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Sample records for adenoviral gene delivery

  1. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  2. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  3. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  4. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  5. Efficient adenoviral-mediated gene delivery into porcine mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, P; Fouletier-Dilling, C; Olmsted-Davis, E A; Davis, A R; Stice, S L

    2006-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mediated gene therapy research has been conducted predominantly on rodents. Appropriate large animal models may provide additional safety and efficacy information prior to human clinical trials. The objectives of this study were: (a) to optimize adenoviral transduction efficiency of porcine bone marrow MSCs using a commercial polyamine-based transfection reagent (GeneJammer, Stratagene, La Jolla, CA), and (b) to determine whether transduced MSCs retain the ability to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. Porcine MSCs (pMSCs) were infected under varying conditions, with replication-defective adenoviral vectors carrying the GFP gene and GFP expression analyzed. Transduced cells were induced to differentiate in vitro into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages. We observed a 5.5-fold increase in the percentage of GFP-expressing pMSCs when adenovirus type 5 carrying the adenovirus type 35 fiber (Ad5F35eGFP) was used in conjunction with GeneJammer. Transduction of pMSCs at 10.3-13.8 MOI (1,500-2,000 vp/cell) in the presence of Gene Jammer yielded the highest percentage of GFP-expressing cells ( approximately 90%) without affecting cell viability. A similar positive effect was detected when pMSCs were infected with an Ad5eGFP vector. Presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) during adenoviral transduction enhanced vector-encoded transgene expression in both GeneJammer-treated and control groups. pMSCs transduced with adenovirus vector in the presence of GeneJammer underwent lipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation. Addition of GeneJammer during adenoviral infection of pMSCs can revert the poor transduction efficiency of pMSCs while retaining their pluripotent differentiation capacity. GeneJammer-enhanced transduction will facilitate the use of adenoviral vectors in MSC-mediated gene therapy models and therapies.

  6. Human coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression in transgenic mouse prostate tumors enhances adenoviral delivery of genes.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yunhua; Peng, Weidan; Verbitsky, Amy; Chen, Jiping; Wu, Lily; Rauen, Katherine A; Sawicki, Janet A

    2005-09-01

    Transgenic mice that recapitulate the progression of human diseases are potentially useful models for testing the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Their use in pre-clinical testing of adenovirally-delivered gene therapies, however, is limited because of restricted cell surface expression of Coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) in mice. To develop a more suitable transgenic mouse model for testing adenoviral-based gene therapies for prostate cancer, we generated prostate specific antigen/human CAR (PSA/hCAR) transgenic mice in which a chimeric enhancer/promoter sequence of the human PSA gene drives expression of a functional hCAR coding sequence. Expression of an adenovirally-delivered luciferase reporter gene in prostate tumor cells in bigenic mice (PSA/hCAR + TRAMP) was enhanced compared to the level in tumor cells lacking the PSA/hCAR transgene. Breeding PSA/hCAR mice to existing transgenic mouse models for prostate cancer (e.g., TRAMP) results in improved mouse models for testing adenovirally-delivered therapeutic genes. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  8. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models.

  9. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtype- and cell-type-specific activation of genomic target genes upon adenoviral transgene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ronni; Grøntved, Lars; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Mandrup, Susanne

    2006-08-01

    Investigations of the molecular events involved in activation of genomic target genes by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been hampered by the inability to establish a clean on/off state of the receptor in living cells. Here we show that the combination of adenoviral delivery and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is ideal for dissecting these mechanisms. Adenoviral delivery of PPARs leads to a rapid and synchronous expression of the PPAR subtypes, establishment of transcriptional active complexes at genomic loci, and immediate activation of even silent target genes. We demonstrate that PPARgamma2 possesses considerable ligand-dependent as well as independent transactivation potential and that agonists increase the occupancy of PPARgamma2/retinoid X receptor at PPAR response elements. Intriguingly, by direct comparison of the PPARs (alpha, gamma, and beta/delta), we show that the subtypes have very different abilities to gain access to target sites and that in general the genomic occupancy correlates with the ability to activate the corresponding target gene. In addition, the specificity and potency of activation by PPAR subtypes are highly dependent on the cell type. Thus, PPAR subtype-specific activation of genomic target genes involves an intricate interplay between the properties of the subtype- and cell-type-specific settings at the individual target loci.

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Subtype- and Cell-Type-Specific Activation of Genomic Target Genes upon Adenoviral Transgene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ronni; Grøntved, Lars; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Mandrup, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Investigations of the molecular events involved in activation of genomic target genes by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been hampered by the inability to establish a clean on/off state of the receptor in living cells. Here we show that the combination of adenoviral delivery and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is ideal for dissecting these mechanisms. Adenoviral delivery of PPARs leads to a rapid and synchronous expression of the PPAR subtypes, establishment of transcriptional active complexes at genomic loci, and immediate activation of even silent target genes. We demonstrate that PPARγ2 possesses considerable ligand-dependent as well as independent transactivation potential and that agonists increase the occupancy of PPARγ2/retinoid X receptor at PPAR response elements. Intriguingly, by direct comparison of the PPARs (α, γ, and β/δ), we show that the subtypes have very different abilities to gain access to target sites and that in general the genomic occupancy correlates with the ability to activate the corresponding target gene. In addition, the specificity and potency of activation by PPAR subtypes are highly dependent on the cell type. Thus, PPAR subtype-specific activation of genomic target genes involves an intricate interplay between the properties of the subtype- and cell-type-specific settings at the individual target loci. PMID:16847324

  12. Targeted Delivery of Human VEGF Gene via Complexes of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Adenoviral Vectors Enhanced Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lailiang; Wang, Weiwei; Delyagina, Evgenya; Lux, Cornelia; Sorg, Heiko; Riehemann, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the concept of whether delivery of magnetic nanobeads (MNBs)/adenoviral vectors (Ad)–encoded hVEGF gene (AdhVEGF) could regenerate ischaemically damaged hearts in a rat acute myocardial infarction model under the control of an external magnetic field. Adenoviral vectors were conjugated to MNBs with the Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin linker. In vitro transduction efficacy of MNBs/Ad–encoded luciferase gene (Adluc) was compared with Adluc alone in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under magnetic field stimulation. In vivo, in a rat acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model, MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes were injected intravenously and an epicardial magnet was employed to attract the circulating MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes. In vitro, compared with Adluc alone, MNBs/Adluc complexes had a 50-fold higher transduction efficiency under the magnetic field. In vivo, epicardial magnet effectively attracted MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes and resulted in strong therapeutic gene expression in the ischemic zone of the infarcted heart. When compared to other MI-treated groups, the MI-M+/AdhVEGF group significantly improved left ventricular function (p<0.05) assessed by pressure-volume loops after 4 weeks. Also the MI-M+/AdhVEGF group exhibited higher capillary and arteriole density and lower collagen deposition than other MI-treated groups (p<0.05). Magnetic targeting enhances transduction efficiency and improves heart function. This novel method to improve gene therapy outcomes in AMI treatment offers the potential into clinical applications. PMID:22844395

  13. Comparison of high-capacity and first-generation adenoviral vector gene delivery to murine muscle in utero.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Wu, E; Zheng, H; Biermann, V; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2005-01-01

    In utero gene delivery could offer the advantage of treatment at an early stage for genetic disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in which the inevitable process of muscle degeneration is already initiated at birth. Furthermore, treatment of fetal muscle with adenoviral (Ad) vectors is attractive because of a high density of Ad receptors, easy vector accessibility due to immaturity of the basal lamina and the possibility of treating stem cells. Previously, we demonstrated the efficient transduction of fetal muscle by high-capacity Ad (HC-Ad) vectors. In this study, we compared HC-Ad and first-generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors for longevity of lacZ transgene expression, toxicity and induction of immunity after direct vector-mediated in utero gene delivery to fetal C57BL/6 mice muscle 16 days after conception (E-16). The total amount of beta-galactosidase (betagal) expressed from the HC-Ad vector remained stable for the 5 months of the study, although the concentration of betagal decreased due to muscle growth. Higher survival rates that reflect lower levels of toxicity were observed in those mice transduced with an HC-Ad vector as compared to an FG-Ad vector. The toxicity induced by FG-Ad vector gene delivery was dependent on mouse strain and vector dose. Animals treated with either HC-Ad and FG-Ad vectors developed non-neutralizing antibodies against Ad capsid and antibodies against betagal, but these antibodies did not cause loss of vector genomes from transduced muscle. In a mouse model of DMD, dystrophin gene transfer to muscle in utero using an HC-Ad vector restored the dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that long-term transgene expression can be achieved by HC-Ad vector-mediated gene delivery to fetal muscle, although strategies of vector integration may need to be considered to accommodate muscle growth.

