in analogy with the Debye density of states in 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional crystals. At sufficiently high temperatures, a non-resonant two-phonon process (Raman) should dominate the relaxation of a paramagnetic ion unless low-lying (under ^{~}70 cm^ {-1}) electronic states are present, as in many rare earths and in high spin ferric complexes, including many ferric proteins. The temperature dependence of the Raman rate for a Kramers ion (odd number of electrons) is T^{rm 3+2m} if temperature is sufficiently lower than Theta = hnu_{rm max} /k, the Debye temperature. The values of m from relaxation data on frozen solutions of a protein have sometimes been dependent upon solvent conditions. The maximum values of m for heme proteins, iron-sulfur proteins, and one copper -and-iron-containing protein, have ranged from about 1.3 to 1.8. Pulse saturation/recovery was used. The recoveries were not exponential, but rates were estimated from semilogarithmic displays of signals or from numerical fitting. The temperature dependence of the rates for azurin between 1.5 K and 22 K can be fit with a spectral dimensionality of 3 and

  14. Transcobalamin C776G genotype modifies the association between vitamin B12 and homocysteine in older Hispanics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A common polymorphism, C776G, in the plasma B12 transport protein transcobalamin (TC), encodes for either proline or arginine at codon 259. This polymorphism may affect the affinity of TC for B12 and subsequent delivery of B12 to tissues. Methods: TC genotype and its associations with i...

  15. Transcobalamin C776G genotype modifies the association between vitamin B12 and homocysteine in older hispanics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A common polymorphism, C776G, in the plasma B12 transport protein transcobalamin (TC), encodes for either proline or arginine at codon 259. This polymorphism may affect the affinity of TC for B12 and subsequent delivery of B12 to tissues. Methods: TC genotype and its associations with i...

  16. 17 CFR 240.15b12-1T - Brokers or dealers engaged in a retail forex business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a retail forex business. 240.15b12-1T Section 240.15b12-1T Commodity and Securities Exchanges... § 240.15b12-1T Brokers or dealers engaged in a retail forex business. (a) Definitions. In addition to... et seq.). (2) Retail forex business means engaging in one or more retail forex transactions with...

  17. 17 CFR 240.15b12-1T - Brokers or dealers engaged in a retail forex business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a retail forex business. 240.15b12-1T Section 240.15b12-1T Commodity and Securities Exchanges... § 240.15b12-1T Brokers or dealers engaged in a retail forex business. (a) Definitions. In addition to... et seq.). (2) Retail forex business means engaging in one or more retail forex transactions with...

  18. Correlation between secondary thrombosis in epileptic patients and serum levels of folate and vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Huang, Hong-Li; Wang, Nuan; Pang, Xiao-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain dysfunction syndrome and nervous system disease whose pathogenesis remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between secondary thrombosis and the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in epileptic patients, as well as to determine whether the supplementation of folate and vitamin B12 was associated with a decreased incidence of thrombosis, and provide the basis for novel clinical treatment. A total of 37 patients, diagnosed as epileptic with secondary thrombosis between April 2012 and April 2014, were included in the treatment group. A total of 37 epileptic patients without secondary thrombosis were included in the control group. The serum levels of homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in the two groups and in the epileptic patients with intracranial thrombosis or peripheral thrombosis were compared. According to the Guidance of Epilepsy, the patients in the two groups were administered antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with the supplementation of folate tablet (0.4 mg/day) and vitamin B12 tablet (100 µg/day). These indicators and the incidence of thrombosis in the two groups were compared after 1 year. The serum levels of homocysteine in the two groups were higher than normal, and the levels in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were not associated with the serum level of homocysteine (P>0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary thrombosis [folate: odds ratio (OR)=0.635, P=0.038; vitamin B12: OR=0.418, P=0.042]. The differences in the serum levels of homocysteine, folate and

  19. Plasma Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lian-Hua; Quan, Zhen-Yu; Piao, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Meng-Hui; Shin, Min-Ho; Choi, Jin-Su

    2016-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 involved in the one-carbon metabolism may play a key role in carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through influencing DNA integrity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels with HCC in a case-control study on 312 HCC patients and 325 cancer-free controls. Plasma concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in all the subjects were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Meanwhile, the information of HCC patients' clinical characteristics including tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, tumor size and tumor markers were collected. The patients of HCC had significantly lower folate levels than those of controls; there was no significant difference in the mean of plasma vitamin B12 levels. We also observed an inverse association between the levels of plasma folate and HCC: the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of HCC from the highest to lowest quartile of folate were 0.30 (0.15-0.60), 0.33 (0.17-0.65), and 0.19 (0.09-0.38). Compared to the subjects in the lowest quartile of plasma vitamin B12, only the subjects in the highest quartile of vitamin B12 exhibited a significant positive relationship with HCC, the adjusted OR was 2.01 (95% CI, 1.02-3.98). HCC patients with Stage III and IV or bigger tumor size had lower folate and higher vitamin B12 levels. There was no significant difference in the mean plasma folate levels of the HCC cases in tumor markers status (AFP, CEA and CA19-9 levels), whereas patients with higher CEA or CA19-9 levels retained significantly more plasma vitamin B12 than those with normal-CEA or CA19-9 level. In conclusion, plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels could be associated with HCC, and might be used as predictors of clinical characteristics of HCC patients. However, further prospective studies are essential to confirm the observed results. PMID:27376276

  20. Plasma Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lian-Hua; Quan, Zhen-Yu; Piao, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Meng-Hui; Shin, Min-Ho; Choi, Jin-Su

    2016-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 involved in the one-carbon metabolism may play a key role in carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through influencing DNA integrity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels with HCC in a case-control study on 312 HCC patients and 325 cancer-free controls. Plasma concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in all the subjects were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Meanwhile, the information of HCC patients’ clinical characteristics including tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, tumor size and tumor markers were collected. The patients of HCC had significantly lower folate levels than those of controls; there was no significant difference in the mean of plasma vitamin B12 levels. We also observed an inverse association between the levels of plasma folate and HCC: the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of HCC from the highest to lowest quartile of folate were 0.30 (0.15–0.60), 0.33 (0.17–0.65), and 0.19 (0.09–0.38). Compared to the subjects in the lowest quartile of plasma vitamin B12, only the subjects in the highest quartile of vitamin B12 exhibited a significant positive relationship with HCC, the adjusted OR was 2.01 (95% CI, 1.02–3.98). HCC patients with Stage III and IV or bigger tumor size had lower folate and higher vitamin B12 levels. There was no significant difference in the mean plasma folate levels of the HCC cases in tumor markers status (AFP, CEA and CA19-9 levels), whereas patients with higher CEA or CA19-9 levels retained significantly more plasma vitamin B12 than those with normal-CEA or CA19-9 level. In conclusion, plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels could be associated with HCC, and might be used as predictors of clinical characteristics of HCC patients. However, further prospective studies are essential to confirm the observed results. PMID:27376276

  1. [Vitamin B(12) deficiency anaemia in a 7.5 months old girl].

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Malgorzata; Irga, Ninela; Wierzba, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    Vitamin B(12) stores at birth are adequate for infants until the end of the first year of life even if it 's concentration in maternal breast milk is low. However, there are some situations in which infants have depleted vitamin B(12) stores and in addition have a low dietary intake of cobalamin. Vitamin B(12) depletion occurs in infants who are exclusively breastfed by mothers who have unrecognized pernicious anemia or are strict vegetarians for many years. In those infants symptoms of bone marrow disfunction and impaired development of the central nervous system appear already in the first months of life. Unrecognized cobalamin deficiency may lead to serious neurologic consequences, and even to the death of the child. The authors present a case of a 7.5 month old girl admitted to the Department of Paediatrics, Haematology, Oncology and Endocrinology. Gdańsk Medical University suspected of acute leukaemia. Based on a detailed diagnostic procedure a final diagnosis of vitamin B(12) deficiency anaemia was established. The child was exclusively breast-fed. Results of investigations into the reason for cobalamin deficiency in the patient s organism. Led to the diagnosis of pernicious anaemia in the mother. Such a suspicion had been made during pregnancy, but no continuation of investigations nor appropriate treatment were implemented. After treatment with vitamin B(12) supplements and modification of the diet the patient improved quickly and remarkably. A few months follow-up was enough to observe remarkable improvement of psychomotor development of this child.

  2. Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome as a Rare Presentation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh; Mohammadi, S. Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome is a triad consisting of ipsilateral optic atrophy, contralateral optic disc edema, and ipsilateral anosmia in the absence of an intracranial mass. Vitamin B12 plays an important role in DNA synthesis, and its deficiency causes peripheral neuropathy, myeloneuropathy, and, very rarely, optic neuropathy. Case Presentation In this study, we describe a 34-year-old male who presented with progressive loss of visual acuity and field. Fundoscopy showed optic disc edema with telangiectasia in the right eye, while the left eye had optic disc atrophy. We ruled out nearly all possible and common causes of optic neuropathy, and vitamin B12 deficiency was finally diagnosed. After treatment with vitamin B12, the patient improved. Conclusions Demyelinating disease, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, autoimmune disease, and hereditary optic neuropathy could cause optic neuropathy. Normal CBC parameters and the absence of clinical manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency could not rule out its diagnosis. Careful physical examinations and history-taking with a classical approach led us to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment. PMID:27621919

  3. Localised Skin Hyperpigmentation as a Presenting Symptom of Vitamin B12 Deficiency Complicating Chronic Atrophic Gastritis.

    PubMed

    El-Shafie, Kawther; Samir, Nafisa; Lakhtakia, Ritu; Davidson, Robin; Al-Waili, Ahmed; Al-Mamary, Muna; Al-Shafee, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in developing countries and should be suspected in patients with unexplained anaemia or neurological symptoms. Dermatological manifestations associated with this deficiency include skin hyper- or hypopigmentation, angular stomatitis and hair changes. We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in November 2013 with localised hyperpigmentation of the palmar and dorsal aspects of both hands of two months' duration. Other symptoms included numbness of the hands, anorexia, weight loss, dizziness, fatigability and a sore mouth and tongue. There was no evidence of hypocortisolaemia and a literature search revealed a possible B12 deficiency. The patient had low serum B12 levels and megaloblastic anaemia. An intrinsic factor antibody test was negative. A gastric biopsy revealed chronic gastritis. After B12 supplementation, the patient's symptoms resolved. Family physicians should familiarise themselves with atypical presentations of B12 deficiency. Many symptoms of this deficiency are reversible if detected and treated early. PMID:26357561

  4. Vitamin B12 Levels of Subjects Aged 0-24 Year(s) in Konya, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Haluk; Bodur, Said; Kiyici, Aysel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Research reports indicate that vitamin B12 levels show racial differences, which suggests that using the reference ranges of varied populations may lead to inaccurate results. This study aimed to determine normal serum levels of vitamin B12 among children and young people in the Konya region of Turkey. It evaluated 1,109 samples; 54 were from cord-blood and 1,055 were from healthy subjects aged 0-24 year(s), who were admitted to primary healthcare centres. The normal reference levels obtained for vitamin B12 at 2.5-97.5 percentile (P2.5-P97.5) range were 127-606 pg/mL for girls, 127-576 pg/mL for boys, and 127-590 pg/mL for the entire study group. The reported reference values for vitamin B12 in other studies were higher than the current results. Vitamin B12 levels vary from country to country; comparisons between countries may not be valid, and normal levels for each population should be obtained. PMID:25895195

  5. Urinary levels of early kidney injury molecules in children with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Güneş, Ali; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Uluca, Ünal; Balık, Hasan; Mete, Nuriye

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate urine early kidney injury molecules, including human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty-acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase A (NAG), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency (CD). Twelve children with vitamin B12 deficiency and 20 healthy matched controls were included. Hematologic parameters, serum urea, creatinine (Cr), electrolytes, B12 and folate levels were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urine protein, electrolytes, andurinary early markers were measured. Patients with CD had significantly higher urine electrolyte/Cr ratios (p <0.05). Significantly higher urinary KIM-1/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, NAG/Cr and NGAL/Cr were found in CD group (p <0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between levels of serum B12 and urinary markers in the patients (p <0.05). Increased urinary kidney injury molecules and electrolytes in children with B12 deficiency suggest a possible subclinical renal dysfunction, which cannot be determined by conventional kidney function tests.

  6. Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome as a Rare Presentation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh; Mohammadi, S. Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome is a triad consisting of ipsilateral optic atrophy, contralateral optic disc edema, and ipsilateral anosmia in the absence of an intracranial mass. Vitamin B12 plays an important role in DNA synthesis, and its deficiency causes peripheral neuropathy, myeloneuropathy, and, very rarely, optic neuropathy. Case Presentation In this study, we describe a 34-year-old male who presented with progressive loss of visual acuity and field. Fundoscopy showed optic disc edema with telangiectasia in the right eye, while the left eye had optic disc atrophy. We ruled out nearly all possible and common causes of optic neuropathy, and vitamin B12 deficiency was finally diagnosed. After treatment with vitamin B12, the patient improved. Conclusions Demyelinating disease, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, autoimmune disease, and hereditary optic neuropathy could cause optic neuropathy. Normal CBC parameters and the absence of clinical manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency could not rule out its diagnosis. Careful physical examinations and history-taking with a classical approach led us to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.

  7. Urinary levels of early kidney injury molecules in children with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Güneş, Ali; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Uluca, Ünal; Balık, Hasan; Mete, Nuriye

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate urine early kidney injury molecules, including human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty-acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase A (NAG), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency (CD). Twelve children with vitamin B12 deficiency and 20 healthy matched controls were included. Hematologic parameters, serum urea, creatinine (Cr), electrolytes, B12 and folate levels were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urine protein, electrolytes, andurinary early markers were measured. Patients with CD had significantly higher urine electrolyte/Cr ratios (p <0.05). Significantly higher urinary KIM-1/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, NAG/Cr and NGAL/Cr were found in CD group (p <0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between levels of serum B12 and urinary markers in the patients (p <0.05). Increased urinary kidney injury molecules and electrolytes in children with B12 deficiency suggest a possible subclinical renal dysfunction, which cannot be determined by conventional kidney function tests. PMID:27606644

  8. Stability of added and in situ-produced vitamin B12 in breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Minnamari; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Santin, Marco; Kariluoto, Susanna; Piironen, Vieno

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B12 exists naturally in foods of animal origin and is synthesised only by certain bacteria. New food sources are needed to ensure vitamin B12 intake in risk groups. This study aimed to investigate the stability of added cyanocobalamin (CNCbl, chemically modified form) and hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl, natural form) and in situ-synthesised vitamin B12 in breadmaking. Samples were analysed both with a microbiological (MBA) and a liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) method to test applicability of these two methods. Proofing did not affect CNCbl and OHCbl levels. By contrast, 21% and 31% of OHCbl was lost in oven-baking steps in straight- and sponge-dough processes, respectively, whereas CNCbl remained almost stable. In sourdough baking, 23% of CNCbl and 44% of OHCbl were lost. In situ-produced vitamin B12 was almost as stable as added CNCbl and more stable than OHCbl. The UHPLC method showed its superiority to the MBA in determining the active vitamin B12. PMID:26988471

  9. Purification and characterization of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto B-12.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Du, Ming; Zheng, Dongmei; Kong, Fandong; Zu, Guoren; Feng, Yibing

    2009-10-28

    Bacillus subtilis natto B-12 was isolated from natto, a traditional fermented soybean food in Japan. A fibrinolytic enzyme (B-12 nattokinase) was purified from the supernatant of B. subtilis natto B-12 culture broth and showed strong fibrinolytic activity. The enzyme was homogenously purified to 56.1-fold, with a recovery of 43.2% of the initial activity. B-12 nattokinase was demonstrated to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE and was identified as a monomer of 29000 +/- 300 Da in its native state by SDS-PAGE and size exclusion methods. The optimal pH value and temperature were 8.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Purified nattokinase showed high thermostability at temperatures from 30 to 50 degrees C and alkaline stability within the range of pH 6.0-9.0. The enzyme activity was activated by Zn(2+) and obviously inhibited by Fe(3+) and Al(3+). This study provides some important information for the effect factors of fibrinolytic activity, the purification methods, and characterization of nattokinase from B. subtilis natto B-12, which enriches the theoretical information of nattokinase for the research and development of nattokinase as a functional additive of food.

