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Sample records for adenoviral e1a gene

  1. Novel mechanism of JNK pathway activation by adenoviral E1A.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Vasily S; Brichkina, Anna I; Morrison, Helen; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A; Herrlich, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The adenoviral oncoprotein E1A influences cellular regulation by interacting with a number of cellular proteins. In collaboration with complementary oncogenes, E1A fully transforms primary cells. As part of this action, E1A inhibits transcription of c-Jun:Fos target genes while promoting that of c-Jun:ATF2-dependent genes including jun. Both c-Jun and ATF2 are hyperphosphorylated in response to E1A. In the current study, E1A was fused with the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor (E1A-ER) to monitor the immediate effect of E1A activation. With this approach we now show that E1A activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream kinases MKK4 and MKK7, as well as the small GTPase Rac1. Activation of the JNK pathway requires the N-terminal domain of E1A, and, importantly, is independent of transcription. In addition, it requires the presence of ERM proteins. Downregulation of signaling components upstream of JNK inhibits E1A-dependent JNK/c-Jun activation. Taking these findings together, we show that E1A activates the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway upstream of Rac1 in a transcription-independent manner, demonstrating a novel mechanism of E1A action.

  2. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  3. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  4. Suppression of mutations in two Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes by the adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zieler, H A; Walberg, M; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The protein products of the adenoviral E1A gene are implicated in a variety of transcriptional and cell cycle events, involving interactions with several proteins present in human cells, including parts of the transcriptional machinery and negative regulators of cell division such as the Rb gene product and p107. To determine if there are functional homologs of E1A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have developed a genetic screen for mutants that depend on E1A for growth. The screen is based on a colony color sectoring assay which allows the identification of mutants dependent on the maintenance and expression of an E1A-containing plasmid. Using this screen, we have isolated five mutants that depend on expression of the 12S or 13S cDNA of E1A for growth. A plasmid shuffle assay confirms that the plasmid-dependent phenotype is due to the presence of either the 12S or the 13S E1A cDNA and that both forms of E1A rescue growth of all mutants equally well. The five mutants fall into two classes that were named web1 and web2 (for "wants E1A badly"). Plasmid shuffle assays with mutant forms of E1A show that conserved region 1 (CR1) is required for rescue of the growth of the web1 and web2 E1A-dependent yeast mutants, while the N-terminal 22 amino acids are only partially required; conserved region 2 (CR2) and the C terminus are dispensable. The phenotypes of mutants in both the web1 and the web2 groups are due to a single gene defect, and the yeast genes that fully complement the mutant phenotypes of both groups were cloned. The WEB1 gene sequence encodes a 1,273-amino-acid protein that is identical to SEC31, a protein involved in the budding of transport vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum. The WEB2 gene encodes a 1,522-amino-acid protein with homology to nucleic acid-dependent ATPases. Deletion of either WEB1 or WEB2 is lethal. Expression of E1A is not able to rescue the lethality of either the web1 or the web2 null allele, implying allele-specific mutations that lead

  5. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  6. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  7. Dissecting the roles of E1A and E1B in adenoviral replication and RCAd-enhanced RDAd transduction efficacy on tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Wang, Huiping; Chen, Xiafang; Li, Chuanyuan; Huang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have recently received widespread attention for their potential in innovative cancer therapy. Many telomerase promoter-regulated oncolytic adenoviral vectors retain E1A and E1B. However, the functions of E1A and E1B proteins in the oncolytic role of replication-competent adenovirus (RCAd) and RCAd enhanced transduction of replication defective adenoviruses (RDAd) have not been addressed well. In this study, we constructed viruses expressing E1A alone, E1A plus E1B-19 kDa, and E1A plus E1B-19 kDa/55 kDa. We then tested their roles in oncolysis and replication of RCAd as well as their roles in RCAd enhanced transfection rate and transgene expression of RDAd in various cancer cells in vitro and in xenografted human NCI-H460 tumors in nude mice. We demonstrated that RCAds expressing E1A alone and plus E1B-19 kDa exhibited an obvious ability in replication and oncolytic effects as well as enhanced RDAd replication and transgene expression, with the former showed more effective oncolysis, while the latter exhibited superior viral replication and transgene promotion activity. However, RCAd expressing both E1A and E1B-19 kDa/55 kDa was clearly worst in all these abilities. The effects of E1A and E1B observed through using RCAd were further validated by using plasmids expressing E1A alone, E1A plus E1B-19 kDa, and E1A plus E1B-19 kDa/55 kDa proteins. Our study provided evidence that E1A was essential for inducing replication and oncolytic effects of RCAd as well as RCAd enhanced RDAd transduction, and expression of E1B-19 kDa other than E1B-55 kDa could promote these effects. E1B-55 kDa is not necessary for the oncolytic effects of adenoviruses and somehow inhibits RCAd-mediated RDAd replication and transgene expression. PMID:25019940

  8. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  9. Tamoxifen-regulated adenoviral E1A chimeras for the control of tumor selective oncolytic adenovirus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sipo, I; Wang, X; Hurtado Picó, A; Suckau, L; Weger, S; Poller, W; Fechner, H

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological control is a desirable safety feature of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV). It has recently been shown that oAdV replication may be controlled by drug-dependent transcriptional regulation of E1A expression. Here, we present a novel concept that relies on tamoxifen-dependent regulation of E1A activity through functional linkage to the mutated hormone-binding domain of the murine estrogen receptor (Mer). Four different E1A-Mer chimeras (ME, EM, E(DeltaNLS)M, MEM) were constructed and inserted into the adenoviral genome under control of a lung-specific surfactant protein B promoter. The highest degree of regulation in vitro was seen for the corresponding oAdVs Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, which exhibited an up to 100-fold higher oAdV replication in the presence as compared with the absence of 4-OH-tamoxifen. Moreover, destruction of nontarget cells was six- and 13-fold reduced for Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, respectively, as compared with Ad.E. Further investigations supported tamoxifen-dependent regulation of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM in vivo. Induction of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M inhibited growth of H441 lung tumors as efficient as a control oAdV expressing E1A. E(DeltaNLS)M and the MEM chimeras can be easily inserted into a single vector genome, which extends their application to existing oAdVs and strongly facilitates in vivo application.

  10. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  11. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  12. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  13. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  14. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman’s disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the “spacer” region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined. PMID:19440465

  15. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman's disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the "spacer" region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined.

  16. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  17. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  18. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  19. Role of an adenovirus E2 promoter binding factor in E1A-mediated coordinate gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, I; Reichel, R; Nevins, J R

    1987-01-01

    A product of the adenovirus gene E1A is responsible for the stimulation of transcription from six viral promoters as well as at least two cellular promoters. We have detected a HeLa cell factor, termed E2 promoter binding factor (E2F), that appears to mediate the transcriptional stimulation of the viral E2 promoter. Competition experiments revealed that E2F did not recognize and bind to the E1B, E3, E4, or major late promoter sequences. Furthermore, three additional promoters stimulated by E1A, heat shock protein 70, beta-globin, and early simian virus 40, do not bind E2F. In contrast, the factor does recognize sequences in the E1A enhancer, and within the E1A enhancer are duplicated binding sites for E2F. Finally, a single E2F binding site from the E1A enhancer can confer increased transcription to a mouse beta-globin promoter, dependent on the action of the E1A gene product. This stimulation requires binding of E2F since methylation of the binding site, which blocks binding in vitro, reduces transcription stimulation in vivo. We, therefore, conclude that E2F is likely to be responsible for the E1A-mediated stimulation of the E1A gene as well as the E2 gene but is not involved in the activation of the other E1A-inducible promoters. Images PMID:2951737

  20. Vascular gene transfer from metallic stent surfaces using adenoviral vectors tethered through hydrolysable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J; Alferiev, Ivan S

    2014-08-12

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  1. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  2. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models.

  3. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  4. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  5. Clinical utility of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene therapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-xia; Zhang, Shu; He, Xiao-hua; Liu, Shi-yu; Ma, Chao; Zou, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised to be a highly effective antitumor treatment by introducing a tumor suppressor gene or the abrogation of an oncogene. Among the potential therapeutic transgenes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 serves as an attractive target. Restoration of wild-type p53 function in tumors can be achieved by introduction of an intact complementary deoxyribonucleic acid copy of the p53 gene using a suitable viral vector, in most cases an adenoviral vector (Adp53). Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that Adp53 triggers a dramatic tumor regression response in various cancers. These viruses are engineered to lack certain early proteins and are thus replication defective, including Gendicine, SCH-58500, and Advexin. Several types of tumor-specific p53-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus vectors (known as replication-competent CRAdp53 vectors) have been developed, such as ONYX 015, AdDelta24-p53, SG600-p53, OBP-702, and H101. Various clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the safety and efficiency of these adenoviral vectors. In this review we will talk about the biological mechanisms, clinical utility, and therapeutic potentials of the replication-deficient Adp53-based and replication-competent CRAdp53-based gene therapy. PMID:25364261

  6. Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Gliomas: Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Wilson, Thomas J.; Calinescu, Alexandra; Paran, Christopher; Kamran, Neha; Koschmann, Carl; Moreno-Ayala, Mariela A.; Assi, Hikmat; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; it carries a dismal prognosis. Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is being developed as a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM. Preclinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of adenovirus administration into the brain and tumor mass in rodents and into the non-human primates’ brain. Importantly Ads have been safely administered within the tumor resection cavity in humans. Areas Covered Background on GBM and Ad vectors; we describe gene therapy strategies for GBM and discuss the value of combination approaches. Finally we discuss the results of the human clinical trials for GBM that have used adenoviral vectors. Expert Opinion The transduction characteristics of Ad vectors, and their safety profile, added to their capacity to achieve high levels of transgene expression have made them powerful vectors for the treatment of GBM. Recent gene therapy successes in the treatment of retinal diseases and systemic brain metabolic diseases, encourages the development of gene therapy for malignant glioma. Exciting clinical trials are currently recruiting patients; although it is large randomized phase III controlled clinical trials that will provide the final decision on the success of gene therapy for the treatment of GBM. PMID:24773178

  7. Vascular Gene Transfer from Metallic Stent Surfaces Using Adenoviral Vectors Tethered through Hydrolysable Cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P.; Adamo, Richard F.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  8. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  9. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  10. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  11. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  12. A Hybrid Adenoviral Vector System Achieves Efficient Long-Term Gene Expression in the Liver via piggyBac Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Feddersen, Charlotte R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Much research has gone into the development of hybrid gene delivery systems that combine the broad tropism and efficient transduction of adenoviral vectors with the ability to achieve stable expression of cargo genes. In addition to gene therapy applications, such a system has considerable advantages for studies of gene function in vivo, permitting fine-tuned genetic manipulation with higher throughput than can be achieved using standard transgenic and DNA targeting techniques. Existing strategies are limited, however, by low integration efficiencies, small cargo capacity, and/or a dependence on target cell division. The utility of this approach could be enhanced by a system that provides all of the following: (1) efficient delivery, (2) stable expression in a high percentage of target cells (whether mitotic or not), (3) large cargo capacity, (4) flexibility to use with a wide range of additional experimental conditions, and (5) simple experimental technique. Here we report the initial characterization of a hybrid system that meets these criteria by utilizing piggyBac (PB) transposition to achieve genomic integration from adenoviral vectors. We demonstrate stable expression of an adenovirus (Ad)-PB-delivered reporter gene in ∼20–40% of hepatocytes following standard tail vein injection. Its high efficiency and flexibility relative to existing hybrid adenoviral gene delivery approaches indicate a considerable potential utility of the Ad-PB system for therapeutic gene delivery and in vivo studies of gene function. PMID:25808258

  13. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  16. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy.

  17. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  18. Adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF-B enhances wound healing in type I and type II diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Katz, Anna B; Lim, Foong-Yen; Zoltick, Philip; Radu, Antoneta; Alaee, Datis; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2004-01-01

    We have shown that the genetically diabetic mouse (C57BLKS/J-m+/+Lepr(db)) has a wound healing and neovascularization deficit associated with an inability to recruit endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) to the wound. This may account for a fundamental mechanism in impaired diabetic wound healing. We hypothesized that the adenoviral mediated overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) would enhance wound healing, improve neovascularization, and recruit EPCs to the epithelial wound in three diabetic mouse models. Eight-mm full-thickness flank wounds were made in db/db, nonobese NOD/Ltj, streptozotocin, and C57BLKS/J mice. Wounds were treated with either 1 x 10(8) PFU Ad-PDGF-B or Ad LacZ or phosphate buffered saline solution. Wounds harvested at seven days were analyzed for epithelial gap, blood vessel density, granulation tissue area, and EPCs per high powered field. All three diabetic models have a significant wound healing and neovascularization defect compared to C57BLKS/J controls. Adenoviral-PDGF-B treatment significantly enhanced epithelial gap closure in db/db, streptozotocin, and nonobese NOD/Ltj mice as compared to diabetic phosphate buffered saline solution or Ad LacZ controls. A similar increase in the formation of granulation tissue and vessel density was also observed. All three models had reduced levels of GATA-2 positive EPCs in the wound bed that was corrected by the adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF. EPC recruitment was positively correlated with neovascularization and wound healing. Three different diabetic models have a wound healing impairment and a decreased ability to recruit EPCs. The vulnerary effect of adenoviral mediated gene therapy with PDGF-B significantly enhanced wound healing and neovascularization in diabetic wounds. The PDGF-B mediated augmentation of EPC recruitment to the wound bed may be a fundamental mechanism of these results.

  19. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  20. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  1. Efficacy of CD46-targeting chimeric Ad5/35 adenoviral gene therapy for colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se-Young; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Kwonseop; Lee, Keesook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hemmi, Silvio; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Min Soo; Jung, Chaeyong

    2016-01-01

    CD46 is a complement inhibitor membrane cofactor which also acts as a receptor for various microbes, including species B adenoviruses (Ads). While most Ad gene therapy vectors are derived from species C and infect cells through coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR expression is downregulated in many cancer cells, resulting inefficient Ad-based therapeutics. Despite a limited knowledge on the expression status of many cancer cells, an increasing number of cancer gene therapy studies include fiber-modified Ad vectors redirected to the more ubiquitously expressed CD46. Since our finding from tumor microarray indicate that CD46 was overexpressed in cancers of the prostate and colon, fiber chimeric Ad5/35 vectors that have infection tropism for CD46 were employed to demonstrate its efficacy in colorectal cancers (CRC). CD46-overexpressed cells showed a significantly higher response to Ad5/35-GFP and to Ad5/35-tk/GCV. While CRC cells express variable levels of CD46, CD46 expression was positively correlated with Ad5/35-mediated GFP fluorescence and accordingly its cell killing. Injection of Ad5/35-tk/GCV caused much greater tumor-suppression in mice bearing CD46-overexpressed cancer xenograft compared to mock group. Analysis of CRC samples revealed that patients with positive CD46 expression had a higher survival rate (p=0.031), carried tumors that were well-differentiated, but less invasive and metastatic, and with a low T stage (all p<0.05). Taken together, our study demonstrated that species B-based adenoviral gene therapy is a suitable approach for generally CD46-overexpressed CRC but would require careful consideration preceding CD46 analysis and categorizing CRC patients. PMID:27203670

  2. Adenoviral gene therapy of the Tay-Sachs disease in hexosaminidase A-deficient knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, J E; Mignon, A; Haase, G; Caillaud, C; McDonell, N; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1999-05-01

    The severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tays-Sachs disease, is caused by a beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency which prevents the formation of lysosomal heterodimeric alpha-beta enzyme, hexosaminidase A (HexA). No treatment is available for this fatal disease; however, gene therapy could represent a therapeutic approach. We previously have constructed and characterized, in vitro, adenoviral and retroviral vectors coding for alpha- and beta-subunits of the human beta-hexosaminidases. Here, we have determined the in vivo strategy which leads to the highest HexA activity in the maximum number of tissues in hexA -deficient knock-out mice. We demonstrated that intravenous co-administration of adenoviral vectors coding for both alpha- and beta-subunits, resulting in preferential liver transduction, was essential to obtain the most successful results. Only the supply of both subunits allowed for HexA overexpression leading to massive secretion of the enzyme in serum, and full or partial enzymatic activity restoration in all peripheral tissues tested. The enzymatic correction was likely to be due to direct cellular transduction by adenoviral vectors and/or uptake of secreted HexA by different organs. These results confirmed that the liver was the preferential target organ to deliver a large amount of secreted proteins. In addition, the need to overexpress both subunits of heterodimeric proteins in order to obtain a high level of secretion in animals defective in only one subunit is emphasized. The endogenous non-defective subunit is otherwise limiting.

  3. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  4. Identification of functional domains of adenovirus tumor-specific transplantation antigen in types 5 and 12 by viable viruses carrying chimeric E1A genes.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Rasková, J; Fujinaga, K; Raska, K

    1994-05-15

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A gene induces in immunized animals a strong tumor transplantation (TSTA) immunity against Ad tumors. Such immunity with group-A and group-C viruses is highly group-specific and no cross-protection is detected between serotypes 5 and 12. This fact was used to map the domains of the Ad5 and Ad12 E1A gene products, respectively, which control the TSTA. We constructed a library of 8 recombinant viruses (H5sub1101 through H5sub1108) which carry chimeric Ad5/Ad12 E1A genes in the background of Ad5. The chimeric genes are functional and these viruses are viable. Some of these constructs induce strong and highly specific tumor syngraft immunity in immunized rats. The viruses carrying the 5' terminus of the first E1A exon derived from Ad12 (viruses H5sub1101, H5sub1102 and H5sub1103) induce strong protection against Ad12 tumors irrespective of the rest of their E1A sequence. The viruses which carry the second exon of the Ad5 E1A gene (viruses H5sub1101, H5sub1102 and H5sub1106) protect against group-C tumors, regardless of the origin of the rest of their E1A gene. The 2 viruses that carry the 5' E1A terminus of the first exon of Ad12 and the second exon of Ad5 (H5sub1101 and H5sub1102) are thus effective in inducing immunity against Ad12 tumors as well as against Ad2 tumors. The viruses which carry the 5' terminus of the first exon derived from Ad5 and the second exon of Ad12 (H5sub1107 and H5sub 1108) fail to induce immunity against either tumor. Expression of only the truncated 5' terminus of the Ad12 E1A gene (viruses H5sub1104 and H5sub1105) is sufficient for induction of Ad12 TSTA. Our results provide direct and unequivocal in vivo evidence that TSTA activities of adenovirus groups A and C are controlled by different domains of their respective E1A genes. The Ad12 TSTA is a function of the 5' terminus of the first E1A exon, while the Ad5 TSTA is coded for by the 3' exon of its E1A gene.

  5. Adenovirus Small E1A Employs the Lysine Acetylases p300/CBP and Tumor Suppressor Rb to Repress Select Host Genes and Promote Productive Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberto; Gou, Dawei; Jawdekar, Gauri; Johnson, Sarah A.; Nava, Miguel; Su, Trent; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zemke, Nathan R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic transformation by adenovirus small e1a depends on simultaneous interactions with the host lysine acetylases p300/CBP and the tumor suppressor RB. How these interactions influence cellular gene expression remains unclear. We find that e1a displaces RBs from E2F transcription factors and promotes p300 acetylation of RB1 K873/K874 to lock it into a repressing conformation that interacts with repressive chromatin-modifying enzymes. These repressing p300-e1a-RB1 complexes specifically interact with host genes that have unusually high p300 association within the gene body. The TGFβ-, TNF-, and interleukin-signaling pathway components are enriched among such p300-targeted genes. The p300-e1a-RB1 complex condenses chromatin in a manner dependent on HDAC activity, p300 lysine acetylase activity, the p300 bromodomain, and RB K873/K874 and e1a K239 acetylation to repress host genes that would otherwise inhibit productive virus infection. Thus, adenovirus employs e1a to repress host genes that interfere with viral replication. PMID:25525796

  6. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  7. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Cittadini, A; Monti, MG; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, PN; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the β-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) handling, oxygen consumption, and β-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca2+–force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6±0.2 versus 2.7±0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca2+ available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca2+–force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. β-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1 levels, and

  8. High efficiency myogenic conversion of human fibroblasts by adenoviral vector-mediated MyoD gene transfer. An alternative strategy for ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, L; Salvatori, G; Coletta, M; Sonnino, C; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Gioglio, L; Murry, C E; Kelly, R; Ferrari, G; Molinaro, M; Crescenzi, M; Mavilio, F; Cossu, G

    1998-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on autologous transplantation of genetically modified myogenic cells, is seriously limited by the number of primary myogenic cells that can be isolated, expanded, transduced, and reimplanted into the patient's muscles. We explored the possibility of using the MyoD gene to induce myogenic conversion of nonmuscle, primary cells in a quantitatively relevant fashion. Primary human and murine fibroblasts from skin, muscle, or bone marrow were infected by an E1-deleted adenoviral vector carrying a retroviral long terminal repeat-promoted MyoD cDNA. Expression of MyoD caused irreversible withdrawal from the cell cycle and myogenic differentiation in the majority (from 60 to 90%) of cultured fibroblasts, as defined by activation of muscle-specific genes, fusion into contractile myotubes, and appearance of ultrastructurally normal sarcomagenesis in culture. 24 h after adenoviral exposure, MyoD-converted cultures were injected into regenerating muscle of immunodeficient (severe combined immunodeficiency/beige) mice, where they gave rise to beta-galactosidase positive, centrally nucleated fibers expressing human myosin heavy chains. Fibers originating from converted fibroblasts were indistinguishable from those obtained by injection of control cultures of lacZ-transduced satellite cells. MyoD-converted murine fibroblasts participated to muscle regeneration also in immunocompetent, syngeneic mice. Although antibodies from these mice bound to adenoviral infected cells in vitro, no inflammatory infiltrate was present in the graft site throughout the 3-wk study period. These data support the feasibility of an alternative approach to gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on implantation of large numbers of genetically modified primary fibroblasts massively converted to myogenesis by adenoviral delivery of MyoD ex vivo. PMID:9593768

  9. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  10. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  11. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  12. BLG-e1 - a novel regulatory element in the distal region of the beta-lactoglobulin gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Reichenstein, Moshe; German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2005-04-11

    beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major ruminant milk protein. A regulatory element, termed BLG-e1, was defined in the distal region of the ovine BLG gene promoter. This 299-bp element lacks the established cis-regulatory sequences that affect milk-protein gene expression. Nevertheless, it alters the binding of downstream BLG sequences to histone H4 and the sensitivity of the histone-DNA complexes to trichostatin A treatment. In mammary cells cultured under favorable lactogenic conditions, BLG-e1 acts as a potent, position-independent silencer of BLG/luciferase expression, and similarly affects the promoter activity of the mouse whey acidic protein gene. Intragenic sequences upstream of BLG exon 2 reverse the silencing effect of BLG-e1 in vitro and in transgenic mice.

  13. A novel single tetracycline-regulative adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax gene expression and cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Zhang, Lidong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Tongyu; Yin, Min; Xu, Kai; Ji, Lin; Roth, Jack A; Fang, Bingliang

    2002-07-18

    Using a binary adenoviral system, we recently showed that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter induces tumor-specific Bax gene expression. However, the strong cytotoxicity of Bax and other pro-apoptotic genes to packaging 293 cells has so far hindered construction of the desired single adenoviral vectors expressing toxic genes. We report here the construction of a single bicistronic adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax expression. The vector (Ad/gBax) utilizes the Tet-Off system and expresses a GFP/Bax fusion protein for easy detection. The hTERT promoter drives the expression of tTA, a transactivator capable of binding to TRE (tetracycline-responsive element) in the absence of tetracycline, which in turn induces expression of the GFP-Bax gene. The addition of tetracycline in 293 cells blocks the binding of tTA to TRE and substantially inhibits GFP-Bax expression and toxicity, thus allowing the packaging and production of Ad/gBax. Our data show that Ad/gBax could drive the high expression of GFP-Bax in tumor cells but not in normal cells and mouse tissues. Furthermore, the expression of GFP-Bax fusion protein elicited tumor-specific apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo at a level comparable to that induced by the binary system. Thus, Ad/gBax may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancers.

  14. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  15. Comparison of high-capacity and first-generation adenoviral vector gene delivery to murine muscle in utero.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Wu, E; Zheng, H; Biermann, V; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2005-01-01

    In utero gene delivery could offer the advantage of treatment at an early stage for genetic disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in which the inevitable process of muscle degeneration is already initiated at birth. Furthermore, treatment of fetal muscle with adenoviral (Ad) vectors is attractive because of a high density of Ad receptors, easy vector accessibility due to immaturity of the basal lamina and the possibility of treating stem cells. Previously, we demonstrated the efficient transduction of fetal muscle by high-capacity Ad (HC-Ad) vectors. In this study, we compared HC-Ad and first-generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors for longevity of lacZ transgene expression, toxicity and induction of immunity after direct vector-mediated in utero gene delivery to fetal C57BL/6 mice muscle 16 days after conception (E-16). The total amount of beta-galactosidase (betagal) expressed from the HC-Ad vector remained stable for the 5 months of the study, although the concentration of betagal decreased due to muscle growth. Higher survival rates that reflect lower levels of toxicity were observed in those mice transduced with an HC-Ad vector as compared to an FG-Ad vector. The toxicity induced by FG-Ad vector gene delivery was dependent on mouse strain and vector dose. Animals treated with either HC-Ad and FG-Ad vectors developed non-neutralizing antibodies against Ad capsid and antibodies against betagal, but these antibodies did not cause loss of vector genomes from transduced muscle. In a mouse model of DMD, dystrophin gene transfer to muscle in utero using an HC-Ad vector restored the dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that long-term transgene expression can be achieved by HC-Ad vector-mediated gene delivery to fetal muscle, although strategies of vector integration may need to be considered to accommodate muscle growth.

  16. A bidirectional Tet-dependent promotor construct regulating the expression of E1A for tight control of oncolytic adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Wang, Xiaomin; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Wildner, Judith; Suckau, Lennart; Pinkert, Sandra; Sipo, Isaac; Weger, Stefan; Poller, Wolfgang

    2007-01-20

    Tight regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV) represents an important requirement for their safe application. Here we describe a new doxycycline (Dox)-dependent oAdV with a bidirectional expression cassette, which drives the expression of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA(s)-M2) from a lung tumor-specific promoter and, in the opposite direction, the expression of the adenoviral E1A gene from a second generation TetO(7) sequence linked to an isolated TATA box. In H441 lung cancer cells, this oAdV showed a strictly Dox-dependent E1A expression, adenoviral replication, cell killing activity and a 450-fold induction of progeny virus production. The virus could be shut off again by withdrawal of Dox and, in contrast to a control oAdV expressing E1A directly from the SP-B promoter, did not replicate in non-target cells. However, the absolute values of virus production and the cell killing activity in the presence of the inducer were still reduced as compared to the control oAdV. The results demonstrate, for the first time, Dox-dependent oAdV replication from a single adenoviral vector genome. Future improvement of the Dox-dependent E1A regulation cassette should lead to the generation of an oAdV well suited to meet the demands for a highly regulated and efficient oncolytic virus for in vivo applications.

  17. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation. PMID:27727248

  18. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  19. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  20. A simple method for the simultaneous detection of E1A and E1B in adenovirus stocks.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Erika; Murata, Takehide; Watanabe, Sanae; Kujime, Yukari; Hirose, Megumi; Pan, Jianzhi; Yamazaki, Takahito; Ugai, Hideyo; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have been developed for use as therapeutic agents and for the introduction of exogenous genes into living cells. However, the occurrence of replication-competent adenoviruses (RCA) in adenovirus stocks produced in 293 cells remains a major problem in terms of the safe use of such vectors. To overcome the problems associated with the occurrence of RCA, we have established a simple method for the simultaneous detection of amplified E1A and E1B from RCA that might contaminate adenoviral stocks. The products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were fractionated by regular electrophoresis on agarose gels and visualized by staining with ethidium bromide. This method is rapid and inexpensive for detection of RCA in the preparation of adenoviruses.

  1. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human Apo A-I for gene therapy in LDLR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Leggiero, E; Astone, D; Cerullo, V; Lombardo, B; Mazzaccara, C; Labruna, G; Sacchetti, L; Salvatore, F; Croyle, M; Pastore, L

    2013-12-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors have great potential for gene therapy applications; however, their administration induces acute toxicity that impairs safe clinical applications. We previously observed that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors strongly reduces the acute response in murine and primate models. To evaluate whether PEGylated HD-Ad vectors combine reduced toxicity with the correction of pathological phenotypes, we administered an HD-Ad vector expressing the human apolipoprotein A-I (hApoA-I) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice (a model for familial hypercholesterolemia) fed a high-cholesterol diet. Mice were treated with high doses of HD-Ad-expressing apo A-I or its PEGylated version. Twelve weeks later, LDL levels were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels higher in mice treated with either of the vectors than in untreated mice. After terminal killing, the areas of atherosclerotic plaques were much smaller in the vector-treated mice than in the control animals. Moreover, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was lower and consequently the toxicity profile better in mice treated with PEGylated vector than in mice treated with the unmodified vector. This finding indicates that the reduction in toxicity resulting from PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors does not impair the correction of pathological phenotypes. It also supports the clinical potential of these vectors for the correction of genetic diseases.

  2. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  3. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs.

  4. Gene Therapy of Disseminated Breast Cancer Using Adenoviral Vectors Targeted Through Immunological Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    vectors encoding the firefly luciferase and 13-galactosidase reporter genes. In addition to these, an adenovirus vector encoding for the cytosine ... deaminase (CD) gene will be used to perform therapeutic studies. The CD enzyme converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a

  5. Adenoviral vector-mediated GDNF gene therapy in a rodent lesion model of late stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, P A; Araujo, D M; Hilt, D C; Sheng, J; Jiao, S

    1997-11-28

    A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene (Ad-GDNF) was used to express the neurotrophic factor GDNF in the unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated substantia nigra (SN) of adult rats ten weeks following the 6-OHDA injection. 6-OHDA lesions significantly increased apomorphine-induced (contralateral) rotations and reduced striatal and nigral dopamine (DA) levels by 99% and 70%, respectively. Ad-GDNF significantly (P < 0.01) decreased (by 30-40%) apomorphine-induced rotations in lesioned rats for up to two weeks following a single injection. Locomotor activity, assessed 7 days following the Ad-GDNF injection, was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased (by 300-400%). Two weeks after the Ad-GDNF injection, locomotor activity was still significantly increased compared to the Ad-beta-gal-injected 6-OHDA lesioned (control) group. Additionally, in Ad-GDNF-injected rats, there was a significant decrease (10-13%) in weight gain which persisted for approximately two weeks following the injection. Consistent with the behavioral changes, levels of DA and the metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were elevated (by 98% and 65%, respectively) in the SN, but not the striatum of Ad-GDNF-injected rats. Overall, a single Ad-GDNF injection had significant effects for 2-3 weeks following administration. These results suggest that virally delivered GDNF promotes the recovery of nigral dopaminergic tone (i.e.: increased DA and DOPAC levels) and improves behavioral performance (i.e.: decreased rotations, increased locomotion) in rodents with extensive nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Moreover, our results suggest that viral delivery of trophic factors may be used eventually to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  6. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  7. Highly efficient retinal gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Cao, Huibi; Wu, Jing; Duan, Rongqi; Hu, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the field of retinal gene therapy in the past several years. In particular, therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in three separate human clinical trials conducted to assess the ability of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) to treat of a type of Leber’s congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. However, despite the success of retinal gene therapy with AAV, challenges remain for delivering large therapeutic genes or genes requiring long DNA regulatory elements for controlling their expression. For example, Stargardt’s disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration, is caused by defects in ABCA4, a gene that is too large to be packaged in AAV. Therefore, we investigated the ability of helper dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad) to deliver genes to the retina as it has a much larger transgene capacity. Using an EGFP reporter, our results showed that HD-Ad can transduce the entire retinal epithelium of a mouse using a dose of only 1 × 105 infectious units and maintain transgene expression for at least 4 months. The results demonstrate that HD-Ad has the potential to be an effective vector for the gene therapy of the retina. PMID:26161435

  8. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  9. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  10. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-Il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. "adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein", "adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein" and "adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein". Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and effective gene

  11. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. “adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein”, “adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein” and “adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein”. Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and

  12. Retargeting of Gene Expression Using Endothelium Specific Hexon Modified Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Lu, Zhi Hong; Preuss, Meredith A.; Barnes, Justin A.; Stockard, Cecil R.; Grizzle, William E.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter were characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution. PMID:24210128

  13. Retargeting of gene expression using endothelium specific hexon modified adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, Sergey A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Hong Lu, Zhi; Preuss, Meredith A; Barnes, Justin A; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Curiel, David T

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter was characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution.

  14. Targeting adeno-associated virus and adenoviral gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Gang; Huang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Bu-Yun; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) heavily endangers human heath worldwide. HCC is one of most frequent cancers in China because patients with liver disease, such as chronic hepatitis, have the highest cancer susceptibility. Traditional therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy in advanced liver cancer, and novel strategies are urgently needed to improve the limited treatment options for HCC. This review summarizes the basic knowledge, current advances, and future challenges and prospects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and adenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy of HCC. This paper also reviews the clinical trials of gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, immunotherapy, toxicity and immunological barriers for AAV and adenoviruses, and proposes several alternative strategies to overcome the therapeutic barriers to using AAV and adenoviruses as vectors. PMID:26755879

  15. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases.

  16. Efficacy of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene in the treatment of lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    LI, KUN-LIN; KANG, JUN; ZHANG, PENG; LI, LI; WANG, YU-BO; CHEN, HENG-YI; HE, YONG

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion induced by lung cancer exerts a negative impact on quality of life and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of the recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene (rAd-p53) in the local treatment of lung cancer and its synergistic effect with chemotherapy. The present study retrospectively recruited 210 patients with lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion who had adopted a treatment strategy of platinum chemotherapy. Pleurodesis was performed via the injection of cisplatin or rAd-p53. Long-term follow-up was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effects of cisplatin and rAd-p53 administration on pleural effusion and other relevant clinical indicators. The short-term effect of pleurodesis was as follows: The efficacy rate of rAd-p53 therapy was significantly higher compared with cisplatin therapy (71.26 vs. 54.47%), and the efficacy of treatment with ≥2×1012 viral particles of rAd-p53 for pleurodesis was significantly greater than treatment with 40 mg cisplatin (P<0.05). Furthermore, efficacy analysis performed 6 and 12 months after pleurodesis indicated that the efficacy rate of rAd-p53 was significantly greater than that of cisplatin (P<0.05). A comparison of median progression-free survival (PFS) time identified a significant difference (P<0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (3.3 vs. 2.7 months); however, a comparison of median overall survival time identified no significant difference (P>0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (9.6 vs. 8.7 months). In addition, Cox regression analysis indicated that PFS was not affected by clinical indicators such as age, gender, prognostic staging and smoking status; however, PFS was affected by pathological subtype (adenocarcinoma or squamous carcinoma) in the rAd-p53 group. rAd-p53 administration for pleurodesis exerts long-term therapeutic effects on the local treatment of lung cancer. Thus, a combination of rAd-p53 and chemotherapy may exert a synergistic effect and

  17. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function.

  18. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a bona fide lysosomal protein which undergoes proteolytic maturation during its biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaehs, Philipp; Weidinger, Petra; Probst, Olivia C.; Svoboda, Barbara; Stadlmann, Johannes; Beug, Hartmut; Waerner, Thomas; Mach, Lukas

    2008-10-01

    Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been reported to be a secretory glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. We now show that CREG is predominantly localized within intracellular compartments. Intracellular CREG was found to lack an N-terminal peptide present in the secreted form of the protein. In contrast to normal cells, CREG is largely secreted by fibroblasts missing both mannose 6-phosphate receptors. This is not observed in cells lacking only one of them. Mass spectrometric analysis of recombinant CREG revealed that the protein contains phosphorylated oligosaccharides at either of its two N-glycosylation sites. Cellular CREG was found to cosediment with lysosomal markers upon subcellular fractionation by density-gradient centrifugation. In fibroblasts expressing a CREG-GFP fusion construct, the heterologous protein was detected in compartments containing lysosomal proteins. Immunolocalization of endogenous CREG confirmed that intracellular CREG is localized in lysosomes. Proteolytic processing of intracellular CREG involves the action of lysosomal cysteine proteinases. These results establish that CREG is a lysosomal protein that undergoes proteolytic maturation in the course of its biosynthesis, carries the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker and depends on the interaction with mannose 6-phosphate receptors for efficient delivery to lysosomes.

  19. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Overexpression of cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis via NF-{kappa}B in mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Cheng-Fei; Han, Ya-Ling; Jie-Deng,; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Jian-Kang,; Bo-Luan,; Jie-Li

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} CREG protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis. {yields} CREG inhibits the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevents the activation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} CREG inhibits NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and pro-apoptosis protein transcription. {yields} CREG anti-apoptotic effect involves inhibition of the death receptor pathway. {yields} p53 is downregulated by CREG via NF-{kappa}B pathway under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. -- Abstract: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show great potential for therapeutic repair after myocardial infarction. However, poor viability of transplanted MSCs in the ischemic heart has limited their use. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been identified as a potent inhibitor of apoptosis. This study therefore aimed to determine if rat bone marrow MSCs transfected with CREG-were able to effectively resist apoptosis induced by inflammatory mediators, and to demonstrate the mechanism of CREG action. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assays. The pathways mediating these apoptotic effects were investigated by Western blotting. Overexpression of CREG markedly protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis by 50% after 10 h, through inhibition of the death-receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, leading to attenuation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Moreover, CREG resisted the serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevented the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. Treatment of cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly increased the transcription of pro-apoptosis proteins (p53 and Fas) by NF-{kappa}B, and attenuated the anti-apoptotic effects of CREG on MSCs. The results of this study

  1. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27833761

  2. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  4. Developing adenoviral vectors encoding therapeutic genes toxic to host cells: comparing binary and single-inducible vectors expressing truncated E2F-1.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Hao, Hongying; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, H Sam

    2010-02-20

    Adenoviral vectors are highly efficient at transferring genes into cells and are broadly used in cancer gene therapy. However, many therapeutic genes are toxic to vector host cells and thus inhibit vector production. The truncated form of E2F-1 (E2Ftr), which lacks the transactivation domain, can significantly induce cancer cell apoptosis, but is also toxic to HEK-293 cells and inhibits adenovirus replication. To overcome this, we have developed binary- and single-vector systems with a modified tetracycline-off inducible promoter to control E2Ftr expression. We compared several vectors and found that the structure of expression cassettes in vectors significantly affects E2Ftr expression. One construct expresses high levels of inducible E2Ftr and efficiently causes apoptotic cancer cell death by activation of caspase-3. The approach developed in this study may be applied in other viral vectors for encoding therapeutic genes that are toxic to their host cells and/or inhibit vector propagation.