  14. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  15. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function.

  16. Highly efficient retinal gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Cao, Huibi; Wu, Jing; Duan, Rongqi; Hu, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the field of retinal gene therapy in the past several years. In particular, therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in three separate human clinical trials conducted to assess the ability of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) to treat of a type of Leber’s congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. However, despite the success of retinal gene therapy with AAV, challenges remain for delivering large therapeutic genes or genes requiring long DNA regulatory elements for controlling their expression. For example, Stargardt’s disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration, is caused by defects in ABCA4, a gene that is too large to be packaged in AAV. Therefore, we investigated the ability of helper dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad) to deliver genes to the retina as it has a much larger transgene capacity. Using an EGFP reporter, our results showed that HD-Ad can transduce the entire retinal epithelium of a mouse using a dose of only 1 × 105 infectious units and maintain transgene expression for at least 4 months. The results demonstrate that HD-Ad has the potential to be an effective vector for the gene therapy of the retina. PMID:26161435

  17. Enhanced adenoviral gene delivery to motor and dorsal root ganglion neurons following injection into demyelinated peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zheng, Yiyan; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Hu, Xiaoling; Yu, Panpan; Burke, Darlene A; Wang, Heming; Jun, Cai; Byers, Jonathan; Whittemore, Scott R; Shields, Christopher B

    2010-08-15

    Injection of viral vectors into peripheral nerves may transfer specific genes into their dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and motoneurons. However, myelin sheaths of peripheral axons block the entry of viral particles into nerves. We studied whether mild, transient peripheral nerve demyelination prior to intraneural viral vector injection would enhance gene transfer to target DRG neurons and motoneurons. The right sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 mice was focally demyelinated with 1% lysolecithin, and the left sciatic nerve was similarly injected with saline (control). Five days after demyelination, 0.5 microl of Ad5-GFP was injected into both sciatic nerves at the site of previous injection. The effectiveness of gene transfer was evaluated by counting GFP(+) neurons in the DRGs and ventral horns. After peripheral nerve demyelination, there was a fivefold increase in the number of infected DRG neurons and almost a 15-fold increase in the number of infected motoneurons compared with the control, nondemyelinated side. Focal demyelination reduced the myelin sheath barrier, allowing greater virus-axon contact. Increased CXADR expression on the demyelinated axons facilitated axoplasmic viral entry. No animals sustained any prolonged neurological deficits. Increased gene delivery into DRG neurons and motoneurons may provide effective treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pain, and spinal cord injury.

  18. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  19. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  20. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Oka, K; Mullins, C E; Kushwaha, R S; Leen, A M; Chan, L

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/-) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high-cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery or by catheter-based intrahepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ⩽1.1 × 10(12) viral particles (vp) kg(-1) failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pre-treatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pre-treatment level on days 20-48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransferase remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upward on day 72 and returned to pre-treatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol-lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78 and 50% in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR

  1. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  2. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  3. Adenoviral delivery of human and viral IL-10 in murine sepsis.

    PubMed

    Minter, R M; Ferry, M A; Murday, M E; Tannahill, C L; Bahjat, F R; Oberholzer, C; Oberholzer, A; LaFace, D; Hutchins, B; Wen, S; Shinoda, J; Copeland, E M; Moldawer, L L

    2001-07-15

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene therapy has been proposed as a drug-delivery system for the targeted administration of protein-based therapies, including growth factors and biological response modifiers. However, inflammation associated with Ad transduction has raised concern about its safety and efficacy in acute inflammatory diseases. In the present report, intratracheal and i.v. administration of a first-generation adenoviral recombinant (E1,E3 deleted) either containing an empty cassette or expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokines viral or human IL-10 (IL-10) was administered to mice subjected to zymosan-induced multisystem organ failure or to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Pretreatment of mice with the intratracheal instillation of Ad expressing human IL-10 or viral IL-10 reduced weight loss, attenuated the proinflammatory cytokine response, and reduced mortality in the zymosan-induced model, whereas pretreatment with a control adenoviral recombinant did not significantly exacerbate the response. Pretreatment of mice with pancreatitis using adenoviral vectors expressing IL-10 significantly reduced the degree of pancreatic and liver injury and liver inflammation when administered systemically, but not intratracheally. We conclude that adenoviral vectors can be administered prophylactically in acute inflammatory syndromes, and expression of the anti-inflammatory protein IL-10 can be used to suppress the underlying inflammatory process.

  4. PET imaging of thymidine kinase gene expression in the liver of non-human primates following systemic delivery of an adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, A; Hervas-Stubbs, S; Sampedro, A; Collantes, M; Azpilicueta, A; Mauleón, I; Pañeda, A; Quincoces, G; Prieto, J; Melero, I; Peñuelas, I

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of transgene expression is currently providing very important means to optimize gene therapy regimes. Results in non-human primates are considered the most predictive models for the outcome in patients. In this study, we have documented that tumour and primary cell lines from human and non-human primates are comparably gene-transduced in vitro by serotype 5 adenovirus expressing HSV1-thymidine kinase. Transgene expression can be quantified in human and monkey cultured cells by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging when transduced cells are incubated with a fluoride-18 labelled penciclovir analogue. In our hands, PET images of cell cultures estimate the number of transduced cells rather than intensity of transgene expression once a threshold of TK per cell is reached. Interestingly, in vivo systemic administration of a clinical grade recombinant adenovirus expressing TK into macaques gives rise to an intense retention of the radiotracer in the liver parenchyma, providing an experimental system to visualize transgene expression that ought to be similar in human and macaques. Such imaging methodology might contribute to improve strategies based on adenoviral vectors.

  5. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  6. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  7. Vascular gene transfer from metallic stent surfaces using adenoviral vectors tethered through hydrolysable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J; Alferiev, Ivan S

    2014-08-12

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  8. A Hybrid Adenoviral Vector System Achieves Efficient Long-Term Gene Expression in the Liver via piggyBac Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Feddersen, Charlotte R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Much research has gone into the development of hybrid gene delivery systems that combine the broad tropism and efficient transduction of adenoviral vectors with the ability to achieve stable expression of cargo genes. In addition to gene therapy applications, such a system has considerable advantages for studies of gene function in vivo, permitting fine-tuned genetic manipulation with higher throughput than can be achieved using standard transgenic and DNA targeting techniques. Existing strategies are limited, however, by low integration efficiencies, small cargo capacity, and/or a dependence on target cell division. The utility of this approach could be enhanced by a system that provides all of the following: (1) efficient delivery, (2) stable expression in a high percentage of target cells (whether mitotic or not), (3) large cargo capacity, (4) flexibility to use with a wide range of additional experimental conditions, and (5) simple experimental technique. Here we report the initial characterization of a hybrid system that meets these criteria by utilizing piggyBac (PB) transposition to achieve genomic integration from adenoviral vectors. We demonstrate stable expression of an adenovirus (Ad)-PB-delivered reporter gene in ∼20–40% of hepatocytes following standard tail vein injection. Its high efficiency and flexibility relative to existing hybrid adenoviral gene delivery approaches indicate a considerable potential utility of the Ad-PB system for therapeutic gene delivery and in vivo studies of gene function. PMID:25808258

  9. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  10. Intramarrow cytokine gene transfer by adenoviral vectors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Foley, R; Ellis, R; Walker, I; Wan, Y; Carter, R; Boyle, M; Braciak, T; Addison, C; Graham, F; Gauldie, J

    1997-03-20

    Daily systemic administration of hematopoietic growth factors can be associated with dose-limiting systemic side effects. To overcome this, we have investigated hematopoietic cytokine gene transfer to the marrow cavity of dogs by direct intramarrow injection of adenoviral vectors. In marrow culture, replication-deficient (E1-deleted) adenoviral vectors were able to transduce marrow stromal cells, demonstrating 30-fold greater expression than from other marrow cell types. High-level (ng/ml) cytokine production from transduced stromal cells persisted for 14 days in culture. Because adenovectors could efficiently transduce marrow stromal cells in culture, we investigated if stromal cells could also be transduced in vivo following direct intramarrow vector injection. Adenovectors with genes for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Lac Z (beta-galactosidase) were injected directly into the marrow cavity of dogs resulting in protein expression localized to within the treated marrow. To evaluate this approach further in dogs, we constructed a vector expressing biologically active canine granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). 293 cells infected with ADGM-CSF demonstrated prevalent GM-CSF mRNA by Northern blot and 135 +/- 30 ng/ml of protein as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In vitro bioactivity of protein expressed was confirmed by canine GM colony-forming assay (CFU-GM). In vivo high-level protein production was noted in supernatants of marrow aspirates 72 hr following direct intramarrow administration of ADGM-CSF (baseline mean +/- SEM, 27 +/- 22 ng/ml, 72-hr sample 921 +/- 461 ng/ml). A localized myeloid expansion of marrow and significant peripheral leukocytosis (neutrophilia) were noted in all ADGM-CSF-treated dogs. Peripheral blood changes lasted for up to 3 weeks in dogs following single intramarrow injection. Thus, adenoviral cytokine expression from the marrow of a single large bone (ilium) led to compartmentalized expression of