  10. Cobalamin and folate evaluation: measurement of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine vs vitamin B(12) and folate.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G

    2000-08-01

    Vitamin B(12) and folate are two vitamins that have interdependent roles in nucleic acid synthesis. Deficiencies of either vitamin can cause megaloblastic anemia; however, inappropriate treatment of B(12) deficiency with folate can cause irreversible nerve degeneration. Inadequate folate nutrition during early pregnancy can cause neural tube defects in the developing fetus. In addition, folate and vitamin B(12) deficiency and the compensatory increase in homocysteine are a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Laboratory support for the diagnosis and management of these multiple clinical entities is controversial and somewhat problematic. Automated ligand binding measurements of vitamin B(12) and folate are easiest to perform and widely used. Unfortunately, these tests are not the most sensitive indicators of disease. Measurement of red cell folate is less dependent on dietary fluctuations, but these measurements may not be reliable. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are better metabolic indicators of deficiencies at the tissue level. There are no "gold standards" for the diagnosis of these disorders, and controversy exists regarding the best diagnostic approach. Healthcare strategies that consider the impact of laboratory tests on the overall costs and quality of care should consider the advantages of including methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in the early evaluation of patients with suspected deficiencies of vitamin B(12) and folate.

  11. Biosynthesis of coenzyme Q in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a component of the electron transport chain that participates in aerobic cellular respiration to produce ATP. In addition, CoQ acts as an electron acceptor in several enzymatic reactions involving oxidation-reduction. Biosynthesis of CoQ has been investigated mainly in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the findings have been extended to various higher organisms, including plants and humans. Analyses in yeast have contributed greatly to current understanding of human diseases related to CoQ biosynthesis. To date, human genetic disorders related to mutations in eight COQ biosynthetic genes have been reported. In addition, the crystal structures of a number of proteins involved in CoQ synthesis have been solved, including those of IspB, UbiA, UbiD, UbiX, UbiI, Alr8543 (Coq4 homolog), Coq5, ADCK3, and COQ9. Over the last decade, knowledge of CoQ biosynthesis has accumulated, and striking advances in related human genetic disorders and the crystal structure of proteins required for CoQ synthesis have been made. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of CoQ in eukaryotes, with some comparisons to the process in prokaryotes.

  12. Isolated cerebellar involvement in vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Dubey, Rachana; Gulati, Sheffali; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Atin

    2014-11-01

    Deficiency of vitamin B12 causes megaloblastic anemia and nervous system demyelination. Structures affected in the nervous system include spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves, and brain white matter. A 9-year-old boy presented with knuckle hyperpigmentation and oral ulcers for 3 years, pallor and easy fatigability for 6 months, gait abnormalities for 3 months, and abnormal speech and behavioral abnormalities for 3 days. On examination, he had physical signs of megaloblastic anemia, mood swings with intermittent hallucinations, and features of cerebellar impairment. Blood investigations revealed megaloblastic anemia, and pernicious anemia was ruled out. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral cerebellar signal changes. He received treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency and appropriate nutritional counseling. Three months later, he showed significant clinical and radiologic resolution. To our knowledge, isolated cerebellar involvement as the sole neurologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency has not been described previously in children. PMID:24346315

  13. Pancytopenia due to vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast-fed infant.

    PubMed

    Yenicesu, Idil

    2008-06-01

    Nutritional B12 deficiency in childhood is an uncommon disorder. Most cases are due to maternal insufficiency, resulting from deficient stores and intake, and is generally seen in exclusively breast fed infants. This report describes a breast-fed infant with megaloblastic anemia secondary to maternal vitamin B12 deficiency. We describe this patient to remind readers that B12 deficiency may cause severe pancytopenia and regression of motor functions. These patients can present with unexpected signs and symptoms, such as developmental delay and regression as in our patient. It is also important to take the nutritional history of both the child and the mother of early prevention and treatment. With early awareness and appropriate measures potentially irreversible neurologic damage can be prevented in the infant.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency in Caenorhabditis elegans results in loss of fertility, extended life cycle, and reduced lifespan.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Matsunaga, Yohei; Yabuta, Yukinori; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency has been linked to developmental disorders, metabolic abnormalities, and neuropathy; however, the mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans grown under B12-deficient conditions for five generations develop severe B12 deficiency associated with various phenotypes that include decreased egg-laying capacity (infertility), prolonged life cycle (growth retardation), and reduced lifespan. These phenotypes resemble the consequences of B12 deficiency in mammals, and can be induced in C. elegans in only 15 days. Thus, C. elegans is a suitable animal model for studying the biological processes induced by vitamin deficiency.

  15. Genetic architecture of vitamin B12 and folate levels uncovered applying deeply sequenced large datasets.

    PubMed

    Grarup, Niels; Sulem, Patrick; Sandholt, Camilla H; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Bjarnason, Helgi; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sparsø, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Anders; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Tian, Geng; Cao, Hongzhi; Nie, Chao; Kristiansen, Karsten; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Thuesen, Betina; Li, Yingrui; Nielsen, Rasmus; Linneberg, Allan; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Jørgensen, Torben; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefánsson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf

    2013-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have mainly relied on common HapMap sequence variations. Recently, sequencing approaches have allowed analysis of low frequency and rare variants in conjunction with common variants, thereby improving the search for functional variants and thus the understanding of the underlying biology of human traits and diseases. Here, we used a large Icelandic whole genome sequence dataset combined with Danish exome sequence data to gain insight into the genetic architecture of serum levels of vitamin B(12) (B12) and folate. Up to 22.9 million sequence variants were analyzed in combined samples of 45,576 and 37,341 individuals with serum B(12) and folate measurements, respectively. We found six novel loci associating with serum B(12) (CD320, TCN2, ABCD4, MMAA, MMACHC) or folate levels (FOLR3) and confirmed seven loci for these traits (TCN1, FUT6, FUT2, CUBN, CLYBL, MUT, MTHFR). Conditional analyses established that four loci contain additional independent signals. Interestingly, 13 of the 18 identified variants were coding and 11 of the 13 target genes have known functions related to B(12) and folate pathways. Contrary to epidemiological studies we did not find consistent association of the variants with cardiovascular diseases, cancers or Alzheimer's disease although some variants demonstrated pleiotropic effects. Although to some degree impeded by low statistical power for some of these conditions, these data suggest that sequence variants that contribute to the population diversity in serum B(12) or folate levels do not modify the risk of developing these conditions. Yet, the study demonstrates the value of combining whole genome and exome sequencing approaches to ascertain the genetic and molecular architectures underlying quantitative trait associations.

  16. Effects of vitamin B12 on the corneal nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Biagioni, Francesca; Carrizzo, Albino; Lorusso, Massimo; Spadaro, Angelo; Micelli Ferrari, Tommaso; Vecchione, Carmine; Zurria, Monia; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Mascio, Giada; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Madonna, Michele; Fornai, Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Lograno, Marcello Diego

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of a new ophthalmic solution containing 0.05% vitamin B12 0.05% on corneal nerve regeneration in rats after corneal injury. Eyes of anesthetized male Wistar rats were subjected to corneal injury by removing the corneal epithelium with corneal brush (Algerbrush). After the epithelial debridement, the right eye of each animal received the instillation of one drop of the ophthalmic solution containing vitamin B12 0.05% plus taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% four time per day for 10 or 30 days. Left eyes were used as control and treated with solution containing taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% alone following the same regimen. Fluorescein staining by slit-lamp and morphological analysis was used to determine corneal wound healing. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and confocal microscopy were used to examine corneal re-innervation. Slit-lamp and histological analyses showed that re-epithelization of the corneas was accelerated in rats treated with vitamin B12. A clear-cut difference between the two groups of rats was seen after 10 days of treatment, whereas a near-to-complete re-epithelization was observed in both groups at 30 days. Vitamin B12 treatment had also a remarkable effect on corneal re-innervation, as shown by substantial increased in the expression of neurofilament 160 and β-III tubulin at both 10 and 30 days. The presence of SV2A-positive nerve endings suggests the presence of synapse-like specialized structures in corneal epithelium of the eye treated with vitamin B12. Our findings suggest that vitamin B12 treatment represents a powerful strategy to accelerate not only re-epithelization but also corneal re-innervation after mechanical injury. PMID:24486457

  17. NutriPhone: vitamin B12 testing on your smartphone (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoho; O'Dell, Dakota; Hohenstein, Jessica; Colt, Susannah; Mehta, Saurabh; Erickson, David

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is the leading cause of cognitive decline in the elderly and is associated with increased risks of several acute and chronic conditions including anemia. The deficiency is prevalent among the world population, most of whom are unaware of their condition due to the lack of a simple diagnostics system. Recent advancements in the smartphone-enabled mobile health can help address this problem by making the deficiency tests more accessible. Previously, our group has demonstrated the NutriPhone, a smartphone platform for the accurate quantification of vitamin D levels. The NutriPhone technology comprises of a disposable test strip that performs a colorimetric reaction upon collecting a sample, a reusable accessory that interfaces with the smartphone camera, and a smartphone app that stores the algorithm for analyzing the test-strip reaction. In this work, we show that the NutriPhone can be expanded to measure vitamin B12 concentrations by developing a lateral flow assay for B12 that is compatible with our NutriPhone system. Our novel vitamin B12 assay incorporates blood sample processing and key reagent storage on-chip, which advances it into a sample-in-answer-out format that is suitable for point-of-care diagnostic applications. In order to enable the detection of pM levels of vitamin B12 levels, silver amplification of the initial signal is used within the total assay time of less than 15 minutes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our NutriPhone system by deploying it in a resource-limited clinical setting in India where it is used to test tens of participants for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  18. Effects of vitamin B12 on the corneal nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Biagioni, Francesca; Carrizzo, Albino; Lorusso, Massimo; Spadaro, Angelo; Micelli Ferrari, Tommaso; Vecchione, Carmine; Zurria, Monia; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Mascio, Giada; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Madonna, Michele; Fornai, Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Lograno, Marcello Diego

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of a new ophthalmic solution containing 0.05% vitamin B12 0.05% on corneal nerve regeneration in rats after corneal injury. Eyes of anesthetized male Wistar rats were subjected to corneal injury by removing the corneal epithelium with corneal brush (Algerbrush). After the epithelial debridement, the right eye of each animal received the instillation of one drop of the ophthalmic solution containing vitamin B12 0.05% plus taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% four time per day for 10 or 30 days. Left eyes were used as control and treated with solution containing taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% alone following the same regimen. Fluorescein staining by slit-lamp and morphological analysis was used to determine corneal wound healing. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and confocal microscopy were used to examine corneal re-innervation. Slit-lamp and histological analyses showed that re-epithelization of the corneas was accelerated in rats treated with vitamin B12. A clear-cut difference between the two groups of rats was seen after 10 days of treatment, whereas a near-to-complete re-epithelization was observed in both groups at 30 days. Vitamin B12 treatment had also a remarkable effect on corneal re-innervation, as shown by substantial increased in the expression of neurofilament 160 and β-III tubulin at both 10 and 30 days. The presence of SV2A-positive nerve endings suggests the presence of synapse-like specialized structures in corneal epithelium of the eye treated with vitamin B12. Our findings suggest that vitamin B12 treatment represents a powerful strategy to accelerate not only re-epithelization but also corneal re-innervation after mechanical injury.

  19. Genetic Architecture of Vitamin B12 and Folate Levels Uncovered Applying Deeply Sequenced Large Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Bjarnason, Helgi; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Sparsø, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Anders; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Tian, Geng; Cao, Hongzhi; Nie, Chao; Kristiansen, Karsten; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Thuesen, Betina; Li, Yingrui; Nielsen, Rasmus; Linneberg, Allan; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Jørgensen, Torben; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefánsson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have mainly relied on common HapMap sequence variations. Recently, sequencing approaches have allowed analysis of low frequency and rare variants in conjunction with common variants, thereby improving the search for functional variants and thus the understanding of the underlying biology of human traits and diseases. Here, we used a large Icelandic whole genome sequence dataset combined with Danish exome sequence data to gain insight into the genetic architecture of serum levels of vitamin B12 (B12) and folate. Up to 22.9 million sequence variants were analyzed in combined samples of 45,576 and 37,341 individuals with serum B12 and folate measurements, respectively. We found six novel loci associating with serum B12 (CD320, TCN2, ABCD4, MMAA, MMACHC) or folate levels (FOLR3) and confirmed seven loci for these traits (TCN1, FUT6, FUT2, CUBN, CLYBL, MUT, MTHFR). Conditional analyses established that four loci contain additional independent signals. Interestingly, 13 of the 18 identified variants were coding and 11 of the 13 target genes have known functions related to B12 and folate pathways. Contrary to epidemiological studies we did not find consistent association of the variants with cardiovascular diseases, cancers or Alzheimer's disease although some variants demonstrated pleiotropic effects. Although to some degree impeded by low statistical power for some of these conditions, these data suggest that sequence variants that contribute to the population diversity in serum B12 or folate levels do not modify the risk of developing these conditions. Yet, the study demonstrates the value of combining whole genome and exome sequencing approaches to ascertain the genetic and molecular architectures underlying quantitative trait associations. PMID:23754956

  20. Serum folate, vitamin B-12 and cognitive function in middle and older age: The HAPIEE study

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Pia; Gardiner, Julian; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Schöttker, Ben; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Jansen, Eugene; Bobak, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutrient status of B vitamins, particularly folate and vitamin B-12, may be related to cognitive ageing but epidemiological evidence remains inconclusive. Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the association of serum folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations with cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults from three Central and Eastern European populations. Methods Men and women aged 45–69 at baseline participating in the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) study were recruited in Krakow (Poland), Kaunas (Lithuania) and six urban centres in the Czech Republic. Tests of immediate and delayed recall, verbal fluency and letter search were administered at baseline and repeated in 2006–2008. Serum concentrations of biomarkers at baseline were measured in a sub-sample of participants. Associations of vitamin quartiles with baseline (n = 4166) and follow-up (n = 2739) cognitive domain-specific z-scores were estimated using multiple linear regression. Results After adjusting for confounders, folate was positively associated with letter search and vitamin B-12 with word recall in cross-sectional analyses. In prospective analyses, participants in the highest quartile of folate had higher verbal fluency (p < 0.01) and immediate recall (p < 0.05) scores compared to those in the bottom quartile. In addition, participants in the highest quartile of vitamin B-12 had significantly higher verbal fluency scores (β = 0.12; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.21). Conclusions Folate and vitamin B-12 were positively associated with performance in some but not all cognitive domains in older Central and Eastern Europeans. These findings do not lend unequivocal support to potential importance of folate and vitamin B-12 status for cognitive function in older age. Long-term longitudinal studies and randomised trials are required before drawing conclusions on the role of these vitamins in cognitive decline. PMID:26808046

  1. Serum vitamin B12 and folic Acid levels in acute cerebral atherothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Kocer, Abdulkadir; Ince, Nurhan; Canbulat, Cuneyt E; Sargin, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cerebral stroke. Vitamin B12 and folic acid are important determinants of homocysteine metabolism. We aimed to evaluate the relationship, if present, between vitamin B12 and folic acid levels and acute cerebral stroke in this study. Blood aliquots drawn within 24 hours after the stroke from hospitalized patients (n=66) with the diagnosis of acute ischemic cerebrovascular episode and also blood samples from 38 healthy controls without any vascular risk factor were analyzed. With a competitive, chemoluminescence assay, serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured in blood samples taken within 24 hours after the stroke. The differences and correlations were tested using frequency test, student-t test and multivariate analysis. Mean serum vitamin B12 levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the control subjects, 245.40 (S.D.: 72.9) and 343.2 (S.D.: 113.0) pg/ml respectively (p=0.0001). This difference was independent from other risk factors. Likewise, mean serum folic acid levels were lower in the patients than in the control subjects, 4.62 (S.D.: 1.94) and 5.97 (S.D.: 1.19) ng/ml, respectively (p=0.003). Mean serum levels of vitamin B12 and folate at the convalescence phase were 253.05 (S.D.: 68.78) pg/ml and 4.48 (S.D.: 2.08) ng/ml, respectively; the values obtained at the acute phase were not significantly different from the values obtained at the convalescence phase. We conclude that low vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations are associated with an increased risk of stroke, and the relationship for vitamin B12 is independent from the other known modifiable stroke risk factors. For understanding the effects of B12 and folate in stroke patients, more detailed follow-up studies with long period are needed.