  5. Autoregulated expression of p53 from an adenoviral vector confers superior tumor inhibition in a model of prostate carcinoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo Esaki; da Silva Soares, Rafael Bento; Costanzi-Strauss, Eugenia; Strauss, Bryan E

    2016-12-01

    Alternative treatments for cancer using gene therapy approaches have shown promising results and some have even reached the marketplace. Even so, additional improvements are needed, such as employing a strategically chosen promoter to drive expression of the transgene in the target cell. Previously, we described viral vectors where high-level transgene expression was achieved using a p53-responsive promoter. Here we present an adenoviral vector (AdPGp53) where p53 is employed to regulate its own expression and which outperforms a traditional vector when tested in a model of gene therapy for prostate cancer. The functionality of AdPGp53 and AdCMVp53 were compared in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. AdPGp53 conferred greatly enhanced levels of p53 protein and induction of the p53 target gene, p21, as well as superior cell killing by a mechanism consistent with apoptosis. DU145 cells were susceptible to induction of death with AdPGp53, yet PC3 cells were quite resistant. Though AdCMVp53 was shown to be reliable, extremely high-level expression of p53 offered by AdPGp53 was necessary for tumor suppressor activity in PC3 and DU145. In situ gene therapy experiments revealed tumor inhibition and increased overall survival in response to AdPGp53, but not AdCMVp53. Upon histologic examination, only AdPGp53 treatment was correlated with the detection of both p53 and TUNEL-positive cells. This study points to the importance of improved vector performance for gene therapy of prostate cancer.

  6. qnrE1, a Member of a New Family of Plasmid-located Quinolone Resistance Genes Originated from the Chromosome of Enterobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Ezequiel; Tijet, Nathalie; De Belder, Denise; Gomez, Sonia; Martino, Florencia; Corso, Alejandra; Melano, Roberto G; Petroni, Alejandro

    2017-02-13

    qnrE1, found in a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae, resulted undetectable by PCR assays used for the six qnr families. qnrE1 was located on a conjugative plasmid (ca. 185 kb) and differed from qnrB alleles by 25%. Phylogenetic reconstructions of qnr genes and proteins, and analysis of the qnrE1 surroundings showed that this gene belongs to a new qnr family and was likely mobilized by ISEcp1 from the chromosome of Enterobacter spp. to plasmids of K. pneumoniae.

  7. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Introgen's adenoviral p53 gene therapy [INGN 201, ADVEXIN] is in clinical development for the treatment of various cancers. The p53 tumour suppressor gene is deleted or mutated in many tumour cells and is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human tumours. INGN 201 has been shown to kill cancer cells directly. In August 2002, Introgen announced plans to file an application for INGN 201 with the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of head and neck cancer; the European filing will be submitted simultaneously with the previously scheduled (planned for 2004) submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) for ADVEXIN to the US FDA. On 20 February 2003, INGN 201 received orphan drug designation from the US FDA for head and neck cancer. INGN 201 is available for licensing although Introgen favours retaining partial or full rights to the therapy in the US. Introgen Therapeutics and its collaborative partner for the p53 programme, Aventis Gencell, have been developing p53 gene therapy products. The agreement was originally signed by Rhône-Poulenc Rorer's Gencell division, which became Aventis Gencell after Rhône-Poulenc Rorer merged with Hoechst Marion Roussel to form Aventis Pharma. According to the original agreement, Introgen was responsible for phase I and preclinical development in North America, while Aventis Gencell was responsible for clinical trials conducted in Europe and for clinical trials in North America beyond phase I. In April 2001, Aventis Gencell and Introgen restructured their existing collaboration agreement for p53 gene therapy products. Aventis Gencell indicated that p53 research had suffered from internal competition for resources and was pulling back from its development agreement with Introgen for p53 gene therapy products. Introgen will assume responsibility for worldwide development of all p53 programmes and will obtain exclusive worldwide commercial rights to p53-based gene therapy

  8. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  9. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  10. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Oka, K; Mullins, C E; Kushwaha, R S; Leen, A M; Chan, L

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/-) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high-cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery or by catheter-based intrahepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ⩽1.1 × 10(12) viral particles (vp) kg(-1) failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pre-treatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pre-treatment level on days 20-48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransferase remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upward on day 72 and returned to pre-treatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol-lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78 and 50% in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR

  11. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  12. Cytotoxic effect of a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector with cytosine deaminase gene driven by L-plastin promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihwa; Kim, Sunja; Lee, Kyumhyang; Kim, Changmin; Chung, Injae

    2007-06-01

    Great expectations are set on gene therapy for the treatment of malignant hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in East Asia. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (AV) have been developed in which the L-plastin promoter (LP) regulates the expression of transgenes, in a tumor cell specific manner, resulting in an increase in the therapeutic index. The development of the AdLPCD vector, a replication-incompetent AV, containing a transcription unit of LP and E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD), was reported in our previous work. In the present study, the AdLPCD vector combined with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) administration was tested to see if it might have significant utility in the chemosensitization of L-plastin positive HCC. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Chang Liver, Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells) were investigated for the expression of LacZ after infecting the cells with the AdLPLacZ vector containing a 2.4 kb fragment of LP and the LacZ gene. Relatively high levels of LP activity were detected in HepG2, followed by Chang Liver cells; whereas, no promoter activity was found in Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells, as determined by AdLPLacZ infection followed by the beta-galactosidase assay. In addition, the results of RT-PCR assays for the detection of endogenous L-plastin mRNA in these cells lines correlated well with those of the beta-galactosidase activity after infection with AdLPLacZ. Based on these data, the cytotoxic effect of AdLPCD/5-FC was evaluated in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that the CD gene delivered by AV could sensitize HepG2 cells to the prodrug, 5-FC. However, the observed effects were insufficient to cause the death of most of cells. This suggests that the screening of patients for an AdLP/5-FC strategy based on AdLPLacZ data might not always guarantee a good therapeutic outcome.

  13. Enhanced adenoviral gene delivery to motor and dorsal root ganglion neurons following injection into demyelinated peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zheng, Yiyan; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Hu, Xiaoling; Yu, Panpan; Burke, Darlene A; Wang, Heming; Jun, Cai; Byers, Jonathan; Whittemore, Scott R; Shields, Christopher B

    2010-08-15

    Injection of viral vectors into peripheral nerves may transfer specific genes into their dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and motoneurons. However, myelin sheaths of peripheral axons block the entry of viral particles into nerves. We studied whether mild, transient peripheral nerve demyelination prior to intraneural viral vector injection would enhance gene transfer to target DRG neurons and motoneurons. The right sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 mice was focally demyelinated with 1% lysolecithin, and the left sciatic nerve was similarly injected with saline (control). Five days after demyelination, 0.5 microl of Ad5-GFP was injected into both sciatic nerves at the site of previous injection. The effectiveness of gene transfer was evaluated by counting GFP(+) neurons in the DRGs and ventral horns. After peripheral nerve demyelination, there was a fivefold increase in the number of infected DRG neurons and almost a 15-fold increase in the number of infected motoneurons compared with the control, nondemyelinated side. Focal demyelination reduced the myelin sheath barrier, allowing greater virus-axon contact. Increased CXADR expression on the demyelinated axons facilitated axoplasmic viral entry. No animals sustained any prolonged neurological deficits. Increased gene delivery into DRG neurons and motoneurons may provide effective treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pain, and spinal cord injury.

  14. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  15. High Efficiency CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Editing in Primary Human T-cells Using Mutant Adenoviral E4orf6/E1b55k "Helper" Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, Kamila S; Grier, Alexandra E; Sahni, Jaya; Burleigh, Stephen M; Martin, Unja; Yang, Julia G; Popp, Nicholas A; Krutein, Michelle C; Khan, Iram F; Jacoby, Kyle; Jensen, Michael C; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2016-09-29

    Many future therapeutic applications of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 and related RNA-guided nucleases are likely to require their use to promote gene targeting, thus necessitating development of methods that provide for delivery of three components-Cas9, guide RNAs and recombination templates-to primary cells rendered proficient for homology-directed repair. Here, we demonstrate an electroporation/transduction codelivery method that utilizes mRNA to express both Cas9 and mutant adenoviral E4orf6 and E1b55k helper proteins in association with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing guide RNAs and recombination templates. By transiently enhancing target cell permissiveness to AAV transduction and gene editing efficiency, this novel approach promotes efficient gene disruption and/or gene targeting at multiple loci in primary human T-cells, illustrating its broad potential for application in translational gene editing.

  16. Specific transcription of an adenoviral gene that possesses no TATA sequence homology in extracts of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Leong, K; Flint, S J

    1984-09-25

    Transcription of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) IVa2 gene, which contains no TATA-like sequence in the region immediately upstream of the IVa2 cap sites (Baker, C. C., and Ziff, E. B. (1981) J. Mol. Biol. 149, 189-221), has been examined in extracts of HeLa cells (Manley, J. L., Fire, A., Cano, A., Sharp, P. A., and Gefter, M.L. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 3855-3859). Run-off transcripts of the predicted length of those initiated at the IVa2 cap sites were synthesized from different Ad2 DNA templates, each of which also contained the major late transcriptional control region. Mapping of the 5' ends of the RNA made from one template by a nuclease protection assay established the fidelity of initiation of IVa2 transcription in vitro. The efficiency of IVa2 expression in whole HeLa extracts was influenced quite dramatically by monovalent and divalent metal ion concentrations and the concentration of extract protein present in the reaction mixture. Under certain conditions, IVa2 run-off transcripts were made almost as efficiently as those from the Ad2 major late transcriptional control region. However, conditions promoting optimal IVa2 transcription in vitro did not favor recognition of the major late transcriptional control region, and vice versa: the synthesis of IVa2 and major late run-off transcripts responded differently to all parameters tested.

  17. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  18. E1A-engineered human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells as carriers and amplifiers for adenovirus suppress hepatocarcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Ye, Zhou; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Qing; Fan, Dongmei; Zhang, Yanjun; Luo, Hongbo R.; Yuan, Xiangfei; Li, Zongfang; Xiong, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Nevertheless, efficient transgene delivery remains a challenge. In this study, we explored a new targeted system based on human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), which were engineered to deliver adenovirus to tumor sites, and to replicate and assemble into new adenovirus against HCC. Our results showed that HUMSCs infected by Ad-hTERTp-IL24 followed by LentiR.E1A infection could specifically migrate to HepG2 tumor cells and support adenoviral replication in vitro and in vivo 36 h after LentiR.E1A infection. Ad-hTERTp-IL24 specifically inhibited HepG2 cells growth, and this inhibitory effect was enhanced by low doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), because the expression levels of coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin ανβ3 on tumor cells were significantly increased, causing higher viral uptake. Compared with the no treatment groups, Ad-hTERTp-IL24 and LentiR.E1A co-loaded HUMSCs exhibited significant anti-tumor activity in vivo, particularly in combination with low doses of 5-Fu. In summary, this study provides a promising targeted gene therapeutic strategy dependent on the tumor tropism of HUMSCs, to improve the outcome of virotherapy for tumor patients especially those with metastatic diseases. PMID:27322080

  19. Induction of Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Mouse Model following Gene Fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan Virus Gn and S0.7 in an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Li, Puyuan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV) glycoprotein (GP) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359–610 aa, HSP70C) to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1–274-S0.7). C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7) and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV. PMID:24505421

  20. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:23127366

  1. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  2. Emerging adenoviral vectors for stable correction of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jager, Lorenz; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2007-08-01

    Recent drawbacks in treating patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders with retroviral vectors underline the importance of generating novel tools for stable transduction of mammalian cells. Substantial progress has been made over the recent years which may offer important steps towards stable and more importantly safer correction of genetic diseases. This article discusses recent advances for stable transduction of target cells based on adenoviral gene transfer. There is accumulating evidence that recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) based on various human serotypes with a broad cellular tropism and adenoviruses (Ads) from different species will play an important role in future gene therapy applications. In combination with recombinant AdVs for somatic integration these gene transfer vectors offer high transduction efficiencies with potentially safer integration patterns. Other approaches for persistent transgene expression include excision of stable episomes from the adenoviral vector genome, but also long-term persistence of the complete adenoviral vector genome as an episomal DNA molecule was demonstrated and exemplified by the treatment of various genetic diseases in small and large animal models. This review displays advantages but also limitations of these Ad based vector systems. This is the perfect time to pursue such approaches because alternative strategies for stable transduction of mammalian cells undergoing many cell divisions are urgently needed. Looking into the future, we believe that a combination of different components from different viral vectors in concert with non-viral vector systems will be successful in designing significantly optimized transfer vehicles for a broad range of different genetic diseases.

  3. Overexpression of IL-1beta by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in the rat brain causes a prolonged hepatic chemokine response, axonal injury and the suppression of spontaneous behaviour.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sandra J; Deacon, Rob M J; Jiang, Yanyan; Ferrari, Carina; Pitossi, Fernando J; Anthony, Daniel C

    2007-08-01

    Acute brain injury induces early and transient hepatic expression of chemokines, which amplify the injury response and give rise to movement of leukocytes into the blood and subsequently the brain and liver. Here, we sought to determine whether an ongoing injury stimulus within the brain would continue to drive the hepatic chemokine response and how it impacts on behaviour and CNS integrity. We generated chronic IL-1beta expression in rat brain by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer, which resulted in chronic leukocyte recruitment, axonal injury and prolonged depression of spontaneous behaviour. IL-1beta could not be detected in circulating blood, but a chronic systemic response was established, including extended production of hepatic and circulating chemokines, leukocytosis, liver damage, weight loss, decreased serum albumin and marked liver leukocyte recruitment. Thus, hepatic chemokine synthesis is a feature of active chronic CNS disease and provides an accessible target for the suppression of CNS inflammation.

  4. E1a induces the expression of epithelial characteristics

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cells closely resembling epithelia constitute the first specific cell type in a mammalian embryo. Many other cell types emerge via epithelial- mesenchymal differentiation. The transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in this differentiation are being elucidated. I have previously reported (Frisch, 1991) that adenovirus E1a is a tumor suppressor gene in certain human cell lines. In the present report, I demonstrate that E1a expression caused diverse human tumor cells (rhabdomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, melanoma, osteosarcoma) and fibroblasts to assume at least two of the following epithelial characteristics: (a) epithelioid morphology; (b) epithelial-type intercellular adhesion proteins localized to newly formed junctional complexes; (c) keratin-containing intermediate filaments; and (d) down- regulation of non-epithelial genes. E1a thus appeared to partially convert diverse human tumor cells into an epithelial phenotype. This provides a new system for molecular analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal interconversions. This effect may also contribute to E1a's tumor suppression activity, possibly through sensitization to anoikis (Frisch, S.M., and H. Francis, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 124:619-626). PMID:7525602

  5. Apoptotic genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Bertram; Dickopp, Alexandra; Kirch, Hans-Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in malignant cells is a major goal of cancer therapy in general and of certain cancer gene therapy strategies in particular. Numerous apoptosis-regulating genes have been evaluated for this purpose. Besides the most prominent p53 gene others include p16, p21, p27, E2F genes, FHIT, PTEN and CASPASE genes. Recently, the potential for therapy of an adenoviral gene, E1A, known for a long time for its apoptosis-inducing activity, has been discovered. In experimental settings, these genes have proven their tumor-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activity. Clinical trials are currently being performed with selected genes. By far the most studies transfer the p53 gene using retro- or adenoviral vectors. Disease stabilization or other benefits were observed in a limited number of patients when p53 was applied alone or in combination with cytotoxic drugs. A second proapoptotic gene that has entered clinical trials is adenovirus E1A. Here, too, disease stabilization as well as/or local regression in one case have been demonstrated in selected patients. In all cases, side effects were tolerable. To further improve E1A as a therapeutic transgene, we have deleted transforming domains from the adenovirus 5 and 12 13S cDNAs. Mutants were derived which had completely lost their transforming activity in combination with the E1B oncogene but retained a pronounced tumor-suppressive activity. Cells transduced with these constructs showed a highly reduced ability to grow in soft agar, and tumor growth in nude mice could be substantially suppressed. Outgrowing tumors had lost E1A expression when analyzed in Western blots. These E1A constructs may represent valuable tools for cancer gene therapy in the future.

  6. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  7. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-17

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  8. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are superior in vitro to first-generation vectors for endothelial cell-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua M; Tang, Chongren; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David A

    2010-12-01

    Arterial endothelial cells (EC) are attractive targets for gene therapy of atherosclerosis because they are accessible to hematogenous and catheter-based vector delivery and overlie atherosclerotic plaques. Vector-mediated expression-in EC-of proteins that mediate cholesterol transfer out of the artery wall and decrease inflammation could prevent and reverse atherosclerosis. However, clinical application of this strategy is limited by lack of a suitable gene-transfer vector. First-generation adenovirus (FGAd) is useful for EC gene transfer in proof-of-concept studies, but is unsuitable for atheroprotective human gene therapy because of limited duration of expression and proinflammatory effects. Moreover, others have reported detrimental effects of FGAd on critical aspects of EC physiology including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) either alone or expressing an atheroprotective gene [apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)] could circumvent these limitations. In contrast to control FGAd, HDAd did not alter any of several critical EC physiologic functions (including proliferation, migration, apoptosis, metabolic activity, and nitric oxide (NO) production) and did not stimulate proinflammatory pathways [including expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Expression of apoA-I by HDAd reduced EC VCAM-1 expression. HDAd is a promising vector and apoA-I is a promising gene for atheroprotective human gene therapy delivered via EC.

  9. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  10. Long-term survival of cardiac allografts induced by cyclophosphamide combined with CTLA4Ig-gene transfer mediated by adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Ma, J B; Jin, Y Z; Feng, Y G; Hao, J; Gao, X; Xie, S S

    2006-11-01

    There is a need to achieve donor-specific tolerance in clinical organ transplantation, where potential benefits remain overshadowed by chronic rejection and the side-effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. It is known that the mature immune system in mice can be reprogrammed to accept a foreign graft as if it was "self". The AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer (SC) + cyclophosphamide (CP) treatment alone prolongs allograft survival but does not induce tolerance. However, in our study, the AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer combined with SC + CP treatment yielded significantly prolonged mean survival times (149.7 +/- 18.0 days), while those in the untreated or AdLacZ treated mice were rejected in normal fashion (5.3 +/- 0.5 and 5.2 +/- 0.4 days, respectively), and survival in the AdCTLA4Ig or SC + CP treated groups were 45.7 +/- 9.6 or 50.2 +/- 5.3 days, respectively. In conclusion, a protocol of AdCTLA4Ig + SC + CP improved the survival of DA-->LEW cardiac allografts.

  11. Intrapleural Adenoviral-mediated Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor Gene Transfer Suppresses the Progression of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Keshava, Shiva; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive thoracic cancer with a high mortality rate as it responds poorly to standard therapeutic interventions. Our recent studies showed that expression of endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) in MPM cells suppresses tumorigenicity. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanism by which EPCR suppresses MPM tumor growth and evaluate whether EPCR gene therapy could suppress the progression of MPM in a mouse model of MPM. Measurement of cytokines from the pleural lavage showed that mice implanted with MPM cells expressing EPCR had elevated levels of IFNγ and TNFα compared to mice implanted with MPM cells lacking EPCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that EPCR expression renders MPM cells highly susceptible to IFNγ + TNFα-induced apoptosis. Intrapleural injection of Ad.EPCR into mice with an established MPM originating from MPM cells lacking EPCR reduced the progression of tumor growth. Ad.EPCR treatment elicited recruitment of macrophages and NK cells into the tumor microenvironment and increased IFNγ and TNFα levels in the pleural space. Ad.EPCR treatment resulted in a marked increase in tumor cell apoptosis. In summary, our data show that EPCR expression in MPM cells promotes tumor cell apoptosis, and intrapleural EPCR gene therapy suppresses MPM progression. PMID:27833109

  12. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  13. Limited temperature-sensitive transactivation by mutant adenovirus type 2 E1a proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fahnestock, M L; Lewis, J B

    1989-01-01

    A series of linker-scanning and deletion mutations was generated in the transactivating domain of the larger, 289-amino-acid-residue E1a protein of adenovirus type 2. Mutant genes were recombined into virus to assay the ability of the variant E1a proteins to activate expression of an E1a-dependent viral gene during infection. Results of assays performed at 32, 37, and 40 degrees C indicated that at least 2 of the 10 mutants tested showed limited temperature sensitivity for transactivation. Images PMID:2523001

  14. Transduction of Brain Dopamine Neurons by Adenoviral Vectors Is Modulated by CAR Expression: Rationale for Tropism Modified Vectors in PD Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Travis B.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Glandon, Anya M.; Curiel, David T.; Standaert, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad) vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)–based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN) in wild type (wt) and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the development

  15. [Deletion of IV a2 gene from adenoviral genome by lambda-Red recombinase system and packaging of the recombinant adenovirus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Fan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Liu, Xue-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Ruan, Li

    2011-05-01

    This investigation is to delete the most of the coding sequence (1104 bp) of the IV a2 gene in an adenovirus genome by a lambda-Red recombinase system-mediated PCR-targeting approach and rescue a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion. First, the template pAK of PCR targeting, containing kanamycin cassette, was constructed. Then, a linear fragment for PCR targeting, which had 39 bp homologous arms at both of its terminus, was amplified by PCR from the pAK. The pFG140 and the linear fragment were electroporated into E. coli BW25113/pIJ790 sequentially and the recombinant pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) was established by homologous recombination between the linear fragment and the pFG140 with aid of X-Red recombinase. The precise deletion of 1 104 bp fragment from IV a2 was confirmed by restriction endonucleases digestion and DNA sequencing. ORF of IV a2 was amplified by PCR from pFG140 and then cloned into the pAAV2neo vector. The recombinant adenovirus Ad5delta IV a2 (1104) was rescued by co-transfection of pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) and pAAV2neo-IV a2 into HEK293 cells. It was shown by Western Blot that IV a2 could not be detected in the Ad5deltaIV a2 (1104)- infected HEK293 cells. This study established a PCR-targeting strategy for manipulating adenovirus genome directly by a lambda-Red recombinase system, and a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion was obtained.

  16. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  17. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  18. E1A dependent up-regulation of c-jun/AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kitabayashi, I; Chiu, R; Gachelin, G; Yokoyama, K

    1991-01-01

    E1A, the early region 1A transcription unit of human adenovirus, exhibits multiple functions that regulate the expression of some cellular genes and promote cell growth and division. We found that E1A stimulated c-jun gene expression at least fifty-fold in rat 3Y1 cells in a serum-independent manner, concomitantly with E1A down-regulation of jun B expression. The E1A-dependent induction of c-jun transcription resulted in increase amount of cJun/AP1. This induction was mediated by the enhancement of the binding activity of the transcription factor cJun/AP1 to an AP1 binding site in the c-jun promoter. Additionally, this induction can be repressed by introducing junB into the cells. Taken collectively, these results suggest that the differential expression of two closely related proteins greatly expands their cellular regulation. Induction of c-jun expression by E1A as well as c-jun autoregulation may amplify the action of E1A during adenovirus infection. Therefore, some of the biological effects of E1A may include mediating the constitutive activation of c-jun, which is important in transcriptional regulation and oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:1826351

  19. Transcription factor TFIID is a direct functional target of the adenovirus E1A transcription-repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Toth, K; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    The 243-amino acid adenovirus E1A oncoprotein both positively and negatively modulates the expression of cellular genes involved in the regulation of cell growth. The E1A transcription repression function appears to be linked with its ability to induce cellular DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell transformation, as well as to inhibit cell differentiation. The mechanism by which E1A represses the transcription of various promoters has proven enigmatic. Here we provide several lines of evidence that the "TATA-box" binding protein (TBP) component of transcription factor TFIID is a cellular target of the E1A repression function encoded within the E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids. (i) The E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids [E1A-(1-80)protein] efficiently represses basal transcription from TATA-containing core promoters in vitro. (ii) TBP reverses completely E1A repression in vitro. (iii) TBP restores transcriptional activity to E1A-(1-80) protein affinity-depleted nuclear extracts. (iv) The N-terminal repression domain of E1A interacts directly and specifically with TBP in vitro. These results may help explain how E1A represses a set of genes that lack common upstream promoter elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479778

  20. A novel immunocompetent murine model for replicating oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Hedjran, F; Larson, C; Perez, G L; Reid, T

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses are under investigation as a promising novel strategy for cancer immunotherapeutics. Unfortunately, there is no immunocompetent mouse cancer model to test oncolytic adenovirus because murine cancer cells are generally unable to produce infectious viral progeny from human adenoviruses. We find that the murine K-ras-induced lung adenocarcinoma cell line ADS-12 supports adenoviral infection and generates infectious viral progeny. ADS-12 cells express the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor and infected ADS-12 cells express the viral protein E1A. We find that our previously described oncolytic virus, adenovirus TAV-255 (AdTAV-255), kills ADS-12 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We investigated ADS-12 cells as an in-vivo model system for replicating oncolytic adenoviruses. Subcutaneous injection of ADS-12 cells into immunocompetent 129 mice led to tumor formation in all injected mice. Intratumoral injection of AdTAV-255 in established tumors causes a significant reduction in tumor growth. This model system represents the first fully immunocompetent mouse model for cancer treatment with replicating oncolytic adenoviruses, and therefore will be useful to study the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenoviruses in general and particularly immunostimulatory viruses designed to evoke an antitumor immune response. PMID:25525035

  1. Circumventing Antivector Immunity: Potential Use of Nonhuman Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Podgorski, Iva I.; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles. PMID:24499174

  2. Circumventing antivector immunity: potential use of nonhuman adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Podgorski, Iva I; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles.

  3. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  4. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Paul M.; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1–80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1–80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1–80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1–80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1–80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1–80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1–80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling. PMID:22521914

  5. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Green, Maurice

    2012-06-20

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1-80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1-80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1-80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1-80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1-80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1-80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling.

  6. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  7. Using multivalent adenoviral vectors for HIV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Li, Zan C; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Wu, Hongju; Matthews, Qiana L

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been used for a variety of vaccine applications including cancer and infectious diseases. Traditionally, Ad-based vaccines are designed to express antigens through transgene expression of a given antigen. For effective vaccine development it is often necessary to express or present multiple antigens to the immune system to elicit an optimal vaccine as observed preclinically with mosaic/polyvalent HIV vaccines or malaria vaccines. Due to the wide flexibility of Ad vectors they are an ideal platform for expressing large amounts of antigen and/or polyvalent mosaic antigens. Ad vectors that display antigens on their capsid surface can elicit a robust humoral immune response, the "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy. The adenoviral hexon protein has been utilized to display peptides in the majority of vaccine strategies involving capsid incorporation. Based on our abilities to manipulate hexon HVR2 and HVR5, we sought to manipulate HVR1 in the context of HIV antigen display for the first time ever. More importantly, peptide incorporation within HVR1 was utilized in combination with other HVRs, thus creating multivalent vectors. To date this is the first report where dual antigens are displayed within one Ad hexon particle. These vectors utilize HVR1 as an incorporation site for a seven amino acid region of the HIV glycoprotein 41, in combination with six Histidine incorporation within HVR2 or HVR5. Our study illustrates that these multivalent antigen vectors are viable and can present HIV antigen as well as His6 within one Ad virion particle. Furthermore, mouse immunizations with these vectors demonstrate that these vectors can elicit a HIV and His6 epitope-specific humoral immune response.

  8. The degradation sequence of adenovirus E1A consists of the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R; Richter, J D

    1990-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene product is a potent transcriptional activator and nuclear oncoprotein. Like other regulatory proteins, E1A has a short half-life, in the range of 30 to 120 min. This short half-life, which was measured in cells synthesizing E1A, is not observed in cells injected with E1A protein made in bacteria or in vitro. In these cases, E1A is essentially refractory to degradation. In an attempt to reconcile this apparent paradox, we suggested that E1A was marked for degradation during its synthesis. Furthermore, we showed that a domain in the amino terminus of E1A was required for rapid degradation in cells translating E1A mRNA (J. M. Slavicek, N. C. Jones, and J. D. Richter, EMBO J. 7:3171-3180, 1988). In this study, we have used Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with mRNAs encoding altered E1A proteins to show that the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile is required for E1A degradation. Even conservative amino acid substitutions in this degradation sequence render it nonfunctional. This degradation sequence can function as a transferable signal, since it induces instability when fused to another normally stable protein. Furthermore, the degradation sequence requires a proximity of no more than six residues from the amino terminus for activity. These data suggest that a trans-acting factor recognizes the amino terminus of E1A during the translation of its message to mark the protein for subsequent destruction. Images PMID:2146491

  9. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  10. Differential Contribution of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep Protein Expression and Nucleic Acid Elements to Inhibition of Adenoviral Replication in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Heilbronn, Regine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) exhibits complex interactions with its helper adenovirus. Whereas AAV-2 is dependent on adenoviral functions for productive replication, it conversely inhibits adenoviral replication, both when its genome is present in trans after coinfection with both viruses and when it is present in cis, as in the production of recombinant adenovirus (rAd)/AAV-2 hybrid vectors. The notion that AAV-mediated inhibition of adenoviral replication is due predominantly to the expression of the AAV-2 Rep proteins was recently challenged by successful Rep78 expression in a rAd5 vector through recoding of the Rep open reading frame (ORF). We closely analyzed the relative contributions of AAV-2 nucleic acid elements and Rep protein expression to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in both of the above scenarios. When present in cis, a sequence element in the 3′ part of the rep gene, comprising only the AAV-2 p40 promoter and the AAV-2 intron sequence, which we termed the RIS-Ad, completely blocks adenoviral replication. p5/p19 promoter-driven Rep protein expression, on the other hand, only weakly inhibits rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation, and by inactivation of the RIS-Ad, it is feasible to generate first-generation rAd vectors expressing functional Rep proteins. The RIS-Ad plays no role in the inhibition of adenoviral replication in trans in a model closely mimicking AAV-2–Ad coinfection. In this case, expression of the Rep proteins is required, as well as the presence of an amplifiable inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-containing template. Thus, very different AAV-2 elements and mechanisms are involved in inhibition of adenoviral replication during rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation and after Ad-AAV coinfection. IMPORTANCE This is the first study to systematically compare the contributions of AAV-2 protein expression and AAV-2 nucleic acid elements to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in rAd/AAV-2 hybrid vector

  11. A novel application of E1A in combination therapy with EGFR-TKI treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ming; Chang, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Hui-Huang; Li, Jie-Ning; Lyu, Yu-Jhen; Kuo, Kuang-Tai; Huang, Ming-Te; Su, Jen-Liang; Chen, Pai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor clinical outcomes; however, an increasing number of patients have shown a poor effective response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI). Here, we found that AXL expression was positively correlated with poor progression in breast cancer patients. Suppression of AXL by an anti-tumor protein, E1A, enhanced EGFR-TKI (gefitinib, erlotinib and lapatinib) sensitization, resulting in significant inhibition of tumor growth in breast cancer cells. Additionally, AXL overexpression dramatically impaired E1A-mediated EGFR-TKI sensitization. These findings show that downregulation of AXL expression by E1A contributes to sensitization to EGFR-TKI in breast cancer, suggesting that combinatorial therapy of AXL inhibitors or E1A gene therapy with EGFR-TKI may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of breast cancer patients. PMID:27590506

  12. Reversal of experimental colitis disease activity in mice following administration of an adenoviral IL-10 vector

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Makoto; Mathis, J Michael; Jennings, Merilyn H; Jordan, Paul; Wang, Yuping; Ando, Tomoaki; Joh, Takashi; Alexander, J Steven

    2005-01-01

    Genetic deficiency in the expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) is associated with the onset and progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The clinical significance of IL-10 expression is supported by studies showing that immune-augmentation of IL-10 prevents inflammation and mucosal damage in animal models of colitis and in human colitis. Interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating cytokine, has been shown to prevent some inflammation and injury in animal and clinical studies, but the efficacy of IL-10 treatment remains unsatisfactory. We found that intra-peritoneal administration of adenoviral IL-10 to mice significantly reversed colitis induced by administration of 3% DSS (dextran sulfate), a common model of colitis. Adenoviral IL-10 (Ad-IL10) transfected mice developed high levels of IL-10 (394 +/- 136 pg/ml) within the peritoneal cavity where the adenovirus was expressed. Importantly, when given on day 4 (after the induction of colitis w/DSS), Ad-IL10 significantly reduced disease activity and weight loss and completely prevented histopathologic injury to the colon at day 10. Mechanistically, compared to Ad-null and DSS treated mice, Ad-IL10 and DSS-treated mice were able to suppress the expression of MAdCAM-1, an endothelial adhesion molecule associated with IBD. Our results suggest that Ad-IL10 (adenoviral IL-10) gene therapy of the intestine or peritoneum may be useful in the clinical treatment of IBD, since we demonstrated that this vector can reverse the course of an existing gut inflammation and markers of inflammation. PMID:16259632

  13. Adenoviral vector tethering to metal surfaces via hydrolyzable cross-linkers for the modulation of vector release and transduction.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Chorny, Michael; Connolly, Jeanne M; Adamo, Richard F; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The use of arterial stents and other medical implants as a delivery platform for surface immobilized gene vectors allows for safe and efficient localized expression of therapeutic transgenes. In this study we investigate the use of hydrolyzable cross-linkers with distinct kinetics of hydrolysis for delivery of gene vectors from polyallylamine bisphosphonate-modified metal surfaces. Three cross-linkers with the estimated t1/2 of ester bonds hydrolysis of 5, 12 and 50 days demonstrated a cumulative 20%, 39% and 45% vector release, respectively, after 30 days exposure to physiological buffer at 37 °C. Transgene expression in endothelial and smooth muscles cells transduced with substrate immobilized adenovirus resulted in significantly different expression profiles for each individual cross-linker. Furthermore, immobilization of adenoviral vectors effectively extended their transduction effectiveness beyond the initial phase of release. Transgene expression driven by adenovirus-tethered stents in rat carotid arteries demonstrated that a faster rate of cross-linker hydrolysis resulted in higher expression levels at day 1, which declined by day 8 after stent implantation, while inversely, slower hydrolysis was associated with increased arterial expression at day 8 in comparison with day 1. In conclusion, adjustable release of transduction-competent adenoviral vectors from metallic surfaces can be achieved, both in vitro and in vivo, through surface immobilization of adenoviral vectors using hydrolyzable cross-linkers with structure-specific release kinetics.

  14. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  15. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  16. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  17. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  18. Development of an adenoviral vector with robust expression driven by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a new adenoviral vector where transgene expression is driven by p53. We first developed a synthetic promoter, referred to as PGTx{beta}, containing a p53-responsive element, a minimal promoter and the first intron of the rabbit {beta}-globin gene. Initial assays using plasmid-based vectors indicated that expression was tightly controlled by p53 and was 5-fold stronger than the constitutive CMV immediate early promoter/enhancer. The adenoviral vector, AdPG, was also shown to offer p53-responsive expression in prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP (wt p53), DU-145 (temperature sensitive mutant of p53) and PC3 (p53-null, but engineered to express temperature-sensitive p53 mutants). AdPG served as a sensor of p53 activity in LNCaP cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Since p53 can be induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this new vector could be further developed for use in combination with conventional therapies to bring about cooperation between the genetic and pharmacologic treatment modalities.

  19. An efficient and scalable process for helper-dependent adenoviral vector production using polyethylenimine-adenofection.

    PubMed

    Dormond, E; Meneses-Acosta, A; Jacob, D; Durocher, Y; Gilbert, R; Perrier, M; Kamen, A

    2009-02-15

    Safety requirements for adenoviral gene therapy protocols have led to the development of the third generation of vectors commonly called helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). HDVs have demonstrated a high therapeutic potential; however, the poor efficiency and reliability of the actual production process hampers further large-scale clinical evaluation of this new vector. The current HDV production methods involve a preliminary rescue step through transfection of adherent cell cultures by an HDV plasmid followed by a helper adenovirus (HV) infection. Amplification by serial co-infection of complementary cells allows an increase in the HDV titer. Using a HEK293 FLP/frt cell system in suspension culture, an alternative protocol to the current transfection/infection procedure was evaluated. In this work, the adenofection uses the HDV plasmid linked to the HV with the help of polyethylenimine (PEI) and has shown to outperform standard protocols by producing higher HDV yield. The influence of complex composition on the HDV production was examined by a statistical design. The optimized adenofection and amplification conditions were successively performed to generate HDV at the 3 L bioreactor scale. Following only two serial co-infection passages, up to 1.44 x 10(8) HDV infectious units/mL of culture were generated, which corresponded to 26% of the total particles produced. This production strategy, realized in cell suspension culture, reduced process duration and therefore the probability of vector recombination by introducing a cost-effective transfection protocol, ensuring production of high-quality vector stock.