  11. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of early growth response factor-1 gene increases tissue perfusion in a murine model of hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sam; Jang, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jeong-Min; Lee, Jung-Sun; Lee, Jae-Young; Li Kim, Koung; Shin, In-Soon; Suh, Wonhee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Byun, Jonghoe; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2005-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that overexpression of early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) contributes to the revascularization of ischemic limbs, a constitutively active form of Egr-1 (Egr-1*) was made and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Analyses of the transduced myocytes revealed significant upregulation of bFGF, PDGF-A, PDGF-B, IGF-II, and TGF-beta1. A coculture assay of the paracrine effects indicated that Ad-Egr-1* promoted proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. When Ad-Egr-1* was injected into the tibialis anterior muscle of mice, followed by explant culture in growth factor-reduced Matrigel, many capillary-like structures were observed in the Egr-1* group compared with minimal sprouting from the LacZ group, suggesting an angiogenic potential of Egr-1*. Next we evaluated Ad-Egr-1* in a murine model of hindlimb ischemia. Compared with slow revascularization in the control PBS or LacZ group, a rapid increase in tissue perfusion was observed in the Egr-1* group and the difference in flux ratio was statistically significant at day 7. In the injected muscle, expression of Egr-1*, upregulation of its target genes, and increased number of vessels staining positive for smooth muscle alpha-actin were observed. These results suggest that Egr-1 plays an important role in vascular recovery after occlusion and could be a potential target for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  12. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein–Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  13. Vascular Gene Transfer from Metallic Stent Surfaces Using Adenoviral Vectors Tethered through Hydrolysable Cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P.; Adamo, Richard F.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  14. Adenoviral vectors can impair adrenocortical steroidogenesis: Clinical implications for natural infections and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alesci, Salvatore; Ramsey, Walter J.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Chrousos, George P.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Benvenga, Salvatore; Trimarchi, Francesco; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are effective in transferring foreign genes to a variety of cells and tissue types, both in vitro and in vivo. However, during the gene transfer, they may alter the principal function and local environment of transfected cells. Increasing evidence exists for a selective adrenotropism of adenovirus during infections and gene transfer. Therefore, using bovine adrenocortical cells in primary culture, we analyzed the influence of different adenoviral deletion mutants on cell morphology and physiology. Transfection of cells with an E1/E3-deleted adenoviral vector, engineered to express a modified form of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein, was highly efficient, as documented by fluorescent microscopy. Ultrastructural analysis, however, demonstrated nuclear fragmentation and mitochondrial alterations in addition to intranuclear viral particles. Basal secretion of 17-OH-progesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, and cortisol was significantly increased by E1/E3-deleted vectors; yet, the corticotropin-stimulated release of these steroids was decreased. Interestingly, neither purified viral capsids nor E3/E4-deleted adenoviral mutants altered basal and stimulated steroidogenesis of adrenocortical cells. An intact adrenal response is crucial for adaptation to stress and survival. Therefore, the implications of our findings need to be considered in patients with adenoviral infections and those undergoing clinical studies using adenoviral gene transfer. At the same time, the high level of transfection in adrenocortical cells might make appropriately modified adenoviral vectors suitable for gene therapy of adrenocortical carcinomas with poor prognosis. PMID:12032309

  15. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  16. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia in gunn rats by surgical delivery of low doses of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Françoise; Pastore, Nunzia; Abarrategui-Pontes, Cecilia; Flageul, Maude; Myara, Anne; Laplanche, Sophie; Labrune, Philippe; Podevin, Guillaume; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors are attractive for liver-directed gene therapy because they can drive sustained high levels of transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potential lethal consequences. We have previously shown in nonhuman primates that delivery of HDAd in surgically isolated livers resulted in a significantly higher hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with intravenous delivery and multiyear transgene expression. Encouraged by these data, we have now employed a surgical vector delivery method in the Gunn rat, an animal model for Crigler-Najjar syndrome. After vector delivery into the surgically isolated liver, we show phenotypic correction at the low and clinically relevant vector dose of 1 × 10(11) vp/kg. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased glucuronidation of bilirubin in bile was achieved for up to 1 year after vector administration. Surgical delivery of the vector was well tolerated without signs of acute or chronic toxicity. This method of delivery could thereby be a safer alternative to liver transplantation for long-term treatment of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

  17. A Novel Adenoviral Hybrid-vector System Carrying a Plasmid Replicon for Safe and Efficient Cell and Gene Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Voigtlander, Richard; Haase, Rudolf; Mück-Hausl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Boehme, Philip; Lipps, Hans-Joachim; Schulz, Eric; Baiker, Armin; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-04-02

    In dividing cells, the two aims a gene therapeutic approach should accomplish are efficient nuclear delivery and retention of therapeutic DNA. For stable transgene expression, therapeutic DNA can either be maintained by somatic integration or episomal persistence of which the latter approach would diminish the risk of insertional mutagenesis. As most monosystems fail to fulfill both tasks with equal efficiency, hybrid-vector systems represent promising alternatives. Our hybrid-vector system synergizes high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) for efficient delivery and the scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR)-based pEPito plasmid replicon for episomal persistence. After proving that this plasmid replicon can be excised from adenovirus in vitro, colony forming assays were performed. We found an increased number of colonies of up to sevenfold in cells that received the functional plasmid replicon proving that the hybrid-vector system is functional. Transgene expression could be maintained for 6 weeks and the extrachromosomal plasmid replicon was rescued. To show efficacy in vivo, the adenoviral hybrid-vector system was injected into C57Bl/6 mice. We found that the plasmid replicon can be released from adenoviral DNA in murine liver resulting in long-term transgene expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficacy of our novel HCAdV-pEPito hybrid-vector system in vitro and in vivo.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e83; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.11; published online 2 April 2013.

  18. High efficiency myogenic conversion of human fibroblasts by adenoviral vector-mediated MyoD gene transfer. An alternative strategy for ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, L; Salvatori, G; Coletta, M; Sonnino, C; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Gioglio, L; Murry, C E; Kelly, R; Ferrari, G; Molinaro, M; Crescenzi, M; Mavilio, F; Cossu, G

    1998-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on autologous transplantation of genetically modified myogenic cells, is seriously limited by the number of primary myogenic cells that can be isolated, expanded, transduced, and reimplanted into the patient's muscles. We explored the possibility of using the MyoD gene to induce myogenic conversion of nonmuscle, primary cells in a quantitatively relevant fashion. Primary human and murine fibroblasts from skin, muscle, or bone marrow were infected by an E1-deleted adenoviral vector carrying a retroviral long terminal repeat-promoted MyoD cDNA. Expression of MyoD caused irreversible withdrawal from the cell cycle and myogenic differentiation in the majority (from 60 to 90%) of cultured fibroblasts, as defined by activation of muscle-specific genes, fusion into contractile myotubes, and appearance of ultrastructurally normal sarcomagenesis in culture. 24 h after adenoviral exposure, MyoD-converted cultures were injected into regenerating muscle of immunodeficient (severe combined immunodeficiency/beige) mice, where they gave rise to beta-galactosidase positive, centrally nucleated fibers expressing human myosin heavy chains. Fibers originating from converted fibroblasts were indistinguishable from those obtained by injection of control cultures of lacZ-transduced satellite cells. MyoD-converted murine fibroblasts participated to muscle regeneration also in immunocompetent, syngeneic mice. Although antibodies from these mice bound to adenoviral infected cells in vitro, no inflammatory infiltrate was present in the graft site throughout the 3-wk study period. These data support the feasibility of an alternative approach to gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on implantation of large numbers of genetically modified primary fibroblasts massively converted to myogenesis by adenoviral delivery of MyoD ex vivo. PMID:9593768