  2. Studies on the spin Hamiltonian parameters of vitamin B 12r

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-Yi; Wei, Li-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters g factors gi ( i = x, y, z) and the hyperfine structure constants Ai of vitamin B 12r have been theoretically studied from the perturbation formulas of these parameters for a Co 2+(3d 7) ion with low spin ( S = 1/2) in rhombically distorted octahedra. The related crystal-field parameters are determined from the point-charge-dipole model and the local structure around Co 2+ in vitamin B 12r. The theoretical spin Hamiltonian parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Bioelectrochemical activity of an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pu; Zheng, Haitao; Nie, Pingping; Wei, Yaotian; Feng, Zhenchao; Sun, Tao

    2009-07-01

    As coenzyme utilized by more than hundreds of dehydrogenases, the efficient immobilization and regeneration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are of great importance and have practical applications in industrial, analytical and biomedical field. In this paper, an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative (PEI-DHBNAD) was prepared by attaching both NAD+ and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3,4-DHB) to a water-soluble polyelectrolyte, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). The functional polymer exhibited both electrochemical properties of catechol unites and coenzymatic activity of NAD moieties. The macromolecular NAD analogue showed a substantial degree of efficiency relative to free NAD+ with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glucose-6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), and a litter higher Michaelis-Menton constant (Km) was obtained for the coenzyme derivative than free NAD+. The bioelectrochemical properties of PEI-DHB-NAD were investigated by using G6PDH as the model enzyme, and both of them were retained on electrode surface by ultrafiltration membrane. The modified electrode showed typical response to substrate without the addition of free coenzyme, which indicated that PEI-DHB-NAD can carry out the electron transfer between electrode and NAD-dependent dehydrogenase. The utilization of polymer-based PEI-DHB-NAD is convenient for the immobilization of both electron mediator and coenzyme, and offers a practical approach for the construction of reagentless biosensors.

  4. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Manuel Jesús; Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Cerqua, Cristina; Zordan, Roberta; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, or ubiquinone) is a remarkable lipid that plays an essential role in mitochondria as an electron shuttle between complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and complex III. It is also a cofactor of other dehydrogenases, a modulator of the permeability transition pore and an essential antioxidant. CoQ is synthesized in mitochondria by a set of at least 12 proteins that form a multiprotein complex. The exact composition of this complex is still unclear. Most of the genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis (COQ genes) have been studied in yeast and have mammalian orthologues. Some of them encode enzymes involved in the modification of the quinone ring of CoQ, but for others the precise function is unknown. Two genes appear to have a regulatory role: COQ8 (and its human counterparts ADCK3 and ADCK4) encodes a putative kinase, while PTC7 encodes a phosphatase required for the activation of Coq7. Mutations in human COQ genes cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with onset from birth to the seventh decade, and with clinical manifestation ranging from fatal multisystem disorders, to isolated encephalopathy or nephropathy. The pathogenesis of CoQ(10) deficiency involves deficient ATP production and excessive ROS formation, but possibly other aspects of CoQ(10) function are implicated. CoQ(10) deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders since an effective treatment is available. Many patients respond to oral CoQ(10) supplementation. Nevertheless, treatment is still problematic because of the low bioavailability of the compound, and novel pharmacological approaches are currently being investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060254

  5. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Manuel Jesús; Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Cerqua, Cristina; Zordan, Roberta; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, or ubiquinone) is a remarkable lipid that plays an essential role in mitochondria as an electron shuttle between complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and complex III. It is also a cofactor of other dehydrogenases, a modulator of the permeability transition pore and an essential antioxidant. CoQ is synthesized in mitochondria by a set of at least 12 proteins that form a multiprotein complex. The exact composition of this complex is still unclear. Most of the genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis (COQ genes) have been studied in yeast and have mammalian orthologues. Some of them encode enzymes involved in the modification of the quinone ring of CoQ, but for others the precise function is unknown. Two genes appear to have a regulatory role: COQ8 (and its human counterparts ADCK3 and ADCK4) encodes a putative kinase, while PTC7 encodes a phosphatase required for the activation of Coq7. Mutations in human COQ genes cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with onset from birth to the seventh decade, and with clinical manifestation ranging from fatal multisystem disorders, to isolated encephalopathy or nephropathy. The pathogenesis of CoQ(10) deficiency involves deficient ATP production and excessive ROS formation, but possibly other aspects of CoQ(10) function are implicated. CoQ(10) deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders since an effective treatment is available. Many patients respond to oral CoQ(10) supplementation. Nevertheless, treatment is still problematic because of the low bioavailability of the compound, and novel pharmacological approaches are currently being investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  6. Invertebrate Models for Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J.M.; Jiménez-Gancedo, Sandra; Guerra, Ignacio; Navas, Plácido

    2014-01-01

    The human syndrome of coenzyme Q (CoQ) deficiency is a heterogeneous mitochondrial disease characterized by a diminution of CoQ content in cells and tissues that affects all the electron transport processes CoQ is responsible for, like the electron transference in mitochondria for respiration and ATP production and the antioxidant capacity that it exerts in membranes and lipoproteins. Supplementation with external CoQ is the main attempt to address these pathologies, but quite variable results have been obtained ranging from little response to a dramatic recovery. Here, we present the importance of modeling human CoQ deficiencies in animal models to understand the genetics and the pathology of this disease, although the election of an organism is crucial and can sometimes be controversial. Bacteria and yeast harboring mutations that lead to CoQ deficiency are unable to grow if they have to respire but develop without any problems on media with fermentable carbon sources. The complete lack of CoQ in mammals causes embryonic lethality, whereas other mutations produce tissue-specific diseases as in humans. However, working with transgenic mammals is time and cost intensive, with no assurance of obtaining results. Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have been used for years as organisms to study embryonic development, biogenesis, degenerative pathologies, and aging because of the genetic facilities and the speed of working with these animal models. In this review, we summarize several attempts to model reliable human CoQ deficiencies in invertebrates, focusing on mutant phenotypes pretty similar to those observed in human patients. PMID:25126050

  7. Genetic Confirmation of the Role of Sulfopyruvate Decarboxylase in Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    DOE PAGES

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Ellison, Courtney K.; Whitman, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Coenzyme M is an essential coenzyme for methanogenesis. The proposed biosynthetic pathway consists of five steps, of which the fourth step is catalyzed by sulfopyruvate decarboxylase (ComDE). Disruption of the gene comE by transposon mutagenesis resulted in a partial coenzyme M auxotroph, which grew poorly in the absence of coenzyme M and retained less than 3% of the wild type level of coenzyme M biosynthesis. Upon coenzyme M addition, normal growth of the mutant was restored. Moreover, complementation of the mutation with the wild type comE gene in trans restored full growth in the absence of coenzyme M. Thesemore » results confirm that ComE plays an important role in coenzyme M biosynthesis. The inability to yield a complete CoM auxotroph suggests that either the transposon insertion failed to completely inactivate the gene or M. maripaludis possesses a promiscuous activity that partially complemented the mutation.« less

  8. Defective remethylation of homocysteine is related to decreased synthesis of coenzymes B2 in thyroidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ayav, A; Alberto, J M; Barbe, F; Brunaud, L; Gerard, P; Merten, M; Gueant, J L

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the influence of hypothyroidism on homocysteine metabolism in rats, focusing on a hypothetical deficient synthesis of FAD by riboflavin kinases. Animals were allocated in control group (n = 7), thyroidectomized rats (n = 6), rats with diet deficient in vitamin B2, B9, B12, choline and methionine (n = 7), thyroidectomized rats with deficient diet (n = 9). Homocysteine was decreased in operated rats (2.6 +/- 1.01 vs. 4.05 +/- 1.0 mumol/L, P = 0.02) and increased in deficient diet rats (29.56 +/- 4.52 vs. 4.05 +/- 1.0 micromol/L, P = 0.001), when compared to control group. Erythrocyte-Glutathione-Reductase-Activation-Coefficient (index of FAD deficiency) was increased in thyroidectomized or deficient diet rats (P = 0.004 for both). Methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase and methionine-synthase activities were decreased in thyroidectomized rats but not in those subjected to deficient diet. Cystathionine-beta-synthase was increased only in operated rats. Taken together, these results showed a defective re-methylation in surgical hypothyroidism, which was due in part to a defective synthesis of vitamin B2 coenzymes. This defective pathway was overcompensated by the increased Cystathionine-beta-synthase activity.

  9. Copper control of bacterial nitrous oxide emission and its impact on vitamin B12-dependent metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew J; Gates, Andrew J; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Rowley, Gary; Richardson, David J

    2013-12-01

    Global agricultural emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have increased by around 20% over the last 100 y, but regulation of these emissions and their impact on bacterial cellular metabolism are poorly understood. Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrate in soils to inert di-nitrogen gas (N2) via N2O and the biochemistry of this process has been studied extensively in Paracoccus denitrificans. Here we demonstrate that expression of the gene encoding the nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ), which converts N2O to N2, is regulated in response to the extracellular copper concentration. We show that elevated levels of N2O released as a consequence of decreased cellular NosZ activity lead to the bacterium switching from vitamin B12-dependent to vitamin B12-independent biosynthetic pathways, through the transcriptional modulation of genes controlled by vitamin B12 riboswitches. This inhibitory effect of N2O can be rescued by addition of exogenous vitamin B12.

  10. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast fed infant with pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Citak, Funda Erkasar; Citak, Elvan Caglar

    2011-02-01

    We report the case of a 7-month-old breast fed infant who presented with a nose bleed and bruises. Investigation showed severe nutritional B12 deficiency anemia with a pancytopenia. It is important to take the nutritional history of both the infant and the mother for early prevention and treatment.

  11. Effect of combined folic acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 on colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) act in concert in the one-carbon metabolism and may protect against colorectal neoplasia. We examined the effect of combined B-vitamin treatment on the occurrence of colorectal adenoma. The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study was a rand...

  12. Total serum homocysteine as an indicator of vitamin B12 and folate status

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, R.C.; Hall, C.A.

    1988-10-01

    Presented is a modification of an assay for total serum homocysteine (Hcy) in which the Hcy plus radioactive adenosine is converted enzymatically to labeled S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy). The modifications included a commerical source for the AdoHcy hydrolase, adenosine labeled with either /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, and separation of the AdoHcy by thin layer chromatography. The assay was sensitive to 25 pmol. Hcy levels in sera from 18 controls ranged from 6.9 to 12.1 mumol/L with a mean of 9.1 and a SD of 1.5 mumol/L. The total serum Hcy was increased in vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. The level was high in congenital defects of vitamin B12 metabolism, blocking the methylation of Hcy regardless of the serum vitamin B12 levels, but was normal in the absence of tissue deficiency even if the serum vitamin B12 levels were low. The procedure has been found practical in two years of use and requires only 0.1 mL of serum.

  13. Quantifying the Electrocatalytic Turnover of Vitamin B12-Mediated Dehalogenation on Single Soft Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Compton, Richard G

    2016-02-12

    We report the electrocatalytic dehalogenation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by single soft nanoparticles in the form of Vitamin B12 -containing droplets. We quantify the turnover number of the catalytic reaction at the single soft nanoparticle level. The kinetic data shows that the binding of TCE with the electro-reduced vitamin in the Co(I) oxidation state is chemically reversible. PMID:26806226

  14. Sintered Cr/Pt and Ni/Au ohmic contacts to B12P2

    DOE PAGES

    Frye, Clint D.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Edgar, James H.; Voss, Lars F.; Conway, Adam M.; Shao, Qinghui; Nikolic, Rebecca J.

    2015-04-09

    With this study, icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor possessing interesting properties such as high hardness, chemical inertness, and the reported ability to self-heal from irradiation by high energy electrons. Here, the authors developed Cr/Pt and Ni/Au ohmic contacts to epitaxially grown B12P2 for materials characterization and electronic device development. Cr/Pt contacts became ohmic after annealing at 700 °C for 30 s with a specific contact resistance of 2×10–4 Ω cm2, as measured by the linear transfer length method. Ni/Au contacts were ohmic prior to any annealing, and their minimum specific contact resistance was ~l–4 × 10–4 Ωmore » cm2 after annealing over the temperature range of 500–800 °C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry revealed a strong reaction and intermixing between Cr/Pt and B12P2 at 700 °C and a reaction layer between Ni and B12P2 thinner than ~25 nm at 500 °C.« less

  15. BluB cannibalizes flavin to form the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Taga, Michiko E.; Larsen, Nicholas A.; Howard-Jones, Annaleise R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is among the largest known non-polymeric natural products, and the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms1. The biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), is poorly understood1–3. Recently, we discovered that a Sinorhizobium meliloti gene, bluB, is necessary for DMB biosynthesis4. Here we show that BluB triggers the unprecedented fragmentation and contraction of the bound flavin mononucleotide cofactor and cleavage of the ribityl tail to form DMB and D-erythrose 4-phosphate. Our structural analysis shows that BluB resembles an NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase, except that its unusually tight binding pocket accommodates flavin mononucleotide but not NAD(P)H. We characterize crystallographically an early intermediate along the reaction coordinate, revealing molecular oxygen poised over reduced flavin. Thus, BluB isolates and directs reduced flavin to activate molecular oxygen for its own cannibalization. This investigation of the biosynthesis of DMB provides clarification of an aspect of vitamin B12 that was otherwise incomplete, and may contribute to a better understanding of vitamin B12-related disease. PMID:17377583

  16. Expeditious synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using Vitamin B12 under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A greener synthesis protocol for noble nanometals is developed using vitamin B12 as a reducing and capping agent in conjunction with the use of microwaves. Successful assembly of nanoparticles or microparticles with varied shapes and sizes have been demonstrated. The synthesized ...

  17. Brief Report: Childhood Disintegrative Disorder as a Likely Manifestation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B. N.; Parakh, Preeti; Lahariya, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare disorder, characterized by regression of acquired skills after a period of normal development. The case of childhood disintegrative disorder presented here was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia on extensive evaluation to find a probable cause for regression. This case…

  18. Mechanism of the S1 excited state internal conversion in vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2014-09-21

    To explain the photostability of vitamin B12, internal conversion of the S1 state was investigated using TD-DFT. The active coordinates for radiationless deactivation were determined to be elongated axial bonds, overcoming a 5.0 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier between the relaxed ligand-to-metal charge transfer (S1), and the ground (S0) states.

  19. 17 CFR 240.3b-12 - Definition of OTC derivatives dealer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of OTC derivatives... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Definitions § 240.3b-12 Definition of OTC derivatives dealer. The term OTC derivatives dealer means any dealer that is affiliated with a registered broker or dealer (other than an...

  20. 17 CFR 240.3b-12 - Definition of OTC derivatives dealer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of OTC derivatives... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Definitions § 240.3b-12 Definition of OTC derivatives dealer. The term OTC derivatives dealer means any dealer that is affiliated with a registered broker or dealer (other than an...

  1. Enhanced pharmacological activity of Vitamin B12 and Penicillin as nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yariv, Inbar; Lipovsky, Anat; Gedanken, Aharon; Lubart, Rachel; Fixler, Dror

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry has become a well-known technique for fabricating nanomaterials. Since one of the advantages of nanomaterials is that they have higher chemical activities compared with particles in the bulk form, efforts are being made to produce nano organic compounds with enhanced biological activities that could be exploited in the medical area. This study uses the sonication technique to prepare nano Vitamin B12 and nano Penicillin, and demonstrates their enhanced biological and pharmacological activity. The size and morphology of the nano Penicillin and nano Vitamin B12 were investigated using electron microscopy as well as dynamic light scattering techniques. The sizes of Penicillin and Vitamin B12 nanoparticles (NPs) were found to be 70 and 120–180 nm, respectively. The bactericidal effect of nano Penicillin was studied and found to be higher than that of the bulk form. Reducing the size of Vitamin B12 resulted in their enhanced antioxidative activity as observed using the electron paramagnetic spectroscopy technique. The penetration depth of these organic NPs can be detected by an optical iterative method. It is believed that nano organic drugs fabrication will have a great impact on the medical field. PMID:26028970

  2. Competitive chemiluminescent anzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent discoveries of matrix interferences by haptocorrin (HC) in human milk and serum show that past analyses of vitamin B12 in samples with high HC content might have been inaccurate (Lildballe et al., 2009; Carmel & Agrawal, 2012). We evaluated two competitive enzyme-binding immunoassays for seru...

  3. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17670.001 PMID:27383050

  4. Genomic Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae IIEMP-3, a Vitamin B12-Producing Strain from Indonesian Tempeh.