  20. Development of a Nanotechnology Platform for Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    metastatic and characterized to be CAR¯/HER2¯. This means that they are not a good candidate for adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin anti-HER2...and can potentially be used in the treatment of the patients that do not respond to adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin immunotherapy.     5

  1. Healing after death: antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Fueyo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We recently evaluated the capacity of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus to trigger an antitumor immune response in a syngeneic mouse glioma model. This virotherapy elicited immunity against both tumor-associated antigens and viral antigens. An immunogenic cell death accompanied by pathogen- or damage- associated patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) induced by the virus may be responsible for the adenoviral-mediated antitumor effect. PMID:25954598

  2. Enhanced Peptide of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Adenoviral Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    greater than that observed in tumors injected with control adenovirus (1.4 - 1..6% ID/g). Another adenovirus encoding for both SSTR2 and cytosine deaminase ...for treating prostate cancer xenografts which involves the use of an adenoviral vector encoding for both SSTR2 and the cytosine deaminase (CD) enzyme...SSTR2 and bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) was performed in a manner similar to that previously described. The AdEasy system was used to generate the

  3. Preclinical safety assessment of Ad[I/PPT-E1A], a novel oncolytic adenovirus for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Kraaij, Robert; Adamson, Rachel; Maitland, Norman J; Bangma, Chris H

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in the Western world. Patients can be cured only when the tumor has not metastasized outside the prostate. However, treatment with curative intent fails in a significant number of men, often resulting in untreatable progressive disease with a fatal outcome. Oncolytic adenovirus therapy may be a promising adjuvant treatment to reduce local failure or the outgrowth of micrometastatic disease. Within the European gene therapy consortium GIANT, we have developed a novel prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus: Ad[I/PPT-E1A]. This adenovirus specifically kills prostate cells via prostate-specific replication. This article describes the clinical development of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] with particular reference to the preclinical safety assessment of this novel virus. The preclinical safety assessment involved an efficacy study in a human orthotopic xenograft mouse model, a specificity study in human primary cells, and a toxicity study in normal mice. These studies confirmed that Ad[I/PPT-E1A] efficiently kills prostate tumor cells in vivo, is not harmful to other organs, and is well tolerated in mice after systemic delivery. The safety, as well as the immunological effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] as a local adjuvant therapy, will now be studied in a phase I dose-escalating trial in patients with localized prostate cancer who are scheduled for curative radical prostatectomy and can be used as an updated paradigm for similar therapeutic viruses.

  4. Adenoviral Gene Therapy Vectors Targeted to Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    collectively called retinitis pigmentosa . Al- though there currently is no treatment or cure for these diseases, the past few years have seen important...Dryja, T. P., and Li, T. (1995). Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa . Hum. Mol. 1358. Genet. 4: 1739-174. 50. Friedlander, M., and Blobel, G...refractory to Ad5 transduction such as EBV-infected B cells and retinal photoreceptors. Using this technique, we are now evaluating the ability of

  5. Survival after prolonged pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for adenoviral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Allibhai, Taslim F; Spinella, Philip C; Meyer, Michael T; Hall, Brian H; Kofos, Daniel; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2008-08-01

    Adenoviral pneumonia can cause significant pulmonary morbidity leading to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rescue. Reported survival of adenoviral pneumonia requiring ECMO has been poor, and prolonged time on ECMO is associated with increased mortality. We present 2 pediatric cases of adenoviral pneumonia in patients who survived after greater than 30 days on ECMO and review the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry to describe the collective experience of children with viral pneumonia requiring prolonged ECMO. Although survival has improved over the past decade for pediatric adenoviral pneumonia, the ELSO database previously has had no surviving children reported with a primary diagnosis of adenovirus after more than 4 weeks on ECMO. Our experience suggests that there may be use for prolonged ECMO support in children despite severe adenoviral pneumonia.

  6. Culture and adenoviral infection of sinoatrial node myocytes from adult mice

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Joshua R.; Sharpe, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker myocytes in the sinoatrial node of the heart initiate each heartbeat by firing spontaneous action potentials. However, the molecular processes that underlie pacemaking are incompletely understood, in part because of our limited ability to manipulate protein expression within the native cellular context of sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs). Here we describe a new method for the culture of fully differentiated SAMs from adult mice, and we demonstrate that robust expression of introduced proteins can be achieved within 24–48 h in vitro via adenoviral gene transfer. Comparison of morphological and electrophysiological characteristics of 48 h-cultured versus acutely isolated SAMs revealed only minor changes in vitro. Specifically, we found that cells tended to flatten in culture but retained an overall normal morphology, with no significant changes in cellular dimensions or membrane capacitance. Cultured cells beat spontaneously and, in patch-clamp recordings, the spontaneous action potential firing rate did not differ between cultured and acutely isolated cells, despite modest changes in a subset of action potential waveform parameters. The biophysical properties of two membrane currents that are critical for pacemaker activity in SAMs, the “funny current” (If) and voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (ICa), were also indistinguishable between cultured and acutely isolated cells. This new method for culture and adenoviral infection of fully-differentiated SAMs from the adult mouse heart expands the range of experimental techniques that can be applied to study the molecular physiology of cardiac pacemaking because it will enable studies in which protein expression levels can be modified or genetically encoded reporter molecules expressed within SAMs. PMID:26001410

  7. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  8. Antigen expression determines adenoviral vaccine potency independent of IFN and STING signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Zak, Daniel E.; Costa, Andreia; Yamamoto, Ayako; Kastenmuller, Kathrin; Hill, Brenna J.; Lynn, Geoffrey M.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gall, Jason G.D.; Roederer, Mario; Aderem, Alan; Seder, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are lead vaccine candidates for protection against a variety of pathogens, including Ebola, HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, due to their ability to potently induce T cell immunity in humans. However, the ability to induce protective cellular immunity varies among rAds. Here, we assessed the mechanisms that control the potency of CD8 T cell responses in murine models following vaccination with human-, chimpanzee-, and simian-derived rAds encoding SIV-Gag antigen (Ag). After rAd vaccination, we quantified Ag expression and performed expression profiling of innate immune response genes in the draining lymph node. Human-derived rAd5 and chimpanzee-derived chAd3 were the most potent rAds and induced high and persistent Ag expression with low innate gene activation, while less potent rAds induced less Ag expression and robustly induced innate immunity genes that were primarily associated with IFN signaling. Abrogation of type I IFN or stimulator of IFN genes (STING) signaling increased Ag expression and accelerated CD8 T cell response kinetics but did not alter memory responses or protection. These findings reveal that the magnitude of rAd-induced memory CD8 T cell immune responses correlates with Ag expression but is independent of IFN and STING and provide criteria for optimizing protective CD8 T cell immunity with rAd vaccines. PMID:25642773

  9. Factors involved in the maturation of murine dendritic cells transduced with adenoviral vector variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Naoko; Koretomo, Ryosuke; Murakami, Sayaka |; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki |; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Fujita, Takuya |; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Naoki |

    2008-05-10

    Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is an attractive method for manipulating the immunostimulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immunotherapy. DCs treated with Ad have phenotype alterations (maturation) that facilitate T cell sensitization. We investigated the mechanisms of DC maturation with Ad transduction. Expression levels of a maturation marker (CD40) on DCs treated with conventional Ad, fiber-modified Ads (AdRGD, AdF35, AdF35{delta}RGD), or a different serotype Ad (Ad35) were correlated with their transduction efficacy. The {alpha}{sub v}-integrin directional Ad, AdRGD, exhibited the most potent ability to enhance both foreign gene expression and CD40 expression, and induced secretion of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and interferon-{alpha} in DCs. The presence of a foreign gene expression cassette in AdRGD was not necessary for DC maturation. Maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD was suppressed by destruction of the Ad genome, inhibition of endocytosis, or endosome acidification, whereas proteasome inhibition increased CD40 expression levels on DCs. Moreover, inhibition of {alpha}{sub v}-integrin signal transduction and blockade of cytokine secretion affected the maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD only slightly or not at all, respectively. Thus, our data provide evidence that Ad-induced DC maturation is due to Ad invasion of the DCs, followed by nuclear transport of the Ad genome, and not to the expression of foreign genes.

  10. Chapter five--The development of transcription-regulated adenoviral vectors with high cancer-selective imaging capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Sato, Makoto; Wu, Lily

    2012-01-01

    A clear benefit of molecular imaging is to enable noninvasive, repetitive monitoring of intrinsic signals within tumor cells as a means to identify the lesions as malignant or to assess the ability of treatment to perturb key pathways within the tumor cells. Due to the promising utility of molecular imaging in oncology, preclinical research to refine molecular imaging techniques in small animals is a blossoming field. We will first discuss the several imaging modalities such as fluorescent imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography that are now commonly used in small animal settings. The indirect imaging approach, which can be adapted to a wide range of imaging reporter genes, is a useful platform to develop molecular imaging. In particular, reporter gene-based imaging is well suited for transcriptional-targeted imaging that can be delivered by recombinant adenoviral vectors. In this review, we will summarize transcription-regulated strategies used in adenoviral-mediated molecular imaging to visualize metastasis and monitor oncolytic therapy in preclinical models.

  11. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks.

  12. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  13. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julius W.; Kane, J. Robert; Young, Jacob S.; Chang, Alan L.; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as “GliomaFF.” We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy. PMID:26058317

  14. Ocular Localization and Transduction by Adenoviral Vectors Are Serotype-Dependent and Can Be Modified by Inclusion of RGD Fiber Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Kazuhiro; Mori, Keisuke; Shoji, Takuhei; Omata, Hidekazu; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Brough, Douglas E.; Wei, Lisa L.; Yoneya, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate localization and transgene expression from adenoviral vector of serotypes 5, 35, and 28, ± an RGD motif in the fiber following intravitreal or subretinal administration. Methods Ocular transduction by adenoviral vector serotypes ± RGD was studied in the eyes of mice receiving an intravitreous or subretinal injection. Each serotype expressed a CMV-GFP expression cassette and histological sections of eyes were examined. Transgene expression levels were examined using luciferase (Luc) regulated by the CMV promoter. Results GFP localization studies revealed that serotypes 5 and 28 given intravitreously transduced corneal endothelial, trabecular, and iris cells. Intravitreous delivery of the unmodified Ad35 serotype transduced only trabecular meshwork cells, but, the modification of the RGD motif into the fiber of the Ad35 viral vector base expanded transduction to corneal endothelial and iris cells. Incorporation of the RGD motif into the fiber knob with deletion of RGD from the penton base did not affect the transduction ability of the Ad5 vector base. Subretinal studies showed that RGD in the Ad5 knob shifted transduction from RPE cells to photoreceptor cells. Using a CMV-Luc expression cassette, intravitreous delivery of all the tested vectors, such as Ad5-, Ad35- and Ad28- resulted in an initial rapid induction of luciferase activity that thereafter declined. Subretinal administration of vectors showed a marked difference in transgene activity. Ad35-Luc gene expression peaked at 7 days and remained elevated for 6 months. Ad28-Luc expression was high after 1 day and remained sustained for one month. Conclusions Different adenoviral vector serotypes ± modifications transduce different cells within the eye. Transgene expression can be brief or extended and is serotype and delivery route dependent. Thus, adenoviral vectors provide a versatile platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents for ocular diseases. PMID:25232844

  15. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  16. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  17. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  18. Preclinical pharmacology and toxicology study of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, a novel dual cancer-specific oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yanxin; Guo, Huanhuan; Hu, Ningning; He, Dongyun; Zhang, Shi; Chu, Yunjie; Huang, Yubin; Li, Xiao; Sun, LiLi; Jin, Ningyi

    2014-10-15

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that conditionally replicating adenovirus is safe. We constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, using a cancer-specific promoter (human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERTp) and a cancer cell-selective apoptosis-inducing gene (Apoptin). Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin was proven effective both in vitro and in vivo in our previous study. In this study, the preclinical safety profiles of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in animal models were investigated. At doses of 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} viral particles (VP)/kg, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin had no adverse effects on mouse behavior, muscle cooperation, sedative effect, digestive system, and nervous systems, or on beagle cardiovascular and respiratory systems at 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg doses. In acute toxicity tests in mice, the maximum tolerated dose > 5 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg. There was no inflammation or ulceration at the injection sites within two weeks. In repeat-dose toxicological studies, the no observable adverse effect levels of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in rats (1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg) and beagles (2.5 × 10{sup 9} VP/kg) were 62.5- and 12.5-fold of the proposed clinical dose, respectively. The anti-virus antibody was produced in animal sera. Bone marrow examination revealed no histopathological changes. Guinea pigs sensitized by three repeated intraperitoneal injections of 1.35 × 10{sup 10} VP/mL Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin each and challenged by one intravenous injection of 1.67 × 10{sup 8} VP/kg Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin did not exhibit any sign of systemic anaphylaxis. Our data from different animal models suggest that Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • We use the rodents and non-rodents animal models to evaluation Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin. • Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. • Demonstrate the safety and feasibility dose of injected Ad-hTERT-E

  19. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  20. Construction and characterization of adenoviral vectors for the delivery of TALENs into human cells.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are designed to cut the genomic DNA at specific chromosomal positions. The resulting DNA double strand break activates cellular repair pathways that can be harnessed for targeted genome modifications. TALENs thus constitute a powerful tool to interrogate the function of DNA sequences within complex genomes. Moreover, their high DNA cleavage activity combined with a low cytotoxicity make them excellent candidates for applications in human gene therapy. Full exploitation of these large and repeat-bearing nucleases in human cell types will benefit largely from using the adenoviral vector (AdV) technology. The genetic stability and the episomal nature of AdV genomes in conjunction with the availability of a large number of AdV serotypes able to transduce various human cell types make it possible to achieve high-level and transient expression of TALENs in numerous target cells, regardless of their mitotic state. Here, we describe a set of protocols detailing the rescue, propagation and purification of TALEN-encoding AdVs. Moreover, we describe procedures for the characterization and quantification of recombinant viral DNA present in the resulting AdV preparations. The protocols are preceded by information about their underlying principles and applied in the context of second-generation capsid-modified AdVs expressing TALENs targeted to the AAVS1 "safe harbor" locus on human chromosome 19.

  1. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  2. Advances and Future Challenges in Adenoviral Vector Pharmacology and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Reeti; Chen, Christopher Y; Weaver, Eric A; Barry, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus is a robust vector for therapeutic applications, but its use is limited by our understanding of its complex in vivo pharmacology. In this review we describe the necessity of identifying its natural, widespread, and multifaceted interactions with the host since this information will be crucial for efficiently redirecting virus into target cells. In the rational design of vectors, the notion of overcoming a sequence of viral “sinks” must be combined with re-targeting to target populations with capsid as well as shielding the vectors from pre-existing or toxic immune responses. It must also be noted that most known adenoviral pharmacology is deduced from the most commonly used serotypes, Ad5 and Ad2. However, these serotypes may not represent all adenoviruses, and may not even represent the most useful vectors for all purposes. Chimeras between Ad serotypes may become useful in engineering vectors that can selectively evade substantial viral traps, such as Kupffer cells, while retaining the robust qualities of Ad5. Similarly, vectorizing other Ad serotypes may become useful in avoiding immunity against Ad5 altogether. Taken together, this research on basic adenovirus biology will be necessary in developing vectors that interact more strategically with the host for the most optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:21453281

  3. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  4. Isolation and characterization of anti-adenoviral secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-28

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure. PMID:24477283

  6. Adenoviral protein V promotes a process of viral assembly through nucleophosmin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, Hideyo; Dobbins, George C.; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Curiel, David T.

    2012-10-25

    Adenoviral infection induces nucleoplasmic redistribution of a nucleolar nucleophosmin 1/NPM1/B23.1. NPM1 is preferentially localized in the nucleoli of normal cells, whereas it is also present at the nuclear matrix in cancer cells. However, the biological roles of NPM1 during infection are unknown. Here, by analyzing a pV-deletion mutant, Ad5-dV/TSB, we demonstrate that pV promotes the NPM1 translocation from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm in normal cells, and the NPM1 translocation is correlated with adenoviral replication. Lack of pV causes a dramatic reduction of adenoviral replication in normal cells, but not cancer cells, and Ad5-dV/TSB was defective in viral assembly in normal cells. NPM1 knockdown inhibits adenoviral replication, suggesting an involvement of NPM1 in adenoviral biology. Further, we show that NPM1 interacts with empty adenovirus particles which are an intermediate during virion maturation by immunoelectron microscopy. Collectively, these data implicate that pV participates in a process of viral assembly through NPM1.

  7. Improvement of antitumor activity by gene amplification with a replicating but nondisseminating adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Denis; Lau, Cara Jean; Jaime, Jairo; Koty, Zafiro; Zehntner, Simone P; Lavoie, Geneviève; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Massie, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for cancer treatment; however, efficacy of current vectors remains insufficient. To improve the success of suicide gene therapy, we constructed a replication-competent adenoviral vector that has its protease gene deleted and expresses bacterial cytosine deaminase fused with bacterial uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CU). The prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine, is transformed into the highly toxic and tissue-diffusible 5-fluorouracil by CU in infected cells. This vector is incapable of producing infectious particles but is able to undergo a single round of replication, thereby increasing transgene copy number and expression. In the presence of 5-FC, compared with the first-generation vector (AdCU), the replication-competent vector, Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A, was significantly more efficacious for in vitro tumor cell killing and in bystander assays, whereas 25-fold fewer viral particles were required in a three-dimensional spheroid model. For in vivo experiments, in which virus was injected into preestablished intracranial glioma xenografts, followed by 5-FC treatment, mice receiving Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A had significantly smaller tumors at 35 days postinjection as well as significantly longer median survival than mice treated with the replication-deficient, protease-deleted vector [Ad(dPS)CU]. In an immunocompetent syngeneic model, Ad(dPS)CU + 5-FC-treated mice had a median survival of only 23 days, whereas Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A + 5-FC-treated animals had a survival of 57.1% at 365 days. In conclusion, Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A in the presence of 5-FC produces more potent tumoricidal effects than its replication-deficient counterparts.

  8. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  9. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  10. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development.

  11. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  12. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  13. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko

    2011-06-01

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  14. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  15. Adenoviral vectors encoding CRISPR/Cas9 multiplexes rescue dystrophin synthesis in unselected populations of DMD muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M.; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A. F. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disrupting the reading frame of the ~2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene cause a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Genome editing based on paired RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) from CRISPR/Cas9 systems has been proposed for permanently repairing faulty DMD loci. However, such multiplexing strategies require the development and testing of delivery systems capable of introducing the various gene editing tools into target cells. Here, we investigated the suitability of adenoviral vectors (AdVs) for multiplexed DMD editing by packaging in single vector particles expression units encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease and sequence-specific gRNA pairs. These RGN components were customized to trigger short- and long-range intragenic DMD excisions encompassing reading frame-disrupting exons in patient-derived muscle progenitor cells. By allowing synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the various RGN components, we demonstrate that dual RGN-encoding AdVs can correct over 10% of target DMD alleles, readily leading to the detection of Becker-like dystrophin proteins in unselected muscle cell populations. Moreover, we report that AdV-based gene editing can be tailored for removing mutations located within the over 500-kb major DMD mutational hotspot. Hence, this single DMD editing strategy can in principle tackle a broad spectrum of mutations present in more than 60% of patients with DMD. PMID:27845387

  16. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  17. The amino-terminal portion of CD1 of the adenovirus E1A proteins is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Duerksen-Hughes, P J; Hermiston, T W; Wold, W S; Gooding, L R

    1991-01-01

    Previous work by our laboratory and others has shown that mouse cells normally resistant to tumor necrosis factor can be made sensitive to the cytokine by the expression of adenovirus E1A. The E1A gene can be introduced by either infection or transfection, and either of the two major E1A proteins, 289R or 243R, can induce this sensitivity. The E1A proteins are multifunctional and modular, with specific domains associated with specific functions. Here, we report that the CD1 domain of E1A is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse C3HA fibroblasts. Amino acids C terminal to residue 60 and N terminal to residue 36 are not necessary for this function. This conclusion is based on 51Cr-release assays for cytolysis in cells infected with adenovirus mutants with deletions in various portions of E1A. These E1A mutants are all in an H5dl309 background and therefore they lack the tumor necrosis factor protection function provided by the 14.7-kilodalton (14.7K) protein encoded by region E3. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that most of the mutant E1A proteins were stable in infected C3HA cells, although with certain large deletions the E1A proteins were unstable. The region between residues 36 and 60 is included within but does not precisely correlate with domains in E1A that have been implicated in nuclear localization, enhancer repression, cellular immortalization, cell transformation in cooperation with ras, induction of cellular DNA synthesis and proliferation, induction of DNA degradation, and binding to the 300K protein and the 105K retinoblastoma protein. Images PMID:1825340

  18. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+) T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  19. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  20. Identification of specific adenovirus E1A N-terminal residues critical to the binding of cellular proteins and to the control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H G; Rikitake, Y; Carter, M C; Yaciuk, P; Abraham, S E; Zerler, B; Moran, E

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncogene-encoded sequences essential for transformation- and cell growth-regulating activities are localized at the N terminus and in regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence designated conserved regions 1 and 2. These regions interact to form the binding sites for two classes of cellular proteins: those, such as the retinoblastoma gene product, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on region 2, and another class which so far is known to include only a large cellular DNA-binding protein, p300, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on the N-terminal region. Association between the E1A products and either class of cellular proteins can be disrupted by mutations in conserved region 1. While region 2 has been studied intensively, very little is known so far concerning the nature of the essential residues in the N-terminal region, or about the manner in which conserved region 1 participates in the binding of two distinct sets of cellular proteins. A combination of site-directed point mutagenesis and monoclonal antibody competition experiments reported here suggests that p300 binding is dependent on specific, conserved residues in the N terminus, including positively charged residues at positions 2 and 3 of the E1A proteins, and that p300 and pRB bind to distinct, nonoverlapping subregions within conserved region 1. The availability of precise point mutations disrupting p300 binding supports previous data linking p300 with cell cycle control and enhancer function. Images PMID:8416379

  1. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells with adenoviral vectors: differences of infectability between lines and correlation of infectability with expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Brokhman, Irina; Pomp, Oz; Fishman, Lital; Tennenbaum, Tamar; Amit, Michal; Itzkovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    Adenovirus is an efficient vector for expression of transgenes in dividing and nondividing cells. However, very few studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have utilized adenoviral vectors. We examine here the ability of adenovirus to infect naive hESCs and the differentiated derivatives of multiple hESC lines. We found a striking variation in adenovirus infection rates between lines. The variability in infection rates was positively correlated with the expression of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, but not that of alpha(nu)-integrin. Adenoviral infection did not interfere with the expression of pluripotency markers, even after passaging. In addition, infection did not affect differentiation of hESC-derived neural precursors in vitro. We also found that green fluorescent protein expression mediated by adenovirus can be a useful marker for tracking hESC in xenografts. We conclude that adenovirus is a practical vector for genetic modification of naive hESC from most, but not all lines, but may be more generally useful for gene transfer into differentiated derivatives of hESC lines.

  2. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  3. Correction of chromosomal mutation and random integration in embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Fumi; Balamotis, Michael A; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Aizawa, Emi; Diaz, Arturo; Hasty, Paul; Graham, Frank L; Caskey, C Thomas; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2005-09-20

    For gene therapy of inherited diseases, targeted integration/gene repair through homologous recombination (HR) between exogenous and chromosomal DNA would be an ideal strategy to avoid potentially serious problems of random integration such as cellular transformation and gene silencing. Efficient sequence-specific modification of chromosomes by HR would also advance both biological studies and therapeutic applications of a variety of stem cells. Toward these goals, we developed an improved strategy of adenoviral vector (AdV)-mediated HR and examined its ability to correct an insertional mutation in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) locus in male mouse ES cells. The efficiency of HR was compared between four types of AdVs that contained various lengths of homologies at the Hprt locus and with various multiplicities of infections. The frequency of HR with helper-dependent AdVs (HD AdVs) with an 18.6-kb homology reached 0.2% per transduced cell at a multiplicity of infection of 10 genomes per cell. Detection of random integration at DNA levels by PCR revealed extremely high efficiency of 5% per cell. We also isolated and characterized chromosomal sites where HD AdVs integrated in a random manner. In contrast to retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, which tend to integrate into genes, the integration sites of AdV was distributed randomly inside and outside genes. These findings suggest that HR mediated by HD AdVs is efficient and relatively safe and might be a new viable option for ex vivo gene therapy as well as a tool for chromosomal manipulation of a variety of stem cells.

  4. Improved efficacy and reduced toxicity by ultrasound-guided intrahepatic injections of helper-dependent adenoviral vector in Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Nunzia; Nusco, Edoardo; Piccolo, Pasquale; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Vaníkova, Jana; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna J; Vitek, Libor; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I is caused by mutations of the uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene resulting in life-threatening increase of serum bilirubin. Life-long correction of hyperbilirubinemia was previously shown with intravenous injection of high doses of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing UGT1A1 in the Gunn rat, the animal model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome. However, such high vector doses can activate an acute and potentially lethal inflammatory response with elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6). To overcome this obstacle, we investigated safety and efficacy of direct injections of low HDAd doses delivered directly into the liver parenchyma of Gunn rats. Direct hepatic injections performed by either laparotomy or ultrasound-guided percutaneous injections were compared with the same doses given by intravenous injections. A greater reduction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased conjugated bilirubin in bile were achieved with 1 × 10(11) vp/kg by direct liver injections compared with intravenous injections. In sharp contrast to intravenous injections, direct hepatic injections neither raised serum IL-6 nor resulted in thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of HDAd vectors into liver parenchyma resulted in improved hepatocyte transduction and reduced toxicity compared with systemic injections and is clinically attractive for liver-directed gene therapy of Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

  5. Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity in an Infant with Adenoviral Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Con, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC) has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC) is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases. PMID:25874149

  6. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  7. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia in gunn rats by surgical delivery of low doses of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Françoise; Pastore, Nunzia; Abarrategui-Pontes, Cecilia; Flageul, Maude; Myara, Anne; Laplanche, Sophie; Labrune, Philippe; Podevin, Guillaume; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors are attractive for liver-directed gene therapy because they can drive sustained high levels of transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potential lethal consequences. We have previously shown in nonhuman primates that delivery of HDAd in surgically isolated livers resulted in a significantly higher hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with intravenous delivery and multiyear transgene expression. Encouraged by these data, we have now employed a surgical vector delivery method in the Gunn rat, an animal model for Crigler-Najjar syndrome. After vector delivery into the surgically isolated liver, we show phenotypic correction at the low and clinically relevant vector dose of 1 × 10(11) vp/kg. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased glucuronidation of bilirubin in bile was achieved for up to 1 year after vector administration. Surgical delivery of the vector was well tolerated without signs of acute or chronic toxicity. This method of delivery could thereby be a safer alternative to liver transplantation for long-term treatment of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

  8. The spread of adenoviral vectors to central nervous system through pathway of cochlea in mimetic aging and young rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhao, X; Hu, Y; Lan, F; Sun, H; Fan, G; Sun, Y; Wu, J; Kong, W; Kong, W

    2015-11-01

    There is no definitive conclusion concerning the spread of viral vectors to the brain after a cochlear inoculation. In addition, some studies have reported different distribution profiles of viral vectors in the central auditory system after a cochlear inoculation. Thus, rats were grouped into either a mimetic aging group or a young group and transfected with adenoviral vectors (AdVs) by round window membrane injection. The distribution of AdV in central nervous system (CNS) was demonstrated in the two groups with transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. We found that the AdV could disseminate into the CNS and that the neuronal damage and stress-induced GRP78 expression were reduced after transfection with PGC-1α, as compared with the control vectors, especially in the mimetic aging group. We also found that the host immune response was degraded in CNS in the mimetic aging group after transduction through the cochlea, as compared with the young group. These results demonstrate that viral vectors can disseminate into the CNS through the cochlea. Moreover, mimetic aging induced by D-galactose could facilitate the spread of viral vectors into the CNS from the cochlea. These findings may indicate a new potential approach for gene therapy against age-related diseases in the CNS.

  9. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF... elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). No person described in 11 CFR 300.60 shall solicit, receive,...

  10. Adenoviral targeting using genetically incorporated camelid single variable domains

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buggio, Maurizio; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique ability of human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) to accomplish efficient transduction has allowed the use of Ad5-based vectors for a range of gene therapy applications. Several strategies have been developed to alter tropism of Ad vectors to achieve a cell-specific gene delivery by employing fiber modifications via genetic incorporation of targeting motifs. In this study we have explored the utility of novel anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA) single variable domains derived from heavy chain (VHH) camelid family of antibodies to achieve targeted gene transfer. To obtain anti-CEA VHHs we produced a VHH-display library from peripheral blood lymphocytes RNA of alpacas at the peak of immune response to the hCEA antigen. We genetically incorporated an anti-hCEA VHH into a de-knobbed Ad5 fiber-fibritin chimera and demonstrated selective targeting to the cognate epitope expressed on the membrane surface of target cells. We report that the anti-hCEA VHH employed in this study retains antigen recognition functionality and provides specificity for gene transfer of capsid-modified Ad5 vectors. These studies clearly demonstrated the feasibility of retargeting of Ad5-based gene transfer using VHHs. PMID:24933423

  11. Adenoviral targeting using genetically incorporated camelid single variable domains.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, Sergey A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Buggio, Maurizio; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Curiel, David T

    2014-08-01

    The unique ability of human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) to accomplish efficient transduction has allowed the use of Ad5-based vectors for a range of gene therapy applications. Several strategies have been developed to alter tropism of Ad vectors to achieve a cell-specific gene delivery by using fiber modifications via genetic incorporation of targeting motifs. In this study, we have explored the utility of novel anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA) single variable domains derived from heavy chain (VHH) camelid family of antibodies to achieve targeted gene transfer. To obtain anti-CEA VHHs, we produced a VHH-display library from peripheral blood lymphocytes RNA of alpacas at the peak of immune response to the hCEA antigen (Ag). We genetically incorporated an anti-hCEA VHH into a de-knobbed Ad5 fiber-fibritin chimera and demonstrated selective targeting to the cognate epitope expressed on the membrane surface of target cells. We report that the anti-hCEA VHH used in this study retains Ag recognition functionality and provides specificity for gene transfer of capsid-modified Ad5 vectors. These studies clearly demonstrated the feasibility of retargeting of Ad5-based gene transfer using VHHs.

  12. Construction and evaluation of an adenoviral vector for the liver-specific expression of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, SRSF3

    PubMed Central

    Suchanek, Amanda L.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor-3 (SRSF3), alternatively known as SRp20, is a member of the highly-conserved SR protein family of mRNA splicing factors. SRSF3 generally functions as an enhancer of mRNA splicing by binding to transcripts in a sequence-specific manner to both recruit and stabilize the binding of spliceosomal components to the mRNA. In liver, expression of SRSF3 is relatively low and its activity is increased in response to insulin and feeding a high carbohydrate diet. We sought to over-express SRSF3 in primary rat hepatocytes to identify regulatory targets. A standard adenoviral shuttle vector system containing an epitope-tagged SRSF3 under the transcriptional control of the CMV promoter could not be used to produce infectious adenoviral particles. SRSF3 over-expression in the packaging cell line prevented the production of infectious adenovirus particles by interfering with the viral splicing program. To circumvent this issue, SRSF3 expression from the shuttle vector was blocked by placing its expression under the control of the liver-specific albumin promoter. In this system, the FLAG-SRSF3 transgene is only expressed in the target cells (hepatocytes) but not in the packaging cell line. An additional benefit of the albumin promoter is that expression of the transgene does not require the addition of hormones or antibiotics to drive SRSF3 expression in the hepatocytes. Robust expression of FLAG-SRSF3 protein is detected in both HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes infected with adenovirus prepared from this new shuttle vector. Furthermore, abundances of several known and suspected mRNA targets of SRSF3 action are increased in response to over-expression using this virus. This report details the construction of the albumin promoter-driven adenoviral shuttle vector, termed pmAlbAd5-FLAG.SRSF3, that can be used to generate functional adenovirus to express FLAG-SRSF3 specifically in liver. This vector would be suitable for over-expression of

  13. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Curiel, David T.; Leppla, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  14. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-01-06

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors.

  15. Encapsulation of adenoviral vectors into chitosan-bile salt microparticles for mucosal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lameiro, Maria Helena; Malpique, Rita; Silva, Ana Carina; Alves, Paula M; Melo, Eurico

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study is the incorporation of adenoviral vectors into a microparticulate system adequate for mucosal delivery. Microencapsulation of the vectors was accomplished by ionotropic coacervation of chitosan, using bile salts as counter-anion. The process was optimized in order to promote high encapsulation efficiency, with a minimal loss of viral infectivity. The maintenance of sterility during all the encapsulation procedure was also taken into account. The principle relies on the simple addition of a solution containing adenoviral vectors to a solution of neutralized chitosan, under stirring. Some surfactants were added to the chitosan solution, to improve the efficiency of this process, such as Tween 80, and Pluronic F68 at 1% (w/v). Encapsulation efficiency higher than 84% was achieved with formulations containing sodium deoxycholate as counter-anion and Pluronic F68 as dispersant agent. The infectivity of the adenoviral vectors incorporated into microparticles was assessed by release assays in PBS and by direct inoculation in 293 and Caco-2 cells. The release in aqueous media was negligible but, when in contact with monolayers of the cells, an effective release of bioactive adenovirus was obtained. Our work shows that encapsulation in microparticles, not only appear to protect the adenovirus from the external medium, namely from low pH, but can also delay their release that is fully dependent on cell contact, an advantage for mucosal vaccination purposes. The formulations developed are able to maintain AdV infectivity and permit a delayed release of the bioactives that is promoted by digestion in situ of the microparticles by the cell monolayers. The onset of delivery is, that way, host-controlled. In view of these results, these formulations showed good properties for mucosal adenovirus delivery.

  16. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  17. An Adenoviral Vaccine Encoding Full-Length Inactivated Human HER2 Exhibits Potent Immunogenicty and Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy Without Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary; Wei, Junping; Osada, Takuya; Glass, Oliver; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Peplinski, Sharon; Kim, Dong-Wan; Xia, Wenle; Spector, Neil; Marks, Jeffrey; Barry, William; Hobeika, Amy; Devi, Gayathri; Amalfitano, Andrea; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of the breast cancer oncogene HER2 correlates with poor survival. Current HER2-directed therapies confer limited clinical benefits and most patients experience progressive disease. Because refractory tumors remain strongly HER2+, vaccine approaches targeting HER2 have therapeutic potential, but wild type (wt) HER2 cannot safely be delivered in imunogenic viral vectors because it is a potent oncogene. We designed and tested several HER2 vaccines devoid of oncogenic activity to develop a safe vaccine for clinical use. Experimental Design We created recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain of HER2 (Ad-HER2-ECD), ECD plus the transmembrane domain (Ad-HER2-ECD-TM) and full length HER2 inactivated for kinase function (Ad-HER2-ki) and determined their immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect in wild type (WT) and HER2 tolerant mice. To assess their safety, we compared their effect on the cellular transcriptome, cell proliferation, anchorage-dependent growth, and transformation potential in vivo. Results Ad-HER2-ki was the most immunogenic vector in WT animals, retained immunogenicity in HER2-transgenic tolerant animals, and showed strong therapeutic efficacy in treatment models. Despite being highly expressed, HER2-ki protein was not phosphorylated and did not produce an oncogenic gene signature in primary human cells. And, in contrast to HER2-wt, cells overexpressing HER2-ki were less proliferative, displayed less anchorage independent growth and were not transformed in vivo. Conclusions Vaccination with mutationally inactivated, non-oncogenic Ad-HER2-ki results in robust polyclonal immune responses to HER2 in tolerant models, which translates into strong and effective anti-tumor responses in vivo. Ad-HER2-ki is thus a safe and promising vaccine for evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:20179231

  18. GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors for enhanced inhibition of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Liu, Zhongbing; Bian, Tierong; Li, Juan; Huang, Wenjun; Jing, Pei; Liu, Li; Wang, Yunlong; Zhong, Zhirong

    2015-12-30

    Gastric cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and its 5-year survival rate remains depressed in spite of multiple treatment options. Targeting drug delivery to tumor vasculature may be a promising strategy for gastric cancer therapy, for it can block the nutrition source of tumor and inhibit the metastasis and invasion in a certain extent. In present study, we have prepared the drug-targeting delivery system of peptide GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors (GX1-Ad5-AL), in which the tumor suppressor gene of PTEN was integrated into DNA of Ad5 and the GX1 peptide could play targeting role to vascular of gastric cancer. The inhibition ability of GX1-Ad5-AL to human gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was evaluated by MTT assay. Further, the cell migration assay was carried out in transwell inserts and the cells uptaking of GX1-Ad5-AL was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The experimental results indicated that the average cell proliferation inhibition rates resulted from the drug delivery system of GX1-Ad5-AL in SGC-7901 and HUVEC were 68.36% and 64.13%, respectively which were higher than that resulted from GX1 or Ad5-AL. Meanwhile, results of cell migration experiment demonstrated that GX1-Ad5-AL could significantly suppress the migration of gastric cancer cell of SGC-7901. Moreover, both the imaging from confocal laser scanning microscopy and the quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that, GX1-Ad5-AL was more easily uptaken by SGC-7901 cells, as compared to Ad5-AL. Therefore, the formulation of GX1-Ad5-AL was effective for enhancing the inhibition effect and suppressing the migration of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

  19. Altered hyaluronic acid content in tear fluid of patients with adenoviral conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Juliana L; Regatieri, Caio V; Coelho, Bruno; Barbosa, José B; De Freitas, Denise; Nader, Helena B; Martins, João R

    2015-03-01

    The adenoviral conjunctivitis is one of the biggest causes of conjunctival infection in the world. Conjunctivitis causes relatively nonspecific symptoms, as hyperaemia and chemosis. Even after biomicroscopy, complex laboratory tests, such as viral culture, are necessary to identify the pathogen or its etiology. To contribute to the better understanding of the pathobiology of the adenoviral conjunctivitis, the tear fluids of patients with unilateral acute adenovirus conjunctivitis (UAAC), normal donors (control) and patients with allergic conjunctivitis were analyzed. Tear samples were collected with Schirmer strips from control, allergic conjunctivitis and UAAC patients, diagnosed by clinical signs. UAAC tears were tested positive in viral cultures. After the elution, HA was quantified using an ELISA-like fluorometric assay and the protein profile was determined by SDS-PAGE. A profound increase in the HA tear content in UAAC patients was found when compared to control and ALC. This HA increase in UAAC tears remarkably was not observed in tears from contralateral eyes without clinical signs, nor in allergic conjunctivitis. In addition a distinct profile of UAAC tear proteins was observed in patients with UAAC. The quantification of HA in the tear fluid is a rapid, sensitive and specific test. This molecule might be a biomarker candidate for acute conjunctivitis.