  19. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  20. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  1. Optimization of radiation controlled gene expression by adenoviral vectors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anton, Martina; Gomaa, Iman E O; von Lukowicz, Tobias; Molls, Michael; Gansbacher, Bernd; Würschmidt, Florian

    2005-07-01

    The radiation-inducible EGR-1-promoter has been used in different gene therapy approaches in order to enhance and locally restrict therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study was to reduce nonspecific gene expression in the absence of irradiation (IR) in an adenoviral vector. Rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumor cells were infected with adenoviral vectors expressing either EGFP or HSV-TK under control of the murine EGR-1 promoter/enhancer. Cells were irradiated at 0-6 Gy. Gene expression was determined by FACS-analysis (EGFP), or crystal violet staining (HSV-TK). The bovine growth hormone polyadenylation signal (BGH pA) was used as insulating sequence and was introduced upstream or upstream and downstream of the expression cassette. Infected R1H cells displayed IR dose-dependent EGFP expression. Cells treated with IR, AdEGR.TK and ganciclovir displayed a survival of 17.3% (6 Gy). However, significant gene expression was observed in the absence of IR with EGR.TK and EGR.EGFP constructs. Introduction of BGHpA upstream or upstream and downstream of expression cassette resulted in decreased nonspecific cytotoxicity by a factor of 1.6-2.3 with minor influence on the induced level of cytotoxicity. Introduction of insulating sequences in adenoviral vectors might allow tighter temporospatial control of gene expression by the radiation-inducible EGR-1 promoter.

  2. Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into bone marrow: an effective surgical technique in rat.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Romero-Perez, G A; Ramirez-Yañez, G; Ask, K; Gauldie, J

    2013-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β₁) in the onset of bone marrow fibrosis has been confirmed in some animal models. To further understand the genetic expression of some myeloproliferative disorders affecting marrow stem cells, however, it is necessary to develop a specific and reliable procedure to deliver modified adenoviral vectors into the bone marrow cavity. The aim of this paper is to report a surgical technique designed to deliver an adenoviral vector-mediated gene expressing TGF-β₁ into the bone marrow of rat femurs. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. Rat femurs were exposed and the compact and trabecular bones at the proximal head removed. An intrabone marrow injection of a mutated TGF-β₁ adenoviral vector, a null adenoviral vector, or PBS was delivered into the bone. Three groups were accounted (n = 14 per group): fibrogenic and positive and negative controls. The quality of the surgical entrance was assessed by means of computerized tomography and histological changes were assessed by histochemistry. The concentration of TGF-β₁ in the bone marrow was determined by ELISA. The surgical technique was conducted under ideal timing (approx. 10 min) and no surgical or postsurgical complications were observed. Computerized tomography revealed no changes in the bone tissue and a clean entrance was delimited through the bone to the bone marrow. HE and Masson's trichrome staining indicated highly fibrotic areas in the profibrotic group and bone marrow lavage reported a significantly higher concentration of TGF-β₁ (p < 0.05) in that same group. The present study confirmed that the proposed surgical technique is an effective method to deliver adenoviral vectors into the femoral bone marrow to investigate the physiopathology of bone marrow fibrosis in rats. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Intrapleural Adenoviral Delivery of Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor–1 Exacerbates Tetracycline-Induced Pleural Injury in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Karandashova, Sophia; Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali O.; Komissarov, Andrey A.; Koenig, Kathy; Tucker, Torry A.; Allen, Timothy C.; Stewart, Kris; Tvinnereim, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 (PAI-1) are associated with pleural injury, but its effects on pleural organization remain unclear. A method of adenovirus-mediated delivery of genes of interest (expressed under a cytomegalovirus promoter) to rabbit pleura was developed and used with lacZ and human (h) PAI-1. Histology, β-galactosidase staining, Western blotting, enzymatic and immunohistochemical analyses of pleural fluids (PFs), lavages, and pleural mesothelial cells were used to evaluate the efficiency and effects of transduction. Transduction was selective and limited to the pleural mesothelial monolayer. The intrapleural expression of both genes was transient, with their peak expression at 4 to 5 days. On Day 5, hPAI-1 (40–80 and 200–400 nM of active and total hPAI-1 in lavages, respectively) caused no overt pleural injury, effusions, or fibrosis. The adenovirus-mediated delivery of hPAI-1 with subsequent tetracycline-induced pleural injury resulted in a significant exacerbation of the pleural fibrosis observed on Day 5 (P = 0.029 and P = 0.021 versus vehicle and adenoviral control samples, respectively). Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) with plasminogen activators was effective in both animals overexpressing hPAI-1 and control animals with tetracycline injury alone. An increase in intrapleural active PAI-1 (from 10–15 nM in control animals to 20–40 nM in hPAI-1–overexpressing animals) resulted in the increased formation of PAI-1/plasminogen activator complexes in vivo. The decrease in intrapleural plasminogen-activating activity observed at 10 to 40 minutes after IPFT correlates linearly with the initial concentration of active PAI-1. Therefore, active PAI-1 in PFs affects the outcome of IPFT, and may be both a biomarker of pleural injury and a molecular target for its treatment. PMID:23002099

  4. Construction and characterization of adenoviral vectors for the delivery of TALENs into human cells.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are designed to cut the genomic DNA at specific chromosomal positions. The resulting DNA double strand break activates cellular repair pathways that can be harnessed for targeted genome modifications. TALENs thus constitute a powerful tool to interrogate the function of DNA sequences within complex genomes. Moreover, their high DNA cleavage activity combined with a low cytotoxicity make them excellent candidates for applications in human gene therapy. Full exploitation of these large and repeat-bearing nucleases in human cell types will benefit largely from using the adenoviral vector (AdV) technology. The genetic stability and the episomal nature of AdV genomes in conjunction with the availability of a large number of AdV serotypes able to transduce various human cell types make it possible to achieve high-level and transient expression of TALENs in numerous target cells, regardless of their mitotic state. Here, we describe a set of protocols detailing the rescue, propagation and purification of TALEN-encoding AdVs. Moreover, we describe procedures for the characterization and quantification of recombinant viral DNA present in the resulting AdV preparations. The protocols are preceded by information about their underlying principles and applied in the context of second-generation capsid-modified AdVs expressing TALENs targeted to the AAVS1 "safe harbor" locus on human chromosome 19.

  5. In vivo, cardiac-specific knockdown of target protein, Malic Enzyme-1, in rat via adenoviral delivery of DNA for non-native miRNA

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J. Michael; Kalichira, Asha; Bi, Jian; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of using the adenoviral delivery of DNA for a non-native microRNA to suppress expression of a target protein (cytosolic NADP+-dependent malic-enzyme 1, ME1) in whole heart in vivo, via an isolated-heart coronary perfusion approach. Complementary DNA constructs for ME1 microRNA were inserted into adenoviral vectors. Viral gene transfer to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes yielded 65% suppression of ME1 protein. This viral package was delivered to rat hearts in vivo (Adv.miR_ME1, 1013 vp/ml PBS) via coronary perfusion, using a cardiac-specific isolation technique. ME1 mRNA was reduced by 73% at 2-6 days post-surgery in heart receiving the Adv.miR_ME1. Importantly, ME1 protein was reduced by 66% (p<0.0002) at 5-6 days relative to sham-operated control hearts. Non-target protein expression for GAPDH, calsequestrin, and mitochondrial malic enzyme, ME3, were all unchanged. The non-target isoform, ME2, was unchanged at 2-5 days and reduced at day 6. This new approach demonstrates for the first time significant and acute silencing of target RNA translation and protein content in whole heart, in vivo, via non-native microRNA expression. PMID:22974418

  6. Adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors-mediated neuronal gene transfer to cardiovascular control regions of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Gao, Yongxin; Speth, Robert C; Jiang, Nan; Mao, Yingying; Sumners, Colin; Li, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors have been utilized extensively to introduce genetic material into the central nervous system. In order to investigate gene functions in cardiovascular control regions of rat brain, we applied WPRE (woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element) enhanced-adenoviral (Ad) and adeno-assoicated virus (AAV) type 2 vectors to mediate neuronal gene delivery to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the nucleus tractus solitarius and the rostral ventrolateral medulla, three important cardiovascular control regions known to express renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genes. Ad or AAV2 harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene or the angiotensin type 2 receptor gene were microinjected into these brain regions in adult rats. Our results demonstrated that both AAV2 and Ad vectors elicited long-term neuronal transduction in these regions. Interestingly, we found that the WPRE caused expression of GFP driven by the synapsin1 promoter in pure glial cultures or co-cultures of neurons and glia derived from rat hypothalamus and brainstem. However, in rat paraventricular nucleus WPRE did not cause expression of GFP in glia. This demonstrates the potential use of these vectors in studies of physiological functions of certain genes in the cardiovascular control regions of the brain.