    PubMed

    Yulandi, Adi; Sugiokto, Febri Gunawan; Febrilina; Suwanto, Antonius

    2016-02-25

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain IIEMP-3, isolated from Indonesian tempeh, is a vitamin B12-producing strain that exhibited a different genetic profile from pathogenic isolates. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain IIEMP-3, which may provide insights on the nature of fermentation, nutrition, and immunological function of Indonesian tempeh.

  5. Copper control of bacterial nitrous oxide emission and its impact on vitamin B12-dependent metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Matthew J.; Gates, Andrew J.; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Rowley, Gary; Richardson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Global agricultural emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have increased by around 20% over the last 100 y, but regulation of these emissions and their impact on bacterial cellular metabolism are poorly understood. Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrate in soils to inert di-nitrogen gas (N2) via N2O and the biochemistry of this process has been studied extensively in Paracoccus denitrificans. Here we demonstrate that expression of the gene encoding the nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ), which converts N2O to N2, is regulated in response to the extracellular copper concentration. We show that elevated levels of N2O released as a consequence of decreased cellular NosZ activity lead to the bacterium switching from vitamin B12-dependent to vitamin B12-independent biosynthetic pathways, through the transcriptional modulation of genes controlled by vitamin B12 riboswitches. This inhibitory effect of N2O can be rescued by addition of exogenous vitamin B12. PMID:24248380

  6. Effects of Formulation Variables and Storage Conditions on Light Protected Vitamin B12 Mixed Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this research the effect of vitamin B1 and B6 on cyanocobalamin stability in commercial light protected parenteral formulations and upon adding stabilizing agents will be investigated and best formulation composition and proper storage condition will be introduced. Methods: In this research some additives such as co solvents and tonicity adjusters, surfactants, antioxidants and chelating agents as well as buffer solutions, were used to improve the stability of the parenteral mixed formulations of B12 in the presence of other B vitamins (B1 and B6). Screening tests and accelerated stability tests were performed according to ICH guidelines Q1A (R2). Results: Shelf life evaluation revealed the best formulation and the proper storage condition. The results indicated the first kinetic models for all tested formulations and the optimum pH value was determined to be 5.8. There was no evidence of B12 loss when mixed with B1 and B6 in a medical syringe at room temperature for maximum of 8 hours. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate vitamin B12 mixed parenteral solutions using proper phosphate buffers (pH=5.8) and to indicate “Store in refrigerator” on the mixed parenteral formulations of vitamin B12 with other B vitamins, which has not been expressed on the label of tested Brand formulations at the time of this study. PMID:25436187

  7. Improved vitamin B12 fermentation process by adding rotenone to regulate the metabolism of Pseudomonas denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Chen, Wei; Peng, Wei-Fu; Li, Kun-Tai

    2014-06-01

    Our previous research had revealed that the dissolved oxygen limitation was more favorable for vitamin B12 fermentation, due to its inducement to the increased glycolytic flux in Pseudomonas denitrificans. In this paper, a novel strategy was implemented to further investigate the metabolic characteristics of P. denitrificans under different oxygen supply levels, by exogenously adding rotenone (a respiratory chain inhibitor interfering with the oxygen consumption) to the fermentation broths. Compared to the fermentation process without rotenone treatment, it was observed that 5 mg/L rotenone treatment could significantly strengthen the glycolytic flux of P. denitrificans via activating the key glycolytic enzymes (phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase), resulting in the accelerated generations of anterior precursors (glutamate and 5-aminolevulinic acid) for vitamin B12 biosynthesis. Although 5 mg/L rotenone treatment had a negative effect on cell growth of P. denitrificans, the vitamin B12 yield was increased from 48.28 ± 0.62 mg/L to 54.70 ± 0.45 mg/L, which further proved that an increased glycolytic flux in P. denitrificans was a consequence of higher vitamin B12 production. PMID:24687557

  8. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Acyl Coenzyme A Substrates Enables in Situ Labeling of Small Molecules and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Diethelm, Stefan; Ray, Lauren; Garg, Neha; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-09-18

    A chemoenzymatic approach to generate fully functional acyl coenzyme A molecules that are then used as substrates to drive in situ acyl transfer reactions is described. Mass spectrometry based assays to verify the identity of acyl coenzyme A enzymatic products are also illustrated. The approach is responsive to a diverse array of carboxylic acids that can be elaborated to their corresponding coenzyme A thioesters, with potential applications in wide-ranging chemical biology studies that utilize acyl coenzyme A substrates.

  9. Algorithm for the early diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Gonzalo; Sola, Ricardo; Barrios, Laura; Pietrzik, Klaus; Castillo, Manuel J; González-Gross, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: Los mayores son una población que presenta un riesgo importante de desarrollar una deficiencia de vitamina B12, pero las concentraciones de cobalamina en suero no reflejan necesariamente un estado abnormal en el estado de B12 . Existen biomarcadores asociados a la vitamina B12: el ácido metilmalónico no está disponible en todos los laboratorios, la holotranscobalamina es poco sensible y la homocisteína presenta una baja especificidad. El objetivo del presente estudio es establecer un algoritmo de diagnóstico mediante el uso de una combinación de estos biomarcadores en lugar de la medición de uno sólo de ellos. Métodos: Se comparó la eficacia diagnóstica de estos marcadores para la detección de deficiencia de vitamina B12 en una población (n = 218) de ancianos institucionalizados (edad media 80 años). Los parámetros bioquímicos, hematológicos y morfológicos fueron utilizados para clasificar a los sujetos con o sin deficiencia de vitamina B12. Resultados: Se establecieron las curvas ROC (Receiver Operating Curves) para determinar la eficacia diagnóstica de cada parámetro, tomado individualmente. El folato sérico tenía la mayor área bajo la curva (0,87) y la homocisteína la más baja (0,67). Se observó que la mejor especificidad la presentaba el folato eritrocitario y el ácido metilmalónico (100% para ambos), pero sus sensibilidades eran muy bajas (17% y 53%, respectivamente). Y se observó que la sensibilidad más alta la presentaba la homocisteína (81%) y el folato sérico (74%), pero en contrapartida una especificidad baja. Cuando se combinaron estos marcadores, iniciando las determinaciones con el folato sérco y eritrocitario, seguido por holotranscobalamina y terminando por las mediciones de ácido metilmalónico, la sensibilidad y especificidad global del algoritmo fueron 100% y 90%, respectivamente. Conclusión: El algoritmo propuesto, que combina la determinación de folato sérico y eritrocitario

  10. [Vitamin B12 deficiency associated with high doses od metformin in older people diabetic].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Hugo; Masferrer, Dominique; Lera, Lydia; Arancibia, Estrella; Angel, Barbara; Albala, Cecilia

    2014-06-01

    Introducción: El objetivo del estudio es estimar si el déficit de B12 se asocia con el uso de la metformina en adultos mayores (AM) diabéticos. Métodos: Estudio de casos y controles en AM diabéticos. Los casos (n = 137) se definieron como AM con B12 < 221 pmol/L y los controles(n = 279) como AM con B12 > 221 pmol/L. Se definieron 4 categorías de uso de metformina: no usuarios, ≤850 mg/día; > 850 y < 2.550 mg/día; ≥2.550 mg/día. Se consideró altas dosis de metformina (≥2.550 mg/día). Se calcularon los OR crudos para déficit de B12 y consumo de Metformina. Se elaboraron modelos de regresión logística para explorar la asociación entre déficit B12 y dosis de metformina. El protocolo de investigación fue aprobado por el Comité de Ética deI INTA. Resultados: La edad de casos y controles fue (70,2 años vs 68,6 años (p < 0,05); 62% fueron mujeres en los casos vs 74,9% en los controles (p < 0,05). El 73% de los casos y el 76% de los controles usaban metformina (p < 0,05). El promedio de uso de metformina fue de 1.954,3 mg/día (DS: 1.063,2) en los casos y 1696.6 mg/día (DS: 1.074,4) en los controles(p < 0,05). La dosis de 2.550 mg/día se observó en el 29,2% de los casos y en 19,3 de los controles (p < 0,05). Se observó que los adultos mayores que consumían altas dosis de metformina presentaban 1,9 veces más riesgo de déficit de B12 (OR:1,9; 95%IC: 1,08-3,30). Conclusión: Estos resultados muestran una fuerte asociación entre altas dosis de metformina y niveles bajos de vitamina B12. Este proyecto fue financiado por FONIS SA11I2092.

  11. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  12. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  13. Comparative genomic analyses of nickel, cobalt and vitamin B12 utilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2009-01-01

    Background Nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) are trace elements required for a variety of biological processes. Ni is directly coordinated by proteins, whereas Co is mainly used as a component of vitamin B12. Although a number of Ni and Co-dependent enzymes have been characterized, systematic evolutionary analyses of utilization of these metals are limited. Results We carried out comparative genomic analyses to examine occurrence and evolutionary dynamics of the use of Ni and Co at the level of (i) transport systems, and (ii) metalloproteomes. Our data show that both metals are widely used in bacteria and archaea. Cbi/NikMNQO is the most common prokaryotic Ni/Co transporter, while Ni-dependent urease and Ni-Fe hydrogenase, and B12-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), ribonucleotide reductase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase are the most widespread metalloproteins for Ni and Co, respectively. Occurrence of other metalloenzymes showed a mosaic distribution and a new B12-dependent protein family was predicted. Deltaproteobacteria and Methanosarcina generally have larger Ni- and Co-dependent proteomes. On the other hand, utilization of these two metals is limited in eukaryotes, and very few of these organisms utilize both of them. The Ni-utilizing eukaryotes are mostly fungi (except saccharomycotina) and plants, whereas most B12-utilizing organisms are animals. The NiCoT transporter family is the most widespread eukaryotic Ni transporter, and eukaryotic urease and MetH are the most common Ni- and B12-dependent enzymes, respectively. Finally, investigation of environmental and other conditions and identity of organisms that show dependence on Ni or Co revealed that host-associated organisms (particularly obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts) have a tendency for loss of Ni/Co utilization. Conclusion Our data provide information on the evolutionary dynamics of Ni and Co utilization and highlight widespread use of these metals in the three domains of life, yet only a

  14. Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels in Thai Patients with Oral Lichenoid Related Drug

    PubMed Central

    Panyawaraphon, Tin; Pathomkulmai, Thanapat; Hungsaprug, Sahaphon

    2015-01-01

    Background Medications have been increasingly used by patients for the treatment of their systemic diseases. However, many drugs are reported to induce oral lichenoid lesions (OLL). Aim The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between OLL, medications, and folate and vitamin B12 levels. Material and Methods Twenty Thai patients who were diagnosed with OLL by clinical and histopathological examination were included in this study. These subjects were compared with 24 healthy control subjects. Complete blood counts, hemoglobin typing, serum and red cell folate, and serum vitamin B12 levels were investigated. The medications taken and the systemic diseases of the Thai patients with OLL were recorded and analyzed. Results Our results showed that only 1/20 patients with OLL (5%) had low red cell folate and only 1 case showed a low level of serum folate. Vitamin B12 levels were within normal range in both groups. There were no significant differences in red cell folate, serum folate, or vitamin B12 levels between the patients with OLL and the control group (p>0.05). Four cases in OLL and 3 cases in the control group had low hematocrit less than 36% and they were defined as anemic. Conclusion Antihypertensives and hypolipidemics were the most common medications taken by patients with OLL; however, these drugs had no effect on red cell folate, serum folate, or vitamin B12 levels. Since the patients were taking multiple drugs and we could not confirm the diagnosis of OLDR by withdrawal of the drugs, we used the term OLL related drug instead. PMID:27688405

  15. Aluminum distribution in the boron framework of γ-AlB 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Iwami

    1983-05-01

    The crystal structure of γ-AlB 12 ( P2 12 12 1; a = 16.573(4), b = 17.510(3), c = 10.144(1)Å) was reinvestigated by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry and the nature of the metal distribution in the boron framework examined. Starting from the structure data published by Hughes et al. (Journal of the American Chemical Society 83, 2337 (1977)), 458 independent parameters, including the occupancies of 11 Al sites, were finally refined to a conventional R value of 2.9%. A total of 5282 observed unique reflections (Mo Kα radiation; 2θ < 64°) were used. Although distributed in an apparently complicated manner, the aluminum atoms occur in the boron framework according to a simple rule as in the crystals of the α-AlB 12 structure type. The numbers of the valence electrons of Al, allotted to the six boron subunits, B 12(i-iv), B 20-(C 2, C s), proportionately to the contact frequencies of Al with the units, are 2.2, 1.9, 2.2, 1.9, 5.3, and 5.2, respectively. The charge assignment is compatible with the ionic formula {20}/{3}Al+3 · 4B 12-2 · 2 B20-6, proposed from preliminary molecular orbital calculations. A negative charge balance among the six boron units at about 1:1:1:1:3:3 seems to be essential for making up the stable boron framework of γ-AlB 12.

  16. Intakes of Folate and Vitamin B12 and Biomarkers of Status in the Very Old: The Newcastle 85+ Study

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Nuno; Mathers, John C.; Adamson, Ashley J.; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Seal, Chris J.; Jagger, Carol; Hill, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Very old adults are at increased risk of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies due to reduced food intake and gastrointestinal absorption. The main aim was to determine the association between folate and vitamin B12 intake from total diets and food groups, and status. Folate or vitamin B12 intakes (2 × 24 h multiple pass recalls) and red blood cell (RBC) folate or plasma vitamin B12 (chemiluminescence immunoassays) concentrations were available at baseline for 731 participants aged 85 from the Newcastle 85+ Study (North-East England). Generalized additive and binary logistic models estimated the associations between folate and vitamin B12 intakes from total diets and food groups, and RBC folate and plasma B12. Folate intake from total diets and cereal and cereal products was strongly associated with RBC folate (p < 0.001). Total vitamin B12 intake was weakly associated with plasma vitamin B12 (p = 0.054) but those with higher intakes from total diets or meat and meat products were less likely to have deficient status. Women homozygous for the FUT2 G allele had higher concentrations of plasma vitamin B12. Cereals and cereal products are a very important source of folate in the very old. Higher intakes of folate and vitamin B12 lower the risk of “inadequate” status. PMID:27690091

  17. Structural Insight into Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase Chemistry Using Coenzyme B Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Pearson, Arwen R.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2010-09-07

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step in methane biogenesis: the reduction of methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-SCoM) by coenzyme B (CoBSH) to methane and a heterodisulfide (CoBS-SCoM). Crystallographic studies show that the active site is deeply buried within the enzyme and contains a highly reduced nickel-tetrapyrrole, coenzyme F430. Methyl-SCoM must enter the active site prior to CoBSH, as species derived from methyl-SCoM are always observed bound to the F430 nickel in the deepest part of the 30 {angstrom} long substrate channel that leads from the protein surface to the active site. The seven-carbon mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoBSH binds within a 16 {angstrom} predominantly hydrophobic part of the channel close to F430, with the CoBSH thiolate lying closest to the nickel at a distance of 8.8 {angstrom}. It has previously been suggested that binding of CoBSH initiates catalysis by inducing a conformational change that moves methyl-SCoM closer to the nickel promoting cleavage of the C-S bond of methyl-SCoM. In order to better understand the structural role of CoBSH early in the MCR mechanism, we have determined crystal structures of MCR in complex with four different CoBSH analogues: pentanoyl, hexanoyl, octanoyl, and nonanoyl derivatives of CoBSH (CoB5SH, CoB6SH, CoB8SH, and CoB9SH, respectively). The data presented here reveal that the shorter CoB5SH mercaptoalkanoyl chain overlays with that of CoBSH but terminates two units short of the CoBSH thiolate position. In contrast, the mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoB6SH adopts a different conformation, such that its thiolate is coincident with the position of the CoBSH thiolate. This is consistent with the observation that CoB6SH is a slow substrate. A labile water in the substrate channel was found to be a sensitive indicator for the presence of CoBSH and HSCoM. The longer CoB8SH and CoB9SH analogues can be accommodated in the active site through exclusion of this water. These analogues

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency with intrinsic factor antibodies in an infant with poor growth and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Kathleen; Chowdhury, Dhiman; Penney, Lynette; Rashid, Mohsin

    2014-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is very rare in infants and may lead to serious hematological and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The present article describes a case involving a seven-month-old boy with severe vitamin B12 deficiency, likely caused by juvenile pernicious anemia, an entity rarely described. The child presented with feeding intolerance, poor growth and developmental delay. He was noted to have macrocytic anemia, a markedly low serum vitamin B12 level, and elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels. Antibodies to intrinsic factor were positive. The mother was healthy, with normal vitamin B12 status. Therapy with vitamin B12 supplements led to excellent recovery of symptoms. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in children presenting with failure to thrive, especially when compounded with neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment is essential to avoid serious complications. PMID:24596481

  19. UNDERNUTRITION, SERUM VITAMIN B12, FOLIC ACID AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN OLDER ADULTS.

    PubMed

    Brito Noronha, Mafalda; Almeida Cunha, Nathalie; Agra Araújo, Daniela; Flamínio Abrunhosa, Sofia; Nunes Rocha, Ada; Freitas Amaral, Teresa

    2015-07-01

    Antecedentes: la cuestión del posible vínculo entre la desnutrición y los síntomas depresivos, considerando el efecto de las deficiencias de vitamina B12 y de folato, es de importancia práctica porque estas son potencialmente prevenibles y tratables. Este estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar si la desnutrición está relacionada con los síntomas depresivos, teniendo en cuenta el efecto de los niveles plasmáticos de vitamina B12 y de folato. Método: un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en una muestra de 84 adultos mayores que viven en hogares de cuidado. Se obtuvieron datos sobre el estado nutricional utilizando Mini-Nutritional Assessment, los niveles séricos de ácido fólico y vitamina B12, la capacidad cognitiva, la dependencia funcional, y/o los síntomas de comportamiento depresivo. Los síntomas de depresión se midieron utilizando la versión de 20 ítems de la Escala de Depresión del Centro de Estudios Epidemiológicos. Resultados: cincuenta y tres adultos mayores estaban en riesgo de depresión (63,1%). De ellos, el 34% estaban en riesgo de desnutrición. Aunque se encontró una alta frecuencia de adultos mayores con bajos niveles plasmáticos de vitamina B12 (42,9%) y niveles más bajos de ácido fólico (5,9%), no se encontraron diferencias significativas en relación con la existencia de síntomas depresivos. En el análisis multivariable se observó un aumento en el riesgo de depresión entre los participantes con riesgo nutricional OR = 3,47 (1,05 a 11,46), mientras tener bajos niveles de ácido fólico y vitamina B12 no se asociaron con el riesgo de depresión. Conclusión: entre los adultos mayores desnutridos se observó un aumento en el riesgo de depresión, independientemente del ácido fólico y del estado de la vitamina B12. Estos resultados ponen de manifiesto la necesidad de implementar estrategias preventivas, especialmente dirigidas a los adultos mayores que viven en hogares de cuidado.