  20. Oral Immunization of Rhesus Macaques with Adenoviral HIV Vaccines Using Enteric-coated Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, George T.; Nehete, Pramod N.; Passeri, Marco F.; Nehete, Bharti N.; Weaver, Eric A.; Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Schluns, Kimberly; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Targeted delivery of vaccine candidates to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract holds potential for mucosal immunization, particularly against mucosal pathogens like the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Among the different strategies for achieving targeted release in the GI tract, namely the small intestine, pH sensitive enteric coating polymers have been shown to protect solid oral dosage forms from the harsh digestive environment of the stomach and dissolve relatively rapidly in the small intestine by taking advantage of the luminal pH gradient. We developed an enteric polymethacrylate formulation for coating hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC) capsules containing lyophilized Adenoviral type 5 (Ad5) vectors expressing HIV-1 gag and a string of six highly-conserved HIV-1 envelope peptides representing broadly cross-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. Oral immunization of rhesus macaques with these capsules primed antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses and subsequent intranasal delivery of the envelope peptide cocktail using a mutant cholera toxin adjuvant boosted cellular immune responses including, antigen-specific intracellular IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory T cells in the intestine. These results suggest that the combination of oral adenoviral vector priming followed by intranasal protein/peptide boosting may be an effective mucosal HIV vaccination strategy for targeting viral antigens to the GI tract and priming systemic and mucosal immunity. PMID:18063450

  1. Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Aboumohamed, Ahmed; Flechner, Stuart M; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Srinivas, Titte R; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-11-01

    Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function.

  2. Vaccine-preventable adenoviral respiratory illness in US military recruits, 1999-2004

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Kevin L.; Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Ryan, Margaret A. K.; Strickler, Jennifer; Irvine, Marina; Hansen, Christian J.; Gray, Gregory C.; Gaydos, Joel C.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Methods: The high burden of respiratory infections in military populations is well documented throughout history. The primary pathogen responsible for morbidity among US recruits in training was shown to be adenovirus. Highly efficacious oral vaccines were used for 25 years, but vaccine production ceased in 1996, and available stores were depleted by early 1999. Surveillance for acute febrile respiratory illness was performed at eight military recruit training sites throughout the United States from July 1999 through June 2004 to document rates after loss of the vaccines. Laboratory diagnoses complimented the surveillance efforts. Results: Over the 5 years, nearly 12 million person-weeks were followed and an estimated 110,172 febrile respiratory illness cases and 73,748 adenovirus cases were identified. Rates of illness were highest at the Navy and Air Force training centers, with average annual rates of 1.20 and 1.35 cases per 100 recruit- weeks respectively. Adenoviral-associated illness rates peaked in weeks 3 to 5 of training, depending upon service. Conclusions: The burden of adenoviral illness among US recruit populations has returned to high levels since loss of the vaccines. Restoration of an effective adenovirus vaccine effort within the military is anticipated by 2008, potentially reducing the adenovirus morbidity suffered in this vulnerable population. Efforts to determine the burden of adenovirus and potential benefits of vaccination in civilian populations are being renewed. PMID:16480793

  3. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-07-19

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose.

  4. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose.

  5. Characterization of Murine Thymic Stromal-Cell Lines Immortalized by Temperature-Sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T or Adenovirus 5 E1a

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Lena; Timms, Emma; Blight, Kenneth; Restall, Deborah E.; Jat, Parmjit S.; Fisher, Amanda G.

    1991-01-01

    The heterogeneity of thymic stromal cells is probably related to their role in providing different microenvironments where T cells can develop. We have immortalized thymic stromal elements using recombinant retroviral constructs containing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 (SV40tsA58) large-T antigen gene or the adenovirus 5 E1a region linked to the gene coding for resistance to G418. Cell lines containing the thermolabile large T antigen encoded by SV40 proliferate at the permissive temperature of 33°C and arrest growth when transferred to the nonpermissive temperature of 39°C. At the nonpermissive temperature, ts-derived cell lines are shown to alter their phenotype but remain metabolically active, as indicated by the inducible expression of class I and class II MHC antigens. Here we describe the generation of a total of 84 thymic stromal-cell lines, many of which show distinct morphologic, phenotypic, and functional properties consistent with fibroblastoid, epithelial, or monocytoid origins. Several E1a and SV40tsA58-derived cell lines generated exhibit the epithelial characteristic of desmosome formation and, in addition, two of these lines (15.5 and 15.18) form multicellular complexes (rosettes) when incubated with unfractionated thymocytes from syngeneic mice. A single line (14.5) displays very strong nonspecific esterase activity, suggesting it may represent a macrophagelike cell type. We describe the generation of stromal cell lines with different properties, which is consistent with the heterogeneity found in the thymic microenvironment. In addition to documenting this diversity, these cell lines may be useful tools for studying T-cell development in vitro and give access to model systems in which stromal-thymocyte interactions can be examined. PMID:1668372

  6. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Dolzhikova, Inna V.; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N.; Zubkova, Olga V.; Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Tukhvatulin, Amir I.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Logunov, Denis Y.; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L.

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  7. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4: A novel approach to marking circulating prostate tumor cells with a replication competent adenovirus controlled by PSA/PSMA transcription regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Eun; Joung, Jae Young; Shin, Seung-Phil; Choi, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells serve as useful biomarkers with which to identify disease status associated with survival, metastasis and drug sensitivity. Here, we established a novel application for detecting PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells circulating in peripheral blood employing an adenovirus called Ad5/35E1aPSESE4. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 utilized PSES, a chimeric enhancer derived from PSA/PSMA promoters that is highly active with and without androgen. A fluorescence signal mediated by GFP expression upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection was selectively amplified in PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, for the in vivo model, blood drawn from TRAMP was tested for CTCs with Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection and was positive for CTCs at week 16. Validation was performed on patient blood at various clinical stages and found out 1-100 CTCs expressing GFP upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection. Interestingly, CTC from one patient was confirmed to be sensitive to docetaxel chemotherapeutic reagent and to abundantly express metastasis-related genes like MMP9, Cofilin1, and FCER1G through RNA-seq. Our study established that the usage of Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 is effective in marking PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in patient blood to improve the efficacy of utilizing CTCs as a biomarker.

  8. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Alternative RNA Splicing by the Adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins. PMID:25636034

  9. Regulation of human adenovirus alternative RNA splicing by the adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K proteins.

    PubMed

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-28

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins.

  10. The regions of the retinoblastoma protein needed for binding to adenovirus E1A or SV40 large T antigen are common sites for mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Q J; Dyson, N; Harlow, E

    1990-01-01

    The protein product of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene is thought to function in a pathway that restricts cell proliferation. Recently, transforming proteins from three different classes of DNA tumor viruses have been shown to form complexes with the RB protein. Genetic studies suggest that these interactions with the RB protein are important steps in transformation by these viruses. In order to understand better the function of the RB-viral oncoprotein complexes, we have mapped the regions of the RB protein that are necessary for these associations. Two non-contiguous regions of RB were found to be essential for complex formation with adenovirus E1A or SV40 large T antigen. These two regions are found between amino acids 393 and 572 and 646 and 772. Interestingly, these binding sites on RB overlap with the positions of naturally occurring, inactivating mutations of the RB gene. These results strongly suggest that these viral oncoproteins are targeting a protein domain that is an important site in the normal function of the RB protein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2138977

  11. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein–Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  12. An outbreak of adenoviral infection in inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) coinfected with dependovirus and coccidial protozoa (Isospora sp.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Young; Mitchell, Mark A; Bauer, Rudy W; Poston, Rob; Cho, Doo-Youn

    2002-07-01

    Thirty of 200 (15%) hatchling inland bearded dragons were found dead after a short period (48 hours) of weakness and lethargy. The most common clinical signs were head tilt and circling. Six bearded dragons with neurological signs were euthanized, and postmortem examination revealed no gross abnormalities. Microscopically, severe, randomly distributed hepatocellular necrosis with large basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in numerous hepatocytes was noted. Small-intestinal enterocytes contained intracytoplasmic coccidial protozoa (Isospora sp.) and occasional enterocytes had basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy revealed both 80- and 20-nm-diameter viral particles, which were consistent with adenoviruses and dependoviruses, respectively. Adenoviral outbreaks in groups of animals are uncommon. An adverse synergistic effect of the coccidiosis with the adenoviral infection may have played a critical role in the high morbidity and mortality in this case.

  13. Co-Expression of Tumor Antigen and Interleukin-2 From an Adenoviral Vector Augments the Efficiency of Therapeutic Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nielsen, Karen Nørgaard; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following vaccination with the IL-2 expressing construct, these mice were able to raise a delayed but substantial CD8+ T-cell response, and to control melanoma growth nearly as efficaciously as similarly vaccinated WT mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current vaccine vectors can be improved and even tailored to meet specific demands: in the context of therapeutic vaccination, the capacity to promote an augmented effector T-cell response. PMID:25023330

  14. Improved hepatic transduction, reduced systemic vector dissemination, and long-term transgene expression by delivering helper-dependent adenoviral vectors into the surgically isolated liver of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David A; Palmer, Donna J; Beaudet, Arthur L; Finegold, Milton J; Carey, K Dee; Cioffi, William G; Ng, Philip

    2006-04-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are attractive vectors for liver-directed gene therapy because they can mediate sustained, high-level transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potentially severe and lethal consequences. We hypothesize that the threshold to efficient hepatic transduction may be circumvented by delivering the vector into the surgically isolated liver via the portal vein. Total hepatic isolation was achieved by occluding hepatic inflow from the portal vein and hepatic artery and by occluding hepatic venous outflow at the inferior vena cava. We demonstrate in nonhuman primates that this approach resulted in significantly higher efficiency hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with systemic intravascular delivery. This method of delivery was associated with transient acute toxicity, the severity of which was variable. Importantly, stable, high levels of transgene expression were obtained for at least 665 days for one baboon and for at least 560 days for two baboons with no evidence of long-term toxicity.

  15. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  16. Interaction of CtBP with adenovirus E1A suppresses immortalization of primary epithelial cells and enhances virus replication during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, T.; Zhao, Ling-jun; Chinnadurai, G.

    2013-09-01

    Adenovirus E1A induces cell proliferation, oncogenic transformation and promotes viral replication through interaction with p300/CBP, TRRAP/p400 multi-protein complex and the retinoblastoma (pRb) family proteins through distinct domains in the E1A N-terminal region. The C-terminal region of E1A suppresses E1A/Ras co-transformation and interacts with FOXK1/K2, DYRK1A/1B/HAN11 and CtBP1/2 (CtBP) protein complexes. To specifically dissect the role of CtBP interaction with E1A, we engineered a mutation (DL→AS) within the CtBP-binding motif, PLDLS, and investigated the effect of the mutation on immortalization and Ras cooperative transformation of primary cells and viral replication. Our results suggest that CtBP–E1A interaction suppresses immortalization and Ras co-operative transformation of primary rodent epithelial cells without significantly influencing the tumorigenic activities of transformed cells in immunodeficient and immunocompetent animals. During productive infection, CtBP–E1A interaction enhances viral replication in human cells. Between the two CtBP family proteins, CtBP2 appears to restrict viral replication more than CtBP1 in human cells. - Highlights: • Adenovirus E1A C-terminal region suppresses E1A/Ras co-transformation. • This E1A region binds with FOXK, DYRK1/HAN11 and CtBP cellular protein complexes. • We found that E1A–CtBP interaction suppresses immortalization and transformation. • The interaction enhances viral replication in human cells.

  17. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  18. Adenoviral transfer of mda-7 leads to BAX up-regulation and apoptosis in mesothelioma cells, and is abrogated by over-expression of BCL-XL.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaobo X.; Mohuiddin, Imran; Chada, Sunil; Mhashilkar, Abner M.; Ozvaran, Mustafa K.; McConkey, David J.; Miller, Steven D.; Daniel, Jonathon C.; Smythe, W. Roy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is unresponsive to conventional therapies. Forced expression of the novel tumor suppressor mda-7 gene in other cell types has resulted in decreased growth and apoptosis. We evaluated cell growth, apoptosis and tumor suppressor characteristics following forced expression of this gene in mesothelioma cell lines. METHODS: MDA-7 expression in human MPM cells at baseline, following pharmacologic differentiation and viral mda-7 transduction (Ad-mda7) were evaluated with Western blot. Cell viability was evaluated with a colorimetric (XTT) assay, and apoptosis with subG1 FACS and Hoescht. Caspase-3 expression was evaluated by functional assay. These parameters were also evaluated in a stable bcl-xl hyper-expressing MPM cell line. Bax mRNA levels were evaluated with real-time PCR. RESULTS: No baseline or differentiated MPM MDA7 expression was found, but was noted following Ad-mda7 exposure. More than 50% of MPM cells were killed at 5 days following Ad-mda7 exposure (p < 0.001). Apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 cleavage and increased BAX expression at both the protein (translational) and mRNA (transcriptional) level. These findings were reduced in a bcl-xl hyper-expressing cell line (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Although mda-7 does not appear to be a MPM suppressor gene, adenoviral-mediated expression in cell lines induces apoptotic cellular death related to BAX upregulation and caspase cleavage. This is supported by abrogation of effect in a bcl-xl hyper-expressing cell line. PMID:12606823

  19. Gene therapy in skin: choosing the optimal viral vector.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esther H; Cross, Kevin J; Bomsztyk, Elan D; Lyden, David C; Spector, Jason A

    2009-05-01

    Skin is an ideal gene therapy target because it is readily accessible and is involved in many pathologic processes. Viruses are the most common gene vectors, however, few comparative studies exist examining their efficacy in skin. This study evaluates adenovirus serotype 5, adeno-associated virus type 2 and 5, MMLV-derived retrovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus-1 derived lentivirus for gene vector activity in human dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines. Human immunodeficiency virus-1-based lentiviral vector resulted in over 90% transduction in all cell lines tested. Transduced cells maintained reporter expression over several passages after a single exposure. In contrast, gene activity fell rapidly over cell divisions with adenoviral and adeno-associated vectors. Therefore, lentiviral vectors are the delivery mechanism of choice for long-term therapeutic gene expression in dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines, whereas adenoviral or adeno-associated vectors may be preferred for short-term therapy.

  20. Process Development of Adenoviral Vector Production in Fixed Bed Bioreactor: From Bench to Commercial Scale.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Hanna P; Heikkilä, Kati M; Lipponen, Eevi M; Valonen, Piia; Müller, Achim; Räsänen, Eva; Tuunanen, Tarja; Hassinen, Minna M; Parker, Nigel; Karhinen, Minna; Shaw, Robert; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale vector manufacturing for phase III and beyond has proven to be challenging. Upscaling the process with suspension cells is increasingly feasible, but many viral production applications are still applicable only in adherent settings. Scaling up the adherent system has proven to be troublesome. The iCELLis(®) disposable fixed-bed bioreactors offer a possible option for viral vector manufacturing in large quantities in an adherent environment. In this study, we have optimized adenovirus serotype 5 manufacturing using iCELLis Nano with a cultivation area up to 4 m(2). HEK293 cell cultivation, infection, and harvest of the virus (by lysing the cells inside the bioreactor) proved possible, reaching total yield of up to 1.6×10(14) viral particles (vp)/batch. The iCELLis 500 is designed to satisfy demand for large-scale requirements. Inoculating a large quantity of cell mass into the iCELLis 500 was achieved by first expanding the cell mass in suspension. Upscaling the process into an iCELLis 500/100 m(2) cultivation area cassette was practical and produced up to 6.1×10(15) vp. Flask productivity per cm(2) in iCELLis Nano and iCELLis 500 was in the same range. As a conclusion, we showed for the first time that iCELLis 500 equipment has provided an effective way to manufacture large batches of adenoviral vectors.

  1. Adenoviral Infections in Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Musa; Chemaly, Roy F.; Han, Xiang Y.; Thall, Peter F.; Fox, Patricia S.; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.; De Lima, Marcos J.; Hosing, Chitra M.; Popat, Uday R.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E.; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated adenoviral infection (AI) is associated with profound immunosuppression and poor outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). A better understanding of AI in allo-HCT recipients can serve a basis to develop more effective management strategies. We evaluated all adult patients who received allo-HCT at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1999 and 2008. Among the 2879 allo-HCT patients, 73 (2.5%) were diagnosed with AI. Enteritis (26%) and pneumonia (24%) were the most common clinical manifestations; pneumonia was the most common cause of adenovirus-associated death. A multivariable Bayesian logistic regression showed that, when the joint effects of all covariates were accounted for, a cord blood transplant, absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≤ 200/mm3, and male gender were associated with a higher probability of disseminated AI. The overall survival was significantly worse for patients with AI that was disseminated rather than localized (median of 5 months versus 28 months, respectively, p<0.001) and for patients with ALC ≤ 200/mm3 (p<0.001). Disseminated AI, in patients who received allo-HCT, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Strategies for early diagnosis and intervention are essential, especially for high-risk patients. PMID:23503529

  2. Evaluation of CD46 re-targeted adenoviral vectors for clinical ovarian cancer intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hulin-Curtis, S L; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Jones, R; Hanna, L; Chester, J D; Parker, A L

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer accounts for >140 000 deaths globally each year. Typically, disease is asymptomatic until an advanced, incurable stage. Although response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is frequently observed, resistance to conventional platinum-based therapies develop rapidly. Improved treatments are therefore urgently required. Virotherapy offers great potential for ovarian cancer, where the application of local, intraperitoneal delivery circumvents some of the limitations of intravenous strategies. To develop effective, adenovirus (Ad)-based platforms for ovarian cancer, we profiled the fluid and cellular components of patient ascites for factors known to influence adenoviral transduction. Levels of factor X (FX) and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in ascitic fluid were quantified and tumor cells were assessed for the expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and CD46. We show that clinical ascites contains significant levels of FX but consistently high CD46 expression. We therefore evaluated in vitro the relative transduction of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) by Ad5 (via CAR) and Ad5 pseudotyped with the fiber of Ad35 (Ad5T*F35++) via CD46. Ad5T*F35++ achieved significantly increased transduction in comparison to Ad5 (P<0.001), independent of FX and nAb levels. We therefore propose selective transduction of CD46 over-expressing EOCs using re-targeted, Ad35-pseudotyped Ad vectors may represent a promising virotherapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:27229159

  3. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  4. CD40-targeted adenoviral cancer vaccines: the long and winding road to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hangalapura, Basav N.; Timares, Laura; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Scheper, Rik J.; Curiel, David T.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ability of Dendritic Cells (DC) to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses has been exploited to develop potent anti-cancer immunotherapies. Recent clinical trials exploring the efficacy of ex vivo modified autologous DC-based vaccines have reported some promising results. However, in vitro generation of autologous DC for clinical administration, their loading with tumor associated antigens (TAA) and their activation, is laborious and expensive, and, due to interindividual variability in the personalized vaccines, poorly standardized. An attractive alternative approach is to load resident DC in vivo by targeted delivery of TAA , using viral vectors and activating them simultaneously. To this end we have constructed genetically modified Adenoviral (Ad) vectors and bispecific adaptor molecules to retarget Ad vectors encoding TAA to the CD40 receptor on DC. Preclinical human and murine studies conducted so far have clearly demonstrated the suitability of a “two-component”, i.e. Ad and adaptor molecule, configuration for targeted modification of DC in vivo for cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes recent progress in the development of CD40-targeted Ad-based cancer vaccines and highlights pre-clinical issues in clinical translation of this approach. PMID:22228547

  5. Targeting of adenovirus E1A and E4-ORF3 proteins to nuclear matrix- associated PML bodies

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The PML protein was first identified as part of a fusion product with the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha), resulting from the t(15;17) chromosomal translocation associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It has been previously demonstrated that PML, which is tightly bound to the nuclear matrix, concentrates in discrete subnuclear compartments that are disorganized in APL cells due to the expression of the PML-RAR alpha hybrid. Here we report that adenovirus infection causes a drastic redistribution of PML from spherical nuclear bodies into fibrous structures. The product encoded by adenovirus E4- ORF3 is shown to be responsible for this reorganization and to colocalize with PML into these fibers. In addition, we demonstrate that E1A oncoproteins concentrate in the PML domains, both in infected and transiently transfected cells, and that this association requires the conserved amino acid motif (D)LXCXE, common to all viral oncoproteins that bind pRB or the related p107 and p130 proteins. The SV-40 large T antigen, another member of this oncoprotein family is also found in close association with the PML nuclear bodies. Taken together, the present data indicate that the subnuclear domains containing PML represent a preferential target for DNA tumor viruses, and therefore suggest a more general involvement of the PML nuclear bodies in oncogenic processes. PMID:7559785

  6. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  7. Standard Free Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction as a New Tool for the Quality Control of High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors in Small-Scale Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy. PMID:25640117

  8. Standard free droplet digital polymerase chain reaction as a new tool for the quality control of high-capacity adenoviral vectors in small-scale preparations.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-02-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy.

  9. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  10. Label-free biochemical analytic method for the early detection of adenoviral conjunctivitis using human tear biofluids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Moon, Sung Woon; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk; Jin, Kyung-Hyun

    2014-11-18

    Cell culture and polymerase chain reaction are currently regarded as the gold standard for adenoviral conjunctivitis diagnosis. They maximize sensitivity and specificity but require several days to 3 weeks to get the results. The aim of this study is to determine the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a stand-alone analytical tool for clinical diagnosis of adenoviral conjunctivitis using human tear fluids. A drop-coating deposition surface enhanced Raman scattering (DCD-SERS) method was identified as the most effective method of proteomic analysis in tear biofluids. The proposed DCD-SERS method (using a 2-μL sample) led to Raman spectra with high reproducibility, noise-independence, and uniformity. Additionally, the spectra were independent of the volume of biofluids used and detection zones, including the ring, middle, and central zone, with the exception of the outer layer of the ring zone. Assessments with an intensity ratio of 1242-1342 cm(-1) achieved 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the central zone. Principal component analysis assessments achieved 0.9453 in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as well as 93.3% sensitivity and 94.5% specificity in the central zone. Multi-Gaussian peak assessments showed that the differences between these two groups resulted from the reduction of the amide III α-helix structures of the proteins. The presence of adenovirus in tear fluids could be detected more accurately in the center of the sample than in the periphery. The DCD-SERS technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of adenoviral conjunctivitis. Therefore, we are hopeful that the DCD-SERS method will be approved for use in ophthalmological clinics in the near future.

  11. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktutar, Betül N.; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  12. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smethells, John R; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector injection was examined in rats on measures of anxiety, body weight, cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. To examine anxiety, periadolescent rats were tested in an elevated-plus maze. Weight gain was then examined under four rodent diets. Ten months after CocH-injection, adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine intravenously and, subsequently, cocaine-induced locomotion was tested. Viral gene transfer produced sustained plasma levels of CocH for over 13 months of testing. CocH-treated rats did not differ from controls in measures of anxiety, and only showed a transient reduction in weight gain during the first 3 weeks postinjection. However, CocH-treated rats were insensitive to cocaine. At 10 months postinjection, none of the CocH-treated rats initiated cocaine self-administration, unlike 90% of the control rats. At 13 months postinjection, CocH-treated rats showed no cocaine-induced locomotion, whereas control rats showed a dose-dependent enhancement of locomotion. CocH vector produced a long-term blockade of the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine in rats, emphasizing its role as a promising therapeutic intervention in cocaine abuse.

  13. Adenoviral vectors modified by heparin-polyethyleneimine nanogels enhance targeting to the lung and show therapeutic potential for pulmonary metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Mu, Yandong; Li, XiaoPeng; Gou, MaLing; Zhang, HaiLong; Luo, ShunTao; Men, Ke; Mao, YongQiu; Qian, ZhiYong; Yang, Li

    2011-12-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is a well-known cationic polymer that has previously been shown to have significant potential to deliver genes in vitro and in vivo. However, PEI is non-degradable and exhibits a high cytotoxicity as its molecular weight increases. The clinical application for systemic administration of adenoviral (Ad) vectors is limited, as these vectors do not efficiently penetrate solid tumor masses due to a common deficiency of Coxsackie Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) on the tumor surface. In this study, we conjugated low molecular weight PEI (Mn = 1,800) to heparin (Mn = 4,000-6,000) to create a new type of cationic degradable nanogel (HPEI) that was then used to modify Ad vectors. The resulting HPEI-Ad complexes were used to infect CT26 and HeLa cells in vitro. Additionally, the HPEI-Ad complexes were administrated in vivo via intravenous injection, and tissue distribution was assessed using luciferase assays; the therapeutic potential of HPEI-Ad complexes for pulmonary metastasis mediated by CT26 cells was also investigated. In vitro, HPEI-Ad complexes enhanced the transfection efficiency in CT26 cells, reaching 36.3% compared with 0.1% of the native adenovirus. In vivo, HPEI-Ad complexes exhibited greater affinity for lung tissue than the native adenovirus and effectively inhibited the growth of pulmonary metastases mediated by CT26 cells. Our results indicate that Ad vectors modified by HPEI nanogels to form HPEI-Ad complexes enhanced transfection efficiency in CT26 cells that lacked CAR, targeted to the lung and demostrated a potential therapy for pulmonary metastasis.

  14. GENE THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF PITUITARY TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Silvia S.; Castro, Maria G.; Brown, Oscar A.; Goya, Rodolfo G.; Console, Gloria M.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology in humans. Current therapies include surgery, radiotherapy and pharmacological approaches. Although useful, none of them offers a permanent cure. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental adenomas with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. Although the efficiency and safety of current viral vectors must be optimized before clinical use, they remain as highly promising therapeutic tools. PMID:20186255

  15. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  16. Vascular administration of adenoviral vector soaked in absorbable gelatin sponge particles (GSP) prolongs the transgene expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeong-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Rha, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seung-Eun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jeong-Man; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2005-02-01

    Transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization using emulsions composed of anticancer agents and gelatin sponges (GS) has been an efficient and safe palliative treatment for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We employed catheter-mediated left hepatic arterial embolization (CHAE) to increase transduction efficiency of adenoviral vector in canine hepatocytes. The emulsion was prepared by mixing pieces of GSP and adenoviral vectors expressing recombinant beta-galactosidase (Ad.LacZ) or human hepatocyte growth factor (Ad.hHGF). After the left hepatic artery was catheterized under angiography, CHAE with Ad.LacZ or Ad.hHGF was performed. Livers were removed and stained for LacZ activity on day 7. The expression pattern of LacZ staining was either scarce or patchy around the central hilum of the hepatic artery, or was homogeneously distributed in whole lobes, depending on whether large or small pieces of GSP were used. Hematological and serum biochemical changes during CHAE exhibited only a few effects. The chronological measurement of serum HGF concentration showed that the duration of transgene expression was greater after CHAE with Ad.hHGF. A similar pattern of transgene expression was observed in a rat model after hepatic arterial embolization with differential doses of Ad.hHGF soaked in GSP. These results suggest that hepatic arterial embolization by transcatheter mediated infusion with a mixture of adenovirus-GSP could be used for human HCC.

  17. Association between Rare Variants in AP4E1, a Component of Intracellular Trafficking, and Persistent Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Raza, M. Hashim; Mattera, Rafael; Morell, Robert; Sainz, Eduardo; Rahn, Rachel; Gutierrez, Joanne; Paris, Emily; Root, Jessica; Solomon, Beth; Brewer, Carmen; Basra, M. Asim Raza; Khan, Shaheen; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Braun, Allen; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Drayna, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Stuttering is a common, highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in the volitional control of speech. Whole-exome sequencing identified two heterozygous AP4E1 coding variants, c.1549G>A (p.Val517Ile) and c.2401G>A (p.Glu801Lys), that co-segregate with persistent developmental stuttering in a large Cameroonian family, and we observed the same two variants in unrelated Cameroonians with persistent stuttering. We found 23 other rare variants, including predicted loss-of-function variants, in AP4E1 in unrelated stuttering individuals in Cameroon, Pakistan, and North America. The rate of rare variants in AP4E1 was significantly higher in unrelated Pakistani and Cameroonian stuttering individuals than in population-matched control individuals, and coding variants in this gene are exceptionally rare in the general sub-Saharan West African, South Asian, and North American populations. Clinical examination of the Cameroonian family members failed to identify any symptoms previously reported in rare individuals carrying homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene. AP4E1 encodes the ε subunit of the heterotetrameric (ε-β4-μ4-σ4) AP-4 complex, involved in protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network. We found that the μ4 subunit of AP-4 interacts with NAGPA, an enzyme involved in the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate signal that targets acid hydrolases to the lysosome and the product of a gene previously associated with stuttering. These findings implicate deficits in intracellular trafficking in persistent stuttering. PMID:26544806

  18. Association between Rare Variants in AP4E1, a Component of Intracellular Trafficking, and Persistent Stuttering.

    PubMed

    Raza, M Hashim; Mattera, Rafael; Morell, Robert; Sainz, Eduardo; Rahn, Rachel; Gutierrez, Joanne; Paris, Emily; Root, Jessica; Solomon, Beth; Brewer, Carmen; Basra, M Asim Raza; Khan, Shaheen; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Braun, Allen; Bonifacino, Juan S; Drayna, Dennis

    2015-11-05

    Stuttering is a common, highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in the volitional control of speech. Whole-exome sequencing identified two heterozygous AP4E1 coding variants, c.1549G>A (p.Val517Ile) and c.2401G>A (p.Glu801Lys), that co-segregate with persistent developmental stuttering in a large Cameroonian family, and we observed the same two variants in unrelated Cameroonians with persistent stuttering. We found 23 other rare variants, including predicted loss-of-function variants, in AP4E1 in unrelated stuttering individuals in Cameroon, Pakistan, and North America. The rate of rare variants in AP4E1 was significantly higher in unrelated Pakistani and Cameroonian stuttering individuals than in population-matched control individuals, and coding variants in this gene are exceptionally rare in the general sub-Saharan West African, South Asian, and North American populations. Clinical examination of the Cameroonian family members failed to identify any symptoms previously reported in rare individuals carrying homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene. AP4E1 encodes the ε subunit of the heterotetrameric (ε-β4-μ4-σ4) AP-4 complex, involved in protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network. We found that the μ4 subunit of AP-4 interacts with NAGPA, an enzyme involved in the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate signal that targets acid hydrolases to the lysosome and the product of a gene previously associated with stuttering. These findings implicate deficits in intracellular trafficking in persistent stuttering.

  19. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF ADENOVIRAL TRANSDUCTION OF AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR POSITIVE CELL LINE WITH AN MMTV-LUC REPORTER FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standardization and Validation of Adenoviral Transduction of an Androgen Receptor Positive Cell Line with an MMTV-Luc Reporter for Endocrine Screening P. Hartig, K . Bobseine,
    M. Cardon, C. Lambright and L. E. Gray, Jr. USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC...

  20. Early life vaccination: Generation of adult-quality memory CD8+ T cells in infant mice using non-replicating adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria R.; Uddback, Ida E. M.; Holst, Peter J.; Christensen, Jan P.; Thomsen, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens represent a serious threat during early life. Importantly, even though the immune system of newborns may be characterized as developmentally immature, with a propensity to develop Th2 immunity, significant CD8+ T-cell responses may still be elicited in the context of optimal priming. Replication deficient adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to induce potent CD8+ T-cell response in mice, primates and humans. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether replication-deficient adenovectors could overcome the risk of overwhelming antigen stimulation during the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate that memory CD8+ T cells induced by adenoviral vectors in infant mice are of good quality and match those elicited in the adult host. PMID:27929135

  1. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  2. Early life vaccination: Generation of adult-quality memory CD8+ T cells in infant mice using non-replicating adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria R; Uddback, Ida E M; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2016-12-08

    Intracellular pathogens represent a serious threat during early life. Importantly, even though the immune system of newborns may be characterized as developmentally immature, with a propensity to develop Th2 immunity, significant CD8+ T-cell responses may still be elicited in the context of optimal priming. Replication deficient adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to induce potent CD8+ T-cell response in mice, primates and humans. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether replication-deficient adenovectors could overcome the risk of overwhelming antigen stimulation during the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate that memory CD8+ T cells induced by adenoviral vectors in infant mice are of good quality and match those elicited in the adult host.

  3. Ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer of AQP1 to the irradiated minipig parotid gland restores fluid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zourelias, L; Wu, C; Edwards, PC; Trombetta, M; Passineau, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Xerostomia is a common side effect of ionizing radiation used to treat head and neck cancer. A groundbreaking Phase I human clinical trial utilizing Adenoviral gene transfer of Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) to a single salivary gland of individuals suffering from radiation-induced xerostomia has recently been reported. Unfortunately, the limitations of the Adenoviral vector system utilized in this pioneering trial preclude its advancement to a Phase II trial and we have thus undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer (UAGT) as an alternative means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy to the salivary gland by comparing head-to-head with the canonical Adenoviral vector in a swine model. Findings Swine irradiated unilaterally with a 10Gy electron beam targeted at the parotid gland suffered from significant, sustained hyposalivation that was bilateral, despite irradiation being confined to the targeted gland. Unilateral AQP1 gene therapy with UAGT resulted in bilateral restoration of stimulated salivary flow at 48 hours and one week post-treatment (1.62+/−0.48ml, 1.87+/−0.45ml) to pre-injury levels (1.34+/−0.14ml) in a manner comparable to Adenoviral delivery (2.32+/−0.6ml, 1.33+/−0.97ml). Conclusions UAGT can replace the Adenoviral vector as a means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy in the irradiated swine model and is a candidate for advancement to a Phase I human clinical trial. PMID:25871828

  4. Immunogenicity without Efficacy of an Adenoviral Tuberculosis Vaccine in a Stringent Mouse Model for Immunotherapy during Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alyahya, S. Anisah; Nolan, Scott T.; Smith, Cara M. R.; Bishai, William R.; Sadoff, Jerald; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if bacterial persistence during TB drug treatment could be overcome by modulation of host immunity, we adapted a clinically-relevant model developed for the evaluation of new drugs and examined if immunotherapy with two adenoviral vaccines, Ad35-TBS (AERAS-402) and Ad26-TBS, could shorten therapy in mice. Even though immunotherapy resulted in strong splenic IFN-γ responses, no effect on bacterial replication in the lungs was seen. Multiplex assay analysis of lung samples revealed the absence of cytokine augmentation such as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, suggesting that immunization failed to induce immunity in the lungs. In this model, we show that IFN-γ levels were not associated with protection against disease relapse. The results obtained from our study raise questions regarding the traits of protective TB immunity that are relevant for the development of future immunotherapeutic and post-exposure vaccination strategies. PMID:25996375

  5. A single intratumoral injection of a fiber-mutant adenoviral vector encoding interleukin 12 induces remarkable anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activity in mice with Meth-A fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Sugita, Toshiki; Kanagawa, Naoko; Iida, Keisuke; Eto, Yusuke; Motomura, Yoshiaki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2005-03-25

    Cytokine-encoding viral vectors are considered to be promising in cancer gene immunotherapy. Interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been used widely for anti-tumor treatment, but the administration route and tumor characteristics strongly influence therapeutic efficiency. Meth-A fibrosarcoma has been demonstrated to be insensitive to IL-12 treatment via systemic administration. In the present study, we developed an IL-12-encoding fiber-mutant adenoviral vector (AdRGD-IL-12) that showed enhanced gene transfection efficiency in Meth-A tumor cells, and the production of IL-12 p70 in the culture supernatant from transfected cells was confirmed by ELISA. In therapeutic experiments, a single low-dose (2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units) intratumoral injection of AdRGD-IL-12 elicited pronounced anti-tumor activity and notably prolonged the survival of Meth-A fibrosarcoma-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the IL-12 vector induced the accumulation of T cells in tumor tissue. Furthermore, intratumoral administration of the vector induced an anti-metastasis effect as well as long-term specific immunity against syngeneic tumor challenge.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 2-retargeted adenoviral vectors exhibit a modified biolocalization pattern and display reduced toxicity relative to native adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Printz, M A; Gonzalez, A M; Cunningham, M; Gu, D L; Ong, M; Pierce, G F; Aukerman, S L

    2000-01-01

    Targeted vectors provide a number of advantages for systemic and local gene delivery strategies. Several groups have investigated the utility of using various ligands to alter the tropism of adenovirus (Ad) vectors. We have previously demonstrated that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) ligands can specifically target DNA transfection and Ad transduction through high-affinity FGF receptors (FGFRs). FGFRs are overexpressed in abnormally proliferating tissues, such as malignancies. The present studies explore the effects of retargeting with FGF2 on the tissue localization pattern and the systemic toxicity of Ad in mice. Results of semiquantitative PCR analyses indicate that the distribution of FGF2-Ad vector genome sequences after intravenous administration in mice is altered. Markedly lower amounts (10- to 20-fold) of FGF2-Ad localize to the liver when compared with native Ad. This decrease in liver deposition translates into a significant reduction in subsequent toxicity as measured by serum transaminases and histopathology in mice injected with FGF2-AdHSV-thymidine kinase with and without ganciclovir administration. In an intraperitoneal model of ovarian cancer, FGF2-Ad generates increased transgene expression in tumor tissue when compared with Ad. Taken together, these results indicate that the retargeting of Ad with FGF2 results in a more efficient vector system for systemic and regional gene therapy applications, with concomitant lower levels of systemic toxicity.

  7. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S.; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  8. Pathogen-Induced Proapoptotic Phenotype and High CD95 (Fas) Expression Accompany a Suboptimal CD8+ T-Cell Response: Reversal by Adenoviral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Bruña–Romero, Oscar; Araújo, Adriano F.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Ersching, Jonatan; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Marcela F.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2012-01-01

    MHC class Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination. PMID:22615561

  9. Adenoviral Vectors Incorporating Multiple Targeting and Efficacy Strategies to Eliminate Breast Cancer Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    7464-7472. DORONIN, K., TOTH, K., KUPPUSWAMY, M., WARD, P ., TOLLEFSON, A.E., and WOLD, W.S. (2000). Tumor-specific, replication-competent adenovirus...Gene Increases the Oncolytic Effect. Human Gene Therapy 12, 1323-1332. HARVEY, B.G., MARONI , J., O’DONOGHUE, K.A., CHU, K.W., MUSCAT, J.C., PIPPO, A.L...region. Gene Ther 8, 1132-1141. HAWKINS, L.K., JOHNSON, L., BAUZON, M., NYE, J.A., CASTRO, D., KITZES, G.A., YOUNG, M.D., HOLT, J.K., TROWN, P ., and

  10. Role of CBP/p300 and SRC-1 in transcriptional regulation of the pulmonary surfactant protein-A (SP-A) gene by thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1).