  7. Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Gliomas: Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Wilson, Thomas J.; Calinescu, Alexandra; Paran, Christopher; Kamran, Neha; Koschmann, Carl; Moreno-Ayala, Mariela A.; Assi, Hikmat; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; it carries a dismal prognosis. Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is being developed as a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM. Preclinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of adenovirus administration into the brain and tumor mass in rodents and into the non-human primates’ brain. Importantly Ads have been safely administered within the tumor resection cavity in humans. Areas Covered Background on GBM and Ad vectors; we describe gene therapy strategies for GBM and discuss the value of combination approaches. Finally we discuss the results of the human clinical trials for GBM that have used adenoviral vectors. Expert Opinion The transduction characteristics of Ad vectors, and their safety profile, added to their capacity to achieve high levels of transgene expression have made them powerful vectors for the treatment of GBM. Recent gene therapy successes in the treatment of retinal diseases and systemic brain metabolic diseases, encourages the development of gene therapy for malignant glioma. Exciting clinical trials are currently recruiting patients; although it is large randomized phase III controlled clinical trials that will provide the final decision on the success of gene therapy for the treatment of GBM. PMID:24773178

  8. Clinical utility of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene therapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-xia; Zhang, Shu; He, Xiao-hua; Liu, Shi-yu; Ma, Chao; Zou, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised to be a highly effective antitumor treatment by introducing a tumor suppressor gene or the abrogation of an oncogene. Among the potential therapeutic transgenes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 serves as an attractive target. Restoration of wild-type p53 function in tumors can be achieved by introduction of an intact complementary deoxyribonucleic acid copy of the p53 gene using a suitable viral vector, in most cases an adenoviral vector (Adp53). Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that Adp53 triggers a dramatic tumor regression response in various cancers. These viruses are engineered to lack certain early proteins and are thus replication defective, including Gendicine, SCH-58500, and Advexin. Several types of tumor-specific p53-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus vectors (known as replication-competent CRAdp53 vectors) have been developed, such as ONYX 015, AdDelta24-p53, SG600-p53, OBP-702, and H101. Various clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the safety and efficiency of these adenoviral vectors. In this review we will talk about the biological mechanisms, clinical utility, and therapeutic potentials of the replication-deficient Adp53-based and replication-competent CRAdp53-based gene therapy. PMID:25364261

  9. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  10. Computer-assisted hydrodynamic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Suda, Takeshi; Suda, Kieko; Liu, Dexi

    2008-06-01

    The recently developed hydrodynamic delivery method makes it possible to deliver DNA and RNA into parenchyma cells by intravascular injection of nucleic acid-containing solution. While this procedure is effective in rodents, it is difficult to perform in large animals, because manual control while delivering the injection cannot be sufficiently reliable for achieving a just-right hydrodynamic pressure in targeted tissue. In order to overcome this problem, we have developed a computer-controlled injection device that uses real-time intravascular pressure as a regulator. Using the new injection device, and mouse liver as the model organ, we demonstrated continuous injection at a single pressure and different pressures, and also serial (repeated) injections at intervals of 250 ms, by programming the computer according to the need. When assessed by reporter plasmids, the computer-controlled injection device exhibits gene delivery efficiency similar to that of conventional hydrodynamic injection. The device is also effective in gene delivery to kidney and muscle cells in rats, with plasmids or adenoviral vectors as gene carriers. Successful gene delivery to liver and kidney was also demonstrated in pigs, with the computer-controlled injection being combined with image-guided catheterization. These results represent a significant advance in in vivo gene delivery research, with potential for use in gene therapy in humans.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of adenoviral catalase gene transfer in cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Tamás; Domoki, Ferenc; Lenti, Laura; Institoris, Adám; Snipes, James A; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W

    2009-05-13

    Reduced availability of reactive oxygen species is a key component of neuroprotection against various toxic stimuli. Recently we showed that the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase plays a central role in delayed preconditioning induced by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener BMS-191095. The purpose of the experiments discussed here was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of catalase in vitro using a recombinant adenoviral catalase gene transfer protocol. To induce catalase overexpression, cultured rat cortical neurons were infected with the adenoviral vector Ad5CMVcatalase and control cells were incubated with Ad5CMVntLacZ for 24 h. Gene transfer effectively increased catalase protein levels and activity, but did not influence other antioxidants tested. Ad5CMVcatalase, with up to 10 plaque forming units (pfu) per neuron, did not affect cell viability under control conditions and did not protect against glutamate excitotoxicity or oxygen-glucose deprivation. In contrast, catalase overexpression conferred a dose-dependent protection against exposure to hydrogen peroxide (viability: control, 33.02+/-1.09%; LacZ 10 pfu/cell, 32.85+/-1.51%; catalase 1 pfu/cell, 62.09+/-4.17%*; catalase 2 pfu/cell, 98.71+/-3.35%*; catalase 10 pfu/cell, 99.68+/-1.99%*; *p<0.05 vs. control; mean+/-SEM). Finally, the protection could be antagonized using the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole. Our results support the view that enhancing cellular antioxidant capacity may play a crucial role in neuroprotective strategies.

  12. Adenoviral Gene Transfer in Bovine Adrenomedullary and Murine Pheochromocytoma Cells: Potential Clinical and Therapeutic Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Alesci, Salvatore; Perera, Shiromi M.; Lai, Edwin W.; Kukura, Christina; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Morris, John C.; Pacak, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) have been widely used as gene transfer vectors both in the laboratory and in human clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in primary bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (BACC) and a murine pheochromocytoma cell line (MPC). Cells were infected with one of three nonreplicating E1/E3-deleted (E1-/E3-) rAd vectors: Ad.GFP, expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP); Ad.null, expressing no transgene; or Ad.C2.TK, expressing the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase gene (TK). Forty-eight hours after exposure to Ad.GFP, the percentage of GFP-expressing BACC ranged from 23.5-97% in a dose-dependent manner and similarly from 1.06 - 84.4% in the MPC, indicating that adrenomedullary cells are a potentially valuable target for adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Ultrastructural analysis, however, revealed profound changes in the nucleus and mitochondria of cells infected with rAd. Furthermore, infection of BACC with Ad.null was accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent decrease in cell survival due to the vector alone. Specific whole-cell norepinephrine uptake was also decreased in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in BACC. Infection of MPC cells with the Ad.C2.TK vector sensitized them to the cytotoxic effect of the antiviral drug ganciclovir, in direct proportion to the fraction of cells infected with the virus. We conclude that rAd may alter the structural and functional integrity of adrenomedullary cells, potentially interfering with the normal stress response. At the same time, in light of their ability to effectively deliver and express genes in pheochromocytoma cells, they may be applicable to the gene therapy of adrenomedullary tumors. PMID:17525127

  13. Adenoviral gene transfer in bovine adrenomedullary and murine pheochromocytoma cells: potential clinical and therapeutic relevance.

    PubMed

    Alesci, Salvatore; Perera, Shiromi M; Lai, Edwin W; Kukura, Christina; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Morris, John C; Pacak, Karel

    2007-08-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) have been widely used as gene transfer vectors both in the laboratory and in human clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in primary bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (BACC) and a murine pheochromocytoma cell line (MPC). Cells were infected with one of three nonreplicating E1/E3-deleted (E1(-)/E3(-)) rAd vectors: Ad.GFP, expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP); Ad.null, expressing no transgene; or Ad.C2.TK, expressing the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase gene (TK). Forty-eight hours after exposure to Ad.GFP, the percentage of GFP-expressing BACC ranged from 23.5-97% in a dose-dependent manner and similarly from 1.06-84.4% in the MPC, indicating that adrenomedullary cells are a potentially valuable target for adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Ultrastructural analysis, however, revealed profound changes in the nucleus and mitochondria of cells infected with rAd. Furthermore, infection of BACC with Ad.null was accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent decrease in cell survival due to the vector alone. Specific whole-cell norepinephrine uptake was also decreased in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in BACC. Infection of MPC cells with the Ad.C2.TK vector sensitized them to the cytotoxic effect of the antiviral drug ganciclovir, in direct proportion to the fraction of cells infected with the virus. We conclude that rAd may alter the structural and functional integrity of adrenomedullary cells, potentially interfering with the normal stress response. At the same time, in light of their ability to effectively deliver and express genes in pheochromocytoma cells, they may be applicable to the gene therapy of adrenomedullary tumors.