  20. Insights into dechlorination of PCE and TCE from carbon isotope fractionation by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lesage, S.; Brown, S.

    2003-04-01

    Reductive dechlorination of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by vitamin B12 is both a potential remediation technique and an analogue of the microbial reductive dechlorination reaction. Stable carbon isotopic analysis, an effective and powerful tool for the investigation and monitoring of contaminant remediation, was used to characterize the isotopic effects of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE by vitamin B12 in laboratory microcosms. 10 mg/L vitamin B12 degraded greater than 90% of an initial concentration of PCE of 20 mg/L. TCE, the primary product of PCE degradation, accounted for between 64 - 72% of the PCE degraded. In experiments with TCE, 147 mg/L vitamin B12 degraded greater than 90% of an initial concentration of TCE of 20 mg/L. Cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), the primary product of TCE degradation, accounted for between 30 - 35% of the TCE degraded. Degradation of both PCE and TCE exhibited first order kinetics. Strong isotopic fractionation of the reactant PCE and of the reactant TCE was observed over the course of degradation. This fractionation could be described by a Rayleigh model with enrichment factors between -16.5 ppm and -15.8 ppm for PCE, and -17.2 ppm and -16.6 ppm for TCE. Fractionation was similar in all four experiments, with a mean enrichment factor of -16.5 +/- 0.6 ppm. These large enrichment factors indicate that isotopic analysis can be used to assess the occurrence of dechlorination of PCE and TCE by vitamin B12 in remediation situations. Significantly, the Rayleigh model could be used to predict the isotopic compositions of the major products of the reaction as well as the reactant, notwithstanding the lack of complete mass balance observed between product and reactant. This evidence suggests that isotopic fractionation is taking place during complexation of the chlorinated ethenes to vitamin B12, as has been suggested for reductive dechlorination by zero valent iron. The differences between e for this reaction and

  1. A combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids across two generations improves cardiometabolic variables in rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Randhir, Karuna; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2016-09-14

    Our earlier studies indicate that micronutrients (vitamin B12, folic acid) and omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are interlinked in one carbon cycle. The present study examines the effects of a sustained vitamin B12 deficiency/supplementation in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids across two generations on the pregnancy outcome and cardiometabolic profile [blood pressure, plasma lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides), plasma/liver fatty acid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism] in the second generation adult Wistar rat offspring. Two generations of animals were fed the following diets: control; vitamin B12 deficient; vitamin B12 supplemented; vitamin B12 deficient diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids; vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplemented diets. Male offspring were sacrificed at 3 months of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency lowered the weight gain (p < 0.01) during pregnancy, increased systolic (p < 0.05) and diastolic (p < 0.01) blood pressure, and lowered the levels of plasma/liver DHA (p < 0.05 for both) but did not affect the lipid profile. Vitamin B12 supplementation showed weight gain, blood pressure and the fatty acid profile similar to the control. However, it increased (p < 0.05) the levels of plasma triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to the vitamin B12 deficient group lowered the weight gain although the levels of cardiometabolic variables were comparable to the control. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in the presence of vitamin B12 improved the pregnancy outcome and all cardio-metabolic variables. Our study highlights the adverse effects of sustained vitamin B12 deficiency across two generations on the pregnancy outcome, fatty acid profile and blood pressure while a combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids is beneficial.

  2. Low Vitamin B12 Levels among Newly-Arrived Refugees from Bhutan, Iran and Afghanistan: A Multicentre Australian Study

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Jill; Phillips, Christine; Kay, Margaret; Webber, Murray T.; Ratcliff, Alison J.; Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Lorimer, Michelle F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin B12 deficiency is prevalent in many countries of origin of refugees. Using a threshold of 5% above which a prevalence of low Vitamin B12 is indicative of a population health problem, we hypothesised that Vitamin B12 deficiency exceeds this threshold among newly-arrived refugees resettling in Australia, and is higher among women due to their increased risk of food insecurity. This paper reports Vitamin B12 levels in a large cohort of newly arrived refugees in five Australian states and territories. Methods In a cross-sectional descriptive study, we collected Vitamin B12, folate and haematological indices on all refugees (n = 916; response rate 94% of eligible population) who had been in Australia for less than one year, and attended one of the collaborating health services between July 2010 and July 2011. Results 16.5% of participants had Vitamin B12 deficiency (<150 pmol/L). One-third of participants from Iran and Bhutan, and one-quarter of participants from Afghanistan had Vitamin B12 deficiency. Contrary to our hypothesis, low Vitamin B12 levels were more prevalent in males than females. A higher prevalence of low Vitamin B12 was also reported in older age groups in some countries. The sensitivity of macrocytosis in detecting Vitamin B12 deficiency was only 4.6%. Conclusion Vitamin B12 deficiency is an important population health issue in newly-arrived refugees from many countries. All newly-arrived refugees should be tested for Vitamin B12 deficiency. Ongoing research should investigate causes, treatment, and ways to mitigate food insecurity, and the contribution of such measures to enhancing the health of the refugee communities. PMID:23469126

  3. Stability and aromaticity of nH2@B12N12 (n=1–12) clusters

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Santanab; Chakraborty, Arindam; Chattaraj, Pratim K.

    2011-01-01

    Standard ab initio and density functional calculations are carried out to determine the structure, stability, and reactivity of B12N12 clusters with hydrogen doping. To lend additional support, conceptual DFT-based reactivity descriptors and the associated electronic structure principles are also used. Related cage aromaticity of this B12N12 and nH2@B12N12 are analyzed through the nucleus independent chemical shift values. PMID:22110872

  4. A combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids across two generations improves cardiometabolic variables in rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Randhir, Karuna; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2016-09-14

    Our earlier studies indicate that micronutrients (vitamin B12, folic acid) and omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are interlinked in one carbon cycle. The present study examines the effects of a sustained vitamin B12 deficiency/supplementation in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids across two generations on the pregnancy outcome and cardiometabolic profile [blood pressure, plasma lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides), plasma/liver fatty acid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism] in the second generation adult Wistar rat offspring. Two generations of animals were fed the following diets: control; vitamin B12 deficient; vitamin B12 supplemented; vitamin B12 deficient diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids; vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplemented diets. Male offspring were sacrificed at 3 months of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency lowered the weight gain (p < 0.01) during pregnancy, increased systolic (p < 0.05) and diastolic (p < 0.01) blood pressure, and lowered the levels of plasma/liver DHA (p < 0.05 for both) but did not affect the lipid profile. Vitamin B12 supplementation showed weight gain, blood pressure and the fatty acid profile similar to the control. However, it increased (p < 0.05) the levels of plasma triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to the vitamin B12 deficient group lowered the weight gain although the levels of cardiometabolic variables were comparable to the control. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in the presence of vitamin B12 improved the pregnancy outcome and all cardio-metabolic variables. Our study highlights the adverse effects of sustained vitamin B12 deficiency across two generations on the pregnancy outcome, fatty acid profile and blood pressure while a combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids is beneficial. PMID:27528436

  5. Do high blood folate concentrations exacerbate metabolic abnormalities in people with low vitamin B-12 status?123

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James L; Carter, Tonia C; Scott, John M; Troendle, James F; Gibney, Eileen R; Shane, Barry; Kirke, Peadar N; Ueland, Per M; Brody, Lawrence C; Molloy, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    Background: In elderly individuals with low serum vitamin B-12, those who have high serum folate have been reported to have greater abnormalities in the following biomarkers for vitamin B-12 deficiency: low hemoglobin and elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA). This suggests that folate exacerbates vitamin B-12–related metabolic abnormalities. Objective: We determined whether high serum folate in individuals with low serum vitamin B-12 increases the deleterious effects of low vitamin B-12 on biomarkers of vitamin B-12 cellular function. Design: In this cross-sectional study, 2507 university students provided data on medical history and exposure to folic acid and vitamin B-12 supplements. Blood was collected to measure serum and red blood cell folate (RCF), hemoglobin, plasma tHcy, and MMA, holotranscobalamin, and ferritin in serum. Results: In subjects with low vitamin B-12 concentrations (<148 pmol/L), those who had high folate concentrations (>30 nmol/L; group 1) did not show greater abnormalities in vitamin B-12 cellular function in any area than did those with lower folate concentrations (≤30 nmol/L; group 2). Group 1 had significantly higher holotranscobalamin and RCF, significantly lower tHcy, and nonsignificantly lower (P = 0.057) MMA concentrations than did group 2. The groups did not differ significantly in hemoglobin or ferritin. Compared with group 2, group 1 had significantly higher mean intakes of folic acid and vitamin B-12 from supplements and fortified food. Conclusions: In this young adult population, high folate concentrations did not exacerbate the biochemical abnormalities related to vitamin B-12 deficiency. These results provide reassurance that folic acid in fortified foods and supplements does not interfere with vitamin B-12 metabolism at the cellular level in a healthy population. PMID:21653798

  6. Investigation on the pH-dependent binding of vitamin B12 and lysozyme by fluorescence and absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daojin; Yang, Yumin; Cao, Xinxiang; Xu, Chen; Ji, Baoming

    2012-01-01

    The binding reaction between vitamin B12 (B12, cyanocobalamin) and lysozyme (Lys) has been investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet-vis (UV) absorbance, and three-dimensional fluorescence. The intrinsic fluorescence of Lys was strongly quenched by the addition of B12 in different pH buffer solutions (pH 3.4, 7.4, and 9.0) and the spectroscopic observations are mainly rationalized in terms of a static quenching process at lower concentration of B12 ( CB12/ CLys < 5) and a combined quenching process at higher concentration of B12 ( CB12/ CLys > 5). The structural characteristics of B12 and Lys were probed, and their binding affinities were determined under different pH conditions (pH 3.4, 7.4, and 9.0). The effect of B12 on the conformation of Lys was analyzed using UV, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence under different pH conditions. These results indicate that the binding of B12 to Lys causes apparent change in the secondary or tertiary structures of Lys. Furthermore, the effect of Zn 2+ on the binding constant of B12 with Lys under various pH conditions (pH 3.4, 7.4, and 9.0) was also studied.

  7. Contribution of Food Sources to the Vitamin B12 Status of South Indian Children from a Birth Cohort Recruited in the City of Mysore

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is evidence that sub-clinical vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency is common in India. Vegetarianism is prevalent and therefore meat consumption is low. Our objective was to explore the contribution of B12 source-foods and maternal B12 status during pregnancy to plasma B12 concentrations. Design Maternal plasma B12 concentrations were measured during pregnancy. Children’s dietary intakes and plasma B12 concentrations were measured at age 9.5 years; B12 and total energy intakes were calculated using food composition databases. We used linear regression to examine associations between maternal B12 status and children’s intakes of B12 and B12 source-foods, and children’s plasma B12 concentrations. Setting South Indian city of Mysore and surrounding rural areas. Subjects Children from the Mysore Parthenon Birth Cohort (n=512, 47.1% male). Results Three percent of children were B12 deficient (<150 pmol/l). A further 14% had ‘marginal’ B12 concentrations (150-221 pmol/l). Children’s total daily B12 intake and consumption frequency of meat and fish, and micronutrient-enriched beverages were positively associated with plasma B12 concentrations (p=0.006, p=0.01 and p=0.04, adjusted for socio-economic indicators and maternal B12 status). Maternal pregnancy plasma B12 was associated with children’s plasma B12 concentrations, independent of current B12 intakes (p<0.001). Milk and curd (yoghurt) intakes were unrelated to B12 status. Conclusions Meat and fish are important B12 sources in this population. Micronutrient-enriched beverages appear to be important sources in our cohort, but their high sugar content necessitates care in their recommendation. Improving maternal B12 status in pregnancy may improve Indian children’s status. PMID:24866058

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, Iñaki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention. PMID:25988174

  9. [Metabolic and nutritional neuropathies: update in diabetes, vitamin B12 and copper deficiency].

    PubMed

    Franques, J; Gazzola, S

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic and deficiency neuropathies retain a growing interest because of their important prevalence. The dismemberment of diabetic neuropathies is proceeded, letting distinct pathophysiological mechanisms appear. So, even if glycaemic control remains determining for preventing the neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes, it seems to have a restricted role with type 2 diabetes in which other metabolic factors are involved. The diagnosis of neuropathy due to B12 vitamin deficiency remains a real challenge for the clinician. Indeed, positive and negative predictive values of serum B12 and metabolites assay are weak, only a good therapeutic response allows a reliable diagnostic. It is so recommended to know the clinical and contextual particularities of this etiology in order to not delay the vitamin substitution, determining for the functional outcome. Finally, copper deficiency remains an unknown cause of neuropathy which is suitable to raise in case of malabsorption but also and especially in case of abuse of dental adhesive rich in zinc. PMID:24269115

  10. Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Young Lady due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency Induced Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Shamkani, Warkaa Al; Jafar, Nagham Saeed; Narayanan, Sunil Roy; Rajappan, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is a risk factor for coronary artery disease in young patients. A 32 years old female without any conventional risk factors except obesity presented with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction (MI). Her echocardiography showed anterior wall hypokinesia with moderate left ventricular dysfunction. Angiography showed tight stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and borderline lesion in left circumflex coronary artery (LCX). She underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to LAD with good result. Her blood tests showed low vitamin B12, folate and serum iron levels and elevated serum homocysteine level. She was given folic acid and vitamin B12 and her homocysteine levels normalized. This case demonstrates that hyperhomocysteinemia caused by nutritional deficiency of vitamin co factors may lead to MI. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be considered in the evalauation of young people with MI, especially those without conventional risk factors.

  11. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  12. High resolution spectroscopy of B12L hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsour, Murad G.

    Jefferson Laboratory experiment E89-009 used the reaction (e,e 'K+) to produce B12L hypernuclei from a carbon target. The scattered electrons were tagged at 0° to take advantage of the increased virtual photon flux at forward angles, and the electroproduced kaons were also detected at small angles, ˜3°, to minimize the momentum transfer. To do this, a splitter magnet was used to bend the scattered electrons into an Enge split-pole spectrometer and the kaons into a short orbit spectrometer. In addition to increasing the production rate, tagging the scattered electrons at 0° minimizes the optical aberrations on the focal plane of the Enge split-pole spectrometer. In this experiment, the spectroscopy of the B12L hypernuclei was studied and excellent energy resolution was achieved, ˜918 keV. The differential cross section of the ground state doublet was also calculated.