    PubMed

    Yi, Ming; Tong, Guo-Xia; Murry, Barbara; Mendelson, Carole R

    2002-01-25

    Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) gene expression is developmentally regulated in fetal lung type II cells and is enhanced by cAMP. cAMP stimulation of SP-A gene expression is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), expressed selectively in developing lung epithelium. In this study, we analyzed roles of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) in TTF-1 regulation of SP-A expression. Upon differentiation of human fetal lung in culture, nuclear localization of CBP, SRC-1, and TTF-1 increased in ductular epithelium in association with type II cell differentiation and induction of SP-A expression. In transient transfections, CBP and SRC-1 acted synergistically with TTF-1 to increase SP-A promoter activity. Overexpression of PKA catalytic subunit enhanced hSP-A promoter activation by SRC-1 plus TTF-1. Adenoviral E1A overexpression reduced TTF-1 +/- SRC-1 induction of SP-A promoter activity, suggesting a role of endogenous CBP/p300. TTF-1 interacted with SRC-1 and CBP in vitro. SRC-1 immunodepletion from type II cell nuclear extracts reduced binding to the TTF-1 binding element upstream of SP-A gene. In cultured type II cells, cAMP increased TTF-1 acetylation. This suggests that cAMP-mediated TTF-1 phosphorylation facilitates interaction with CBP and SRC-1, resulting in its hyperacetylation, further enhancing TTF-1 DNA-binding and transcriptional activity.

  11. A Regulatory Element Near the 3′ End of the Adeno-Associated Virus rep Gene Inhibits Adenovirus Replication in cis by Means of p40 Promoter-Associated Short Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Gonsior, Melanie; Stutika, Catrin; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has long been known to inhibit helper adenovirus (Ad) replication independently of AAV Rep protein expression. More recently, replication of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)/AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) hybrid vectors was shown to be inhibited in cis by a sequence near the 3′ end of AAV rep, termed the Rep inhibition sequence for adenoviral replication (RIS-Ad). RIS-Ad functions independently of Rep protein expression. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of adenoviral replication by RIS-Ad requires an active AAV p40 promoter and the 5′ half of the intron. In addition, Ad inhibition is critically dependent on the integrity of the p40 transcription start site (TSS) leading to short p40-associated transcripts. These do not give rise to effector molecules capable of inhibiting adenoviral replication in trans, like small polypeptides or microRNAs. Our data point to an inhibitory mechanism in which RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pauses directly downstream of the p40 promoter, leading to interference of the stalled Pol II transcription complex with the adenoviral replication machinery. Whereas inhibition by RIS-Ad is mediated exclusively in cis, it can be overcome by providing a replication-competent adenoviral genome in trans. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of RIS-Ad is not limited to AAV-2 but could also be shown for the corresponding regions of other AAV serotypes, including AAV-5. These findings have important implications for the future generation of Ad5/AAV hybrid vectors. IMPORTANCE Insertion of sequences from the 3′ part of the rep gene of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the genome of its helper adenovirus strongly reduces adenoviral genome replication. We could show that this inhibition is mediated exclusively in cis without the involvement of trans-acting regulatory RNAs or polypeptides but nevertheless requires an active AAV-2 p40 promoter and p40-associated short transcripts. Our results suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism that has so

  12. Adenoviral Vector Vaccination Induces a Conserved Program of CD8+ T Cell Memory Differentiation in Mouse and Man

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Sims, Stuart; Swadling, Leo; O’Hara, Geraldine; de Lara, Catherine; Baban, Dilair; Saghal, Natasha; Lee, Lian Ni; Marchi, Emanuele; Davis, Mark; Newell, Evan; Capone, Stefania; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Ellie; Klenerman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Following exposure to vaccines, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses develop as long-term memory pools. Vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, e.g., those developed for HCV, are able to induce and sustain substantial CD8+ T cell populations. How such populations evolve following vaccination remains to be defined at a transcriptional level. We addressed the transcriptional regulation of divergent CD8+ T cell memory pools induced by an adenovector encoding a model antigen (beta-galactosidase). We observe transcriptional profiles that mimic those following infection with persistent pathogens, murine and human cytomegalovirus (CMV). Key transcriptional hallmarks include upregulation of homing receptors and anti-apoptotic pathways, driven by conserved networks of transcription factors, including T-bet. In humans, an adenovirus vaccine induced similar CMV-like phenotypes and transcription factor regulation. These data clarify the core features of CD8+ T cell memory following vaccination with adenovectors and indicate a conserved pathway for memory development shared with persistent herpesviruses. PMID:26586434

  13. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  14. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  15. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  16. Vector sequences are not detected in tumor tissue from research subjects with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency who previously received adenovirus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Li, Shaoyong; Li, Mengxin; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Lee, Brendan; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M; Gao, Guangping

    2013-09-01

    A 66-year-old woman heterozygous for a mutation in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene (Otc) participated in a phase I gene therapy trial for OTC deficiency. She received an adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing the functional OTC gene by intraportal perfusion. Fourteen years later she developed and subsequently died of hepatocellular carcinoma. A second subject, a 45-year-old woman, enrolled in the same trial presented with colon cancer 15 years later. We sought to investigate a possible association between the development of a tumor and prior adenoviral gene transfer in these two subjects. We developed and validated a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay for recovering recombinant Ad sequences from host tissues. Using this method, we could not detect any Ad vector DNA in either tumor or normal tissue from the two patients. Our results are informative in ruling out the possibility that the adenoviral vector might have contributed to the development of cancer in those two subjects.

  17. The HDAC inhibitor FK228 enhances adenoviral transgene expression by a transduction-independent mechanism but does not increase adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Angelika; Dzojic, Helena; Rashkova, Victoria; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Essand, Magnus

    2011-02-17

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 has previously been shown to enhance adenoviral transgene expression when cells are pre-incubated with the drug. Upregulation of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), leading to increased viral transduction, has been proposed as the main mechanism. In the present study, we found that the highest increase in transgene expression was achieved when non-toxic concentrations of FK228 were added immediately after transduction, demonstrating that the main effect by which FK228 enhances transgene expression is transduction-independent. FK228 had positive effects both on Ad5 and Ad5/f35 vectors with a variety of transgenes and promoters, indicating that FK228 works mainly by increasing transgene expression at the transcriptional level. In some cases, the effects were dramatic, as demonstrated by an increase in CD40L expression by FK228 from 0.3% to 62% when the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C2 was transduced with Ad[CD40L]. One unexpected finding was that FK228 decreased the transgene expression of an adenoviral vector with the prostate cell-specific PPT promoter in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-346C. This is probably a consequence of alteration of the adenocarcinoma cell lines towards a neuroendocrine differentiation after FK228 treatment. The observations in this study indicate that FK228 enhances adenoviral therapy by a transduction-independent mechanism. Furthermore, since histone deacetylase inhibitors may affect the differentiation of cells, it is important to keep in mind that the activity and specificity of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters may also be affected.

  18. The HDAC Inhibitor FK228 Enhances Adenoviral Transgene Expression by a Transduction-Independent Mechanism but Does Not Increase Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Angelika; Dzojic, Helena; Rashkova, Victoria; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Essand, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 has previously been shown to enhance adenoviral transgene expression when cells are pre-incubated with the drug. Upregulation of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), leading to increased viral transduction, has been proposed as the main mechanism. In the present study, we found that the highest increase in transgene expression was achieved when non-toxic concentrations of FK228 were added immediately after transduction, demonstrating that the main effect by which FK228 enhances transgene expression is transduction-independent. FK228 had positive effects both on Ad5 and Ad5/f35 vectors with a variety of transgenes and promoters, indicating that FK228 works mainly by increasing transgene expression at the transcriptional level. In some cases, the effects were dramatic, as demonstrated by an increase in CD40L expression by FK228 from 0.3% to 62% when the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C2 was transduced with Ad[CD40L]. One unexpected finding was that FK228 decreased the transgene expression of an adenoviral vector with the prostate cell-specific PPT promoter in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-346C. This is probably a consequence of alteration of the adenocarcinoma cell lines towards a neuroendocrine differentiation after FK228 treatment. The observations in this study indicate that FK228 enhances adenoviral therapy by a transduction-independent mechanism. Furthermore, since histone deacetylase inhibitors may affect the differentiation of cells, it is important to keep in mind that the activity and specificity of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters may also be affected. PMID:21379379

  19. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Dias, Joao D.; Nokisalmi, Petri; Sloniecka, Marta; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Rajecki, Mari; Dobner, Thomas; Tenhunen, Mikko; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Ahtiainen, Laura Ph.D.; Hemminki, Akseli

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  20. Transcriptional Targeting of Primary and Metastatic Tumor Neovasculature by an Adenoviral Type 5 Roundabout4 Vector in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Curiel, David T.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    New approaches targeting metastatic neovasculature are needed. Payload capacity, cellular transduction efficiency, and first-pass cellular uptake following systemic vector administration, motivates persistent interest in tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) adenoviral (Ad) vector targeting. While EC transductional and transcriptional targeting has been accomplished, vector administration approaches of limited clinical utility, lack of tumor-wide EC expression quantification, and failure to address avid liver sequestration, challenged prior work. Here, we intravenously injected an Ad vector containing 3 kb of the human roundabout4 (ROBO4) enhancer/promoter transcriptionally regulating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter into immunodeficient mice bearing 786-O renal cell carcinoma subcutaneous (SC) xenografts and kidney orthotopic (KO) tumors. Initial experiments performed in human coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (hCAR) transgenic:Rag2 knockout mice revealed multiple ECs with high-level Ad5ROBO4-EGFP expression throughout KO and SC tumors. In contrast, Ad5CMV-EGFP was sporadically expressed in a few tumor vascular ECs and stromal cells. As the hCAR transgene also facilitated Ad5ROBO4 and control Ad5CMV vector EC expression in multiple host organs, follow-on experiments engaged warfarin-mediated liver vector detargeting in hCAR non-transgenic mice. Ad5ROBO4-mediated EC expression was undetectable in most host organs, while the frequencies of vector expressing intratumoral vessels and whole tumor EGFP protein levels remained elevated. In contrast, AdCMV vector expression was only detectable in one or two stromal cells throughout the whole tumor. The Ad5ROBO4 vector, in conjunction with liver detargeting, provides tractable genetic access for in-vivo EC genetic engineering in malignancies. PMID:24376772

  1. Adenoviral Delivery of VEGF121 Early in Pregnancy Prevents Spontaneous Development of Preeclampsia in BPH/5 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Hoffmann, Darren S.; Weydert, Christine J.; Butler, Scott D.; Zhou, Yi; Sharma, Ram V.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance in circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is postulated to play a causal role in pre-eclampsia (PE). We have described an inbred mouse strain, BPH/5, which spontaneously develops a PE-like syndrome including late-gestational hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes. Here we tested the hypothesis that an angiogenic imbalance during pregnancy in BPH/5 mice leads to the development of PE-like phenotypes in this model. Similar to clinical findings, plasma from pregnant BPH/5 showed reduced levels of free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PGF) compared to C57BL/6 controls. This was paralleled by a marked decrease in VEGF protein and Pgf mRNA in BPH/5 placentae. Surprisingly, antagonism by the soluble form of the FLT1 receptor (sFLT1) did not appear to be the cause of this reduction, as sFLT1 levels were unchanged or even reduced in BPH/5 compared to controls. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of VEGF121 (Ad-VEGF) via tail vein at e7.5 normalized both the plasma free VEGF levels in BPH/5 and restored the in vitro angiogenic capacity of serum from these mice. Ad-VEGF also reduced the incidence of fetal resorptions and prevented the late-gestational spike in blood pressure and proteinuria observed in BPH/5. These data underscore the importance of dysregulation of angiogenic factors in the pathogenesis of PE, and suggest the potential utility of early pro-angiogenic therapies in treating this disease. PMID:21079047

  2. Transcriptional targeting of primary and metastatic tumor neovasculature by an adenoviral type 5 roundabout4 vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    New approaches targeting metastatic neovasculature are needed. Payload capacity, cellular transduction efficiency, and first-pass cellular uptake following systemic vector administration, motivates persistent interest in tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) adenoviral (Ad) vector targeting. While EC transductional and transcriptional targeting has been accomplished, vector administration approaches of limited clinical utility, lack of tumor-wide EC expression quantification, and failure to address avid liver sequestration, challenged prior work. Here, we intravenously injected an Ad vector containing 3 kb of the human roundabout4 (ROBO4) enhancer/promoter transcriptionally regulating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter into immunodeficient mice bearing 786-O renal cell carcinoma subcutaneous (SC) xenografts and kidney orthotopic (KO) tumors. Initial experiments performed in human coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (hCAR) transgenic:Rag2 knockout mice revealed multiple ECs with high-level Ad5ROBO4-EGFP expression throughout KO and SC tumors. In contrast, Ad5CMV-EGFP was sporadically expressed in a few tumor vascular ECs and stromal cells. As the hCAR transgene also facilitated Ad5ROBO4 and control Ad5CMV vector EC expression in multiple host organs, follow-on experiments engaged warfarin-mediated liver vector detargeting in hCAR non-transgenic mice. Ad5ROBO4-mediated EC expression was undetectable in most host organs, while the frequencies of vector expressing intratumoral vessels and whole tumor EGFP protein levels remained elevated. In contrast, AdCMV vector expression was only detectable in one or two stromal cells throughout the whole tumor. The Ad5ROBO4 vector, in conjunction with liver detargeting, provides tractable genetic access for in-vivo EC genetic engineering in malignancies.

  3. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  4. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  5. Exogenous surfactant enhances the delivery of recombinant adenoviral vectors to the lung.

    PubMed

    Katkin, J P; Husser, R C; Langston, C; Welty, S E

    1997-01-20

    Somatic gene therapy for pulmonary diseases must be accomplished in vivo, requiring the spread of a gene transfer vector across a vast expanse of respiratory epithelium. Surfactant, a naturally occurring protein and lipid mixture used to treat the respiratory distress syndrome of prematurity, disperses rapidly and evenly throughout the lung. We employed exogenous bovine surfactant (Survanta beractant) as a carrier vehicle for pulmonary delivery of a recombinant adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal). Rats treated with an adenovirus-beractant mixture demonstrated more uniform lobar distribution of transgene expression than rats treated with the same amount of virus in saline. Tissue homogenates were examined for quantitative beta-Gal expression by reaction with o-nitrophenol beta-n-galactopyranoside (ONPG). The degree of beta-Gal activity was affected by both the volume and type of carrier used to deliver the virus. At low volumes (0.5 ml, 1.3 ml/kg), beractant-treated animals demonstrated significantly greater pulmonary beta-Gal activity than saline-treated animals (p < 0.002) and untreated controls. At high volume (1.2 ml, 4 ml/kg), average beta-Gal activity was similar between groups treated with beractant or saline, but was more variable within the saline treated group. Higher volumes of delivery medium were associated with increased levels of beta-Gal expression regardless of the carrier used. Survanta was well tolerated by the animals and did not affect the duration of transgene expression. Exogenous beractant provides a useful medium for delivering recombinant adenoviruses to the lung when diffuse distribution of transgene expression is desired.

  6. Gene Therapy of Breast Cancer: Studies of Selective Promoter/Enhancer-Modified Vectors to Deliver Suicide Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    gene therapy strategies for breast cancer by translation of studies derived from the DF3/MUCl gene. We have completed Tasks 1 and 2 as outlined in the Statement of Work using the DF3 promoter to selectively drive transgenes in breast cancer cells. The DF3 promoter has been used in an adenoviral vector to selectively detect and eliminate breast cancer cells that contaminate hematopoietic stem cell preparations used in autologous bone marrow transplantation. More recent work has involved modification of the DF3 promoter by adding a Tet-enhancer system to increase expression

  7. Viability of long-term gene therapy in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Wise, Andrew K; Flynn, Brianna O; Nayagam, Bryony A; Richardson, Rachael T

    2014-04-22

    Gene therapy has been investigated as a way to introduce a variety of genes to treat neurological disorders. An important clinical consideration is its long-term effectiveness. This research aims to study the long-term expression and effectiveness of gene therapy in promoting spiral ganglion neuron survival after deafness. Adenoviral vectors modified to express brain derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 were unilaterally injected into the guinea pig cochlea one week post ototoxic deafening. After six months, persistence of gene expression and significantly greater neuronal survival in neurotrophin-treated cochleae compared to the contralateral cochleae were observed. The long-term gene expression observed indicates that gene therapy is potentially viable; however the degeneration of the transduced cells as a result of the original ototoxic insult may limit clinical effectiveness. With further research aimed at transducing stable cochlear cells, gene therapy may be an efficacious way to introduce neurotrophins to promote neuronal survival after hearing loss.

  8. Identification of a Novel Immunodominant HLA-B*07: 02-restricted Adenoviral Peptide Epitope and Its Potential in Adoptive Transfer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Faist, Benjamin; Kayser, Simone; Hartl, Lena; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Stevanović, Stefan; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients, particularly following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are associated with morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of hexon-specific and penton-specific T cells has been successfully applied, but many approaches are impeded by the low number of HLA class I-restricted adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. We use a novel method to identify naturally presented adenoviral peptide epitopes from infected human cells, ectopically expressing defined HLA, using peptide elution and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the previously described HLA-A*01:01-restricted peptide epitope LTDLGQNLLY from hexon protein is naturally presented, and demonstrate the functionality of LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells. We further identify a novel immunodominant HLA-B*07:02-restricted peptide epitope VPATGRTLVL from protein 13.6 K, and demonstrate the high proliferative, cytotoxic, and IFN-γ-producing capacity of peptide-specific T cells. Lastly, LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells can be detected ex vivo following adoptive transfer therapy, and LTDLGQNLLY-specific and VPATGRTLVL-specific T cells have memory phenotypes ex vivo. Given their proliferative and cytotoxic capacity, such epitope-specific T cells are promising candidates for adoptive T-cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  9. Neurotrophin Gene Therapy for Sustained Neural Preservation after Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Patrick J.; Wise, Andrew K.; Flynn, Brianna O.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Hume, Clifford R.; O’Leary, Stephen J.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Richardson, Rachael T.

    2012-01-01

    The cochlear implant provides auditory cues to profoundly deaf patients by electrically stimulating the residual spiral ganglion neurons. These neurons, however, undergo progressive degeneration after hearing loss, marked initially by peripheral fibre retraction and ultimately culminating in cell death. This research aims to use gene therapy techniques to both hold and reverse this degeneration by providing a sustained and localised source of neurotrophins to the deafened cochlea. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein, with or without neurotrophin-3 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, were injected into the lower basal turn of scala media of guinea pigs ototoxically deafened one week prior to intervention. This single injection resulted in localised and sustained gene expression, principally in the supporting cells within the organ of Corti. Guinea pigs treated with adenoviral neurotrophin-gene therapy had greater neuronal survival compared to contralateral non-treated cochleae when examined at 7 and 11 weeks post injection. Moreover; there was evidence of directed peripheral fibre regrowth towards cells expressing neurotrophin genes after both treatment periods. These data suggest that neurotrophin-gene therapy can provide sustained protection of spiral ganglion neurons and peripheral fibres after hearing loss. PMID:23284995

  10. Neurotrophin gene therapy for sustained neural preservation after deafness.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Wise, Andrew K; Flynn, Brianna O; Nayagam, Bryony A; Hume, Clifford R; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2012-01-01

    The cochlear implant provides auditory cues to profoundly deaf patients by electrically stimulating the residual spiral ganglion neurons. These neurons, however, undergo progressive degeneration after hearing loss, marked initially by peripheral fibre retraction and ultimately culminating in cell death. This research aims to use gene therapy techniques to both hold and reverse this degeneration by providing a sustained and localised source of neurotrophins to the deafened cochlea. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein, with or without neurotrophin-3 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, were injected into the lower basal turn of scala media of guinea pigs ototoxically deafened one week prior to intervention. This single injection resulted in localised and sustained gene expression, principally in the supporting cells within the organ of Corti. Guinea pigs treated with adenoviral neurotrophin-gene therapy had greater neuronal survival compared to contralateral non-treated cochleae when examined at 7 and 11 weeks post injection. Moreover; there was evidence of directed peripheral fibre regrowth towards cells expressing neurotrophin genes after both treatment periods. These data suggest that neurotrophin-gene therapy can provide sustained protection of spiral ganglion neurons and peripheral fibres after hearing loss.

  11. [Gene therapy of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Haase, G; Akli, S; Guidotti, J E

    1996-01-01

    In hereditary neurological diseases, gene transfer into neurons is made difficult by: the nature of the cells (postmitotic cells, that cannot be cultured, genetically modified ex vivo, then retransplanted), sometimes, their widespread localization, the blood-brain barrier. However, three viral vectors derived from adenovirus, Herpes simplex virus and adeno-associated virus have been shown to be very efficient in transferring DNA into brain cells. All of these vectors can infect resting cells, especially neurons, and are efficient in vivo. Retroviral vectors which can infect dividing cells only are mainly used for ex vivo genetic modification of cells (neural progenitor cells, myoblasts, fibroblasts) followed by intracerebral transplantation. Alternatively, genetically modified cells can be transplanted in a peripheral site if the transgene product is able to cross the blood-brain barrier or to be transported retrogradely from the nerve terminals. We have especially investigated the potential interest of adenoviral vectors to transfer foreign genes into brain cells and to treat animal models of neurological diseases. These vectors allowed us to transfer the lacZ gene into any neural cell type, including neurons, glia, photoreceptors and olfactory receptors, ex vivo, in cell culture, and in vivo, by stereotactic administration. In addition, axonal transport of adenoviral vectors has been demonstrated, e.g. in the substantia nigra after injection into the striatum, in the olfactory bulb after intranasal instillation and in spinal motor neurons after intramuscular injection. After intracerebroventricular injection, ependymal cells are massively infected and express the transgene for several months, as this is also observed in neurons. Through the spinal canal and cerebrospinal fluid, the vector can diffuse to a considerable distance from the injection point, e.g. to the lumbar spinal cord after injection in the suboccipital region. To test the biological function of

  12. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate sensitizes E1A+Ras-transformed cells to DNA damaging agents by facilitating formation and persistence of γH2AX foci.

    PubMed

    Abramova, Maria V; Svetlikova, Svetlana B; Kukushkin, Alexander N; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A

    2011-12-15

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) suppress the growth of tumor cells due to induction of cell cycle arrest, senescence or apoptosis. Recent data demonstrate that HDACi can interfere with DNA Damage Response (DDR) thereby sensitizing the cells to DNA damaging agents. Here, we show that HDACi sodium butyrate (NaBut) potentiates the formation of γH2AX foci predominantly in S-phase E1A+Ras cells. Accumulation of γH2AX foci sensitizes the cells toward such DNA damaging agents as irradiation (IR) and adriamycin. In fact, NaBut potentiates the persistence of γH2AX foci induced by genotoxic agents. The synergizing effects depend on DNA damaging factors and on the order of NaBut treatment. Indeed, NaBut treatment for 24 h leads to an accumulation of G 1-phase cells and a lack of S-phase cells, therefore, adriamycin, a powerful S-phase-specific inhibitor, when added to NaBut-treated cells, is unable to substantially add γH2AX foci. In contrast, IR produces both single- and double-strand DNA breaks at any stage of the cell cycle and was shown to increase γH2AX foci in NaBut-treated cells. Further, a lifetime of IR-induced γH2AX foci depends on the subsequent presence of HDACi. Correspondingly, NaBut withdrawal leads to the extinction of IR-induced γH2AX foci. This necessitates HDACi to hold the IR-induced γH2AX foci unrepaired. However, the IR-induced γH2AX foci persist after long-term NaBut treatment (72 h) even after washing the drug. Thus, although signaling pathways regulating H2AX phosphorylation in NaBut-treated cells remain to be investigated, the obtained results show that NaBut potentiates effects of DNA damaging agents by facilitating formation and persistence of γH2AX foci.

  13. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  14. Heterologous Prime-Boost Regimens with a Recombinant Chimpanzee Adenoviral Vector and Adjuvanted F4 Protein Elicit Polyfunctional HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN (‘A’), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 (‘P’), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques

  15. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  16. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  17. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  18. A human vaccine strategy based on chimpanzee adenoviral and MVA vectors that primes, boosts, and sustains functional HCV-specific T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2014-11-05

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies, and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study, we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A, and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype 1b. Analysis used single-cell mass cytometry and human leukocyte antigen class I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV-specific T cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) HCV-specific T cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T cell populations are generated, and T cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) after heterologous MVA boost. We have developed an HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained, and balanced T cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine.

  19. Potential of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goya, R G.; Sarkar, D.K.; Brown, O.A.; Hereñú, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology, comprising up to 15% of primary intracranial tumors. Current therapies for pituitary tumors include surgery and radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological approaches for some types. Although all of these approaches have shown a significant degree of success, they are not devoid of unwanted side effects, and in most cases do not offer a permanent cure. Gene therapy—the transfer of genetic material for therapeutic purposes—has undergone an explosive development in the last few years. Within this context, the development of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of pituitary tumors emerges as a promising area of research. We begin by presenting a brief account of the genesis of prolactinomas, with particular emphasis on how estradiol induces prolactinomas in animals. In so doing, we discuss the role of each of the recently discovered growth inhibitory and growth stimulatory substances and their interactions in estrogen action. We also evaluate the cell-cell communication that may govern these growth factor interactions and subsequently promote the growth and survival of prolactinomas. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental prolactinomas or somatomammotropic tumors with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for the herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters, like the human prolactin or human growth hormone promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. In a different type of approach, an adenoviral vector, encoding the human retinoblastoma suppressor oncogene, has been successfully used to rescue the phenotype of spontaneous pituitary

  20. Development of hybrid viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuohao; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral, retroviral/lentiviral, adeno-associated viral, and herpesviral vectors are the major viral vectors used in gene therapy. Compared with non-viral methods, viruses are highly-evolved, natural delivery agents for genetic materials. Despite their remarkable transduction efficiency, both clinical trials and laboratory experiments have suggested that viral vectors have inherent shortcomings for gene therapy, including limited loading capacity, immunogenicity, genotoxicity, and failure to support long-term adequate transgenic expression. One of the key issues in viral gene therapy is the state of the delivered genetic material in transduced cells. To address genotoxicity and improve the therapeutic transgene expression profile, construction of hybrid vectors have recently been developed. By adding new abilities or replacing certain undesirable elements, novel hybrid viral vectors are expected to outperform their conventional counterparts with improved safety and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. This review provides a comprehensive summary of current achievements in hybrid viral vector development and their impact on the field of gene therapy.

  1. Gene therapy techniques for the delivery of endothelial nitric oxide synthase to the lung for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deng, W; Bivalacqua, T J; Champion, H C; Hellstrom, W J; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious, often fatal disease characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary vascular bed, increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and right heart failure. The increased vascular resistance in the pulmonary circulation is due to structural changes and increased vasoconstrictor tone. Although current therapies have prolonged survival, the long-term outcome is not favorable. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and is important in regulating vascular resistance and in vascular remodeling in the lung. NO deficiency due to endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PH. Therefore, local eNOS gene delivery to the lung is a promising approach for the treatment of PH. Adenoviral-mediated in vivo gene therapy and adult stem cell-based ex vivo gene therapy are two attractive current gene therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In this chapter we describe the use of two gene transfer techniques, i.e., adenoviral gene transfer of eNOS and eNOS gene-modified rat marrow stromal cells, for eNOS gene delivery to the lung of laboratory animals for the treatment of PH.

  2. Muscle as a target for supplementary factor IX gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brad E; Dobrzynski, Eric; Wang, Lixin; Hirao, Lauren; Mingozzi, Federico; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-07-01

    Immune responses to the factor IX (F.IX) transgene product are a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. The risk for such responses is determined by several factors, including the vector, target tissue, and others. Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatic gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can induce F.IX-specific immune tolerance. Muscle-derived F.IX expression, however, is limited by a local immune response. Here, skeletal muscle was investigated as a target for supplemental gene transfer. Given the low invasiveness of intramuscular injections, this route would be ideal for secondary gene transfer, thereby boosting levels of transgene expression. However, this is feasible only if immune tolerance established by compartmentalization of expression to the liver extends to other sites. Immune tolerance to human F.IX established by prior hepatic AAV-2 gene transfer was maintained after subsequent injection of AAV-1 or adenoviral vector into skeletal muscle, and tolerized mice failed to form antibodies or an interferon (IFN)-gamma(+) T cell response to human F.IX. A sustained increase in systemic transgene expression was obtained for AAV-1, whereas an increase after adenoviral gene transfer was transient. A CD8(+) T cell response specifically against adenovirus-transduced fibers was observed, suggesting that cytotoxic T cell responses against viral antigens were sufficient to eliminate expression in muscle. In summary, the data demonstrate that supplemental F.IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle does not break tolerance achieved by liver-derived expression. The approach is efficacious, if the vector for muscle gene transfer does not express immunogenic viral proteins.

  3. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  4. Enhancement of Protective Efficacy through Adenoviral Vectored Vaccine Priming and Protein Boosting Strategy Encoding Triosephosphate Isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. Conclusions/Significance The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China. PMID:25793406

  5. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors’ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  6. Sublingual administration of a helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing the codon-optimized soluble fusion glycoprotein of human respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan-hui; Jiao, Yue-Ying; He, Jin-sheng; Giang, Gui-Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Yi-Fei; Ma, Yao; Hua, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Xiang-Lei; Shi, Chang-Xin; Hong, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) immunization has been described as a convenient and safe way to induce mucosal immune responses in the respiratory and genital tracts. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing a condon-optimized soluble fusion glycoprotein (sFsyn) of respiratory syncytial virus (HDAd-sFsyn) and explored the potential of s.l. immunization with HDAd-sFsyn to stimulate immune responses in the respiratory mucosa. The RSV specific systemic and mucosal immune responses were generated in BALB/c mice, and the serum IgG with neutralizing activity was significantly elevated after homologous boost with s.l. application of HDAd-sFsyn. Humoral immune responses could be measured even 14weeks after a single immunization. Upon challenge, s.l. immunization with HDAd-sFsyn displayed an effective protection against RSV infection. These findings suggest that s.l. administration of HDAd-sFsyn acts as an effective and safe mucosal vaccine against RSV infection, and may be a useful tool in the prevention of RSV infection.

  7. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yuanhui; He, Jinsheng; Zheng, Xianxian; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yan; Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin; Hong, Tao

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  8. Recombinant adenoviral vector expressing HCV NS4 induces protective immune responses in a mouse model of Vaccinia-HCV virus infection: a dose and route conundrum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Li, Wen; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2014-05-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected patients presumably due to failure or inefficiency of the immune responses generated. Both antibody and cellular immune responses have been suggested to be important in viral clearance. Non-replicative adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of interest are considered as attractive vaccine vectors for a number of pathogens. In this study, we sought to evaluate cellular and humoral immune responses against HCV NS4 protein using recombinant adenovirus as a vaccine vector expressing NS4 antigen. We have also measured the effect of antigen doses and routes of immunization on the quality and extent of the immune responses, especially their role in viral load reduction, in a recombinant Vaccinia-HCV (Vac-HCV) infection mouse model. Our results show that an optimum dose of adenovirus vector (2×10(7)pfu/mouse) administered intramuscularly (i.m.) induces high T cell proliferation, granzyme B-expressing CD8(+) T cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6, and antibody responses that can significantly reduce the Vac-HCV viral load in the ovaries of female C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that recombinant adenovirus vector can induce both humoral and cellular protective immunity against HCV-NS4 antigen, and that immunity is intricately controlled by route and dose of immunizing vector.

  9. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Flint, S J; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  10. Peptide-Based Technologies to Alter Adenoviral Vector Tropism: Ways and Means for Systemic Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reetz, Julia; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Pützer, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fundamental progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and the arrival of the post-genomic era, increasing numbers of therapeutic genes and cellular targets are available for gene therapy. Meanwhile, the most important challenge is to develop gene delivery vectors with high efficiency through target cell selectivity, in particular under in situ conditions. The most widely used vector system to transduce cells is based on adenovirus (Ad). Recent endeavors in the development of selective Ad vectors that target cells or tissues of interest and spare the alteration of all others have focused on the modification of the virus broad natural tropism. A popular way of Ad targeting is achieved by directing the vector towards distinct cellular receptors. Redirecting can be accomplished by linking custom-made peptides with specific affinity to cellular surface proteins via genetic integration, chemical coupling or bridging with dual-specific adapter molecules. Ideally, targeted vectors are incapable of entering cells via their native receptors. Such altered vectors offer new opportunities to delineate functional genomics in a natural environment and may enable efficient systemic therapeutic approaches. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art techniques to specifically target adenovirus-based gene delivery vectors. PMID:24699364

  11. Development of Novel Adenoviral Vectors to Overcome Challenges Observed With HAdV-5–based Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Papp, Tibor; Kaján, Győző L; Benkő, Mária; Havenga, Menzo; Lemckert, Angelique; Harrach, Balázs; Baker, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) have been extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials over the past two decades. However, the thorough understanding of the HAdV-5 interaction with human subjects has uncovered major concerns about its product applicability. High vector-associated toxicity and widespread preexisting immunity have been shown to significantly impede the effectiveness of HAdV-5–mediated gene transfer. It is therefore that the in-depth knowledge attained working on HAdV-5 is currently being used to develop alternative vectors. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of data obtained in recent years disqualifying the HAdV-5 vector for systemic gene delivery as well as novel strategies being pursued to overcome the limitations observed with particular emphasis on the ongoing vectorization efforts to obtain vectors based on alternative serotypes. PMID:26478249

  12. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  13. A novel adenoviral vector labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for real-time tracking of viral delivery.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jonathan; Sonabend, Adam M; Ulasov, Ilya V; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Rozhkova, Elena A; Novosad, Valentyn; Dashnaw, Stephen; Brown, Truman; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2012-06-01

    In vivo tracking of gene therapy vectors challenges the investigation and improvement of biodistribution of these agents in the brain, a key feature for their targeting of infiltrative malignant gliomas. The glioma-targeting Ad5/3-cRGD gene therapy vector was covalently bound to super-paramagnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (SPION) to monitor its distribution by MRI. Transduction of labeled and unlabeled vectors was assessed on the U87 glioma cell line and normal human astrocytes (NHA), and was higher in U87 compared to NHA, but was similar between labeled and unlabeled virus. An in vivo study was performed by intracranial subcortical injection of labeled-Ad5/3-cRGD particles into a pig brain. The labeled vector appeared in vivo as a T2-weighted hyperintensity and a T2-gradient echo signal at the injection site, persisting up to 72 hours post-injection. We describe a glioma-targeting vector that is labeled with SPION, thereby allowing for MRI detection with no change in transduction capability.

  14. Adenoviral vectors coated with PAMAM dendrimer conjugates allow CAR independent virus uptake and targeting to the EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Alexandra; Virdi, Kulpreet S; Espenlaub, Sigrid; Rödl, Wolfgang; Wagner, Ernst; Holm, Per S; Scheu, Christina; Kreppel, Florian; Spitzweg, Christine; Ogris, Manfred

    2013-02-04

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad) is an efficient gene vector with high gene transduction potential, but its efficiency depends on its native cell receptors coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) for cell attachment and α(v)β(3/5) integrins for internalization. To enable transduction of CAR negative cancer cell lines, we have coated the negatively charged Ad by noncovalent charge interaction with cationic PAMAM (polyamidoamine) dendrimers. The specificity for tumor cell infection was increased by targeting the coated Ad to the epidermal growth factor receptor using the peptide ligand GE11, which was coupled to the PAMAM dendrimer via a 2 kDa PEG spacer. Particles were examined by measuring surface charge and size, the degree of coating was determined by transmission electron microscopy. The net positive charge of PAMAM coated Ad enhanced cellular binding and uptake leading to increased transduction efficiency, especially in low to medium CAR expressing cancer cell lines using enhanced green fluorescent protein or luciferase as transgene. While PAMAM coated Ad allowed for efficient internalization, coating with linear polyethylenimine induced excessive particle aggregation, elevated cellular toxicity and lowered transduction efficiency. PAMAM coating of Ad enabled successful transduction of cells in vitro even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Taken together, this study clearly proves noncovalent, charge-based coating of Ad vectors with ligand-equipped dendrimers as a viable strategy for efficient transduction of cells otherwise refractory to Ad infection.

  15. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    de Vrij, Jeroen; Willemsen, Ralph A; Lindholm, Leif; Hoeben, Rob C; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; de Ridder, Corrina; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Essand, Magnus; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Jennings, Ian; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nugent, Regina; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schenk-Braat, Ellen; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Slade, Michael; Szyjanowicz, Pio; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, Laura; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Zuber, Guy

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men in Western countries. Whereas the survival rate approaches 100% for patients with localized cancer, the results of treatment in patients with metastasized prostate cancer at diagnosis are much less successful. The patients are usually presented with a variety of treatment options, but therapeutic interventions in prostate cancer are associated with frequent adverse side effects. Gene therapy and oncolytic virus therapy may constitute new strategies. Already a wide variety of preclinical studies has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of such approaches, with oncolytic prostate-specific adenoviruses as the most prominent vector. The state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer are reviewed, with a focus on adenoviral vectors. We summarize advances in adenovirus technology for prostate cancer treatment and highlight areas where further developments are necessary.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  17. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  18. Phosphodiesterase 5a Inhibition with Adenoviral Short Hairpin RNA Benefits Infarcted Heart Partially through Activation of Akt Signaling Pathway and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Zhang, Jian; Paul, Christian; Wang, Yigang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference therapy targeting phosphodiesterase 5a after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown to mitigate post-MI heart failure. We investigated the mechanisms that underpin the beneficial effects of PDE5a inhibition through shRNA on post-MI heart failure. Methods An adenoviral vector with an shRNA sequence inserted was adopted for the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5a (Ad-shPDE5a) in vivo and in vitro. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in male C57BL/6J mice by left coronary artery ligation, and immediately after that, the Ad-shPDE5a was injected intramyocardially around the MI region and border areas. Results Four weeks post-MI, the Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice showed significant mitigation of the left ventricular (LV) dilatation and dysfunction compared to control mice. Infarction size and fibrosis were also significantly reduced in Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice. Additionally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment decreased the MI-induced inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β1, which was confirmed in vitro in Ad-shPDE5a transfected myofibroblasts cultured under oxygen glucose deprivation. Finally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment was found to activate the myocardial Akt signaling pathway in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Conclusion These findings indicate that PDE5a inhibition by Ad-shPDE5a via the Akt signal pathway could be of significant value in the design of future therapeutics for post-MI heart failure. PMID:26709517

  19. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; E. Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide; Dorigo, Natalia A.; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAbs) induced in mice with the levels of Ad5NAb titers found in humans. The data indicate that approximately 60% of the human serum samples tested displayed Ad5NAb levels that could be overcome with a prime-boost vaccination protocol. These results suggest that recombinant HAd5V vectors are potentially useful for prime-boost vaccination strategies, at least when pre-existing immunity against HAd5V is at low or medium levels. PMID:26679149

  20. A new model of multi-visceral and bone metastatic prostate cancer with perivascular niche targeting by a novel endothelial specific adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Prior, Julie L; Leib, Daniel J; Chauchereau, Anne; Sehn, Jennifer K; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-17

    While modern therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) have improved survival they are associated with an increasingly prevalent entity, aggressive variant PCa (AVPCa), lacking androgen receptor (AR) expression, enriched for cancer stem cells (CSCs), and evidencing epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity with a varying extent of neuroendocrine transdifferentiation. Parallel work revealed that endothelial cells (ECs) create a perivascular CSC niche mediated by juxtacrine and membrane tethered signaling. There is increasing interest in pharmacological metastatic niche targeting, however, targeted access has been impossible. Here, we discovered that the Gleason 7 derived, androgen receptor negative, IGR-CaP1 cell line possessed some but not all of the molecular features of AVPCa. Intracardiac injection into NOD/SCID/IL2Rg -/- (NSG) mice produced a completely penetrant bone, liver, adrenal, and brain metastatic phenotype; noninvasively and histologically detectable at 2 weeks, and necessitating sacrifice 4-5 weeks post injection. Bone metastases were osteoblastic, and osteolytic. IGR-CaP1 cells expressed the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin, near equivalent levels of vimentin and e-cadherin, all of the EMT transcription factors, and activation of NOTCH and WNT pathways. In parallel, we created a new triple-targeted adenoviral vector containing a fiber knob RGD peptide, a hexon mutation, and an EC specific ROBO4 promoter (Ad.RGD.H5/3.ROBO4). This vector was expressed in metastatic microvessels tightly juxtaposed to IGR-CaP1 cells in bone and visceral niches. Thus, the combination of IGR-CaP1 cells and NSG mice produces a completely penetrant metastatic PCa model emulating end-stage human disease. In addition, the metastatic niche access provided by our novel Ad vector could be therapeutically leveraged for future disease control or cure.