  14. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Dharmin; de Jong, Marion; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Avezaat, Cees; Cox, Peter; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-07-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives. The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1 region, driven

  15. Effects of Adenoviral Gene Transduction on the Stemness of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Subash; Chang, Da-Young; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Su-Jung; Cha, Hye Lim; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being evaluated as a cell-based therapy for tissue injury and degenerative diseases. Recently, several methods have been suggested to further enhance the therapeutic functions of MSCs, including genetic modifications with tissue- and/or disease-specific genes. The objective of this study was to examine the efficiency and stability of transduction using an adenoviral vector in human MSCs. Additionally, we aimed to assess the effects of transduction on the proliferation and multipotency of MSCs. The results indicate that MSCs can be transduced by adenoviruses in vitro, but high viral titers are necessary to achieve high efficiency. In addition, transduction at a higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) was associated with attenuated proliferation and senescence-like morphology. Furthermore, transduced MSCs showed a diminished capacity for adipogenic differentiation while retaining their potential to differentiate into osteocytes and chondrocytes. This work could contribute significantly to clinical trials of MSCs modified with therapeutic genes. PMID:28835020

  16. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of adenoviral catalase gene transfer in cortical neuronal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gáspár, Tamás; Domoki, Ferenc; Lenti, Laura; Institoris, Ádám; Snipes, James A; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W

    2009-01-01

    Reduced availability of reactive oxygen species is a key component of neuroprotection against various toxic stimuli. Recently we showed that the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase plays a central role in delayed preconditioning induced by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener BMS-191095. The purpose of the experiments discussed here was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of catalase in vitro using a recombinant adenoviral catalase gene transfer protocol. To induce catalase overexpression, cultured rat cortical neurons were infected with the adenoviral vector Ad5CMVcatalase and control cells were incubated with Ad5CMVntLacZ for 24h. Gene transfer effectively increased catalase protein levels and activity, but did not influence other antioxidants tested. Ad5CMVcatalase, with up to 10 plaque forming units (pfu) per neuron, did not affect cell viability under control conditions and did not protect against glutamate excitotoxicity or oxygen-glucose deprivation. In contrast, catalase overexpression conferred a dose-dependent protection against exposure to hydrogen peroxide (viability: control, 33.02±1.09%; LacZ 10 pfu/cell, 32.85±1.51%; catalase 1 pfu/cell, 62.09±4.17%*; catalase 2 pfu/cell, 98.71±3.35%*; catalase 10 pfu/cell, 99.68±1.99%*; *p<0.05 vs. control; mean±SEM). Finally, the protection could be antagonized using the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole. Our results support the view that enhancing cellular antioxidant capacity may play a crucial role in neuroprotective strategies. PMID:19302986

  18. Adenoviral Mediated Gene Transfer of IGF-1 Enhances Wound Healing and Induces Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S.; LeSaint, M.; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Moles, C.; Dhamija, Y.; Kidd, M.; Le, L.D.; King, A.; Shaaban, A.; Crombleholme, T. M.; Bollyky, P.; Keswani, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    to control treatments. Conclusions In two different models, our data demonstrates that adenoviral mediated gene transfer of IGF-1 results in enhanced wound healing and induces angiogenesis via a VEGF-independent pathway. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of IGF-1 effects on angiogenesis may help produce novel therapeutics for chronic wounds or diseases characterized by a deficit in neovascularization. PMID:24725678

  19. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  20. Exogenous surfactant enhances the delivery of recombinant adenoviral vectors to the lung.

    PubMed

    Katkin, J P; Husser, R C; Langston, C; Welty, S E

    1997-01-20

    Somatic gene therapy for pulmonary diseases must be accomplished in vivo, requiring the spread of a gene transfer vector across a vast expanse of respiratory epithelium. Surfactant, a naturally occurring protein and lipid mixture used to treat the respiratory distress syndrome of prematurity, disperses rapidly and evenly throughout the lung. We employed exogenous bovine surfactant (Survanta beractant) as a carrier vehicle for pulmonary delivery of a recombinant adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal). Rats treated with an adenovirus-beractant mixture demonstrated more uniform lobar distribution of transgene expression than rats treated with the same amount of virus in saline. Tissue homogenates were examined for quantitative beta-Gal expression by reaction with o-nitrophenol beta-n-galactopyranoside (ONPG). The degree of beta-Gal activity was affected by both the volume and type of carrier used to deliver the virus. At low volumes (0.5 ml, 1.3 ml/kg), beractant-treated animals demonstrated significantly greater pulmonary beta-Gal activity than saline-treated animals (p < 0.002) and untreated controls. At high volume (1.2 ml, 4 ml/kg), average beta-Gal activity was similar between groups treated with beractant or saline, but was more variable within the saline treated group. Higher volumes of delivery medium were associated with increased levels of beta-Gal expression regardless of the carrier used. Survanta was well tolerated by the animals and did not affect the duration of transgene expression. Exogenous beractant provides a useful medium for delivering recombinant adenoviruses to the lung when diffuse distribution of transgene expression is desired.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  3. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy.

  4. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  5. Myocardial gene transfer by selective pressure-regulated retroinfusion of coronary veins: comparison with surgical and percutaneous intramyocardial gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Raake, Philip; von Degenfeld, Georges; Hinkel, Rabea; Vachenauer, Robert; Sandner, Torleif; Beller, Sabrina; Andrees, Martin; Kupatt, Christian; Schuler, Gerhard; Boekstegers, Peter

    2004-09-01

    We sought to study adenoviral gene delivery using percutaneous selective pressure-regulated retroinfusion and to compare it directly with surgical and percutaneous intramyocardial delivery (PIMD) for the first time. Intramyocardial delivery (IMD) has been recommended to be the preferred gene delivery strategy so far. However, surgical and percutaneous intramyocardial injection lead to incomplete retention of the injected viral vectors and to limited spatial myocardial distribution. Percutaneous selective pressure-regulated retroinfusion of the coronary veins was developed recently to provide an effective and more homogenous regional myocardial gene transfer. In 15 pigs, adenoviral vectors (Ad2-CMV beta-galactosidase [beta-gal] 5 x 10(9) pfu) were applied via surgical IMD (n = 5), PIMD (n = 5), and selective pressure-regulated retroinfusion (n = 5). Seven days after gene transfer, myocardial beta-gal expression was measured by ELISA. Selective retroinfusion into the anterior cardiac vein substantially increased reporter gene expression (1,039 +/- 79 pg beta-gal/mg protein) in the targeted left anterior descending coronary artery territory when compared with surgical (448 +/- 127, p < 0.05) and PIMD (842 +/- 145, p < 0.05). Both IMD approaches showed an inhomogenous beta-gal expression, particularly along the injection sites, while retroinfusion resulted in a more homogenous transmural gene expression. Percutaneous selective pressure-regulated retroinfusion compares favorably with surgical and percutaneous intramyocardial injection techniques by providing a more homogenous and even more efficient adenoviral gene delivery.

  6. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  7. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  8. Adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF-B enhances wound healing in type I and type II diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Katz, Anna B; Lim, Foong-Yen; Zoltick, Philip; Radu, Antoneta; Alaee, Datis; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2004-01-01

    We have shown that the genetically diabetic mouse (C57BLKS/J-m+/+Lepr(db)) has a wound healing and neovascularization deficit associated with an inability to recruit endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) to the wound. This may account for a fundamental mechanism in impaired diabetic wound healing. We hypothesized that the adenoviral mediated overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) would enhance wound healing, improve neovascularization, and recruit EPCs to the epithelial wound in three diabetic mouse models. Eight-mm full-thickness flank wounds were made in db/db, nonobese NOD/Ltj, streptozotocin, and C57BLKS/J mice. Wounds were treated with either 1 x 10(8) PFU Ad-PDGF-B or Ad LacZ or phosphate buffered saline solution. Wounds harvested at seven days were analyzed for epithelial gap, blood vessel density, granulation tissue area, and EPCs per high powered field. All three diabetic models have a significant wound healing and neovascularization defect compared to C57BLKS/J controls. Adenoviral-PDGF-B treatment significantly enhanced epithelial gap closure in db/db, streptozotocin, and nonobese NOD/Ltj mice as compared to diabetic phosphate buffered saline solution or Ad LacZ controls. A similar increase in the formation of granulation tissue and vessel density was also observed. All three models had reduced levels of GATA-2 positive EPCs in the wound bed that was corrected by the adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF. EPC recruitment was positively correlated with neovascularization and wound healing. Three different diabetic models have a wound healing impairment and a decreased ability to recruit EPCs. The vulnerary effect of adenoviral mediated gene therapy with PDGF-B significantly enhanced wound healing and neovascularization in diabetic wounds. The PDGF-B mediated augmentation of EPC recruitment to the wound bed may be a fundamental mechanism of these results.