  13. Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Young Lady due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency Induced Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamkani, Warkaa Al; Jafar, Nagham Saeed; Narayanan, Sunil Roy; Rajappan, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is a risk factor for coronary artery disease in young patients. A 32 years old female without any conventional risk factors except obesity presented with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction (MI). Her echocardiography showed anterior wall hypokinesia with moderate left ventricular dysfunction. Angiography showed tight stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and borderline lesion in left circumflex coronary artery (LCX). She underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to LAD with good result. Her blood tests showed low vitamin B12, folate and serum iron levels and elevated serum homocysteine level. She was given folic acid and vitamin B12 and her homocysteine levels normalized. This case demonstrates that hyperhomocysteinemia caused by nutritional deficiency of vitamin co factors may lead to MI. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be considered in the evalauation of young people with MI, especially those without conventional risk factors. PMID:25838876

  14. Cytochemical studies of nuclear basic proteins in control and vitamin B12 starved Euglena.

    PubMed

    Bré, M H; Pouphile, M; Delpech, S; Lefort-Tran, M

    1983-09-01

    In avitaminosis B12, Euglena gracilis Z is blocked in the cell cycle in the S/G2 phase. In these blocked cells, transcription and traduction go on and the amount of DNA is less than doubled and remains constant during the blockage. Chromatin clumps observed in situ with classical electron microscopic methods are always condensed in control cells but are not visualized in B12 starved cells. Two cytochemical reactions, ethanolic phosphotungstic acid and ammoniacal silver reaction, specific for lysine- or arginine-rich residues, are performed to reveal basic nuclear proteins of chromatin. With these two methods, control chromatin in situ always shows a condensed aspect, whereas the starved chromatin appears dispersed. These cytochemical differences might be considered to result from a different supramolecular organization of the two kinds of chromatin.

  15. [Metabolic and nutritional neuropathies: update in diabetes, vitamin B12 and copper deficiency].

    PubMed

    Franques, J; Gazzola, S

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic and deficiency neuropathies retain a growing interest because of their important prevalence. The dismemberment of diabetic neuropathies is proceeded, letting distinct pathophysiological mechanisms appear. So, even if glycaemic control remains determining for preventing the neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes, it seems to have a restricted role with type 2 diabetes in which other metabolic factors are involved. The diagnosis of neuropathy due to B12 vitamin deficiency remains a real challenge for the clinician. Indeed, positive and negative predictive values of serum B12 and metabolites assay are weak, only a good therapeutic response allows a reliable diagnostic. It is so recommended to know the clinical and contextual particularities of this etiology in order to not delay the vitamin substitution, determining for the functional outcome. Finally, copper deficiency remains an unknown cause of neuropathy which is suitable to raise in case of malabsorption but also and especially in case of abuse of dental adhesive rich in zinc.

  16. Theoretical analysis of electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniow, Tadeusz; Kozlowski, Pawel M.; Zgierski, Marek Z.

    2001-10-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) is applied to analyze the electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12. To accomplish this two model systems were considered: CN-[CoIII-corrin]-CN (dicyanocobinamide, DCC) and imidazole-[CoIII-corrin]-CN (cyanocobalamin, ImCC). For both models 30 lowest excited states were calculated together with transition dipole moments. When the results of TD-DFT calculations were directly compared with experiment it was found that the theoretical values systematically overestimate experimental data by approximately 0.5 eV. The uniform adjustment of the calculated transition energies allowed detailed analysis of electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12 models. All absorption bands in spectral range 2.0-5.0 eV were readily assigned. In particular, TD-DFT calculations were able to explain the origin of the shift of the lowest absorption band caused by replacement of the-CN axial ligand by imidazole.

  17. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Hanna M; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente; Fraaije, Marco W

    2010-11-01

    Type I Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP(+), we identified four residues that could interact with the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs.

  18. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Hanna M.; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E.; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Type I Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP+, we identified four residues that could interact with the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer–Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs. PMID:20703875

  19. Maternal vegan diet causing a serious infantile neurological disorder due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kühne, T; Bubl, R; Baumgartner, R

    1991-01-01

    We present a 9-month-old exclusively breast-fed baby of a strict vegetarian mother who had excluded all animal proteins from her diet. The patient's symptoms included dystrophy, weakness, muscular atrophy, loss of tendon reflexes, psychomotor regression and haematological abnormalities. Biochemical investigations revealed severe methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria in the patient, slight methylmalonic aciduria in the mother and low concentrations of serum vitamin B12 in both patient and mother.

  20. Ultra-fast mechanochemical synthesis of boron phosphides, BP and B12P2.

    PubMed

    Mukhanov, Vladimir A; Vrel, Dominique; Sokolov, Petr S; Le Godec, Yann; Solozhenko, Vladimir L

    2016-06-21

    Here we propose a new approach to the synthesis of single-phase boron phosphides (BP and B12P2) by mechanochemical reactions between boron phosphate and magnesium/magnesium diboride in the presence of an inert diluent (sodium chloride). The proposed method is characterized by the simplicity of implementation, high efficiency, low cost of the product, and good perspectives for large-scale production.

  1. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  2. Maternal vegan diet causing a serious infantile neurological disorder due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kühne, T; Bubl, R; Baumgartner, R

    1991-01-01

    We present a 9-month-old exclusively breast-fed baby of a strict vegetarian mother who had excluded all animal proteins from her diet. The patient's symptoms included dystrophy, weakness, muscular atrophy, loss of tendon reflexes, psychomotor regression and haematological abnormalities. Biochemical investigations revealed severe methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria in the patient, slight methylmalonic aciduria in the mother and low concentrations of serum vitamin B12 in both patient and mother. PMID:2044594

  3. The molecular genetics of coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Laredj, Leila N; Licitra, Floriana; Puccio, Hélène M

    2014-05-01

    Coenzyme Q, or ubiquinone, is an endogenously synthesized lipid-soluble antioxidant that plays a major role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Although extensively studied for decades, recent data on coenzyme Q have painted an exciting albeit incomplete picture of the multiple facets of this molecule's function. In humans, mutations in the genes involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q lead to a heterogeneous group of rare disorders, with most often severe and debilitating symptoms. In this review, we describe the current understanding of coenzyme Q biosynthesis, provide a detailed overview of human coenzyme Q deficiencies and discuss the existing mouse models for coenzyme Q deficiency. Furthermore, we briefly examine the current state of affairs in non-mitochondrial coenzyme Q functions and the latter's link to statin.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 Administration Increases Brain Mitochondrial Concentrations and Exerts Neuroprotective Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Russell T.; Yang, Lichuan; Browne, Susan; Baik, Myong; Flint Beal, M.

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain as well as a potent free radical scavenger in lipid and mitochondrial membranes. Feeding with coenzyme Q10 increased cerebral cortex concentrations in 12- and 24-month-old rats. In 12-month-old rats administration of coenzyme Q10 resulted in significant increases in cerebral cortex mitochondrial concentrations of coenzyme Q10. Oral administration of coenzyme Q10 markedly attenuated striatal lesions produced by systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid and significantly increased life span in a transgenic mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These results show that oral administration of coenzyme Q10 increases both brain and brain mitochondrial concentrations. They provide further evidence that coenzyme Q10 can exert neuroprotective effects that might be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Hepatoprotective role of vitamin B(12) and folic acid in arsenic intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Deb, Bimal; Maiti, Smarajit

    2012-01-01

    The present study elucidated the protective role of vitamin B(12) with folic acid against arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in female rats. Ingestion of sodium-arsenite- contaminated water [0.4 ppm/100 g body weight (b.w.)/day] in combination with vitamin B(12) plus folic acid (0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w./day) for 24 days to Wistar rats offered a significant protection against alone arsenic-induced distorted liver function, damaged histoarchitecture, elevated oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation of hepatic tissues. Arsenic only exposure decreased hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activities, and the level of nonprotein-soluble thiol (NPSH), with a concomitant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and conjugated dienes (CDs) in the liver. Vitamin supplementation restrained the increase of TBARS and CDs by restoring catalase, SOD, and NPSH levels. Restricted generation of free radicals may be correlated to the protection of DNA stability and hepatic morphology. This study explains the decisive role of vitamin B(12) with folic acid to ameliorate arsenic-mediated liver injuries. PMID:21848401

  6. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxypropionate) from glycerol using engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain without vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinjun; Xian, Mo; Liu, Wei; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhao, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxypropionate) (P3HP) is a biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastic. Previous studies demonstrated that engineered Escherichia coli strains can produce P3HP with supplementation of expensive vitamin B12. The present study examined the production of P3HP from glycerol in the recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, which naturally synthesizes vitamin B12. The genes glycerol dehydratase and its reactivation factor (dhaB123, gdrA, and gdrB from K. pneumoniae), aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldH from E. coli) were cloned and expressed in K. pneumoniae to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), with 2 genes (dhaT and yqhD) for biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol were deleted. To obtain P3HP production, propionyl-CoA synthetase (prpE from E. coli) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (phaC from Ralstonia eutropha) were introduced. Under the appropriate aeration condition, the cell yield and P3HP content were 0.24 g/L and 12.7% (wt/wt [cell dry weight]) respectively along with 2.03 g/L 3HP after 48 h cultivation. Although the yield is relatively low, this study shows the feasibility of producing P3HP in K. pneumoniae from glycerol without vitamin B12 for the first time. The results also suggest that the aeration conditions should be optimized carefully for the efficient production of P3HP. PMID:25621933

  7. Methylamine adsorption and decomposition on B12N12 nanocage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2014-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and decomposition of methylamine (CH3NH2) on the surface of a B12N12 fullerene-like nanocage. Two adsorption types and two reaction channels are identified. It is found that the electrical conductivity of the nanocage can be modified upon the adsorption of CH3NH2. The pathways of CH3NH2 decomposition via bond scission of the Csbnd N and Nsbnd H bonds are examined. The results indicate that Nsbnd H bond scission is the most favorable pathway on the B12N12 surface. The side reaction that generates CH3 and NH2 fragments is endothermic by 15.6 kcal/mol with an energy-barrier height of 81.5 kcal/mol. For the CH3NH2 decomposition on the B12N12 surface, the rate-determining step appears to be as the following reaction: CH3NH → CH3N + H.

  8. Vitamin B12 metabolism and status during pregnancy, lactation and infancy.

    PubMed

    Allen, L H

    1994-01-01

    This overview of vitamin B12 metabolism and requirements during the continuum of pregnancy and lactation has identified several gaps in our knowledge. More information is needed concerning the roles of the different transcobalamins during pregnancy and lactation, including their impact on placental and mammary transfer of cobalamin and their effect on intestinal absorption in the infant. Knowledge is needed about the relative importance of maternal stores and current dietary intake on fetal storage of the vitamin, and on its concentration in breast milk. Because there is some evidence that infant's urinary methylmalonic acid excretion is reduced by intakes slightly higher than the current RDA, the adequacy of the current RDA for vitamin B12 during infancy should be verified. Finally, it is possible that vitamin B12 deficiency is more common in pregnant and lactating women and their young children in developing countries than has been recognized previously, due primarily to malabsorption. It is important to confirm whether or not this is the case, in view of its potential impact on infant neurobehavioral development and the relative ease with which supplements of the vitamin could be provided.

  9. Hepatoprotective role of vitamin B(12) and folic acid in arsenic intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Deb, Bimal; Maiti, Smarajit

    2012-01-01

    The present study elucidated the protective role of vitamin B(12) with folic acid against arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in female rats. Ingestion of sodium-arsenite- contaminated water [0.4 ppm/100 g body weight (b.w.)/day] in combination with vitamin B(12) plus folic acid (0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w./day) for 24 days to Wistar rats offered a significant protection against alone arsenic-induced distorted liver function, damaged histoarchitecture, elevated oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation of hepatic tissues. Arsenic only exposure decreased hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activities, and the level of nonprotein-soluble thiol (NPSH), with a concomitant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and conjugated dienes (CDs) in the liver. Vitamin supplementation restrained the increase of TBARS and CDs by restoring catalase, SOD, and NPSH levels. Restricted generation of free radicals may be correlated to the protection of DNA stability and hepatic morphology. This study explains the decisive role of vitamin B(12) with folic acid to ameliorate arsenic-mediated liver injuries.

  10. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxypropionate) from glycerol using engineered Klebsiella pneumoniae strain without vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinjun; Xian, Mo; Liu, Wei; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhao, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxypropionate) (P3HP) is a biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastic. Previous studies demonstrated that engineered Escherichia coli strains can produce P3HP with supplementation of expensive vitamin B12. The present study examined the production of P3HP from glycerol in the recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, which naturally synthesizes vitamin B12. The genes glycerol dehydratase and its reactivation factor (dhaB123, gdrA, and gdrB from K. pneumoniae), aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldH from E. coli) were cloned and expressed in K. pneumoniae to produce 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), with 2 genes (dhaT and yqhD) for biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol were deleted. To obtain P3HP production, propionyl-CoA synthetase (prpE from E. coli) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (phaC from Ralstonia eutropha) were introduced. Under the appropriate aeration condition, the cell yield and P3HP content were 0.24 g/L and 12.7% (wt/wt [cell dry weight]) respectively along with 2.03 g/L 3HP after 48 h cultivation. Although the yield is relatively low, this study shows the feasibility of producing P3HP in K. pneumoniae from glycerol without vitamin B12 for the first time. The results also suggest that the aeration conditions should be optimized carefully for the efficient production of P3HP. PMID:25621933

  11. Disposable pencil graphite electrode modified with peptide nanotubes for Vitamin B12 analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Betül Bozdoğan; Vural, Tayfun; Kuralay, Filiz; Çırak, Tamer; Bolat, Gülçin; Abacı, Serdar; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-06-01

    In this study, peptide nanostructures from diphenylalanine were synthesized in various solvents with various polarities and characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) techniques. Formation of peptide nanofibrils, nanovesicles, nanoribbons, and nanotubes was observed in different solvent mediums. In order to investigate the effects of peptide nanotubes (PNT) on electrochemical behavior of disposable pencil graphite electrodes (PGE), electrode surfaces were modified with fabricated peptide nanotubes. Electrochemical activity of the pencil graphite electrode was increased with the deposition of PNTs on the surface. The effects of the solvent type, the peptide nanotube concentration, and the passive adsorption time of peptide nanotubes on pencil graphite electrode were studied. For further electrochemical studies, electrodes were modified for 30 min by immobilizing PNTs, which were prepared in water at 6 mg/mL concentration. Vitamin B12 analyses were performed by the Square Wave (SW) voltammetry method using modified PGEs. The obtained data showed linearity over the range of 0.2 μM and 9.50 μM Vitamin B12 concentration with high sensitivity. Results showed that PNT modified PGEs were highly simple, fast, cost effective, and feasible for the electro-analytical determination of Vitamin B12 in real samples.

  12. Iron Limitation of a Springtime Bacterial and Phytoplankton Community in the Ross Sea: Implications for Vitamin B12 Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Saito, Mak A.; Lee, Peter A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DiTullio, Giacomo R.