  1. Regulation of Epithelial Differentiation in Rat Intestine by Intraluminal Delivery of an Adenoviral Vector or Silencing RNA Coding for Schlafen 3

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L.; Yuan, Lisi; Sun, Kelian; Kunovska, Lyudmyla; Seregin, Sergey; Amalfitano, Andrea; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Although we stimulate enterocytic proliferation to ameliorate short gut syndrome or mucosal atrophy, less effort has been directed at enterocytic differentiation. Schlafen 3 (Slfn3) is a poorly understood protein induced during IEC-6 enterocytic differentiation. We hypothesized that exogenous manipulation of Slfn3 would regulate enterocytic differentiation in vivo. Adenoviral vector coding for Slfn3 cDNA (Ad-GFP-Slfn3) or silencing RNA for Slfn3 (siSlfn3) was introduced intraluminally into rat intestine. We assessed Slfn3, villin, sucrase-isomaltase (SI), Dpp4, and Glut2 by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We also studied Slfn3 and these differentiation markers in atrophic defunctionalized jejunal mucosa and the crypt-villus axis of normal jejunum. Ad-GFP-Slfn3 but not Ad-GFP increased Slfn3, villin and Dpp4 expression in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Injecting Ad-GFP-Slfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo increased mucosal Slfn3 mRNA three days later vs. intraluminal Ad-GFP. This Slfn3 overexpression was associated with increases in all four differentiation markers. Injecting siSlfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo substantially reduced Slfn3 and all four intestinal mucosal differentiation markers three days later, as well as Dpp4 specific activity. Endogenous Slfn3 was reduced in atrophic mucosa from a blind-end Roux-en-Y anastomosis in parallel with differentiation marker expression together with AKT and p38 signaling. Slfn3 was more highly expressed in the villi than the crypts, paralleling Glut2, SI and Dpp4. Slfn3 is a key intracellular regulator of rat enterocytic differentiation. Understanding how Slfn3 works may identify targets to promote enterocytic differentiation and maintain mucosal function in vivo, facilitating enteral nutrition and improving survival in patients with mucosal atrophy or short gut syndrome. PMID:24244554

  2. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  3. Gene Therapy for Type I Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The type I glycogen storage diseases (GSD-I) are a group of related diseases caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) system, a key enzyme complex that is essential for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis between meals. The complex consists of a glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) that translocates glucose-6-phosphate from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a G6Pase-α catalytic unit that hydrolyses the glucose-6-phosphate into glucose and phosphate. A deficiency in G6Pase-α causes GSD type Ia (GSD-Ia) and a deficiency in G6PT causes GSD type Ib (GSD-Ib). Both GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, while GSD-Ib patients also suffer symptoms of neutropenia and myeloid dysfunctions. G6Pase-α and G6PT are both hydrophobic endoplasmic reticulum-associated transmembrane proteins that can not expressed in soluble active forms. Therefore protein replacement therapy of GSD-I is not an option. Animal models of GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib that mimic the human disorders are available. Both adenovirus- and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapies have been evaluated for GSD-Ia in these model systems. While adenoviral therapy produces only short term corrections and only impacts liver expression of the gene, AAV-mediated therapy delivers the transgene to both the liver and kidney, achieving longer term correction of the GSD-Ia disorder, although there are substantial differences in efficacy depending on the AAV serotype used. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib in the animal model is still in its infancy, although an adenoviral construct has improved the metabolic profile and myeloid function. Taken together further refinements in gene therapy may hold long term benefits for the treatment of type I GSD disorders. PMID:17430128

  4. Impact of the Adenoviral E4 Orf3 Protein on the Activity and Posttranslational Modification of p53

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Perlman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our previous studies have established that the p53 populations that accumulate in normal human cells exposed to etoposide or infected by an E1B 55-kDa protein-null mutant of human adenovirus type 5 carry a large number of posttranslational modifications at numerous residues (C. J. DeHart, J. S. Chahal, S. J. Flint, and D. H. Perlman, Mol Cell Proteomics 13:1–17, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M113.030254). In the absence of this E1B protein, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced, and it has been reported that the viral E4 Orf3 protein inactivates p53 (C. Soria, F. E. Estermann, K. C. Espantman, and C. C. O'Shea, Nature 466:1076–1081, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09307). As the latter protein disrupts nuclear Pml bodies, sites at which p53 is modified, we used mass spectrometry to catalogue the posttranscriptional modifications of the p53 population that accumulates when neither the E1B 55-kDa nor the E4 Orf3 protein is made in infected cells. Eighty-five residues carrying 163 modifications were identified. The overall patterns of posttranslational modification of this population and p53 present in cells infected by an E1B 55-kDa-null mutant were similar. The efficiencies with which the two forms of p53 bound to a consensus DNA recognition sequence could not be distinguished and were lower than that of transcriptionally active p53. The absence of the E4 Orf3 protein increased expression of several p53-responsive genes when the E1B protein was also absent from infected cells. However, expression of these genes did not attain the levels observed when p53 was activated in response to etoposide treatment and remained lower than those measured in mock-infected cells. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53, a master regulator of cellular responses to stress, is inactivated and destroyed in cells infected by species C human adenoviruses, such as type 5. It is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the action of a virus-specific E3

  5. Intratracheal Instillation of High Dose Adenoviral Vectors Is Sufficient to Induce Lung Injury and Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiyuan; Chen, Tianji; Bozkanat, Melike; Ibe, Joyce Christina F.; Christman, John W.; Raj, J. Usha; Zhou, Guofei

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) vectors are common tools in gene therapy. Since Ad vectors are known to activate innate and adaptive immunity, we investigated whether intratracheal administration of Ad vectors alone is sufficient to induce lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Methods We instilled Ad viruses ranging from 107 to 1.625×109 ifu/mouse as well as the same volume of PBS and bleomycin. 14 and 21 days after administration, we collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and mouse lung tissues. We measured the protein concentration, total and differential cell counts, and TGF-β1 production, performed Trichrome staining and Sircol assay, determined gene and protein levels of profibrotic cytokines, MMPs, and Wnt signaling proteins, and conducted TUNEL staining and co-immunofluorescence for GFP and α-SMA staining. Results Instillation of high dose Ad vectors (1.625×109 ifu/mouse) into mouse lungs induced high levels of protein content, inflammatory cells, and TGF-β1 in BALF, comparable to those in bleomycin-instilled lungs. The collagen content and mRNA levels of Col1a1, Col1a2, PCNA, and α-SMA were also increased in the lungs. Instillation of both bleomycin and Ad vectors increased expression levels of TNFα and IL-1β but not IL-10. Instillation of bleomycin but not Ad increased the expression of IL-1α, IL-13 and IL-16. Treatment with bleomycin or Ad vectors increased expression levels of integrin α1, α5, and αv, MMP9, whereas treatment with bleomycin but not Ad vectors induced MMP2 expression levels. Both bleomycin and Ad vectors induced mRNA levels of Wnt2, 2b, 5b, and Lrp6. Intratracheal instillation of Ad viruses also induced DNA damages and Ad viral infection-mediated fibrosis is not limited to the infection sites. Conclusions Our results suggest that administration of Ad vectors induces an inflammatory response, lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis in a dose dependent manner. PMID:25551570

  6. Resistance of Adenoviral DNA Replication to Aphidicolin Is Dependent on the 72-Kilodalton DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Foster, David A.; Hantzopoulos, Petros; Zubay, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    Aphidicolin is a highly specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase α and has been most useful for assessing the role of this enzyme in various replication processes (J. A. Huberman, Cell 23:647-648, 1981). Both nuclear DNA replication and simian virus 40 DNA replication are highly sensitive to this drug (Krokan et al., Biochemistry 18:4431-4443, 1979), whereas mitochondrial DNA synthesis is completely insensitive (Zimmerman et al., J. Biol. Chem. 255:11847-11852, 1980). Adenovirus DNA replication is sensitive to aphidicolin, but only at much higher concentrations. These patterns of sensitivity are seen both in vivo and in vitro (Krokan et al., Biochemistry 18:4431-4443, 1979). A temperature-sensitive mutant of adenovirus type 5 known as H5ts125 is able to complete but not initiate new rounds of replication at nonpermissive temperatures (P. C. van der Vliet and J. S. Sussenbach, Virology 67:415-426, 1975). When cells infected with H5ts125 were shifted from permissive (33°C) to nonpermissive (41°C) conditions, the residual DNA synthesis (elongation) showed a striking increase in sensitivity to aphidicolin. The temperature-sensitive mutation of H5ts125 is in the gene for the 72-kilodalton single-stranded DNA-binding protein. This demonstrated that the increased resistance to aphidicolin shown by adenovirus DNA replication was dependent on that protein. It also supports an elongation role for both DNA polymerase α and the 72-kilodalton single-stranded DNA-binding protein in adenovirus DNA replication. Further support for an elongation role of DNA polymerase α came from experiments with permissive temperature conditions and inhibiting levels of aphidicolin in which it was shown that newly initiated strands failed to elongate to completion. Images PMID:6809958

  7. Influence of the core circadian gene "Clock" on obesity and leptin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoping; Yang, Shuhong; Zou, Yan; Cheng, Shuting; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Zhengrong; Liu, Yanyou

    2013-01-23

    Alterations in metabolism could be due to cell-autonomous effects associated with altered expression of Clock in central nervous system feeding centers and/or peripheral tissues involved in metabolism. Clock mutant mice are hyperphagic and obese, which indicates that Clock is related to obesity. In the present study, we used intracerebroventricular injection of recombinant adenoviral vector harboring Clock genes to explore the role of Clock on diet induced obesity and the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance and leptin signaling in mice. The results demonstrated that expression of Clock in the arcuate nucleus of diet induced obesity mice was down-regulated. The recombinant adenoviral vector harboring Clock genes could reduce obesity indexes of diet induced obesity mice including body weight, BMI and total fat mass, attenuate hyperleptinemia, increase leptin sensitivity and decrease accumulated suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in the arcuate nucleus. These results indicate that Clock plays an important role on obesity, which may be involved in leptin resistance and regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in arcuate nucleus.

  8. Tuning Surface Charge and PEGylation of Biocompatible Polymers for Efficient Delivery of Nucleic Acid or Adenoviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Jaesung; Bui, Quang Nam; Li, Yi; Yun, Chae-Ok; Lee, Doo Sung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-08-19

    As an effective and safe strategy to overcome the limits of therapeutic nucleic acid or adenovirus (Ad) vectors for in vivo application, various technologies to modify the surface of vectors with nonimmunogenic/biocompatible polymers have been emerging in the field of gene therapy. However, the transfection efficacy of the polymer to transfer genetic materials is still relatively weak. To develop more advanced and effective polymers to deliver not only Ad vectors, but also nucleic acids, 6 biocompatible polymers were newly designed and synthesized to different sizes (2k, 3.4k, or 5k) of poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) and different numbers of amine groups (2 or 5) based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]-l-glutamate (PNLG). We characterized size distribution and surface charge of 6 PNLGs after complexation with either nucleic acid or Ad. Among all 6 PNLGs, the 5 amine group PNLG showed the strongest efficacy in delivering nucleic acid as well as Ad vectors. Interestingly, cellular uptake results showed higher uptake ability in Ad complexed with 2 amine group PNLG than Ad/5 amine group PNLG, suggesting that the size of Ad/PNLGs is more essential than the surface charge for cellular uptake in polymers with charges greater than 30 mV. Moreover, the endosome escape ability of Ad/PNLGs increased depending on the number of amine groups, but decreased by PEG size. Cancer cell killing efficacy and immune response studies of oncolytic Ad/PNLGs showed 5 amine group PNLG to be a more effective and safe carrier for delivering Ad. Overall, these studies provide new insights into the functional mechanism of polymer-based approaches to either nucleic acid or Ad/nanocomplex. Furthermore, the identified ideal biocompatible PNLG polymer formulation (5 amine/2k PEG for nucleic acid, 5 amine/5k PEG for Ad) demonstrated high transduction efficiency as well as therapeutic value (efficacy and safety) and thus has strong potential for in vivo therapeutic

  9. A method to rapidly and accurately compare relative efficacies of non-invasive imaging reporter genes in a mouse model, and its application to luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Jose S.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our goal is to develop a simple, quantitative, robust method to compare the efficacy of imaging reporter genes in culture and in vivo. We describe an adenoviral vector-liver transduction procedure, and compare the luciferase reporter efficacies. Procedures Alternative reporter genes are expressed in a common adenoviral vector. Vector amounts used in vivo are based on cell culture titrations, ensuring the same transduction efficacy is used for each vector. After imaging, in vivo and in vitro values are normalized to hepatic vector transduction using quantitative real-time PCR. Results We assayed standard firefly luciferase (FLuc), enhanced firefly luciferase (EFLuc), luciferase 2 (Luc2), humanized Renilla luciferase (hRLuc), Renilla luciferase 8.6-535 (RLuc8.6), and a membrane-bound Gaussia luciferase variant (extGLuc) in cell culture and in vivo. We observed a greater that 100-fold increase in bioluminescent signal for both EFLuc and Luc2 when compared to FLuc, and a greater than 106-fold increase for RLuc8.6 when compared to hRLuc. ExtGLuc was not detectable in liver. Conclusions Our findings contrast, in some cases, with conclusions drawn in prior comparisons of these reporter genes, and demonstrate the need for a standardized method to evaluate alternative reporter genes in vivo. Our procedure can be adapted for reporter genes that utilize alternative imaging modalities (fluorescence, bioluminescence, MRI, SPECT, PET). PMID:21850545

  10. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J.; Chester, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCARlow/EGFRhigh cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of

  11. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J; Chester, John D; Parker, Alan L

    2015-05-01

    Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCAR(low)/EGFR(high) cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of circumventing

  12. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  13. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  14. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina's compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs' limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations.

  15. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects.

  16. A complementation method for functional analysis of mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Wang, Anan; Koehler, David R.; Martin, Bernard; Navab, Roya; Hu, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Our progress in understanding mammalian gene function has lagged behind that of gene identification. New methods for mammalian gene functional analysis are needed to accelerate the process. In yeast, the powerful genetic shuffle system allows deletion of any chromosomal gene by homologous recombination and episomal expression of a mutant allele in the same cell. Here, we report a method for mammalian cells, which employs a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector to synthesize small hairpin (sh) RNAs to knock-down the expression of an endogenous gene by targeting untranslated regions (UTRs). The vector simultaneously expresses an exogenous version of the same gene (wild-type or mutant allele) lacking the UTRs for functional analysis. We demonstrated the utility of the method by using PRPF3, which encodes the human RNA splicing factor Hprp3p. Recently, missense mutations in PRPF3 were found to cause autosomal-dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa, a form of genetic eye diseases affecting the retina. We knocked-down endogenous PRPF3 in multiple cell lines and rescued the phenotype (cell death) with exogenous PRPF3 cDNA, thereby creating a genetic complementation method. Because Ad vectors can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types, and many tissues in vivo, this method could have a wide application for gene function studies. PMID:15944448

  17. Visualizing gene expression by whole-body fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Moossa, A. R.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Transgene expression in intact animals now can be visualized by noninvasive techniques. However, the instruments and protocols developed so far have been formidable and expensive. We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing transgene expression in major organs of intact live mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently affordable. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed in the cells of brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, and bone, and its fluorescence is encoded in whole-body optical images. For low-magnification images, animals are illuminated atop a fluorescence light box and directly viewed with a thermoelectrically cooled color charge-coupled device camera. Higher-magnification images are made with the camera focused through an epi-fluorescence dissecting microscope. Both nude and normal mice were labeled by directly injecting 8 × 1010 plaque-forming units/ml of adenoviral GFP in 20–100 μl PBS and 10% glycerol into either the brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, or bone marrow. Within 5–8 h after adenoviral GFP injection, the fluorescence of the expressed GFP in brain and liver became visible, and whole-body images were recorded at video rates. The GFP fluorescence continued to increase for at least 12 h and remained detectable in liver for up to 4 months. The system's rapidity of image acquisition makes it capable of real-time recording. It requires neither exogenous contrast agents, radioactive substrates, nor long processing times. The method requires only that the expressed gene or promoter be fused or operatively linked to GFP. A comparatively modest investment allows the study of the therapeutic and diagnostic potential of suitably tagged genes in relatively opaque organisms. PMID:11050247

  18. Liposomal insulin promoter-thymidine kinase gene therapy followed by ganciclovir effectively ablates human pancreatic cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, James X; Liu, Shi-He; Nemunaitis, John J; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2015-04-10

    PDX1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and activates the insulin promoter (IP). Adenoviral IP-thymidine kinase and ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suppresses human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) in mice, but repeated doses carry significant toxicity. We hypothesized that multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity compared to adenoviral IP-TK/GCV. SCID mice with intraperitoneal human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 tumor implants were given a single cycle of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK, or four cycles of 1, 10, 20, 30, or 35 µg iv L-IP-TK (n = 20 per group), followed by intraperitoneal GCV. Insulin and glucose levels were monitored in mice treated with four cycles of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK. We found that four cycles of 10-35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV ablated more PANC-1 tumor volume compared to a single cycle with 35 µg. Mice that received four cycles of 10 µg L-IP-TK demonstrated the longest survival (P < 0.05), with a median survival of 126 days. In comparison, mice that received a single cycle of 35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV or GCV alone survived a median of 92 days and 68.7 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in glucose or insulin levels following treatment. In conclusion, multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity, suggesting non-viral vectors are superior to adenoviral vectors for IP-gene therapy.

  19. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 Gene Delivery Ameliorates Post-Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Ravi; Nilles, Kathleen; Gibson, Gregory; Burkhead, Benjamin; Mathier, Michael; McNamara, Dennis; McTiernan, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Adenoviral-mediated (AdV-T2) overexpression of TIMP-2 would blunt ventricular remodeling and improve survival in a murine model of chronic ischemic injury. Methods Male mice (n=124) aged 10–14 weeks underwent either 1) left coronary artery ligation to induce myocardial infarction (MI group, n=36), 2) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of AdV-T2 immediately post-MI (MI+T2 group, n=30), 3) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of a control adenovirus (MI+Ct, n=38), or 4) received no intervention (controls, n=20). On post-MI day 7, surviving mice (n=79) underwent echocardiographic, immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis. Results In infarcted animals, the MI+T2 group demonstrated improved survival (p< 0.02), better preservation of developed pressure and ventricular diameter (p<0.04), and the lowest expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (P<0.04) compared with MI and MI+Ct groups.. All infarcted hearts displayed significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration (p<0.04 versus control, MI, or MI+T2), with infiltration highest in the MI+Ct group and lowest in the MI+T2 group (p<0.04). Conclusions Adenoviral mediated myocardial delivery of the TIMP-2 gene improves post-MI survival and limits adverse remodeling in a murine model of myocardial infarction. PMID:21348952

  20. Indian hedgehog gene transfer is a chondrogenic inducer of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To date, no single most-appropriate factor or delivery method has been identified for the purpose of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatment of cartilage injury. Therefore, in this study we tested whether gene delivery of the growth factor Indian hedgehog (IHH) was able to induce chondrogenesis in human primary MSCs, and whether it was possible by such an approach to modulate the appearance of chondrogenic hypertrophy in pellet cultures in vitro. Methods First-generation adenoviral vectors encoding the cDNA of the human IHH gene were created by cre-lox recombination and used alone or in combination with adenoviral vectors, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Ad.BMP-2), or transforming growth factor beta-1 (Ad.TGF-β1) to transduce human bone-marrow derived MSCs at 5 × 102 infectious particles/cell. Thereafter, 3 × 105 cells were seeded into aggregates and cultured for 3 weeks in serum-free medium, with untransduced or marker gene transduced cultures as controls. Transgene expressions were determined by ELISA, and aggregates were analysed histologically, immunohistochemically, biochemically and by RT-PCR for chondrogenesis and hypertrophy. Results IHH, TGF-β1 and BMP-2 genes were equipotent inducers of chondrogenesis in primary MSCs, as evidenced by strong staining for proteoglycans, collagen type II, increased levels of glycosaminoglycan synthesis, and expression of mRNAs associated with chondrogenesis. IHH-modified aggregates, alone or in combination, also showed a tendency to progress towards hypertrophy, as judged by the expression of alkaline phosphatase and stainings for collagen type X and Annexin 5. Conclusion As this study provides evidence for chondrogenic induction of MSC aggregates in vitro via IHH gene delivery, this technology may be efficiently employed for generating cartilaginous repair tissues in vivo. PMID:22817660

  1. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  2. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. GENIS: gene expression of sodium iodide symporter for noninvasive imaging of gene therapy vectors and quantification of gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kenneth N; Tyson, Donald; Stricker, Hans; Lew, Young S; Heisey, Gregory; Koul, Sweaty; de la Zerda, Alberto; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Hui; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Randall, Kelly Ann; Jin, Guk Kim; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Jhiang, Sissy; Ho Kim, Jae; Freytag, Svend O; Brown, Stephen L

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of optimizing adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer, we have developed a method based on the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) that allows for noninvasive monitoring of adenoviral vectors and quantification of gene expression magnitude and volume within the prostate. A replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS) coexpressing a therapeutic yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD)/mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mutTK(SR39)) fusion gene and the hNIS gene was developed. Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS and a replication-defective hNIS adenovirus (rAd-CMV-FLhNIS) were injected into contralateral lobes of the dog prostate and hNIS activity was monitored in live animals following administration of Na(99m)TcO(4) using gamma camera scintigraphy. Despite the close proximity of the urinary bladder, (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake was readily detected in the prostate using viral dose levels (10(10) to 10(12) viral particles) that have been safely administered to humans. Due to its rapid clearance and short physical half-life (6 h), it was possible to obtain daily measurements of (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake in vivo, allowing for dynamic monitoring of reporter gene expression within the prostate as well as biodistribution throughout the body. High-resolution autoradiography of prostate sections coupled with 3D reconstruction of gene expression demonstrated that the magnitude and volume of gene expression could be quantified with submillimeter resolution. Implementation of the GENIS (gene expression of Na/I symporter) technology in the clinic will facilitate optimization of future human gene therapy trials.

  4. B-cell translocation gene 2 promotes hepatic hepcidin production via induction of Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Jang, Won-Gu; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2015-05-15

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone secreted in the liver and plays a key role in maintaining iron homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a key player in hepatic hepcidin regulation via induction of Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Hepatic hepcidin gene expression significantly enhanced by fasting states and glucagon exposure led to induction of gluconeogenic gene expression, and elevated serum hepcidin production in mice. Notably, overexpression of BTG2 using adenoviral system (Ad-BTG2) significantly elevated serum hepcidin levels via a significant induction of YY1 gene transcription. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that BTG2 physically interacted with YY1 and recruited on the hepcidin gene promoter. Finally, ablation of hepatic BTG2 gene by gene silencing markedly attenuated the elevation of serum hepcidin production along with YY1 and hepcidin mRNA expression in fasting state. Likewise, forskolin (FSK)-stimulated hepcidin promoter activity was dramatically disrupted by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Overall, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism of BTG2-mediated induction of hepcidin gene expression, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the hepatic hepcidin production involved in iron homeostasis.

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Magnitude, Quality, Phenotype and Protective Capacity of SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Human-, Simian- and Chimpanzee-Derived Recombinant Adenoviral Vector Immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Costa, Andreia Da; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G.D.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. Here we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16), or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared to human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 107 to 109 PU), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses, from most to least as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFNγ+TNFα+IL-2+ and KLRG1+CD127- CD8+ T cells, but strikingly ~30–80% of memory CD8+ T cells co-expressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimise CD8+ T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ~60% of total CD8+ T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8+ T cell responses compared to prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8+ T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively. PMID:23390298

  6. Comparative analysis of the magnitude, quality, phenotype, and protective capacity of simian immunodeficiency virus gag-specific CD8+ T cells following human-, simian-, and chimpanzee-derived recombinant adenoviral vector immunization.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kylie M; Da Costa, Andreia; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W B; Darrah, Patricia A; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G D; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T; Nabel, Gary J; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A

    2013-03-15

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. In this study we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16) or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared with human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype, and protective capacity of CD8(+) T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 10(7)-10(9) particle units), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8(+) T cell responses, from most to least, as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) and KLRG1(+)CD127(-)CD8(+) T cells, but strikingly ∼30-80% of memory CD8(+) T cells coexpressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimize CD8(+) T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ∼60% of total CD8(+) T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8(+) T cell responses compared with prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8(+) T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively.

  7. Potential of Advexin: a p53 gene-replacement therapy in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nemunaitis, Jackie M; Nemunaitis, John

    2008-12-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. The majority of families fulfilling definition of Li-Fraumeni syndrome demonstrate inherited abnormalities involving the p53 gene. Cells with dysfunctional p53 are predisposed to the development of cancer phenotype. Advexin (Introgen Therapeutics Inc., TX, USA) is an adenoviral-based experimental therapeutic that provides delivery of wild-type p53 to cancer cells and demonstrates anticancer activity following adequate expression of p53. Theoretically, correction of p53 function in cancer developing in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome through treatment with Advexin will provide anti-tumor activity. One patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome has been reported to have responded to Advexin. This review will summarize background knowledge of Li-Fraumeni syndrome, mechanisms of Advexin and clinical response of cancer to Advexin with a focus on Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  8. Inhibition of Experimental Liver Cirrhosis in Mice by Telomerase Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Chang, Sandy; Millard, Melissa; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerated telomere loss has been proposed to be a factor leading to end-stage organ failure in chronic diseases of high cellular turnover such as liver cirrhosis. To test this hypothesis directly, telomerase-deficient mice, null for the essential telomerase RNA (mTR) gene, were subjected to genetic, surgical, and chemical ablation of the liver. Telomere dysfunction was associated with defects in liver regeneration and accelerated the development of liver cirrhosis in response to chronic liver injury. Adenoviral delivery of mTR into the livers of mTR-/- mice with short dysfunctional telomeres restored telomerase activity and telomere function, alleviated cirrhotic pathology, and improved liver function. These studies indicate that telomere dysfunction contributes to chronic diseases of continual cellular loss-replacement and encourage the evaluation of ``telomerase therapy'' for such diseases.

  9. Osmotically- induced genes are controlled by the transcription factor TonEBP in cultured cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Paola; Chiong, Mario; Volkwein, Karen; Moraga, Francisco; Ocaranza, María Paz; Jalil, Jorge E.; Lim, Sun Woo; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, H. Moo; Lavandero, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Changes in cardiac osmolarity occur in myocardial infarction. Osmoregulatory mechanisms may, therefore, play a crucial role in cardiomyocyte survival. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a key transcription factor participating in the adaptation of cells to increases in tonicity. However, it is unknown whether cardiac TonEBP is activated by tonicity. Hypertonicity activated transcriptional activity of TonEBP, increased the amounts of both TonEBP mRNA and protein, and induced both the mRNA and protein of TonEBP target genes (aldose reductase and heat shock protein-70). Hypotonicity decreased the amount of TonEBP protein indicating bidirectional osmoregulation of this transcription factor. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative TonEBP suppressed the hypertonicity-dependent increase of aldose reductase protein. These results indicated that TonEBP controls osmoregulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes. PMID:18502201

  10. IL-12 based gene therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Tozon, Natasa

    2012-11-21

    The use of large animals as an experimental model for novel treatment techniques has many advantages over the use of laboratory animals, so veterinary medicine is becoming an increasingly important translational bridge between preclinical studies and human medicine. The results of preclinical studies show that gene therapy with therapeutic gene encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) displays pronounced antitumor effects in various tumor models. A number of different studies employing this therapeutic plasmid, delivered by either viral or non-viral methods, have also been undertaken in veterinary oncology. In cats, adenoviral delivery into soft tissue sarcomas has been employed. In horses, naked plasmid DNA has been delivered by direct intratumoral injection into nodules of metastatic melanoma. In dogs, various types of tumors have been treated with either local or systemic IL-12 electrogene therapy. The results of these studies show that IL-12 based gene therapy elicits a good antitumor effect on spontaneously occurring tumors in large animals, while being safe and well tolerated by the animals. Hopefully, such results will lead to further investigation of this therapy in veterinary medicine and successful translation into human clinical trials.

  11. Conditionally replicating oncolytic adenoviral vector expressing arresten and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand experimentally suppresses lung carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shudong; Qi, Zongli; Li, Huijin; Hu, Jun; Wang, Dongyang; Wang, Xin; Feng, Zhenzhen

    2015-08-01

    Current methods of treatment for lung carcinoma are ineffective for the majority of patients. Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a potential novel treatment for a number of neoplastic diseases, including lung carcinoma. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic mechanisms underlying the anti-angiogenesis gene, arresten, and the apoptosis-inducing gene, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), in order to evaluate their therapeutic potential in lung cancer. The two genes were expressed by CRAd, which was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In vitro analyses demonstrated that CRAd adenoviruses are capable of selectively inhibiting A549 lung cancer cell growth and replication but not in that of healthy cells. In vivo analyses demonstrated that the infection of A549 cell lines using CRAd armed with the two genes (CRAd-arresten-TRAIL) enhanced the tumor inhibition, compared with cells infected with CRAd-arresten, CRAd-TRAIL or CRAd, and with the control group. CRAd-arresten-TRAIL may therefore be useful in the treatment of lung cancer.

  12. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  13. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  14. p21 as a Transcriptional Co-Repressor of S-Phase and Mitotic Control Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, Nuria; Caraballo, Juan M.; García-Gutierrez, Lucía; Devgan, Vikram; Rodriguez-Paredes, Manuel; Lafita, M. Carmen; Bretones, Gabriel; Quintanilla, Andrea; Muñoz-Alonso, M. Jose; Blanco, Rosa; Reyes, Jose C.; Agell, Neus; Delgado, M. Dolores; Dotto, G. Paolo; León, Javier

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes. PMID:22662213

  15. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene delivery enhances antitumor effects of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir system in a model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, T; Nakamoto, Y; Sakai, Y; Tsuchiyama, T; Yagita, H; Mukaida, N; Kaneko, S

    2006-04-01

    Suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system is a well-characterized tool for cancer gene therapy; however, it does not yet exhibit sufficient efficacy to cure patients of malignancies. We have reported that adenovirally delivered monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 augmented the antitumor effects of the HSV-tk/GCV system in an athymic nude mouse model. The current study, which uses an immunocompetent mouse model of colon cancer, was designed to evaluate the antitumor effects of MCP-1 gene delivery in conjunction with this suicide gene therapy system. Subcutaneous tumor foci were directly transduced with both recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) expressing an HSV-tk gene and either of the MCP-1, CD80 and LacZ genes, followed by GCV administration. The growth of tumors was markedly suppressed by codelivery of HSV-tk and MCP-1 genes, which was exclusively associated with the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages, T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine gene expression and cytotoxic activity of the splenocytes. Furthermore, the antitumor effects were more efficient than that obtained by the combination of HSV-tk and CD80 genes. These results suggest an immunomodulatory effect of MCP-1 in the context of suicide gene therapy of colon cancer via orchestration of innate and acquired immune responses.

  16. Restoration of Full-Length SMN Promoted by Adenoviral Vectors Expressing RNA Antisense Oligonucleotides Embedded in U7 snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Till; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to specific loss of motor neurons. It is caused by deletions or mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). The remaining copy of the gene, SMN2, generates only low levels of the SMN protein due to a mutation in SMN2 exon 7 that leads to exon skipping. Methodology/Principal Findings To correct SMN2 splicing, we use Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors to express SMN2-antisense U7 snRNA oligonucleotides targeting the SMN intron 7/exon 8 junction. Infection of SMA type I–derived patient fibroblasts with these vectors resulted in increased levels of exon 7 inclusion, upregulating the expression of SMN to similar levels as in non–SMA control cells. Conclusions/Significance These results show that Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors delivering U7 antisense oligonucleotides can efficiently restore full-length SMN protein and suggest that the viral vector-mediated oligonucleotide application may be a suitable therapeutic approach to counteract SMA. PMID:19997596

  17. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Dong; Zhong, Zhirong; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  18. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-01-01

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism. PMID:27404720

  19. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  20. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Unzu, Carmen; Melero, Ignacio; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  1. Ecdysone Receptor-based Singular Gene Switches for Regulated Transgene Expression in Cells and Adult Rodent Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoghyun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Won, Minho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Kang, Kidong; Bae, Young-Ki; Hur, Gang Min; Ro, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    Controlled gene expression is an indispensable technique in biomedical research. Here, we report a convenient, straightforward, and reliable way to induce expression of a gene of interest with negligible background expression compared to the most widely used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated system. Exploiting a Drosophila ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene regulatory system, we generated nonviral and adenoviral singular vectors designated as pEUI(+) and pENTR-EUI, respectively, which contain all the required elements to guarantee regulated transgene expression (GAL4-miniVP16-EcR, termed GvEcR hereafter, and 10 tandem repeats of an upstream activation sequence promoter followed by a multiple cloning site). Through the transient and stable transfection of mammalian cell lines with reporter genes, we validated that tebufenozide, an ecdysone agonist, reversibly induced gene expression, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with negligible background expression. In addition, we created an adenovirus derived from the pENTR-EUI vector that readily infected not only cultured cells but also rodent tissues and was sensitive to tebufenozide treatment for regulated transgene expression. These results suggest that EcR-based singular gene regulatory switches would be convenient tools for the induction of gene expression in cells and tissues in a tightly controlled fashion. PMID:27673563

  2. Molecular chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer using novel mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Della Manna, Debbie L; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Black, Margaret E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2008-09-01

    The combination of molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful approach for treatment of pancreatic cancer. We have developed an adenoviral vector (AdbCD-D314A) encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene, which converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the active drug 5-fluorouracil. The aim of this study was to investigate AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo alone and in combination with radiation against human pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts. AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity alone and in combination with radiation was analyzed using crystal violet inclusion and clonogenic survival assays. CD enzyme activity was determined by measuring conversion of [3H]5-FC to [3H]5-fluorouracil after adenoviral infection of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and pancreatic tumor xenografts by TLC. S.c. pancreatic tumor xenografts were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy. AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated pancreatic cancer cell killing that correlated with significantly enhanced CD enzyme activity compared with AdbCDwt encoding wild-type of bCD. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of growth of human pancreatic tumors treated with AdbCD-D314A/5-FC in comparison with AdbCDwt/5-FC. Also, a significantly greater inhibition of growth of Panc2.03 and MIA PaCA-2 tumor xenografts was produced by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation compared with either agent alone. The results indicate that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and increased therapeutic efficacy against human pancreatic tumor xenografts.

  3. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  4. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  5. Adenoviral astrocyte-specific expression of BDNF in the striata of mice transgenic for Huntington's disease delays the onset of the motor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Arregui, Leticia; Benítez, Jorge A; Razgado, Luis F; Vergara, Paula; Segovia, Jose

    2011-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. The most characteristic structural feature of this disease is neurodegeneration accompanied by gliosis in the striatum. BDNF has been proposed to protect striatal neurons from degeneration, because it is an important survival factor for these neurons from development to adulthood. Considering the extensive gliosis and the survival effects of BDNF, we constructed an adenovirus to express a BDNF cDNA in astrocyte cells using a promoter of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. Cells stably transfected in vitro with a BDNF cDNA driven by this promoter expressed BDNF and responded to external stimuli increasing BDNF production. When the vector was applied into the striata of mice transgenic for HD, long-term expression of the transgene was observed, associated with a delay of onset of the motor phenotype of the R6/2 HD transgenic mice. The present data indicate that the striatal expression of BDNF is a potential adjuvant for the treatment of HD.

  6. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren’an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted. PMID:26527860

  7. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren'an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted.