  9. Adenoviral vector-mediated GDNF gene therapy in a rodent lesion model of late stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, P A; Araujo, D M; Hilt, D C; Sheng, J; Jiao, S

    1997-11-28

    A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene (Ad-GDNF) was used to express the neurotrophic factor GDNF in the unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated substantia nigra (SN) of adult rats ten weeks following the 6-OHDA injection. 6-OHDA lesions significantly increased apomorphine-induced (contralateral) rotations and reduced striatal and nigral dopamine (DA) levels by 99% and 70%, respectively. Ad-GDNF significantly (P < 0.01) decreased (by 30-40%) apomorphine-induced rotations in lesioned rats for up to two weeks following a single injection. Locomotor activity, assessed 7 days following the Ad-GDNF injection, was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased (by 300-400%). Two weeks after the Ad-GDNF injection, locomotor activity was still significantly increased compared to the Ad-beta-gal-injected 6-OHDA lesioned (control) group. Additionally, in Ad-GDNF-injected rats, there was a significant decrease (10-13%) in weight gain which persisted for approximately two weeks following the injection. Consistent with the behavioral changes, levels of DA and the metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were elevated (by 98% and 65%, respectively) in the SN, but not the striatum of Ad-GDNF-injected rats. Overall, a single Ad-GDNF injection had significant effects for 2-3 weeks following administration. These results suggest that virally delivered GDNF promotes the recovery of nigral dopaminergic tone (i.e.: increased DA and DOPAC levels) and improves behavioral performance (i.e.: decreased rotations, increased locomotion) in rodents with extensive nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Moreover, our results suggest that viral delivery of trophic factors may be used eventually to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  10. Efficacy of CD46-targeting chimeric Ad5/35 adenoviral gene therapy for colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se-Young; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Kwonseop; Lee, Keesook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hemmi, Silvio; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Min Soo; Jung, Chaeyong

    2016-01-01

    CD46 is a complement inhibitor membrane cofactor which also acts as a receptor for various microbes, including species B adenoviruses (Ads). While most Ad gene therapy vectors are derived from species C and infect cells through coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR expression is downregulated in many cancer cells, resulting inefficient Ad-based therapeutics. Despite a limited knowledge on the expression status of many cancer cells, an increasing number of cancer gene therapy studies include fiber-modified Ad vectors redirected to the more ubiquitously expressed CD46. Since our finding from tumor microarray indicate that CD46 was overexpressed in cancers of the prostate and colon, fiber chimeric Ad5/35 vectors that have infection tropism for CD46 were employed to demonstrate its efficacy in colorectal cancers (CRC). CD46-overexpressed cells showed a significantly higher response to Ad5/35-GFP and to Ad5/35-tk/GCV. While CRC cells express variable levels of CD46, CD46 expression was positively correlated with Ad5/35-mediated GFP fluorescence and accordingly its cell killing. Injection of Ad5/35-tk/GCV caused much greater tumor-suppression in mice bearing CD46-overexpressed cancer xenograft compared to mock group. Analysis of CRC samples revealed that patients with positive CD46 expression had a higher survival rate (p=0.031), carried tumors that were well-differentiated, but less invasive and metastatic, and with a low T stage (all p<0.05). Taken together, our study demonstrated that species B-based adenoviral gene therapy is a suitable approach for generally CD46-overexpressed CRC but would require careful consideration preceding CD46 analysis and categorizing CRC patients. PMID:27203670

  11. Adenoviral gene therapy of the Tay-Sachs disease in hexosaminidase A-deficient knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, J E; Mignon, A; Haase, G; Caillaud, C; McDonell, N; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1999-05-01

    The severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tays-Sachs disease, is caused by a beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency which prevents the formation of lysosomal heterodimeric alpha-beta enzyme, hexosaminidase A (HexA). No treatment is available for this fatal disease; however, gene therapy could represent a therapeutic approach. We previously have constructed and characterized, in vitro, adenoviral and retroviral vectors coding for alpha- and beta-subunits of the human beta-hexosaminidases. Here, we have determined the in vivo strategy which leads to the highest HexA activity in the maximum number of tissues in hexA -deficient knock-out mice. We demonstrated that intravenous co-administration of adenoviral vectors coding for both alpha- and beta-subunits, resulting in preferential liver transduction, was essential to obtain the most successful results. Only the supply of both subunits allowed for HexA overexpression leading to massive secretion of the enzyme in serum, and full or partial enzymatic activity restoration in all peripheral tissues tested. The enzymatic correction was likely to be due to direct cellular transduction by adenoviral vectors and/or uptake of secreted HexA by different organs. These results confirmed that the liver was the preferential target organ to deliver a large amount of secreted proteins. In addition, the need to overexpress both subunits of heterodimeric proteins in order to obtain a high level of secretion in animals defective in only one subunit is emphasized. The endogenous non-defective subunit is otherwise limiting.

  12. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  13. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle.

  14. Adenoviral Delivery of VEGF121 Early in Pregnancy Prevents Spontaneous Development of Preeclampsia in BPH/5 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Hoffmann, Darren S.; Weydert, Christine J.; Butler, Scott D.; Zhou, Yi; Sharma, Ram V.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance in circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is postulated to play a causal role in pre-eclampsia (PE). We have described an inbred mouse strain, BPH/5, which spontaneously develops a PE-like syndrome including late-gestational hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes. Here we tested the hypothesis that an angiogenic imbalance during pregnancy in BPH/5 mice leads to the development of PE-like phenotypes in this model. Similar to clinical findings, plasma from pregnant BPH/5 showed reduced levels of free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PGF) compared to C57BL/6 controls. This was paralleled by a marked decrease in VEGF protein and Pgf mRNA in BPH/5 placentae. Surprisingly, antagonism by the soluble form of the FLT1 receptor (sFLT1) did not appear to be the cause of this reduction, as sFLT1 levels were unchanged or even reduced in BPH/5 compared to controls. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of VEGF121 (Ad-VEGF) via tail vein at e7.5 normalized both the plasma free VEGF levels in BPH/5 and restored the in vitro angiogenic capacity of serum from these mice. Ad-VEGF also reduced the incidence of fetal resorptions and prevented the late-gestational spike in blood pressure and proteinuria observed in BPH/5. These data underscore the importance of dysregulation of angiogenic factors in the pathogenesis of PE, and suggest the potential utility of early pro-angiogenic therapies in treating this disease. PMID:21079047

  15. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  16. Configurations of a two-tiered amplified gene expression system in adenoviral vectors designed to improve the specificity of in vivo prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Figueiredo, M L; Burton, J B; Johnson, M; Chen, M; Powell, R; Gambhir, S S; Carey, M; Wu, L

    2008-04-01

    Effective treatment for recurrent, disseminated prostate cancer is notably limited. We have developed adenoviral vectors with a prostate-specific two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system that would express therapeutic genes at a robust level to target metastatic disease. The TSTA system employs the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter/enhancer to drive a potent synthetic activator, which in turn activates the expression of the therapeutic gene. In this study, we explored different configurations of this bipartite system and discovered that physical separation of the two TSTA components into E1 and E3 regions of adenovirus was able to enhance androgen regulation and cell-discriminatory expression. The TSTA vectors that express imaging reporter genes were assessed by noninvasive imaging technologies in animal models. The improved selectivity of the E1E3 configured vector was reflected in silenced ectopic expression in the lung. Significantly, the enhanced specificity of the E1E3 vector enabled the detection of lung metastasis of prostate cancer. An E1E3 TSTA vector that expresses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene can effectively direct positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the tumor. The prostate-targeted gene delivery vectors with robust and cell-specific expression capability will advance the development of safe and effective imaging guided therapy for recurrent metastatic stages of prostate cancer.