    2011-01-01

    The Ross Sea is home to some of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Primary production in this system has previously been shown to be iron limited in the summer and periodically iron and vitamin B12 colimited. In this study, we examined trace metal limitation of biological activity in the Ross Sea in the austral spring and considered possible implications for vitamin B12 nutrition. Bottle incubation experiments demonstrated that iron limited phytoplankton growth in the austral spring while B12, cobalt, and zinc did not. This is the first demonstration of iron limitation in a Phaeocystis antarctica-dominated, early season Ross Sea phytoplankton community. The lack of B12 limitation in this location is consistent with previous Ross Sea studies in the austral summer, wherein vitamin additions did not stimulate P. antarctica growth and B12 was limiting only when bacterial abundance was low. Bottle incubation experiments and a bacterial regrowth experiment also revealed that iron addition directly enhanced bacterial growth. B12 uptake measurements in natural water samples and in an iron fertilized bottle incubation demonstrated that bacteria serve not only as a source for vitamin B12, but also as a significant sink, and that iron additions enhanced B12 uptake rates in phytoplankton but not bacteria. Additionally, vitamin uptake rates did not become saturated upon the addition of up to 95 pM B12. A rapid B12 uptake rate was observed after 13 min, which then decreased to a slower constant uptake rate over the next 52 h. Results from this study highlight the importance of iron availability in limiting early season Ross Sea phytoplankton growth and suggest that rates of vitamin B12 production and consumption may be impacted by iron availability. PMID:21886638

  13. Short communication: Factors affecting vitamin B12 concentration in milk of commercial dairy herds: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Duplessis, M; Pellerin, D; Cue, R I; Girard, C L

    2016-06-01

    Only bacteria can synthesize vitamin B12, and this requires adequate Co supply. The natural source of vitamin B12 in human diets comes from animal products, especially those from ruminants. This study aimed to describe variability regarding vitamin B12 concentration in milk among and within commercial dairy herds in early lactation. A secondary objective was to explore potential causes for this variability such as genetic variation and diet characteristics. In total, 399 dairy cows (135 primiparous and 264 multiparous; 386 Holstein and 13 Jersey cows) in 15 commercial herds were involved. Milk samples were taken at 27.4±4.1 and 55.4±4.1d in milk. Neither parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) nor sampling time affected milk concentrations of vitamin B12. Nevertheless, vitamin B12 concentration in milk was highly variable among and within dairy herds. The lowest vitamin B12 concentration in milk of cows was observed in the Jersey herd. Among herds, vitamin B12 concentration in milk ranged from 2,309 to 3,878 pg/mL; one glass (250mL) of milk from those herds would provide between 23 and 40% of the vitamin B12 recommended daily allowance. Among individual cows, however, this provision varied between 16 and 57% of the recommendation. In spite of the limited size of the studied population, the heritability value was 0.23, suggesting that genetic selection could modify milk vitamin B12 concentration. We observed a positive relationship between milk vitamin B12 concentration and dietary acid detergent fiber content and a negative relationship between milk concentration of vitamin B12 and dietary crude protein content. PMID:27040783

  14. Short communication: Factors affecting vitamin B12 concentration in milk of commercial dairy herds: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Duplessis, M; Pellerin, D; Cue, R I; Girard, C L

    2016-06-01

    Only bacteria can synthesize vitamin B12, and this requires adequate Co supply. The natural source of vitamin B12 in human diets comes from animal products, especially those from ruminants. This study aimed to describe variability regarding vitamin B12 concentration in milk among and within commercial dairy herds in early lactation. A secondary objective was to explore potential causes for this variability such as genetic variation and diet characteristics. In total, 399 dairy cows (135 primiparous and 264 multiparous; 386 Holstein and 13 Jersey cows) in 15 commercial herds were involved. Milk samples were taken at 27.4±4.1 and 55.4±4.1d in milk. Neither parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) nor sampling time affected milk concentrations of vitamin B12. Nevertheless, vitamin B12 concentration in milk was highly variable among and within dairy herds. The lowest vitamin B12 concentration in milk of cows was observed in the Jersey herd. Among herds, vitamin B12 concentration in milk ranged from 2,309 to 3,878 pg/mL; one glass (250mL) of milk from those herds would provide between 23 and 40% of the vitamin B12 recommended daily allowance. Among individual cows, however, this provision varied between 16 and 57% of the recommendation. In spite of the limited size of the studied population, the heritability value was 0.23, suggesting that genetic selection could modify milk vitamin B12 concentration. We observed a positive relationship between milk vitamin B12 concentration and dietary acid detergent fiber content and a negative relationship between milk concentration of vitamin B12 and dietary crude protein content.

  15. Substrate-Induced Radical Formation in 4-Hydroxybutyryl Coenzyme A Dehydratase from Clostridium aminobutyricum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Friedrich, Peter; Pierik, Antonio J.; Martins, Berta M.

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydratase (4HBD) from Clostridium aminobutyricum catalyzes the reversible dehydration of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA and the irreversible isomerization of vinylacetyl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA. 4HBD is an oxygen-sensitive homotetrameric enzyme with one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster and one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in each subunit. Upon the addition of crotonyl-CoA or the analogues butyryl-CoA, acetyl-CoA, and CoA, UV-visible light and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed an internal one-electron transfer to FAD and the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster prior to hydration. We describe an active recombinant 4HBD and variants produced in Escherichia coli. The variants of the cluster ligands (H292C [histidine at position 292 is replaced by cysteine], H292E, C99A, C103A, and C299A) had no measurable dehydratase activity and were composed of monomers, dimers, and tetramers. Variants of other potential catalytic residues were composed only of tetramers and exhibited either no measurable (E257Q, E455Q, and Y296W) hydratase activity or <1% (Y296F and T190V) dehydratase activity. The E455Q variant but not the Y296F or E257Q variant displayed the same spectral changes as the wild-type enzyme after the addition of crotonyl-CoA but at a much lower rate. The results suggest that upon the addition of a substrate, Y296 is deprotonated by E455 and reduces FAD to FADH·, aided by protonation from E257 via T190. In contrast to FADH·, the tyrosyl radical could not be detected by EPR spectroscopy. FADH· appears to initiate the radical dehydration via an allylic ketyl radical that was proposed 19 years ago. The mode of radical generation in 4HBD is without precedent in anaerobic radical chemistry. It differs largely from that in enzymes, which use coenzyme B12, S-adenosylmethionine, ATP-driven electron transfer, or flavin-based electron bifurcation for this purpose. PMID:25452282

  16. Substrate-induced radical formation in 4-hydroxybutyryl coenzyme A dehydratase from Clostridium aminobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Friedrich, Peter; Pierik, Antonio J; Martins, Berta M; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    4-Hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydratase (4HBD) from Clostridium aminobutyricum catalyzes the reversible dehydration of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA and the irreversible isomerization of vinylacetyl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA. 4HBD is an oxygen-sensitive homotetrameric enzyme with one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster and one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in each subunit. Upon the addition of crotonyl-CoA or the analogues butyryl-CoA, acetyl-CoA, and CoA, UV-visible light and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed an internal one-electron transfer to FAD and the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster prior to hydration. We describe an active recombinant 4HBD and variants produced in Escherichia coli. The variants of the cluster ligands (H292C [histidine at position 292 is replaced by cysteine], H292E, C99A, C103A, and C299A) had no measurable dehydratase activity and were composed of monomers, dimers, and tetramers. Variants of other potential catalytic residues were composed only of tetramers and exhibited either no measurable (E257Q, E455Q, and Y296W) hydratase activity or <1% (Y296F and T190V) dehydratase activity. The E455Q variant but not the Y296F or E257Q variant displayed the same spectral changes as the wild-type enzyme after the addition of crotonyl-CoA but at a much lower rate. The results suggest that upon the addition of a substrate, Y296 is deprotonated by E455 and reduces FAD to FADH·, aided by protonation from E257 via T190. In contrast to FADH·, the tyrosyl radical could not be detected by EPR spectroscopy. FADH· appears to initiate the radical dehydration via an allylic ketyl radical that was proposed 19 years ago. The mode of radical generation in 4HBD is without precedent in anaerobic radical chemistry. It differs largely from that in enzymes, which use coenzyme B12, S-adenosylmethionine, ATP-driven electron transfer, or flavin-based electron bifurcation for this purpose.

  17. Solution Structure and Constrained Molecular Dynamics Study of Vitamin B12 Conjugates of the Anorectic Peptide PYY(3-36).

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelly E; Kerwood, Deborah J; Allis, Damian G; Workinger, Jayme L; Bonaccorso, Ron L; Holz, George G; Roth, Christian L; Zubieta, Jon; Doyle, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Vitamin B12 -peptide conjugates have considerable therapeutic potential through improved pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic properties imparted on the peptide upon covalent attachment to vitamin B12 (B12 ). There remains a lack of structural studies investigating the effects of B12 conjugation on peptide secondary structure. Determining the solution structure of a B12 -peptide conjugate or conjugates and measuring functions of the conjugate(s) at the target peptide receptor may offer considerable insight concerning the future design of fully optimized conjugates. This methodology is especially useful in tandem with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) studies, such that predictions may be made about conjugates not yet synthesized. Focusing on two B12 conjugates of the anorectic peptide PYY(3-36), one of which was previously demonstrated to have improved food intake reduction compared with PYY(3-36), we performed NMR structural analyses and used the information to conduct MD simulations. The study provides rare structural insight into vitamin B12 conjugates and validates the fact that B12 can be conjugated to a peptide without markedly affecting peptide secondary structure. PMID:27027248

  18. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Bonaccorso, Ron L.; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Holz, George G.; Doyle, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R). Stability studies reveal that Ex-4 is digested by pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin and by the kidney endopeptidase meprin β. Prebinding the B12 conjugate to IF, however, resulted in up to a 4-fold greater activity of the B12-Ex-4 conjugate relative to Ex-4, when the IF-B12-Ex-4 complex was exposed to 22 µg/mL of trypsin, 2.3-fold greater activity when exposed to 1.25 µg/mL of chymotrypsin, and there was no decrease in function at up to 5 µg/mL of meprin β. PMID:26260673

  19. Dietary pectin shortens the biologic half-life of vitamin B-12 in rats by increasing fecal and urinary losses

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, R.W.; Oace, S.M. )

    1989-08-01

    As little as 5% of pectin added to a fiber-free diet elevates urinary methylmalonic acid (MMA) severalfold in vitamin B-12--deprived rats. The present study examines whether increased urinary MMA reflects lower vitamin B-12 status or occurs only because of fermentation of pectin by intestinal bacteria and increased production of propionate, a precursor of MMA. By monitoring urinary and fecal excretion of {sup 57}Co after a tracer dose of ({sup 57}Co)vitamin B-12, we found the biologic half-life of vitamin B-12 to be 59 d for rats fed a fiber-free diet and only 19 d for rats fed a 5% pectin diet. Also, pectin-fed rats oxidized only 12% of a 1-mmol dose of ({sup 14}C)propionate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in 2 h, whereas rats fed the fiber-free diet expired 33% of the dose. Finally, high urinary MMA persisted even after the removal of pectin from the diet. We conclude that dietary pectin accelerates vitamin B-12 depletion in rats, possibly by interfering with enterohepatic recycling of vitamin B-12. By stimulating microbial propionate production, pectin and other fermentable fibers may also contribute to increased urinary MMA in vitamin B-12 deficiency, but a larger propionate pool does not account for the other effects of pectin on vitamin B-12 status.

  20. The effect of proteolytic enzymes on the vitamin B12-binding proteins of human gastric juice and saliva.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K J; von der Lippe, G

    1979-01-01

    Pepsin had no effect on the vitamin B12 binder in human saliva (R-binder), while trypsin was found to reduce the apparent molecular weight of the R-binder and to release vitamin B12 from the R-B12complex of human saliva and human gastric juice (HGJ). Trypsin had no effect on the molecular weight and biological activity of intrinsic factor (IF) in HGJ, as demonstrated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-150 and the uptake of IF-B12 by guinea pig intestinal brush borders. An extract of purified guinea pig intestinal lysosomes was also without effect on the molecular weight and the biological activity of IF but was found to release vitamin B12 from the R-B12 complex. The results support the observation that the external pancreatic secretion corrects malabsorption of vitamin B12 by an effect on the non-IF protein in the intestinal juice. Moreover, the results indicate that lysosomal enzymes are not involved in the intestinal absorption of vitamin B12. PMID:120000

  1. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  2. Association of B12 deficiency and anemia synergistically increases the risk of high TNF-α levels among adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Ghatpande, N S; Apte, P P; Naik, S S; Joshi, B N; Gokhale, M K; Kulkarni, P P

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the association between iron status, B12, and inflammatory markers among 101 adolescent girls. We found that B12 showed significant negative association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (rs = -0.232, P = 0.020) and positive association with serum ferritin (SF) (rs = 0.209, P = 0.036) among girls. Our results showed that hepcidin discriminates anemic and non-anemic population under normal B12 conditions. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of having higher TNF-α levels was 13.2 times higher in low B12 girls in the presence of anemia compared to the girls having normal hemoglobin and B12 levels. PMID:27346169

  3. The prevalence of cobalamin deficiency among vegetarians assessed by serum vitamin B12: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, R; Lester, S E; Babatunde, T

    2014-05-01

    Individuals following vegetarian diets are at risk for developing vitamin B12 deficiency owing to suboptimal intake. As vitamin B12 is essential for the synthesis of nucleic acids, erythrocytes and in the maintenance of myelin, deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms. Some of these symptoms may be severe while others may be irreversible. The objective of this review was to assess vitamin B12 deficiency, based on reported serum vitamin B12, among individuals adhering to different types of vegetarian diets. A systematic literature search was carried out using multiple search engines including PubMed, Medline, CINAHL plus, ERIC, Nursing and Allied Health Collection and Nursing/Academic Edition. The inclusion criteria consisted of original studies that assessed serum vitamin B12, studies written in English, non-case studies and studies that reported actual percentages of vitamin B12 deficiency. Forty research studies were included. The deficiency prevalence among infants reached 45%. The deficiency among the children and adolescents ranged from 0 to 33.3%. Deficiency among pregnant women ranged from 17 to 39%, dependent on the trimester. Adults and elderly individuals had a deficiency range of 0-86.5%. Higher deficiency prevalence was reported in vegans than in other vegetarians. Thus, with few exceptions, the reviewed studies documented relatively high deficiency prevalence among vegetarians. Vegans who do not ingest vitamin B12 supplements were found to be at especially high risk. Vegetarians, especially vegans, should give strong consideration to the use of vitamin B12 supplements to ensure adequate vitamin B12 intake. Vegetarians, regardless of the type of vegetarian diet they adhere to, should be screened for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  4. CO2 and vitamin B12 interactions determine bioactive trace metal requirements of a subarctic Pacific diatom

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew L; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A; Leblanc, Karine; Hutchins, David A; Fu, Feixue

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton growth can be limited by numerous inorganic nutrients and organic growth factors. Using the subarctic diatom Attheya sp. in culture studies, we examined how the availability of vitamin B12 and carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) influences growth rate, primary productivity, cellular iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) quotas, and the net use efficiencies (NUEs) of these bioactive trace metals (mol C fixed per mol cellular trace metal per day). Under B12-replete conditions, cells grown at high pCO2 had lower Fe, Zn and Cd quotas, and used those trace metals more efficiently in comparison with cells grown at low pCO2. At high pCO2, B12-limited cells had ∼50% lower specific growth and carbon fixation rates, and used Fe ∼15-fold less efficiently, and Zn and Cd ∼3-fold less efficiently, in comparison with B12-replete cells. The observed higher Fe, Zn and Cd NUE under high pCO2/B12-replete conditions are consistent with predicted downregulation of carbon-concentrating mechanisms. Co quotas of B12-replete cells were ∼5- to 14-fold higher in comparison with B12-limited cells, suggesting that >80% of cellular Co of B12-limited cells was likely from B12. Our results demonstrate that CO2 and vitamin B12 interactively influence growth, carbon fixation, trace metal requirements and trace metal NUE of this diatom. This suggests the need to consider complex feedback interactions between multiple environmental factors for this biogeochemically critical group of phytoplankton in the last glacial maximum as well as the current and future changing ocean. PMID:21248860

  5. Micronutrient Status in Female University Students: Iron, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B12 and Folate

    PubMed Central

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Young women are at an increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies, particularly due to higher micronutrient requirements during childbearing years and multiple food group avoidances. The objective of this study was to investigate biomarkers of particular micronutrients in apparently healthy young women. Female students (n = 308; age range 18–35 year; Body Mass Index 21.5 ± 2.8 kg/m2; mean ± SD) were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Blood samples were obtained from participants in the fasted state and analysed for biomarkers of iron status, vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine, selenium, zinc, and copper. The results show iron deficiency anaemia, unspecified anaemia, and hypoferritinemia in 3%, 7% and 33.9% of participants, respectively. Low vitamin B12 concentrations (<120 pmol/L) were found in 11.3% of participants, while 4.7% showed sub-clinical deficiency based on serum methylmalonic acid concentrations >0.34 μmol/L. Folate concentrations below the reference range were observed in 1.7% (serum) or 1% (erythrocytes) of participants, and 99.7% of the participant had erythrocyte-folate concentrations >300 nmol/L. Serum zinc concentrations <10.7 μmol/L were observed in 2% of participants. Serum copper and selenium concentrations were below the reference range in 23% and 11% of participants, respectively. Micronutrient deficiencies including iron and vitamin B12, and apparent excess of folate are present in educated Australian female students of childbearing age, including those studying nutrition. The effects of dietary behaviours and food choices on markers of micronutrient status require further investigation. PMID:25401503

  6. Characterisation of vitamin B12 immunoaffinity columns and method development for determination of vitamin B12 in a range of foods, juices and pharmaceutical products using immunoaffinity clean-up and high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Marley, E C; Mackay, E; Young, G

    2009-03-01

    New rapid and simpler procedures, using immunoaffinity columns, have been developed for the determination of vitamin B12 in a range of samples including three different US National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) Reference Materials, infant formula, powdered energy drinks and bars, wheat breakfast cereal, carbonated soft drinks, fruit juices and vitamin B12 tablets. The procedures involved extraction of vitamin B12 using water or sodium acetate buffer and enzyme digestion (using pepsin or alpha-amylase, or both) if necessary. The extract was clarified and passed through "EASI-EXTRACT Vitamin B12", an immunoaffinity column containing monoclonal antibody with high affinity and specificity to vitamin B12. Subsequently, the vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column was washed with 10 ml water and the vitamin B12 was released from the column with 3 ml methanol. Following evaporation, the samples were reconstituted in mobile phase and analysed by HPLC-UV at 361 nm on an ACE 3AQ analytical column using a gradient elution consisting of 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid in water and acetonitrile. Analysis of three types of NIST Standard Reference Materials in triplicate demonstrated the results of the immunoaffinity column method were comparable to microbiological assay results. Method repeatability was determined for all samples analysed and ranged between 0.8 and 10%, demonstrating the method was repeatable with complex matrices (NIST 2383) containing low levels of vitamin B12 (0.44 microg per 100 g), as well as simpler matrices, such as vitamin tablets containing high levels (2000 microg per 0.849 g) of vitamin B12. PMID:19680900

  7. Measurement of total-body cobalt-57 vitamin B12 absorption with a gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, J A; Slingerland, D W; Burrows, B A; Miller, A

    1985-08-01

    Previously described techniques for the measurement of the absorption of [57Co]vitamin B12 by total-body counting have required an iron room equipped with scanning or multiple detectors. The present study uses simplifying modifications which make the technique more available and include the use of static geometry, the measurement of body thickness to correct for attenuation, a simple formula to convert the capsule-in-air count to a 100% absorption count, and finally the use of an adequately shielded gamma camera obviating the need of an iron room.