  8. Identification of RISC-Associated Adenoviral MicroRNAs, a Subset of Their Direct Targets, and Global Changes in the Targetome upon Lytic Adenovirus 5 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bellutti, Florian; Kauer, Maximilian; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses encode a set of highly abundant microRNAs (mivaRNAs), which are generated by Dicer-mediated cleavage of the larger noncoding virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) I and II. We performed deep RNA sequencing to thoroughly investigate the relative abundance of individual single strands of mivaRNA isoforms in human A549 cells lytically infected with human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) at physiologically relevant multiplicities of infection (MOIs). In addition, we investigated their relative abundance in the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). The occupation of endogenous RISCs by mivaRNAs turned out to be pronounced but not as dominant as previously inferred from experiments with AGO2-overexpressing cells infected at high MOIs. In parallel, levels of RISC-incorporated mRNAs were investigated as well. Analysis of mRNAs enriched in RISCs in Ad5-infected cells revealed that only mRNAs with complementarity to the seed sequences of mivaRNAs derived from VA RNAI but not VA RNAII were overrepresented among them, indicating that only mivaRNAs derived from VA RNAI are likely to contribute substantially to the posttranscriptional downregulation of host gene expression. Furthermore, to generate a comprehensive picture of the entire transcriptome/targetome in lytically infected cells, we determined changes in cellular miRNA levels in both total RNA and RISC RNA as well, and bioinformatical analysis of mRNAs of total RNA/RISC fractions revealed a general, genome-wide trend toward detargeting of cellular mRNAs upon infection. Lastly, we identified the direct targets of both single strands of a VA RNAI-derived mivaRNA that constituted one of the two most abundant isoforms in RISCs of lytically infected A549 cells. IMPORTANCE Viral and cellular miRNAs have been recognized as important players in virus-host interactions. This work provides the currently most comprehensive picture of the entire mRNA/miRNA transcriptome and of the complete RISC targetome during lytic

  9. Recovery of radiation-induced dry eye and corneal damage by pretreatment with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of erythropoietin to the salivary glands in mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cotrim, Ana P; Zheng, Changyu; Riveros, Paola Perez; Baum, Bruce J; Chiorini, John A

    2013-04-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation (RTx) causes dry eye syndrome (DES), dry mouth, and as in other sicca syndromes, they are incurable. The aims of this work are as follows: (a) to evaluate a mouse model of DES induced by clinically relevant doses of radiation, and (b) to evaluate the protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo) in preventing DES. C3H female mice were subjected to five sessions of RTx, with or without pre-RTx retroductal administration of the AdLTR2EF1a-hEPO (AdEpo) vector in the salivary glands (SG), and compared with naïve controls at Day 10 (10d) (8 Gy fractions) and 56 days (56d) (6 Gy fractions) after RTx treatment. Mice were tested for changes in lacrimal glands (LG), tear secretion (phenol red thread), weight, hematocrit (Hct), and markers of inflammation, as well as microvessels and oxidative damage. Tear secretion was reduced in both RTx groups, compared to controls, by 10d. This was also seen at 56d in RTx but not AdEpo+RTx group. Hct was significantly higher in all AdEpo+RTx mice at 10d and 56d. Corneal epithelium was significantly thinner at 10d in the RTx group compared with AdEpo+RTx or the control mice. There was a significant reduction at 10d in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 in LG in the RTx group that was prevented in the AdEpo+RTx group. In conclusion, RTx is able to induce DES in mice. AdEpo administration protected corneal epithelia and resulted in some recovery of LG function, supporting the value of further studies using gene therapy for extraglandular diseases.

  10. An adenovirus with enhanced infectivity mediates molecular chemotherapy of ovarian cancer cells and allows imaging of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, A; Belousova, N; Zinn, K R; Liu, B; Wang, M; Chaudhuri, T R; Rogers, B E; Buchsbaum, D J; Siegal, G P; Barnes, M N; Gomez-Navarro, J; Curiel, D T; Alvarez, R D

    2001-09-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) is a useful vector for cancer gene therapy due to its unparalleled gene transfer efficiency to dividing and quiescent cells. Primary cancer cells, however, often have highly variable or low levels of the requisite coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Also, assessment of gene transfer and vector persistence has been logistically difficult in human clinical trials. We describe here two novel bicistronic adenoviral (Ad) vectors, AdTKSSTR and RGDTKSSTR, which contain the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (TK) for molecular chemotherapy and bystander effect. In addition, the viruses contain the human somatostatin receptor subtype-2 gene (SSTR2), the expression of which can be noninvasively imaged. We enhanced the infectivity of RGDTKSSTR by genetically incorporating the RGD-4C motif into the HI-loop of the fiber. This allows the virus to circumvent CAR deficiency by binding to alpha(v)beta(3) and alpha(v)beta(5) integrins, which are highly expressed on most ovarian cancers. The expanded tropism of RGDTKSSTR results in increased infectivity of purified primary ovarian cancer cells and allows enhanced gene transfer in the presence of malignant ascites containing anti-Ad antibodies. RGDTKSSTR may be a useful agent for treating ovarian cancer in clinical trials.

  11. In vivo evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase responsive silk-elastinlike protein polymers for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-09-10

    Silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs) have been effectively used as controlled release matrices for the delivery of viruses for cancer gene therapy in preclinical models. However, the degradability of these polymers needs to be tuned for improved localized intratumoral gene delivery. Using recombinant techniques, systematic modifications in distinct regions of the polymer backbone, namely, within the elastin blocks, silk blocks, and adjacent to silk and elastin blocks, have been made to impart sensitivity to specific matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) known to be overexpressed in the tumor environment. In this report we investigated the structure-function relationship of MMP-responsive SELPs for viral mediated gene therapy of head and neck cancer. These polymers showed significant degradation in vitro in the presence of MMPs. Their degradation rate was a function of the location of the MMP-responsive sequence in the polymer backbone when in hydrogel form. Treatment efficacy of the adenoviral vectors released from the MMP responsive SELP analogs in a xenograft mouse model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was shown to be polymer structure dependent. These results demonstrate the tunable nature of MMP-responsive SELPs for localized matrix-mediated gene delivery.

  12. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  13. Transcriptional control of viral gene therapy by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Park, James O.; Lopez, Carlos A.; Gupta, Vinay K.; Brown, Charles K.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Darga, Thomas E.; Manan, Abdullah; Hellman, Samuel; Posner, Mitchell C.; Kufe, Donald W.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) and radical oxygen intermediates (ROIs) activate the early growth response-1 (Egr1) promoter through specific cis-acting sequences termed CArG elements. Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, a replication-deficient adenoviral vector containing CArG elements cloned upstream of the cDNA for human recombinant TNF-α was used to treat human esophageal adenocarcinoma and rat colon adenocarcinoma cells in culture and as xenografts in athymic nude mice. Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, causes tumor cell death by producing DNA damage and generating ROIs. The present studies demonstrate induction of TNF-α production in tumor cells and xenografts treated with the combination of Ad.Egr.TNF.11D and cisplatin. The results show that the Egr1 promoter is induced by cisplatin and that this induction is mediated in part through the CArG elements. These studies also demonstrate an enhanced antitumor response without an increase in toxicity following treatment with Ad.Egr.TNF.11D and cisplatin, compared with either agent alone. Chemo-inducible cancer gene therapy thus provides a means to control transgene expression while enhancing the effectiveness of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:12163460

  14. Identification of Four Mouse Diabetes Candidate Genes Altering β-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kamitz, Anne; Jähnert, Markus; Vogel, Heike; Scherneck, Stephan; Schulze, Matthias; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis and failure to induce beta-cell regeneration are hallmarks of type 2-like diabetes in mouse models. Here we show that islets from obese, diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice, in contrast to diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J (B6)-ob/ob mice, do not proliferate in response to an in-vivo glucose challenge but lose their beta-cells. Genome-wide RNAseq based transcriptomics indicated an induction of 22 cell cycle-associated genes in B6-ob/ob islets that did not respond in NZO islets. Of all genes differentially expressed in islets of the two strains, seven mapped to the diabesity QTL Nob3, and were hypomorphic in either NZO (Lefty1, Apoa2, Pcp4l1, Mndal, Slamf7, Pydc3) or B6 (Ifi202b). Adenoviral overexpression of Lefty1, Apoa2, and Pcp4l1 in primary islet cells increased proliferation, whereas overexpression of Ifi202b suppressed it. We conclude that the identified genes in synergy with obesity and insulin resistance participate in adaptive islet hyperplasia and prevention from severe diabetes in B6-ob/ob mice. PMID:26348837

  15. Evidence for an indirect transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression by liver X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Grempler, Rolf . E-mail: rolfgrempler@yahoo.de; Guenther, Susanne; Steffensen, Knut R.; Nilsson, Maria; Barthel, Andreas; Schmoll, Dieter

    2005-12-16

    Liver X receptor (LXR) paralogues {alpha} and {beta} (LXR{alpha} and LXR{beta}) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor family and have oxysterols as endogenous ligands. LXR activation reduces hepatic glucose production in vivo through the inhibition of transcription of the key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of G6Pase gene expression by LXR. Both T0901317, a synthetic LXR agonist, and the adenoviral overexpression of either LXR{alpha} or LXR{beta} suppressed G6Pase gene expression in H4IIE hepatoma cells. However, compared to the suppression of G6Pase expression seen by insulin, the decrease of G6Pase mRNA by LXR activation was delayed and was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These observations, together with the absence of a conserved LXR-binding element within the G6Pase promoter, suggest an indirect inhibition of G6Pase gene expression by liver X receptors.

  16. Adenovector GAD65 gene delivery into the rat trigeminal ganglion produces orofacial analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vit, Jean-Philippe; Ohara, Peter T; Sundberg, Christopher; Rubi, Blanca; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background Our goal is to use gene therapy to alleviate pain by targeting glial cells. In an animal model of facial pain we tested the effect of transfecting the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) gene into satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion by using a serotype 5 adenovector with high tropisms for glial cells. We postulated that GABA produced from the expression of GAD would reduce pain behavior by acting on GABA receptors on neurons within the ganglion. Results Injection of adenoviral vectors (AdGAD65) directly into the trigeminal ganglion leads to sustained expression of the GAD65 isoform over the 4 weeks observation period. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that adenovirus-mediated GAD65 expression and GABA synthesis were mainly in SGCs. GABAA and GABAB receptors were both seen in sensory neurons, yet only GABAA receptors decorated the neuronal surface. GABA receptors were not found on SGCs. Six days after injection of AdGAD65 into the trigeminal ganglion, there was a statistically significant decrease of pain behavior in the orofacial formalin test, a model of inflammatory pain. Rats injected with control virus (AdGFP or AdLacZ) had no reduction in their pain behavior. AdGAD65-dependent analgesia was blocked by bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, but not by CGP46381, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. Conclusion Transfection of glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion with the GAD gene blocks pain behavior by acting on GABAA receptors on neuronal perikarya. PMID:19656360

  17. In vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene or nuclear factor κB shRNA in nodose ganglia improves aortic baroreceptor function in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongze; Liu, Jinxu; Tu, Huiyin; Muelleman, Robert L; Cornish, Kurtis G; Li, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex sensitivity is attenuated in chronic heart failure (CHF) state, which is associated with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in patients with CHF. Our previous study showed that CHF-induced sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons was involved in the blunted baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Mitochondria-derived superoxide overproduction decreased expression and activation of the sodium channels in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats remain unknown. We tested the involvement of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) in the sodium channel dysfunction and evaluated the effects of in vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene and NFκB shRNA on the baroreflex function in CHF rats. CHF was developed at 6 to 8 weeks after left coronary artery ligation in adult rats. Western blot and chromatin immunoprecipitation data showed that phosphorylated NFκB p65 and ability of NFκB p65 binding to the sodium channel promoter were increased in the nodose ganglia from CHF rats. In vivo transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase gene or lentiviral NFκB p65 shRNA into the nodose ganglia partially reversed CHF-reduced sodium channel expression and cell excitability in the baroreceptor neurons and improved CHF-blunted arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Additionally, transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase also inhibited the augmentation of phosphorylated NFκB p65 in the nodose neurons from CHF rats. The present study suggests that superoxide-NFκB signaling contributes to CHF-induced baroreceptor dysfunction and resultant impairment of baroreflex function.

  18. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  19. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  20. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  1. Long-term gene therapy in the CNS: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus in the Brattleboro rat by using an adenovirus expressing arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Geddes, B J; Harding, T C; Lightman, S L; Uney, J B

    1997-12-01

    The ability of adenovirus (Ad) to transfect most cell types efficiently has already resulted in human gene therapy trials involving the systemic administration of adenoviral constructs. However, because of the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in noninvasively monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of Ad gene therapy strategies for treating disorders of the CNS has been difficult to assess. In the present study, we have used an Ad encoding the arginine vasopressin cDNA (AdAVP) in an AVP-deficient animal model of diabetes insipidus (the Brattleboro rat), which allowed us to monitor chronically the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of AdAVP into the supraoptic nuclei (SON) of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of AVP in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by reduced daily water intake and urine volume, as well as increased urine osmolality lasting 4 months. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with an adenovirus-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using Ad gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Epidemic Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jonathan C.; Miller, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians would agree that there is no reason to obtain a magnetic resonance (MR) scan to evaluate a patient with viral conjunctivitis. We scheduled a patient for an annual MR scan to monitor his optic nerve meningiomas. By coincidence, he had florid viral conjunctivitis the day the scan was performed. It showed severe eyelid edema, contrast enhancement of the anterior orbit, enlargement of the lacrimal gland, and obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. Adenovirus produces deep orbital inflammation, in addition to infection of the conjunctival surface. PMID:26022084

  3. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  4. Endogenous gustatory responses and gene expression profile of stably proliferating human taste cells isolated from fungiform papillae.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, Andreas; Krohn, Michael; Rudert, Kerstin; Riedel, Katja; Becker, Sven; Thirion, Christian; Zinke, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Investigating molecular mechanisms underlying human taste sensation requires functionally dedicated and at the same time proliferating human taste cells. Here, we isolated viable human fungiform taste papillae cells from biopsy samples, adenovirally transduced proliferation promoting genes, and obtained stably proliferating cell lines. Analysis of gene expression of 1 human taste cell line termed HTC-8 revealed that these cells express 13 TAS2R bitter taste receptor genes, CD36, OXTR encoding oxytocin receptor, as well as genes implicated with signal transduction and cell fate control. Bitter tastants triggered functionally distinct signaling pathways in HTC-8 cells. Salicin elicited phospholipase C-dependent calcium signaling and no cell depolarization. In contrast, stimulation with saccharin, aristolochic acid, or phenylthiocarbamide triggered cell depolarization and phospholipase C-independent calcium influx. Simultaneous stimulation with salicin and saccharin revealed that saccharin can enhance the phospholipase C-dependent response to salicin indicating crosstalk of signaling pathways. Our results show that HTC-8 cells are programmed to bitter taste reception but are also responsive to fatty acids, oxytocin, and somatosensory stimuli, whereas HTC-8 cells are insensitive to compounds representing other basic taste qualities.

  5. Novel HDAd/EBV Reprogramming Vector and Highly Efficient Ad/CRISPR-Cas Sickle Cell Disease Gene Correction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Ding, Lei; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Wu, Li-Chen; Zhou, Dewang; Pawlik, Kevin M.; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Westin, Erik; Goldman, Frederick D.; Townes, Tim M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas enhanced correction of the sickle cell disease (SCD) genetic defect in patient-specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) provides a potential gene therapy for this debilitating disease. An advantage of this approach is that corrected iPSCs that are free of off-target modifications can be identified before differentiating the cells into hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation. In order for this approach to be practical, iPSC generation must be rapid and efficient. Therefore, we developed a novel helper-dependent adenovirus/Epstein-Barr virus (HDAd/EBV) hybrid reprogramming vector, rCLAE-R6, that delivers six reprogramming factors episomally. HDAd/EBV transduction of keratinocytes from SCD patients resulted in footprint-free iPSCs with high efficiency. Subsequently, the sickle mutation was corrected by delivering CRISPR/Cas9 with adenovirus followed by nucleoporation with a 70 nt single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN) correction template. Correction efficiencies of up to 67.9% (βA/[βS+βA]) were obtained. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of corrected iPSC lines demonstrated no CRISPR/Cas modifications in 1467 potential off-target sites and no modifications in tumor suppressor genes or other genes associated with pathologies. These results demonstrate that adenoviral delivery of reprogramming factors and CRISPR/Cas provides a rapid and efficient method of deriving gene-corrected, patient-specific iPSCs for therapeutic applications. PMID:27460639

  6. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-03-20

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase α respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human α-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy.

  7. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-04-05

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction.

  8. Gene Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; de Castro, Inês Jesus; Lavitas, Liron; Chotalia, Mita; Pombo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is an intricate multistep process, regulated within the cell nucleus through the activation or repression of RNA synthesis, processing, cytoplasmic export, and translation into protein. The major regulators of gene expression are chromatin remodeling and transcription machineries that are locally recruited to genes. However, enzymatic activities that act on genes are not ubiquitously distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but limited to specific and spatially defined foci that promote preferred higher-order chromatin arrangements. The positioning of genes within the nuclear landscape relative to specific functional landmarks plays an important role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:20484389

  9. Polyethylene glycol-grafted polyethylenimine used to enhance adenovirus gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kumar; Pal, Ivy; Ramsey, Joshua D

    2013-07-01

    An improved adenoviral-based gene delivery vector was developed by complexing adenovirus (Ad) with a biocompatible, grafted copolymer PEG-g-PEI composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Although an Ad-based gene vector is considered relatively safe, its native tropism, tendency to elicit an immune response, and susceptibility to inactivating antibodies makes the virus less than ideal. The goal of the current study was to determine whether Ad could be complexed with a PEG-g-PEI copolymer that would enable the virus to transduce cells lacking the Ad receptor, while avoiding the issues commonly associated with PEI. A copolymer library was synthesized using 2 kDa PEG and either linear or branched PEI (25 kDa) with a PEG to PEI grafting ratio of 10, 20, or 30. The results of the study indicate that PEG-g-PEI/Ad complexes are indeed able to transduce CAR-negative NIH 3T3 cells. The results also demonstrate that the PEG-g-PEI/Ad complexes are less toxic, less hemolytic, and more appropriately sized than PEI/Ad complexes.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene therapy ameliorates chronic hyperprolactinemia in senile rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, G R; Sosa, Y E; Bellini, M J; Carri, N G; Rodriguez, S S; Bohn, M C; Goya, R G

    2010-05-19

    Progressive dysfunction of hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons during normal aging is associated in the female rat with chronic hyperprolactinemia. We assessed the effectiveness of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy to restore TIDA neuron function in senile female rats and reverse their chronic hyperprolactinemia. Young (2.5 months) and senile (29 months) rats received a bilateral intrahypothalamic injection (10(10) pfu) of either an adenoviral vector expressing the gene for beta-galactosidase; (Y-betagal and S-betagal, respectively) or a vector expressing rat GDNF (Y-GDNF and S-GDNF, respectively). Transgenic GDNF levels in supernatants of GDNF adenovector-transduced N2a neuronal cell cultures were 25+/-4 ng/ml, as determined by bioassay. In the rats, serum prolactin (PRL) was measured at regular intervals. On day 17 animals were sacrificed and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive cells counted in the arcuate-periventricular hypothalamic region. The S-GDNF but not the S-betagal rats, showed a significant reduction in body weight. The chronic hyperprolactinemia of the senile females was significantly ameliorated in the S-GDNF rats (P<0.05) but not in the S-betagal rats. Neither age nor GDNF induced significant changes in the number of NeuN and TH neurons. We conclude that transgenic GDNF ameliorates chronic hyperprolactinemia in aging female rats, probably by restoring TIDA neuron function.

  11. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids.

  12. “Hit-and-Run” Transformation by Adenovirus Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nevels, Michael; Täuber, Birgitt; Spruss, Thilo; Wolf, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    According to classical concepts of viral oncogenesis, the persistence of virus-specific oncogenes is required to maintain the transformed cellular phenotype. In contrast, the “hit-and-run” hypothesis claims that viruses can mediate cellular transformation through an initial “hit,” while maintenance of the transformed state is compatible with the loss (“run”) of viral molecules. It is well established that the adenovirus E1A and E1B gene products can cooperatively transform primary human and rodent cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and that these cells permanently express the viral oncogenes. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the adenovirus E4 region encodes two novel oncoproteins, the products of E4orf6 and E4orf3, which cooperate with the viral E1A proteins to transform primary rat cells in an E1B-like fashion. Unexpectedly, however, cells transformed by E1A and either E4orf6 or E4orf3 fail to express the viral E4 gene products, and only a subset contain E1A proteins. In fact, the majority of these cells lack E4- and E1A-specific DNA sequences, indicating that transformation occurred through a hit-and-run mechanism. We provide evidence that the unusual transforming activities of the adenoviral oncoproteins may be due to their mutagenic potential. Our results strongly support the possibility that even tumors that lack any detectable virus-specific molecules can be of viral origin, which could have a significant impact on the use of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:11238835

  13. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  14. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  15. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis of genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-defined HLA-A3 subtypes: the E1 subtype.

    PubMed

    Cowan, E P; Jordan, B R; Coligan, J E

    1985-10-01

    Influenza-specific cytotoxic T cells restricted by HLA-A3 and allogeneic CTL specific for HLA-A3 recognize differences between serologically indistinguishable HLA-A3 antigens. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that such differential recognition can be explained by alterations in the primary structure of class I heavy chains. Characterization of these sequence differences may therefore identify portions of the class I molecule that form determinants recognized by CTL. In this study, we describe the cloning and sequencing of an HLA-A3 subtype from donor E1 (E1-A3). Cloning of the gene encoding E1-A3 was simplified by determining that a 15.5-kb BamHI fragment contains the complete gene and is characteristic of HLA-A3 and only one other class I gene (HLA-A11). Comparison of the E1-A3 sequence to that of a previously sequenced HLA-A3 gene for exons encoding extracellular class I domains revealed three nucleotide differences. All of these differences were located within a discrete region of exon 3 (encoding the alpha 2 domain) and result in a change of two amino acids, at positions 152 (Glu----Val) and 156 (Leu----Gln). This finding suggests that these amino acids are crucial for the information of a determinant recognized by CTL. Furthermore, the altered nucleotide sequence of E1-A3 is identical to the sequence of the HLA-Aw24 gene for codons 128 to 161. These observations of multiple clustered changes in the E1-A3 subtype (relative to the prototype sequence) and identity of the altered sequence with the sequence of another class I gene support the concept that gene conversion is a primary mechanism for the generation of class I polymorphism.

  16. Targeted gene correction minimally impacts whole-genome mutational load in human-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell clones.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Yu, Chang; Qu, Jing; Li, Mo; Yao, Xiaotian; Yuan, Tingting; Goebl, April; Tang, Senwei; Ren, Ruotong; Aizawa, Emi; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuling; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jessica; Kim, Na Young; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Benner, Chris; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Jin, Yabin; Liu, Guang-Hui; Li, Yingrui; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2014-07-03

    The utility of genome editing technologies for disease modeling and developing cellular therapies has been extensively documented, but the impact of these technologies on mutational load at the whole-genome level remains unclear. We performed whole-genome sequencing to evaluate the mutational load at single-base resolution in individual gene-corrected human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones in three different disease models. In single-cell clones, gene correction by helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAdV) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) exhibited few off-target effects and a low level of sequence variation, comparable to that accumulated in routine hiPSC culture. The sequence variants were randomly distributed and unique to individual clones. We also combined both technologies and developed a TALEN-HDAdV hybrid vector, which significantly increased gene-correction efficiency in hiPSCs. Therefore, with careful monitoring via whole-genome sequencing it is possible to apply genome editing to human pluripotent cells with minimal impact on genomic mutational load.

  17. Aminoclay as a highly effective cationic vehicle for enhancing adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through nanobiohybrid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic complexation of adenovirus (Ad) with cationic lipids or polymers has been shown to be an effective means for overcoming the limitations of adenoviral vectors and enhancing gene-transfer efficacy. However, such complexation causes cytotoxicity, limiting the use of this strategy. The present study explored the potential of 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) as a cationic vehicle for improving Ad-mediated gene transfer without inducing cytotoxicity. Aminoclay complexation produced a dose-dependent increase in Ad-mediated transgene expression in both Ad infection-sensitive and -refractory cells, thereby greatly lowering the Ad dose required for transgene expression. Unlike the case for cationic lipids (Lipofectamine) or polymers (Polybrene), the enhancement effect of aminoclay was not accompanied by significant cytotoxicity regardless of cell lines and it was not observed for nonviral plasmid vectors. Physical characterization studies revealed that nanobiohybrid complexes formed between aminoclay and Ad particles through electrostatic interactions, creating aggregates of Ad particles whose surface was shielded with aminoclay nanosheet oligomers. It appears that aminoclay complexation changes the surface charge of Ad particles from a negative to a highly positive value and thus increases Ad binding to cellular membranes, thereby providing an additional cellular entry mechanism, namely caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Aminoclay-Ad nanobiohybrids may serve as a next-generation efficient, versatile and biocompatible gene-delivery carrier.

  18. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  19. Gene transfer of manganese superoxide dismutase extends islet graft function in a mouse model of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bertera, Suzanne; Crawford, Megan L; Alexander, Angela M; Papworth, Glenn D; Watkins, Simon C; Robbins, Paul D; Trucco, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising cure for diabetes. However, inflammation, allorejection, and recurrent autoimmune damage all may contribute to early graft loss. Pancreatic islets express lower levels of antioxidant genes than most other tissues of the body, and beta-cells in particular are sensitive to oxidative damage. Therefore, damage from oxidative stress may pose a major obstacle to islet replacement therapy in that both the islet isolation and transplantation processes generate oxygen radicals. To determine whether antioxidant gene overexpression in isolated pancreatic islets can prevent oxidative damage and prolong islet function after transplantation, we used the NOD mouse model to study oxidative stress encountered during both transplantation and autoimmune attack. We transferred an antioxidant gene, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), by adenoviral infection into isolated islets that were transplanted into streptozotocin-treated NODscid recipient mice. Functioning islet grafts were subsequently exposed to diabetogenic spleen cells and monitored until graft failure. The results show that islet grafts overexpressing MnSOD functioned approximately 50% longer than control grafts. This significant prolongation of graft function suggests that the antioxidant activity of MnSOD is beneficial to transplanted islet survival and may be used in combination with other strategies aimed at islet graft protection.

  20. Myocardial β2-adrenoceptor gene delivery promotes coordinated cardiac adaptive remodelling and angiogenesis in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rengo, G; Zincarelli, C; Femminella, GD; Liccardo, D; Pagano, G; de Lucia, C; Altobelli, GG; Cimini, V; Ruggiero, D; Perrone-Filardi, P; Gao, E; Ferrara, N; Lymperopoulos, A; Koch, WJ; Leosco, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We investigated whether β2-adrenoceptor overexpression could promote angiogenesis and improve blood perfusion and left ventricular (LV) remodeling of the failing heart. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We explored the angiogenic effects of β2-adrenoceptor overexpression in a rat model of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). Cardiac adenoviral-mediated β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was obtained via direct intramyocardial injection 4-weeks post-MI. Adenovirus(Ad)-GFP and saline injected rats served as controls. Furthermore, we extended our observation to β2-adrenoceptor −/− mice undergoing MI. KEY RESULTS Transgenes were robustly expressed in the LV at 2 weeks post-gene therapy, whereas their expression was minimal at 4-weeks post-gene delivery. In HF rats, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor overexpression resulted in enhanced basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cardiac contractility at 2-weeks post-gene delivery. At 4 weeks post-gene transfer, Ad-β2-adrenoceptor HF rats showed improved LV remodeling and cardiac function. Importantly, β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was associated with a markedly increased capillary and arteriolar length density and enhanced in vivo myocardial blood flow and coronary reserve. At the molecular level, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor gene transfer induced the activation of the VEGF/PKB/eNOS pro-angiogenic pathway. In β2-adrenoceptor−/− mice, we found a ∼25% reduction in cardiac capillary density compared with β2-adrenoceptor+/+ mice. The lack of β2-adrenoceptors was associated with a higher mortality rate at 30 days and LV dilatation, and a worse global cardiac contractility compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION β2-Adrenoceptors play an important role in the regulation of the angiogenic response in HF. The activation of VEGF/PKB/eNOS pathway seems to be strongly involved in this mechanism. PMID:22452704

  1. Regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerotic lesions: a comparison of LDL lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyveld, Eline; Gordts, Stephanie C; Nefyodova, Elena; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2011-06-01

    Both reductions in atherogenic lipoproteins and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels may affect atherosclerosis regression. Here, the relative potential of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies to induce regression of complex murine atherosclerotic lesions was directly compared. Male C57BL/6 LDL receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice were fed an atherogenic diet (1.25% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil) to induce advanced atherosclerotic lesions. A baseline group was killed after 6 months and remaining mice were randomized into a control progression (Adnull or saline), an apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (AdA-I), an LDLr (AdLDLr), or a combined apo A-I/LDLr (AdA-I/AdLDLr) adenoviral gene transfer group and followed-up for another 12 weeks with continuation of the atherogenic diet. Gene transfer with AdLDLr decreased non-HDL cholesterol levels persistently by 95% (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. This drastic reduction of non-HDL cholesterol levels induced lesion regression by 28% (p < 0.001) in the aortic root and by 25% (p < 0.05) in the brachiocephalic artery at 12 weeks after transfer. Change in lesion size was accompanied by enhanced plaque stability, as evidenced by increased collagen content, reduced lesional macrophage content, a drastic reduction of necrotic core area, and decreased expression of inflammatory genes. Elevated HDL cholesterol following AdA-I transfer increased collagen content in lesions, but did not induce regression. Apo A-I gene transfer on top of AdLDLr transfer resulted in additive effects, particularly on inflammatory gene expression. In conclusion, drastic lipid lowering induced by a powerful gene transfer strategy leads to pronounced regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerosis.

  2. Widespread and efficient marker gene expression in the airway epithelia of fetal sheep after minimally invasive tracheal application of recombinant adenovirus in utero.

    PubMed

    Peebles, D; Gregory, L G; David, A; Themis, M; Waddington, S N; Knapton, H J; Miah, M; Cook, T; Lawrence, L; Nivsarkar, M; Rodeck, C; Coutelle, C

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common lethal genetic disease caused by functional absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Although a candidate disease for in utero gene therapy, demonstration of potentially therapeutic levels of transgene expression in the fetal airways after minimally invasive gene delivery is a mandatory prerequisite before application of this approach in humans can be considered. We report here on the delivery of a beta-galactosidase expressing adenovirus directly to the airways of fetal sheep in utero using ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of the trachea in the fetal chest. Injection of adenoviral particles to the fetal airways was not associated with mortality and resulted in low-level expression in the peripheral airways. However, complexation of the virus with DEAE dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus, and pretreatment of the airways with Na-caprate, which opens tight junctions, increased transgene expression, and a combination of these two enhancers resulted in widespread and efficient gene transfer of the fetal trachea and bronchial tree. Using a percutaneous ultrasound-guided injection technique, we have clearly demonstrated proof of principle for substantial transgene delivery to the fetal airways providing levels of gene expression that could be relevant for a therapeutic application of CFTR expressing vectors.

  3. Gene dispensability.

    PubMed

    Korona, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis studies indicate that up to about 90% of genes in bacteria and 80% in eukaryotes can be inactivated individually leaving an organism viable, often seemingly unaffected. Several strategies are used to learn what these apparently dispensable genes contribute to fitness. Assays of growth under hundreds of physical and chemical stresses are among the most effective experimental approaches. Comparative studies of genomic DNA sequences continue to be valuable in discriminating between the core bacterial genome and the more variable niche-specific genes. The concept of the core genome appears currently unfeasible for eukaryotes but progress has been made in understanding why they contain numerous gene duplicates.

  4. Mice Expressing Minimally Humanized CD81 and Occludin Genes Support Hepatitis C Virus Uptake In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiang; von Schaewen, Markus; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Heller, Brigitte; Sandmann, Lisa; Plaas, Mario; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-02-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic infections in at least 150 million individuals worldwide. HCV has a narrow host range and robustly infects only humans and chimpanzees. The underlying mechanisms for this narrow host range are incompletely understood. At the level of entry, differences in the amino acid sequences between the human and mouse orthologues of two essential host factors, the tetraspanin CD81 and the tight junction protein occludin (OCLN), explain, at least in part, HCV's limited ability to enter mouse hepatocytes. We have previously shown that adenoviral or transgenic overexpression of human CD81 and OCLN facilitates HCV uptake into mouse hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo In efforts to refine these models, we constructed knock-in mice in which the second extracellular loops of CD81 and OCLN were replaced with the respective human sequences, which contain the determinants that are critical for HCV uptake. We demonstrate that the humanized CD81 and OCLN were expressed at physiological levels in a tissue-appropriate fashion. Mice bearing the humanized alleles formed normal tight junctions and did not exhibit any immunologic abnormalities, indicating that interactions with their physiological ligands were intact. HCV entry factor knock-in mice take up HCV with an efficiency similar to that in mice expressing HCV entry factors transgenically or adenovirally, demonstrating the utility of this model for studying HCV infection in vivo IMPORTANCE: At least 150 million individuals are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Chronic hepatitis C can result in progressive liver disease and liver cancer. New antiviral treatments can cure HCV in the majority of patients, but a vaccine remains elusive. To gain a better understanding of the processes culminating in liver failure and cancer and to prioritize vaccine candidates more efficiently, small-animal models are needed. Here, we describe the characterization of a new mouse model in which the parts of

  5. Regulation of the CCL2 gene in pancreatic β-cells by IL-1β and glucocorticoids: role of MKP-1.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Goff, Matthew R; Updegraff, Barrett L; Lu, Danhong; Brown, Patricia L; Minkin, Steven C; Biggerstaff, John P; Zhao, Ling; Karlstad, Michael D; Collier, J Jason

    2012-01-01

    Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from both resident and invading leukocytes within the pancreatic islets impacts the development of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Synthesis and secretion of the chemokine CCL2 from pancreatic β-cells in response to pro-inflammatory signaling pathways influences immune cell recruitment into the pancreatic islets. Therefore, we investigated the positive and negative regulatory components controlling expression of the CCL2 gene using isolated rat islets and INS-1-derived β-cell lines. We discovered that activation of the CCL2 gene by IL-1β required the p65 subunit of NF-κB and was dependent on genomic response elements located in the -3.6 kb region of the proximal gene promoter. CCL2 gene transcription in response to IL-1β was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the IKKβ and p38 MAPK pathways. The IL-1β-mediated increase in CCL2 secretion was also impaired by p38 MAPK inhibition and by glucocorticoids. Moreover, multiple synthetic glucocorticoids inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated induction of the CCL2 gene. Induction of the MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) gene by glucocorticoids or by adenoviral-mediated overexpression decreased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which diminished CCL2 gene expression, promoter activity, and release of CCL2 protein. We conclude that glucocorticoid-mediated repression of IL-1β-induced CCL2 gene transcription and protein secretion occurs in part through the upregulation of the MKP-1 gene and subsequent deactivation of the p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions observed with MKP-1 overexpression were obtained without suppressing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, MKP-1 is a possible target for anti-inflammatory therapeutic intervention with preservation of β-cell function.

  6. Morphological restoration of gonadotrope population by thymulin gene therapy in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Paula; Martines, Eliana; Ferese, Celia; Goya, Rodolfo; Cónsole, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Summary The integrity of the thymus during the first week of life is necessary for a proper maturation of the pituitary-gonadal axis as revealed by the significantly reduced levels of circulating gonadotropins in congenitally athymic (nude) mice. In the present work we studied the impact of athymia and the effect of neonatal thymulin gene therapy on the pituitaries of adult nude mice. Also circulating thymulin and gonadotropin levels were evaluated. We used an adenoviral vector expressing a synthetic gene for the thymic peptide thymulin (metFTS) termed RAd-FTS. On postnatal day 1, each experimental heterozygous (nu/+) and homozygous (nu/nu) pup of both sexes received a single bilateral i.m. injection of RAd-FTS or RAd-GFP/TK, a control vector expressing green fluorescent protein. On postnatal days 51-52, mice were bled and sacrificed, their pituitaries were immediately dissected, fixed and immunostained. Morphometry was performed by means of an image analysis system. The following parameters were calculated: volume density (VD: cell area/reference area), cell density (CD: number of cells/reference area), and cell size (expressed in μm2). Serum thymulin levels were measured by a bioassay and gonadotropin levels were assayed by RIA. It was observed that neonatal thymulin gene therapy in the athymic mice restored their serum thymulin levels and prevented the reduction in circulating gonadotropin levels. The histometrical analysis revealed that the treatment prevented the reduction in gonadotrope CD and the VD in athymic mice. Our data suggest that thymulin gene therapy may be an effective strategy to approach reproductive deficits associated with endocrine thymus dysfunction. PMID:19337971

  7. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors interact with melanoma differentiation associated-7/interleukin-24 to kill primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Hossein A; Yacoub, Adly; Park, Margaret A; Archer, Kellie; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Grant, Steven; Fisher, Paul B; Dent, Paul

    2013-08-01

    We presently demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance toxicity of melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda-7/IL-24) in invasive primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Additionally, a method is described to augment the efficacy of adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 in these cells. HDACIs synergized with melanoma differentiation-associated (MDA)-7/IL-24 killing GBM cells. Enhanced lethality correlated with increased autophagy that was dependent on the expression of ceramide synthase 6. HDACIs interacted with MDA-7/IL-24 prolonging generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+). Quenching of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) blocked HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 killing. In vivo MDA-7/IL-24 prolonged the survival of animals carrying orthotopic tumors, and HDACIs enhanced survival further. A serotype 5/3 adenovirus more effectively delivers mda-7/IL-24 to GBM tumors than a serotype 5 virus. Hence, we constructed a serotype 5/3 adenovirus that conditionally replicates in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24, in which the adenoviral early region 1A (E1A) gene was driven by the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 [Ad.5/3 (INGN 241)-PEG-E1A-mda-7; also called Ad.5/3-CTV (cancer terminator virus)]. Ad.5/3-CTV increased the survival of mice carrying GBM tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a nonreplicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. Ad.5/3-CTV exhibited no toxicity in the brains of Syrian hamsters. Collectively our data demonstrate that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24 lethality, and adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 combined with tumor-specific viral replication is an effective preclinical GBM therapeutic.

  9. Treatment of cholestatic fibrosis by altering gene expression of Cthrc1: Implications for autoimmune and non-autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaolian; Miao, Qi; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Qixia; Peng, Yanshen; Chen, Xiaoyu; Guo, Canjie; Shen, Li; Yang, Fan; Xu, Jie; Qiu, Dekai; Fang, Jingyuan; Friedman, Scott; Tang, Ruqi; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (Cthrc1) is a documented specific inhibitor of TGF-β signaling. Based on this observation, we developed the hypothesis that knocking in/knocking out the Cthrc1 gene in murine models of cholestasis would alter the natural history of cholestatic fibrosis. To study this thesis, we studied two murine models of fibrosis, first, common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and second, feeding of 3, 5-diethoxy-carbonyl-1, 4-dihydrocollidine (DDC). In both models, we administered well-defined adenoviral vectors that expressed either Cthrc1 or, alternatively, a short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-targeting Cthrc1 either before or after establishment of fibrosis. Importantly, when Cthrc1 gene expression was enhanced, we noted a significant improvement of hepatic fibrosis, both microscopically and by analysis of fibrotic gene expression. In contrast, when Cthrc1 gene expression was deleted, there was a significant exacerbation of fibrosis. To identify the mechanism of action of these significant effects produced by knocking in/knocking out Cthrc gene expression, we thence studied the interaction of Cthrc1 gene expression using hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and human LX-2 cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that Cthrc1 is induced by TGF-β1 via phospho-Smad3 binding to the promoter with subsequent transcription activation. In addition, we demonstrate that Cthrc1 inhibits TGF-β signaling by accelerating degradation of phospho-Smad3 through a proteosomal pathway. Importantly, the anti-fibrotic effects can be recapitulated with a truncated fragment of Cthrc1. In conclusion, our findings uncover a critical negative feedback regulatory loop in which TGF-β1 induces Cthrc1, which can attenuate fibrosis by accelerating degradation of phospho-Smad3.

  10. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  11. Thymulin-based gene therapy and pituitary function in animal models of aging.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Paula C; Poch, Brenda; Cónsole, Gloria M; Rimoldi, Omar J; Schwerdt, Jose I; Tüngler, Victoria; Garcia-Bravo, Margarita M; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2011-01-01

    Thymulin is a thymic hormone exclusively produced by the thymic epithelial cells. After its discovery and initial characterization in the 1970s, it was demonstrated that thymulin production and secretion is strongly influenced by the neuroendocrine system. Conversely, a growing core of information, to be reviewed here, points to thymulin as a hypophysiotropic peptide. Additionally, thymulin was shown to possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in the brain. In recent years, a synthetic DNA sequence coding for a biologically active analog of thymulin, metFTS, was constructed and cloned in different adenoviral vectors. These include bidirectional regulatable Tet-Off vector systems that simultaneously express metFTS and green fluorescent protein and that can be downregulated reversibly by the addition of the antibiotic doxycycline. A number of recent studies suggest that thymulin gene therapy may be a suitable therapeutic strategy to prevent some of the endocrine and reproductive alterations that typically appear in congenitally athymic (nude) mice, taken as a suitable model of neuroendocrine and reproductive aging. The present article briefly reviews the literature on the physiology of the thymulin-pituitary axis as well as on the new molecular tools available to exploit the therapeutic potential of thymulin.

  12. Thymulin-Based Gene Therapy and Pituitary Function in Animal Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Paula C.; Poch, Brenda; Cónsole, Gloria M.; Rimoldi, Omar J.; Schwerdt, Jose I.; Tüngler, Victoria; Garcia-Bravo, Margarita M.; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymulin is a thymic hormone exclusively produced by the thymic epithelial cells. After its discovery and initial characterization in the 1970s, it was demonstrated that thymulin production and secretion is strongly influenced by the neuroendocrine system. Conversely, a growing core of information, to be reviewed here, points to thymulin as a hypophysiotropic peptide. Additionally, thymulin was shown to possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in the brain. In recent years, a synthetic DNA sequence coding for a biologically active analog of thymulin, metFTS, was constructed and cloned in different adenoviral vectors. These include bidirectional regulatable Tet-Off vector systems that simultaneously express metFTS and green fluorescent protein and that can be downregulated reversibly by the addition of the antibiotic doxycycline. A number of recent studies suggest that thymulin gene therapy may be a suitable therapeutic strategy to prevent some of the endocrine and reproductive alterations that typically appear in congenitally athymic (nude) mice, taken as a suitable model of neuroendocrine and reproductive aging. The present article briefly reviews the literature on the physiology of the thymulin-pituitary axis as well as on the new molecular tools available to exploit the therapeutic potential of thymulin. PMID:21952687

  13. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Drugan, A; Miller, O J; Evans, M I

    1987-01-01

    Severe genetic disorders are potentially correctable by the addition of a normal gene into tissues. Although the technical problems involving integration, stable expression, and insertional damage to the treated cell are not yet fully solved, enough scientific progress has already been made to consider somatic cell gene therapy acceptable from both the ethical and scientific viewpoints. The resolutions to problems evolving from somatic cell gene therapy will help to overcome the technical difficulties encountered presently with germ line gene manipulation. This procedure would then become morally permissible as it will cause, in time, a reduction in the pool of abnormal genes in the population. Enhancement genetic engineering is technically feasible but morally unacceptable. Eugenic genetic engineering is not technically possible or ethically permissible in the foreseeable future.

  14. An oncolytic adenovirus that expresses the HAb18 and interleukin 24 genes exhibits enhanced antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sujing; Fang, Xianlong; Xu, Yanni; Ni, Aimin; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Chu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by alterations in multiple genes. High expression of CD147 on the surface of HCC cells promotes proliferation. The monoclonal antibody HAb18 recognizes CD147. We constructed an oncolytic adenoviral vector to express HAb18 (ZD55-HAb18) in HCC cells. Interleukin 24 (IL24) was co-expressed through the use of an F2A linker. ZD55-HAb18-IL24 decreased HCC cell viability to a greater degree than either ZD55-HAb18 or ZD55-IL24 alone. ZD55-HAb18-IL24 also induced apoptosis and autophagy in PLC/PRF/5 HCC cells. Intratumoral injection of ZD55-HAb18-IL24 repressed tumor growth in a PLC/PRF/5 xenograft model. Our results suggest that antibody-antitumor gene conjugation elicited a stronger antitumor effect than the antibody alone, and that this strategy could broaden the applications of antibody-based therapies in HCC. PMID:27528029

  15. Liver X receptor α mediates hepatic triglyceride accumulation through upregulation of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Bradlee L.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saarinen, Alicia M.; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Kershaw, Erin E.; Zechner, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are transcription factors essential for cholesterol homeostasis and lipogenesis. LXRα has been implicated in regulating hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation upon both influx of adipose-derived fatty acids (FAs) during fasting and stimulation of de novo FA synthesis by chemical agonism of LXR. However, whether or not a convergent mechanism is employed to drive deposition of FAs from these 2 different sources in TGs is undetermined. Here, we report that the G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2), a selective inhibitor of intracellular TG hydrolysis/lipolysis, is a direct target gene of LXRα. Transcriptional activation is conferred by LXRα binding to a direct repeat 4 (DR4) motif in the G0S2 promoter. While LXRα–/– mice exhibited decreased hepatic G0S2 expression, adenoviral expression of G0S2 was sufficient to restore fasting-induced TG storage and glycogen depletion in the liver of these mice. In response to LXR agonist T0901317, G0S2 ablation prevented hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia without affecting the beneficial effects on HDL. Thus, the LXRα-G0S2 axis plays a distinct role in regulating hepatic TG during both fasting and pharmacological activation of LXR. PMID:28239648

  16. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  17. [Gene and gene sequence patenting].

    PubMed

    Bergel, S D

    1998-01-01

    According to the author, the patenting of elements isolated or copied from the human body boils down to the issue of genes and gene sequences. He describes the current situation from the comparative law standpoint (U.S. and Spanish law mainly) and then esamines the biotechnology industry's position.

  18. The effect of deafness duration on neurotrophin gene therapy for spiral ganglion neuron protection.

    PubMed

    Wise, Andrew K; Tu, Tian; Atkinson, Patrick J; Flynn, Brianna O; Sgro, Beatrice E; Hume, Cliff; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2011-08-01

    A cochlear implant can restore hearing function by electrically exciting spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the deaf cochlea. However, following deafness SGNs undergo progressive degeneration ultimately leading to their death. One significant cause of SGN degeneration is the loss of neurotrophic support that is normally provided by cells within the organ of Corti (OC). The administration of exogenous neurotrophins (NTs) can protect SGNs from degeneration but the effects are short-lived once the source of NTs has been exhausted. NT gene therapy, whereby cells within the cochlea are transfected with genes enabling them to produce NTs, is one strategy for providing a cellular source of NTs that may provide long-term support for SGNs. As the SGNs normally innervate sensory cells within the OC, targeting residual OC cells for gene therapy in the deaf cochlea may provide a source of NTs for SGN protection and targeted regrowth of their peripheral fibers. However, the continual degeneration of the OC over extended periods of deafness may deplete the cellular targets for NT gene therapy and hence limit the effectiveness of this method in preventing SGN loss. This study examined the effects of deafness duration on the efficacy of NT gene therapy in preventing SGN loss in guinea pigs that were systemically deafened with aminoglycosides. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) with or without genes for Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) were injected into the scala media (SM) compartment of cochleae that had been deafened for one, four or eight weeks prior to the viral injection. The results showed that viral transfection of cells within the SM was still possible even after severe degeneration of the OC. Supporting cells (pillar and Deiters' cells), cells within the stria vascularis, the spiral ligament, endosteal cells lining the scala compartments and interdental cells in the spiral limbus were transfected. However, the

  19. Genes V.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This fifth edition book encompasses a wide range of topics covering 1,272 pages. The book is arranged into nine parts with a total of 36 chapters. These nine parts include Introduction; DNA as a Store of Information; Translation; Constructing Cells; Control of Prokaryotypic Gene Expression; Perpetuation of DNA; Organization of the Eukaryotypic Genome; Eukaryotypic Transcription and RNA Processing; The Dynamic Genome; and Genes in Development.

  20. Treatment of leptomeningeal metastases in a rat model using a recombinant adenovirus containing the HSV-tk gene.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J; Esandi, M D; van Someren, G; Noteboom, J L; Avezaat, C J; Vecht, C; Smitt, P A; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Hoogerbrugge, P M; Bout, A

    1996-10-01

    The authors constructed recombinant adenoviral vectors to investigate their potential for gene therapy treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. Several human cell lines that were derived from tumors occurring as leptomeningeal metastases and that were infected in vitro with major late promoter recombinant adenovirus containing the luciferase (luc) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.luc) showed high levels of expression. When these human tumor cell lines were infected in vitro with recombinant adenovirus harboring the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.TK), they were highly sensitive to the killing effects of ganciclovir (GCV). Transduction efficiency of leptomeningeal tumor cells in vivo was assessed by injecting 9-L rat brain tumor cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of Fischer rats via the cisterna magna. After 3 days, recombinant adenovirus containing the lacZ reporter gene (IG.Ad.MLP.lacZ) was injected via the same route. Six days after tumor cell injection, expression of the reporter gene was observed in tumor cells along the total neural axis. Subsequently, rats with leptomeningeal metastases were treated 3 days after tumor cell injection with HSV-tk. Beginning on the next day, GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. The rats that developed neurological symptoms were killed immediately. The symptom-free latency of every rat was determined. The rats treated with HSV-tk and subsequent GCV had significantly longer (p < 0.01) symptom-free latency than all control groups. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of this therapeutic approach in a rat model. Clinically, it should be used in the palliative treatment of patients with leptomeningeal metastases.

  1. Dual cancer-specific targeting strategy cures primary and distant breast carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Vozhilla, Nicolaq; Park, Eun Sook; Gupta, Pankaj; Fisher, Paul B

    2005-09-27

    Limitations of current viral-based gene therapies for malignant tumors include lack of cancer-specific targeting and insufficient tumor delivery. To ameliorate these problems and develop a truly effective adenovirus gene-based therapy for cancer, we constructed a conditionally replication competent adenovirus (CRCA) manifesting the unique properties of tumor-specific virus replication in combination with production of a cancer-selective cytotoxic cytokine, melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24), which embodies potent bystander antitumor activity. Cancer cell selective tropism was ensured by engineering the expression of the adenoviral E1A protein, necessary for viral replication, under the control of a minimal promoter region of progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), which functions selectively in diverse cancer cells with minimal activity in normal cells. In the E3 region of this CRCA, we introduced the mda-7/IL-24 gene, thereby mediating robust production of this cytokine as a function of adenovirus replication. Infection of this CRCA (designated Ad.PEG-E1A-mda-7) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells confirmed cancer cell selective adenoviral replication, mda-7/IL-24 expression, growth inhibition, and apoptosis induction. Injecting Ad.PEG-E1A-mda-7 into human breast cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice completely eradicated not only the primary tumor but also distant tumors (established on the opposite flank of the animal) thereby implementing a cure. This dual cancer-specific targeting strategy provides an effective approach for treating breast and other human neoplasms with the potential for eradicating both primary tumors and metastatic disease. Additionally, these studies support the potential use of mda-7/IL-24 in the therapy of malignant cancers.

  2. Generation of Insulin-Producing Cells from the Mouse Liver Using β Cell-Related Gene Transfer Including Mafa and Mafb

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Hisashi; Tai, Pei-Han; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Koshida, Ryusuke; Jung, Yunshin; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on the large Maf transcription factors have shown that Mafb and Mafa have respective and distinctive roles in β-cell development and maturation. However, whether this difference in roles is due to the timing of the gene expression (roughly, expression of Mafb before birth and of Mafa after birth) or to the specific function of each gene is unclear. Our aim was to examine the functional differences between these genes that are closely related to β cells by using an in vivo model of β-like cell generation. We monitored insulin gene transcription by measuring bioluminescence emitted from the liver of insulin promoter-luciferase transgenic (MIP-Luc-VU) mice. Adenoviral gene transfers of Pdx1/Neurod/Mafa (PDA) and Pdx1/Neurod/Mafb (PDB) combinations generated intense luminescence from the liver that lasted for more than 1 week and peaked at 3 days after transduction. The peak signal intensities of PDA and PDB were comparable. However, PDA but not PDB transfer resulted in significant bioluminescence on day 10, suggesting that Mafa has a more sustainable role in insulin gene activation than does Mafb. Both PDA and PDB transfers ameliorated the glucose levels in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic model for up to 21 days and 7 days, respectively. Furthermore, PDA transfer induced several gene expressions necessary for glucose sensing and insulin secretion in the liver on day 9. However, a glucose tolerance test and liver perfusion experiment did not show glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from intrahepatic β-like cells. These results demonstrate that bioluminescence imaging in MIP-Luc-VU mice provides a noninvasive means of detecting β-like cells in the liver. They also show that Mafa has a markedly intense and sustained role in β-like cell production in comparison with Mafb. PMID:25397325

  3. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  4. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  5. Role of the WWOX gene, encompassing fragile region FRA16D, in suppression of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunji; Semba, Shuho; Maeda, Naoko; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    The WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D (16q23.2) and is believed to be a tumor suppressor in various human malignancies. We have previously shown frequent down-modulation of Wwox expression in pancreatic carcinoma (PC); however, biological function of Wwox in pancreatic duct carcinogenesis remains unknown. In PANC-1 (Wwox-negative) PC-derived cells, restoration of recombinant WWOX gene expression with adenoviral gene delivery (Ad-WWOX) effectively increased the number of cells with subG(1) DNA contents in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manners: Ad-WWOX infection up-regulated caspase-3 activity and reduced procaspase-3 and procaspase-8 levels. We also confirmed that restoration of WWOX gene suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. In addition, transduction of wild-type WWOX-expressing vector inhibited PANC-1 colony formation; however, substitution of Y33 of Wwox with arginine did not lead to inhibition of colony formation, suggesting the biological significance of the WW1 domain of Wwox for its tumor-suppressing activity. In PC tissue samples, abundant cytoplasmic Wwox expression was detected in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, whereas Wwox expression was frequently reduced not only in a large fraction of PC but also in precancerous lesions in accord with the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) grade, which was closely correlated with patients' poorer outcome. Interestingly, the existence of Wwox expression was associated with elevated mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that down-modulation of Wwox expression is an early event and may be associated with the down-regulation of Smad4 protein levels during pancreatic duct carcinogenesis.

  6. Cartilage degradation and invasion by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts is inhibited by gene transfer of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, W H; Quax, P H A; Seemayer, C A; Huisman, L G M; Pieterman, E J; Grimbergen, J M; Verheijen, J H; Breedveld, F C; Gay, R E; Gay, S; Huizinga, T W J; Pap, T

    2003-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are believed to be pivotal enzymes in the invasion of articular cartilage by synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we investigated the effects of gene transfer of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) on the invasiveness of RA synovial fibroblasts (RASF) in vitro and in vivo. Adenoviral vectors (Ad) were used for gene transfer. The effects of AdTIMP-1 and AdTIMP-3 gene transfer on matrix invasion were investigated in vitro in a transwell system. Cartilage invasion in vivo was studied in the SCID mouse co-implantation model for 60 days. In addition, the effects of AdTIMP-1 and AdTIMP-3 on cell proliferation were investigated. A significant reduction in invasiveness was demonstrated in vitro as well as in vivo in both the AdTIMP-1- and AdTIMP-3-transduced RASF compared with untransduced SF or SF that were transduced with control vectors. in vitro, the number of invading cells was reduced to 25% (P<0.001) in the AdTIMP-1-transduced cells and to 13% (P<0.0001) in the AdTIMP-3-transduced cells (% of untransduced cells). Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by AdTIMP-3 and, less, by AdTIMP-1. In conclusion, overexpression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 by Ad gene transfer results in a marked reduction of the invasiveness of RASF in vitro and in the SCID mouse model. Apart from the inhibition of MMPs, a reduction in proliferation rate may contribute to this effect. These results suggest that overexpression of TIMPs, particularly TIMP-3 at the invasive front of pannus tissue, may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for inhibiting joint destruction in RA.

  7. Using a Commercial Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Viral-Mediated Gene Transfer In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Candace M.; Forsberg, Flemming; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A.; Minimo, Corrado; Claudio, Pier P.

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of site-specific gene delivery mediated by diagnostic ultrasound using genes encapsulated in commercially available ultrasound contrast agents in vitro and in vivo. Five different commercially available contrast agents were tested in vitro for their ability to enclose an adenoviral vector carrying GFP. Prostate cancer cells (DU 145) or non small cell lung cancer cells (H23) were plated in 80 culture wells and insonified at 207 or 535 kPa peak negative pressure for 1 min after administration of 0.1 ml of bubbles reconstituted with the viral vector. Experiments were repeated with the delivery vehicle incubated with complement to inactivate unenclosed Adeno-GFP and with controls. After 24 hours transduction efficiency was demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy. In vivo 15 nude mice with 21 melanoma tumors (DB-1) implanted received 0.1 ml injections of contrast. Mice were split into 3 control and 4 active groups and ultrasound was performed for 4 min at 4 MHz using an Aplio scanner (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Tumors, heart, lungs and liver were harvested 48 hours later. Specimens underwent regular and fluorescent microscopy and were stained using an antibody against GFP. In vitro all contrast agents produced more fluorescence at 207 kPa than at 535 kPa. However, only Imagent (IMCOR Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) was able to induce marked gene transduction with the inactivating agent. In vivo systemic delivery of Adeno-GFP carrying microbubbles following pre-treatment with the inactivating agent resulted in specific transduction of the tumor cells only with no uptake in heart, lungs or liver (unlike the controls). In conclusion, specific viral gene transduction has been obtained in vitro and in vivo through the use of ultrasound and Imagent microbubbles as delivery vehicles.

  8. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  9. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  10. Efficient, Long-term Hepatic Gene Transfer Using Clinically Relevant HDAd Doses by Balloon Occlusion Catheter Delivery in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Stapleton, Gary E; Law, Mark; Breinholt, John; Palmer, Donna J; Zuo, Yu; Grove, Nathan C; Finegold, Milton J; Rice, Karen; Beaudet, Arthur L; Mullins, Charles E; Ng, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) are devoid of all viral coding sequences and are thus an improvement over early generation Ad because they can provide long-term transgene expression in vivo without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic intravenous injection, and this unfortunately results in dose-dependent acute toxicity. To overcome this important obstacle, we have developed a minimally invasive method to preferentially deliver HDAd into the liver of nonhuman primates. Briefly, a balloon occlusion catheter was percutaneously positioned in the inferior vena cava to occlude hepatic venous outflow. HDAd was injected directly into the occluded liver via a percutaneously placed hepatic artery catheter. Compared to systemic vector injection, this approach resulted in substantially higher hepatic transduction efficiency using clinically relevant low vector doses and was accompanied by mild-to-moderate acute but transient toxicities. Transgene expression was sustained for up to 964 days. These results suggest that our minimally invasive method of delivery can significantly improve the vector's therapeutic index and may be a first step toward clinical application of HDAd for liver-directed gene therapy. PMID:19050700

  11. Hair cell regeneration after ATOH1 gene therapy in the cochlea of profoundly deaf adult guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Wise, Andrew K; Flynn, Brianna O; Nayagam, Bryony A; Richardson, Rachael T

    2014-01-01

    The degeneration of hair cells in the mammalian cochlea results in permanent sensorineural hearing loss. This study aimed to promote the regeneration of sensory hair cells in the mature cochlea and their reconnection with auditory neurons through the introduction of ATOH1, a transcription factor known to be necessary for hair cell development, and the introduction of neurotrophic factors. Adenoviral vectors containing ATOH1 alone, or with neurotrophin-3 and brain derived neurotrophic factor were injected into the lower basal scala media of guinea pig cochleae four days post ototoxic deafening. Guinea pigs treated with ATOH1 gene therapy, alone, had a significantly greater number of cells expressing hair cell markers compared to the contralateral non-treated cochlea when examined 3 weeks post-treatment. This increase, however, did not result in a commensurate improvement in hearing thresholds, nor was there an increase in synaptic ribbons, as measured by CtBP2 puncta after ATOH1 treatment alone, or when combined with neurotrophins. However, hair cell formation and synaptogenesis after co-treatment with ATOH1 and neurotrophic factors remain inconclusive as viral transduction was reduced due to the halving of viral titres when the samples were combined. Collectively, these data suggest that, whilst ATOH1 alone can drive non-sensory cells towards an immature sensory hair cell phenotype in the mature cochlea, this does not result in functional improvements after aminoglycoside-induced deafness.

  12. Improved potency and selectivity of an oncolytic E1ACR2 and E1B19K deleted adenoviral mutant (AdΔΔ) in prostate and pancreatic cancers

    PubMed Central

    Öberg, Daniel; Yanover, Eva; Adam, Virginie; Sweeney, Katrina; Costas, Celina; Lemoine, Nick R; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses are a promising class of tumor-targeting agents with proven safety in hundreds of patients. However, clinical responses have been limited and viral mutants with higher potency are needed. Here we report on the generation of a novel set of mutants with improved efficacy in prostate and pancreatic carcinoma models. Currently no curative treatments are available for late stage metastatic prostate or rapidly progressing pancreatic cancers. Experimental design Ad5 mutants were created with deletions in the E1ACR2-region for tumor selectivity and/or the E1B19K-gene for attenuated replication in vivo; all constructs retain the E3-genes intact. Cell killing efficacy, replication and cytotoxicity in combination with chemotherapeutics were investigated in normal cells (PrEC, NHBE), seven carcinoma cell lines, and human (PC3, DU145) and murine (TRAMPC, CMT-64, CMT-93) tumor models in vivo. Results The double-deleted AdΔΔ (ΔE1ACR2 and ΔE1B19K) mutant had high cell killing activity in prostate, pancreatic and lung carcinomas. Replication was similar to wild-type in all tumor cells and was attenuated in normal cells to levels less than the single-deleted AdΔCR2 mutant. AdΔΔ combined with the chemotherapeutics docetaxel and mitoxantrone resulted in synergistically enhanced cell killing and greatly improved anti-tumor efficacy in prostate xenografts in vivo. In murine immunocompetent in vivo models efficacy was greater for mutants with the E3B-genes intact even in the absence of viral replication indicating attenuated macrophage-dependent clearance. Conclusions These data suggest that the novel oncolytic mutant AdΔΔ is a promising candidate for targeting of solid tumors specifically in combination with chemotherapeutics. PMID:20068104

  13. PDGF-B gene therapy accelerates bone engineering and oral implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Chang, P-C; Seol, Y-J; Cirelli, J A; Pellegrini, G; Jin, Q; Franco, L M; Goldstein, S A; Chandler, L A; Sosnowski, B; Giannobile, W V

    2010-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) stimulates repair of healing-impaired chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers and periodontal lesions. However, limitations in predictability of tissue regeneration occur due, in part, to transient growth factor bioavailability in vivo. Here, we report that gene delivery of PDGF-B stimulates repair of oral implant extraction socket defects. Alveolar ridge defects were created in rats and were treated at the time of titanium implant installation with a collagen matrix containing an adenoviral (Ad) vector encoding PDGF-B (5.5 x 10(8) or 5.5 x 10(9) pfu ml(-1)), Ad encoding luciferase (Ad-Luc; 5.5 x 10(9) pfu ml(-1); control) or recombinant human PDGF-BB protein (rhPDGF-BB, 0.3 mg ml(-1)). Bone repair and osseointegration were measured through backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography and biomechanical assessments. Furthermore, a panel of local and systemic safety assessments was performed. Results indicated that bone repair was accelerated by Ad-PDGF-B and rhPDGF-BB delivery compared with Ad-Luc, with the high dose of Ad-PDGF-B more effective than the low dose. No significant dissemination of the vector construct or alteration of systemic parameters was noted. In summary, gene delivery of Ad-PDGF-B shows regenerative and safety capabilities for bone tissue engineering and osseointegration in alveolar bone defects comparable with rhPDGF-BB protein delivery in vivo.

  14. Gene therapy of multiple sclerosis using interferon β-secreting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Chung Heon; Park, Kwang Ywel; Hou, Yun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Muk; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-beta (IFN- β ), a well-established standard treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS), has proved to exhibit clinical efficacy. In this study, we first evaluated the therapeutic effects for MS using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) as delivery vehicles with lesion-targeting capability and IFN- β as therapeutic gene. We also engineered hBM-MSCs to secret IFN- β (MSCs-IFN β ) via adenoviral transduction and confirmed the secretory capacity of MSCs-IFN β by an ELISA assay. MSCs-IFN β -treated mice showed inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) onset, and the maximum and average score for all animals in each group was significantly lower in the MSCs-IFN β -treated EAE mice when compared with the MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the lumbar spinal cord also significantly decreased in the MSCs-IFN β -treated EAE mice compared to PBS- or MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Moreover, MSCs-IFN β treatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and conversely increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Importantly, injected MSCs-IFN β migrated into inflamed CNS and significantly reduced further injury of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in EAE mice. Thus, our results provide the rationale for designing novel experimental protocols to enhance the therapeutic effects for MS using hBM-MSCs as an effective gene vehicle to deliver the therapeutic cytokines.

  15. Gene Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Using Interferon β-Secreting Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Chung Heon; Park, Kwang Ywel; Hou, Yun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Muk; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-beta (IFN-β), a well-established standard treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS), has proved to exhibit clinical efficacy. In this study, we first evaluated the therapeutic effects for MS using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) as delivery vehicles with lesion-targeting capability and IFN-β as therapeutic gene. We also engineered hBM-MSCs to secret IFN-β (MSCs-IFNβ) via adenoviral transduction and confirmed the secretory capacity of MSCs-IFNβ by an ELISA assay. MSCs-IFNβ-treated mice showed inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) onset, and the maximum and average score for all animals in each group was significantly lower in the MSCs-IFNβ-treated EAE mice when compared with the MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the lumbar spinal cord also significantly decreased in the MSCs-IFNβ-treated EAE mice compared to PBS- or MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Moreover, MSCs-IFNβ treatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and conversely increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Importantly, injected MSCs-IFNβ migrated into inflamed CNS and significantly reduced further injury of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in EAE mice. Thus, our results provide the rationale for designing novel experimental protocols to enhance the therapeutic effects for MS using hBM-MSCs as an effective gene vehicle to deliver the therapeutic cytokines. PMID:23710456

  16. Partial prevention of hepatic lipid alterations in nude mice by neonatal thymulin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    García de Bravo, Margarita M; Polo, Mónica P; Reggiani, Paula C; Rimoldi, Omar J; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2006-08-01

    During adult life athymic (nude) male mice display not only a severe T-cell-related immunodeficiency but also endocrine imbalances and a moderate hyperglycemia. We studied the impact of congenital athymia on hepatic lipid composition and also assessed the ability of neonatal thymulin gene therapy to prevent the effects of athymia. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, RAd-metFTS, expressing a synthetic DNA sequence encoding met-FTS, an analog of the thymic peptide facteur thymique sérique (FTS), whose Zn-bound biologically active form is known as thymulin. On postnatal day 1-2 homozygous (nu/nu) nude and heterozygous (nu/+) mice were injected with 10(8) pfu of RAd-metFTS or RAd-betagal (control vector) intramuscularly. The animals were processed at 52 d of age. Serum thymulin, glycemia, hepatic phospholipid FA composition and free and esterified cholesterol were determined. Adult homozygous male nudes were significantly (P < 0.01) hyperglycemic when compared with their heterozygous counterparts (2.04 vs. 1.40 g/L, respectively). The relative percentage of 16:0, 18:1 n-9, and 18:1n-7 FA was lower, whereas that of 18:0, 20:4n-6, and 22:6n-3 FA was higher, in hepatic phospholipid (PL) of nu/nu animals as compared with their nu/+ counterparts. Some of these alterations, such as that in the relative content of 22:6n-3 in liver PL and the unsaturation index, were completely or partially prevented by neonatal thymulin gene therapy. We conclude that the thymus influences lipid metabolism and that thymulin is involved in this modulatory activity.

  17. Adenoviral transduction of enterocytes and M-cells using in vitro models based on Caco-2 cells: the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates both apical and basolateral transduction.

    PubMed

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Fleisher, David; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-06-07

    Understanding virus-cell interaction is a key to the design of successful gene delivery vectors. In the present study we investigated Ad5 transduction of enterocytes and M-cells utilizing differentiated Caco-2 cells and cocultures of Caco-2 cells with lymphocytes. Transduction inhibition studies showed that CAR is the major receptor mediating apical and basolateral virus entry in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Integrins and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans do not appear to play a significant role. Immunofluorescence localized CAR to sites of cell-cell contact, with staining mostly observed on the cell perimeter. Staining was observed even in nonpermeabilized monolayers, suggesting apical accessibility of the receptor. Cocultures with mouse Peyer's patch lymphocytes or Raji B human lymphocytes were more susceptible to transduction than Caco-2 cells, and the effects were dose-dependent. Similar to Caco-2 cells, CAR and not integrins mediated apical transduction. In conclusion, contrary to other epithelial cell lines, both apical and basolateral transduction of absorptive enterocytes and M-cells is mediated by binding to CAR. The coculture system can be used to study the interactions between M-cells and gene delivery vectors.

  18. Endothelial Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization re- Cancer: principles and practice of oncology. Philadelphia: Lippincott- vealed an RNA sequence (GenBank accession...Lau YC, Campbell AP, et al. Suppression subtractive hybridization : A method for generating differentially regulated or tissue-tissues, EG-1 appears to...this gene, we investigated its interaction with Src and members of the called suppression subtractive hybridization (12). In human mitogen-activated

  19. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro) than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system. PMID:22321574

  20. Clinically applicable procedure for gene delivery to fetal gut by ultrasound-guided gastric injection: toward prenatal prevention of early-onset intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    David, A L; Peebles, D M; Gregory, L; Waddington, S N; Themis, M; Weisz, B; Ruthe, A; Lawrence, L; Cook, T; Rodeck, C H; Coutelle, C

    2006-07-01

    Targeting gene therapy vectors to the fetal intestinal tract could provide a novel means toward prevention of the early postnatal intestinal pathology of cystic fibrosis and other conditions, such as congenital enteropathy, that cause intestinal failure. Among these conditions, cystic fibrosis is by far the most common lethal genetic disease. It is caused by a functional absence or deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and manifests in the gut as meconium ileus. Prenatal treatment of genetic disease may avoid early-onset tissue damage and immune sensitization, and may target cells that are less accessible in the adult. We investigated gene transfer to the fetal gut, using a minimally invasive injection technique. First-generation replication-deficient adenoviral vectors encoding the beta-galactosidase gene and transduction-enhancing agents were injected into the stomach of early-gestation fetal sheep (n = 8, 60 days of gestation; term, 145 days) under ultrasound guidance. Reporter gene expression was observed 2 days after injection in the villi of the gastrointestinal epithelia after 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside staining and beta-galactosidase immunohistochemistry of fetal tissues. Expression of beta-galactosidase, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was enhanced after pretreatment of the fetal gut with sodium caprate, which opens tight junctions, and after adenovirus complexation with DEAE-dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus. Instillation of the fluorocarbon perflubron after virus delivery resulted in tissue transduction from the fetal stomach to the colon. Using a clinically relevant technique, we have demonstrated widespread gene transfer to the fetal gastrointestinal epithelia.

  1. Replication-deficient adenovirus vector transfer of gfp reporter gene into supraoptic nucleus and subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The present studies used defined cells of the subfornical organ (SFO) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) as model systems to demonstrate the efficacy of replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) for gene transfer. The studies investigated the effects of both direct transfection of the SON and indirect transfection (i.e., via retrograde transport) of SFO neurons. The SON of rats were injected with Ad (2 x 10(6) pfu) and sacrificed 1-7 days later for cell culture of the SON and of the SFO. In the SON, GFP fluorescence was visualized in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells while only neurons in the SFO expressed GFP. Successful in vitro transfection of cultured cells from the SON and SFO was also achieved with Ad (2 x 10(6) to 2 x 10(8) pfu). The expression of GFP in in vitro transfected cells was higher in nonneuronal (approximately 28% in SON and SFO) than neuronal (approximately 4% in SON and 10% in SFO) cells. The expression of GFP was time and viral concentration related. No apparent alterations in cellular morphology of transfected cells were detected and electrophysiological characterization of transfected cells was similar between GFP-expressing and nonexpressing neurons. We conclude that (1) GFP is an effective marker for gene transfer in living SON and SFO cells, (2) Ad infects both neuronal and nonneuronal cells, (3) Ad is taken up by axonal projections from the SON and retrogradely transported to the SFO where it is expressed at detectable levels, and (4) Ad does not adversely affect neuronal viability. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using adenoviral vectors to deliver genes to the SFO-SON axis. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Homologous Boosting with Adenoviral Serotype 5 HIV Vaccine (rAd5) Vector Can Boost Antibody Responses despite Preexisting Vector-Specific Immunity in a Randomized Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E.; Plummer, Sarah A.; Koup, Richard A.; Nason, Martha C.; Bailer, Robert T.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Needle-free delivery improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines but is also associated with more local reactogenicity. Here we report the first comparison of Biojector and needle administration of a candidate rAd5 HIV vaccine. Methods Thirty-one adults, 18–55 years, 20 naive and 11 prior rAd5 vaccine recipients were randomized to receive single rAd5 vaccine via needle or Biojector IM injection at 1010 PU in a Phase I open label clinical trial. Solicited reactogenicity was collected for 5 days; clinical safety and immunogenicity follow-up was continued for 24 weeks. Results Overall, injections by either method were well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events. Frequency of any local reactogenicity was 16/16 (100%) for Biojector compared to 11/15 (73%) for needle injections. There was no difference in HIV Env-specific antibody response between Biojector and needle delivery. Env-specific antibody responses were more than 10-fold higher in subjects receiving a booster dose of rAd5 vaccine than after a single dose delivered by either method regardless of interval between prime and boost. Conclusions Biojector delivery did not improve antibody responses to the rAd5 vaccine compared to needle administration. Homologous boosting with rAd5 gene-based vectors can boost insert-specific antibody responses despite pre-existing vector-specific immunity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00709605 NCT00709605 PMID:25264782

  3. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  4. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, Motoya; Monte, Federica del; Kawase, Yoshiaki; MacNeill, Briain D.; McGregor, Jennifer; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Hoshino, Kozo; Tsuji, Tsuyoshi; De Grand, Alec M.; Gwathmey, Judith K.; Frangioni, John V.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2005-01-01

    Hayase, Motoya, Federica del Monte, Yoshiaki Kawase, Brian D. MacNeill, Jennifer McGregor, Ryuichi Yoneyama, Kozo Hoshino, Tsuyoshi Tsuji, Alec M. De Grand, Judith K. Gwathmey, John V. Frangioni, and Roger J. Hajjar. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288: H2995–H3000, 2005; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00703.2004.—The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous antegrade myocardial gene transfer (PAMGT). A consistent and safe technique for in vivo gene transfer is required for clinical application of myocardial gene therapy. PAMGT with concomitant coronary venous blockade was performed in 12 swine. The myocardium was preconditioned with 1 min of occlusion of the left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries. The anterior interventricular vein was occluded during left anterior descending artery delivery, and the great cardiac vein at the entrance of the middle cardiac vein was occluded during left circumflex artery delivery. With arterial and venous balloons inflated (3 min) and after adenosine (25 μg) injection, PAMGT was performed by antegrade injection of an adenoviral solution (1 ml of 1011 plaque-forming units in each coronary artery) carrying β-galactosidase or saline through the center lumen of the angioplasty balloon. In one set of animals, PAMGT was performed with selective coronary vein blockade (n = 9); in another set of animals, PAMGT was performed without coronary vein blockade (n = 5). At 1 wk after gene delivery, the animals were killed. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis was performed in the left and right ventricular walls. PAMGT was successfully performed in all animals with and without concomitant occlusion of the coronary veins. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis showed that PAMGT with coronary blockade was superior to PAMGT without coronary blockade. β-Galactosidase activity increased significantly in the

  5. β Adrenergic Receptor Kinase C-Terminal Peptide Gene-Therapy Improves β2-Adrenergic Receptor-Dependent Neoangiogenesis after Hindlimb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, Alessandro; Liccardo, Daniela; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Gambino, Giuseppina; D'Amico, Maria Loreta; Rengo, Franco; Koch, Walter J; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    After hindlimb ischemia (HI), increased catecholamine levels within the ischemic muscle can cause dysregulation of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) signaling, leading to reduced revascularization. Indeed, in vivo β2AR overexpression via gene therapy enhances angiogenesis in a rat model of HI. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a key regulator of βAR signaling, and β adrenergic receptor kinase C-terminal peptide (βARKct), a peptide inhibitor of GRK2, has been shown to prevent βAR down-regulation and to protect cardiac myocytes and stem cells from ischemic injury through restoration of β2AR protective signaling (i.e., protein kinase B/endothelial nitric oxide synthase). Herein, we tested the potential therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated βARKct gene transfer in an experimental model of HI and its effects on βAR signaling and on endothelial cell (EC) function i