  8. Proton Radii of B12-17 Define a Thick Neutron Surface in B17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    The first determination of radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of B12-17 from charge-changing cross sections (σCC) measurements at the FRS, GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The proton radii are deduced from a finite-range Glauber model analysis of the σCC. The radii show an increase from B13 to B17 and are consistent with predictions from the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model for the neutron-rich nuclei. The measurements show the existence of a thick neutron surface with neutron-proton radius difference of 0.51(0.11) fm in B17.

  9. Deprivation of folate and B12 increases neurodegeneration beyond that accompanying deprivation of either vitamin alone.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Lydia; Ortiz, Daniela; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Increased homocysteine has in some cases been linked with an increased incidence of Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. Folate or B12 deficiency increases homocysteine, but controversy exists as to whether their levels also correlate with either disorder. Since their presence within various dietary constituents may confound interpretation, we tested the impact of deprivation of either or both in the closed environment of neuronal cell cultures. Deprivation of either increased cytosolic calcium, reactive oxygen species, intracellular homocysteine, and apoptosis, but deprivation of both fostered substantially larger increases, supporting the notion that both are required for optimal neuroprotection.

  10. A eubacterial riboswitch class that senses the coenzyme tetrahydrofolate.

    PubMed

    Ames, Tyler D; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Weinberg, Zasha; Breaker, Ronald R

    2010-07-30

    Comparative sequence analyses of bacterial genomes are revealing many structured RNA motifs that function as metabolite-binding riboswitches. We have identified an RNA motif frequently positioned in the 5' UTRs of folate transport and biosynthesis genes in Firmicute genomes. Biochemical experiments confirm that representatives of this new-found RNA class selectively bind derivatives of the vitamin folate, including di- and tetrahydrofolate coenzymes. In addition, representatives of this aptamer class occasionally reside upstream of RNA structures that are predicted to control translation initiation in response to ligand binding. These findings expand the number of coenzymes that are directly sensed by RNA and reveal possible riboswitch-controlled regulons that respond to changes in single-carbon metabolism.

  11. NutriPhone: a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care quantification of vitamin B12 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoho; O'Dell, Dakota; Hohenstein, Jess; Colt, Susannah; Mehta, Saurabh; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is necessary for formation of red blood cells, DNA synthesis, neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Vitamin B12 deficiency is often asymptomatic early in its course; however, once it manifests, particularly with neurological symptoms, reversal by dietary changes or supplementation becomes less effective. Access to easy, low cost, and personalized nutritional diagnostics could enable individuals to better understand their own deficiencies as well as track the effects of dietary changes. In this work, we present the NutriPhone, a mobile platform for the analysis of blood vitamin B12 levels in 15 minutes. The NutriPhone technology comprises of a smartphone accessory, an app, and a competitive-type lateral flow test strip that quantifies vitamin B12 levels. To achieve the detection of sub-nmol/L physiological levels of vitamin B12, our assay incorporates an innovative "spacer pad" for increasing the duration of the key competitive binding reaction and uses silver amplification of the initial signal. We demonstrate the efficacy of our NutriPhone system by quantifying physiologically relevant levels of vitamin B12 and performing human trials where it was used to accurately evaluate blood vitamin B12 status of 12 participants from just a drop (~40 μl) of finger prick blood. PMID:27301282

  12. Vitamin B12 absorption--a study of intraluminal events in control subjects and patients with tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, C R; Bhat, P; Jacob, E; Baker, S J

    1975-01-01

    The intraluminal fate of orally administered radioactive vitamin B12 has been studied in control subjects with normal vitamin B12 absorption and those with vitamin B12 malabsorption due to tropical sprue. In control subjects 1 to 21% of the dose was bound to sedimentable material and 37 to 75% was bound to immunoreactive intrinsic factor. In subjects with vitamin B12 malabsorption due to tropical sprue, the results were identical with the control subjects. Bacteriological studies showed a statistically significant correlation between both the number of flora in the jejunum and the number of bacteroides in both the jejunum and ileum and vitamin B12 malabsorption. In patients with tropical sprue who have normal intrinsic factor secretion, the vitamin B12 absorptive defect is not due to binding of the vitamin to bacteria or to alteration to the intrinsic factor vitamin B12 complex in the intestinal lumen. The lesion appears to be one of the mucosal cell receptors or of the cells themselves, possibly caused by bacterial toxins. PMID:3457

  13. Opportunistic Screening of Vitamin B12 Deficiency in IT Professionals Presenting for Routine Health Check-up

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rishi Devilal; Ingole, Sonali Jitendra; Pandave, Harshal Tukaram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin B12 deficiency is mainly diagnosed in symptomatic patients. However, the deficiency may also be prevalent in asymptomatic patients. Our aim was to study the prevalence of Vit B12 deficiency in IT professionals (Information Technology Professionals from Software industry) who presented for routine health screening and to correlate the deficiency to various parameters. Materials and Methods This was single centre, observational study comprising of 84 IT professionals. The data was collected in structured format. The study was designed to identify prevalence of Vit B12 deficiency and correlate to other factors such as type of diet, income level & regular use of medication (such as Antacid & Metformin). Results Total 28 individuals were found to be deficient (33.34%). Prevalence of Vit B12 deficiency amongst Vegetarian and non vegetarian diet adhering subjects was 47.5% and 20.45% respectively. B12 deficiency was also prevalent in high income age group. Further chronic intake of PPI (Proton pump inhibitor) and Metformin was associated with prevalence of 37.5% and 33.34% in the present study. Conclusion During health screening of IT Professionals, significant prevalence of Vit B12 deficiency was noted across all income groups & non vegetarian diet consuming subjects also. There is significant correlation between Vit B12 deficiency with chronic use of PPI and Metformin. PMID:26816929

  14. NutriPhone: a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care quantification of vitamin B12 concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoho; O’Dell, Dakota; Hohenstein, Jess; Colt, Susannah; Mehta, Saurabh; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is necessary for formation of red blood cells, DNA synthesis, neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Vitamin B12 deficiency is often asymptomatic early in its course; however, once it manifests, particularly with neurological symptoms, reversal by dietary changes or supplementation becomes less effective. Access to easy, low cost, and personalized nutritional diagnostics could enable individuals to better understand their own deficiencies as well as track the effects of dietary changes. In this work, we present the NutriPhone, a mobile platform for the analysis of blood vitamin B12 levels in 15 minutes. The NutriPhone technology comprises of a smartphone accessory, an app, and a competitive-type lateral flow test strip that quantifies vitamin B12 levels. To achieve the detection of sub-nmol/L physiological levels of vitamin B12, our assay incorporates an innovative “spacer pad” for increasing the duration of the key competitive binding reaction and uses silver amplification of the initial signal. We demonstrate the efficacy of our NutriPhone system by quantifying physiologically relevant levels of vitamin B12 and performing human trials where it was used to accurately evaluate blood vitamin B12 status of 12 participants from just a drop (~40 μl) of finger prick blood. PMID:27301282

  15. Recreational nitrous oxide abuse-induced vitamin B12 deficiency in a patient presenting with hyperpigmentation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tsung-Ta; Hung, Chih-Tsung; Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes skin hyperpigmentation, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, and megaloblastic anemia. Although vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs in well-nourished, healthy, young people, nitrous oxide (N2O) intoxication is an important cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in this cohort. N2O, a colorless gas used as an anesthetic since the late 19th century because of its euphoric and analgesic qualities, is now used as a recreational drug and is available via the Internet and at clubs. Here, we describe the case of a 29-year-old woman presenting with skin hyperpigmentation as her only initial symptom after N2O abuse for approximately 2 years. N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency was diagnosed based on the skin pigmentation that had manifested over the dorsa of her fingers, toes, and trunk, coupled with myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns, a low serum vitamin B12 level, an elevated serum homocysteine level, and the N2O exposure revealed while establishing the patient's history. Symptoms improved significantly with vitamin B12 treatment. We recommend that dermatologists consider N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency as a potential cause of skin hyperpigmentation and myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns in young, otherwise healthy patients. Failure to recognize this presentation may result in inappropriate treatment, thus affecting patients' clinical outcomes. PMID:23898268

  16. Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Imbalance Modifies NK Cytotoxicity, Lymphocytes B and Lymphoprolipheration in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Úbeda, Natalia; Montero, Ana; Achón, María; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Different vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations could exacerbate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate different dietary folic acid and vitamin B12 levels on the immune response in aged rats. Male Sprague Dawley aged rats were assigned to three folic acid groups (deficient, control, supplemented) each in absence of vitamin B12 for 30 days. Several parameters of innate and acquired immune responses were measured. Serum and hepatic folate levels increased according to folic acid dietary level, while vitamin B12 levels decreased. There was a significant decrease in natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen for the vitamin B12 deficient diet and folic acid control diet groups. Significant changes in CD45 lymphocyte subsets were also observed according to dietary imbalance. Lymphoproliferative response to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin did not differ significantly between groups. The spleen response to lipopolysaccharide increased significantly, but was unmodified for the other organs. An imbalance between dietary vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations alters some immunological parameters in aged rats. Therefore, the ratio between folate and vitamin B12 could be as important as their absolute dietary concentrations. PMID:24288024

  17. Effect of vitamin B12 on functional recovery and histopathologic changes of tibial nerve-crushed rats.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, E; Farshid, A A; Samadi, F; Eghdami, K

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested a neuroprotective effect for vitamin B12. The present study investigated the effects of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib in separate and combined treatments on functional recovery of crushed tibial nerve in rats. In ketamine plus xylazin anesthetized rats, right tibial nerve was crushed using a small hemoatatic forceps. Footprints were recorded 1 day before and on days 7, 14 and 21 after induction of nerve injury. Tibial functional index (TFI) was used to evaluate the recovery of tibial nerve function. Histological changes of tibial nerve were investigated by light microscopy. The recovery of TFI values were significantly accelerated with 10 consecutive days treatments with 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg of vitamin B12, 5 mg/kg of diclofenac and 1 and 5 mg/kg of celecoxib. The severity of Wallerian degeneration was reduced by above-mentioned doses of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib. Documented effects were observed when 0.1 mg/kg of vitamin B12 was concurrently used with 1 mg/kg of diclofenac and or 0.2 mg/kg of celecoxib. In the present study, vitamin B12, celecoxib and diclofenac (at a high dose) showed neuroprotective effects. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 pathways may be involved in neuroprotective effect of vitamin B12.

  18. Coenzyme A: to make it or uptake it?

    PubMed

    Sibon, Ody C M; Strauss, Erick

    2016-10-01

    The consensus has been that intracellular coenzyme A (CoA) is obtained exclusively by de novo biosynthesis via a universal, conserved five-step pathway in the cell cytosol. However, old and new evidence suggest that cells (and some microorganisms) have several strategies to obtain CoA, with 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-PantSH; the fourth intermediate in the canonical CoA biosynthetic pathway) serving as a 'nexus' metabolite. PMID:27552973

  19. A Study of the Prevalence of Serum Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency in Western Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Sanket K.; Aundhakar, Swati C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study summarizes the prevalence of vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in the population coming to tertiary care center in Western Maharashtra along with the main presenting symptom routinely misinterpreted in daily practice. Aims and Objectives: 1. To study the prevalence of vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in the population of western Maharashtra. 2. To correlate the symptoms with serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. Materials and Methods: The present study is a cross-sectional observation study carried out on patients from western Maharashtra seeking medical attention on outpatient and inpatient basis in the medicine department of a teaching institute in Karad. One-hundred patients were selected on basis of below mentioned symptoms viz. tingling and numbness in extremities, dizziness, unsteady gait, early tiredness, forgetfulness, proximal weakness, distal weakness, chronic headache, less interest in work, chronic loose stools, strict vegetarians, alcoholics, intake of medications like anti-tubercular treatment, surgery involving terminal ileum. Serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels of these patients were observed. Deficiency of vitamin B12 and folic acid was studied in 4 groups: (a) Absolute vitamin B12 deficiency; (b) Absolute folic acid deficiency; (c) Borderline vitamin B12 deficiency; (d) Combined vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency. Results: Of the 100 cases, 33% patients were vegetarian. Folic acid deficiency formed the major chunk of deficiency group. Six percent patients had neuropsychiatric manifestations. Depressive illness in 1% patients, dementia in 0% patients, forgetfulness in 1% patients, mania/hallucination in 0% patients each, and chronic headache in 1% patients. Neuropathy in form of loss of reflexes, decreased touch sensation was present in 9% patients. Posterior column involvement viz. Loss of joint position, vibration, positive Romberg's sign were present in 34% patients of vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency

  20. Vitamin B12 and folate during pregnancy and offspring motor, mental and social development at 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Bhate, V K; Joshi, S M; Ladkat, R S; Deshmukh, U S; Lubree, H G; Katre, P A; Bhat, D S; Rush, E C; Yajnik, C S

    2012-04-01

    Insufficiency of vitamin B12 (B12) and folate during pregnancy can result in low concentrations in the fetus and have adverse effects on brain development. We investigated the relationship between maternal B12 and folate nutrition during pregnancy and offspring motor, mental and social development at two years of age (2 y). Mothers (n = 123) and their offspring (62 girls, 61 boys) from rural and middle-class urban communities in and around Pune city were followed through pregnancy up to 2 y. Maternal B12 and folate concentrations were measured at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation. At 2 y, the Developmental Assessment Scale for Indian Infants was used to determine motor and mental developmental quotients and the Vineland Social Maturity Scale for the social developmental quotient. Overall, 62% of the mothers had low B12 levels (<150 pmol/l) and one mother was folate deficient during pregnancy. Maternal B12 at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation was associated with offspring B12 at 2 y (r = 0.29, r = 0.32, P < 0.001), but folate was not associated with offspring folate. At 2 y, motor development was associated with maternal folate at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation. Mental and social development quotients were associated positively with head circumference and negatively with birth weight. In addition, pregnancy B12 and folate were positively associated with mental and social development quotients. Maternal B12 and folate during intrauterine life may favorably influence brain development and function. Pregnancy provides a window of opportunity to enhance fetal psychomotor (motor and mental) development.