  17. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:23127366

  18. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  19. Short-term efficiency and safety of gene delivery into canine kidneys.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, V; Klonjkowski, B; Lefebvre, H P; Desvaux, D; Laroute, V; Rosenberg, D; Maurey, C; Crespeau, F; Adam, M; Adnot, S; Eloit, M; Pouchelon, J L

    2001-03-01

    Gene delivery of biologically active molecules to the kidney may have potential therapeutic applications in renal and cardiovascular diseases. Recombinant adenovirus is one of the most efficient vectors for in vivo gene delivery. However, in vivo toxicity at the site of administration has to be evaluated for the successful use of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. The aim of this study was to document precisely the short-term safety of different routes of intra-renal adenoviral administration and to compare their transduction efficiency. Dog puppies were injected with an adenoviral vector expressing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in both kidneys via three different routes, i.e. intra-renal-ureteral route (IU) and intra-renal-arterial route with (IAC) or without (IA) clamping of the renal vein. Toxicity of viral administration was assayed on day 4 at both physiological and histological levels. Renal samples were monitored for the presence of nuclear beta-galactosidase-expressing cells. All renal physiological parameters (glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, and electrolyte excretion fractions) remained stable whatever the route of viral administration. No histological lesion was detected in any of the haematoxylin-eosin-stained kidney sections, and there was no evidence of ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the kidneys subjected to venous clamping. Efficient transgene expression was obtained in dog kidneys following IAC and IU injection of adenoviral vectors. Gene transfer via the IAC route induced gene expression predominantly in the cortical interstitial cells. Retrograde IU adenoviral injection resulted in reduced transduction efficiency compared with the IAC route, with transgene expression occurring mainly in the distal tubular and pyelic epithelial cells. The two major findings of this study were (i) the absence of acute histological and functional renal alteration following intra-arterial and intra-ureteral injections of adenoviral

  20. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Cittadini, A; Monti, MG; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, PN; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the β-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) handling, oxygen consumption, and β-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca2+–force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6±0.2 versus 2.7±0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca2+ available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca2+–force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. β-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1 levels, and

  1. High Efficiency CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Editing in Primary Human T-cells Using Mutant Adenoviral E4orf6/E1b55k "Helper" Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, Kamila S; Grier, Alexandra E; Sahni, Jaya; Burleigh, Stephen M; Martin, Unja; Yang, Julia G; Popp, Nicholas A; Krutein, Michelle C; Khan, Iram F; Jacoby, Kyle; Jensen, Michael C; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2016-09-29

    Many future therapeutic applications of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 and related RNA-guided nucleases are likely to require their use to promote gene targeting, thus necessitating development of methods that provide for delivery of three components-Cas9, guide RNAs and recombination templates-to primary cells rendered proficient for homology-directed repair. Here, we demonstrate an electroporation/transduction codelivery method that utilizes mRNA to express both Cas9 and mutant adenoviral E4orf6 and E1b55k helper proteins in association with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing guide RNAs and recombination templates. By transiently enhancing target cell permissiveness to AAV transduction and gene editing efficiency, this novel approach promotes efficient gene disruption and/or gene targeting at multiple loci in primary human T-cells, illustrating its broad potential for application in translational gene editing.

  2. Nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hidetaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Gene and RNA interference therapies are promising cures for intractable renal failure. However, low delivery efficiency of the therapeutic nucleic acid into the nucleus of the target cell is a significant obstacle in the clinical application of nonviral gene therapy. Various mechanical techniques (hydrodynamic injection, electroporation and ultrasound-microbubble) and topically applied preparations (HVJ liposome and cationic liposome/polymer), which introduce transgenes into specific renal compartments depending on the administration route, have been reported. Additional improvements in renal application of nonviral gene vectors must address the important issue of how to control intracellular trafficking. Therefore, novel vectors based on the 'programmed packaging' concept are desirable in which all functional devices are integrated into a single system so that each function occurs at the appropriate time and correct place. In parallel with development of the carrier, quantitative evaluation of intracellular trafficking is essential to determine the efficacy of the modified devices in the cellular environment. In particular, comparison of the intracellular trafficking of the engineered devices with that of viruses (i.e. adenovirus) is useful in identifying the rate-limiting intracellular processes of the vectors during development.

  3. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  4. Intratympanic Gene Delivery of Antimicrobial Molecules in Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung K; Lim, David J

    2015-04-01

    Otitis media (OM) in children is clinically important because of its detrimental effects on the development of language and motor coordination and is the most common reason for prescription of antibiotics. A recent bacteriological change in OM pathogens such as emergence of antibiotic resistance and vaccination-mediated pathogenic shift urges us to develop a new non-antibiotic strategy. The middle ear epithelium abundantly secretes a variety of antimicrobial molecules suppressing the viability of the common OM pathogens. Recently, we have demonstrated that the adenoviral vector is able to deliver the β-defensin 2 gene to the middle ear epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of β-defensin 2 is protective for experimental OM. There are many hurdles limiting successful clinical application of gene delivery to the respiratory epithelium of the tubotympanum; however, intratympanic gene therapy with β-defensin 2 is a promising alternative or adjuvant strategy for the management of OM.

  5. Polymer-enhanced adenoviral transduction of CAR-negative bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasman, Laura M; Barua, Sutapa; Lu, Ping; Rege, Kaushal; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The application of adenoviral gene therapy for cancer is limited by immune clearance of the virus as well as poor transduction efficiency, since the protein used for viral entry (CAR) serves physiological functions in adhesion and is frequently decreased among cancer cells. Cationic polymers have been used to enhance adenoviral gene delivery, but novel polymers with low toxicity are needed to realize this approach. We recently identified polymers that were characterized by high transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and a low toxicity profile. In this study we evaluated the novel cationic polymer EGDE-3,3' for its potential to increase adenoviral transduction of the CAR-negative bladder cancer cell line TCCSUP. The amount of adenovirus required to transduce 50-60% of the cells was reduced 100-fold when Ad.GFP was preincubated with the EGDE-3,3' polymer. Polyethyleneimine (pEI), a positively charged polymer currently used as a standard for enhancing adenoviral transduction, also increased infectivity, but transgene expression was consistently higher with EGDE-3,3'. In addition, EGDE-3,3'-supplemented transduction of an adenovirus expressing an apoptosis inducing transgene, Ad.GFP-TRAIL, significantly enhanced the amount of cell death. Thus, our results indicate that novel biocompatible polymers may be useful in improving the delivery of adenoviral gene therapy.

  6. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  7. Construction of a targeting adenoviral vector carrying AFP promoter for expressing EGFP gene in AFP producing hepatocarcinoma cell

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu-Jun; Gong, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-An; Li, Xu-Hong; Mei, Ying; Mi, Can; Huo, Yan-Ying

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant adenoviral vector carrying AFP promoter and EGFP gene for specific expression of EGFP gene in AFP producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells. METHODS: Based on the Adeno-XTM expression system, the human immediate early cytomegalovirus promoter (PCMV IE) was removed from the plasmid, pshuttle, and replaced by a 0.3 kb α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter that was synthesized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was inserted into the multi-clone site (MCS), and then the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying the 0.3 kb AFP promoter and EGFP gene was constructed. Cells of a normal liver cell line (LO2), a hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2) and a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) were transfected with the adenovirus. Northern blot and fluorescence microscopy were used to detect the expression of the EGFP gene at mRNA or protein level in three different cell lines. RESULTS: The 0.3 kb AFP promoter was synthesized through PCR from the human genome. The AFP promoter and EGFP gene were directly inserted into the plasmid pshuttle as confirmed by restriction digestion and DNA sequencing. Northern blot showed that EGFP gene was markedly transcribed in HepG2 cells, but only slightly in LO2 and HeLa cells. In addition, strong green fluorescence was observed in HepG2 cells under a fluorescence microscopy, but fluorescence was very weak LO2 and HeLa cells. CONCLUSION: Under control of the 0.3 kb human AFP promoter, the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying EGFP gene can be specially expressed in AFP-producing HepG2 cells. Therefore, this adenovirus system can be used as a novel, potent and specific tool for gene-targeting therapy for the AFP positive primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:14716819

  8. Alanine–glyoxylate aminotransferase-deficient mice, a model for primary hyperoxaluria that responds to adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Salido, Eduardo C.; Li, Xiao M.; Lu, Yang; Wang, Xia; Santana, Alfredo; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Torres, Armando; Shapiro, Larry J.; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the alanine–glyoxylate amino transferase gene (AGXT) are responsible for primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare disease characterized by excessive hepatic oxalate production that leads to renal failure. We generated a null mutant mouse by targeted mutagenesis of the homologous gene, Agxt, in embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice developed normally, and they exhibited hyperoxaluria and crystalluria. Approximately half of the male mice in mixed genetic background developed calcium oxalate urinary stones. Severe nephrocalcinosis and renal failure developed after enhancement of oxalate production by ethylene glycol administration. Hepatic expression of human AGT1, the protein encoded by AGXT, by adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer in Agxt−/− mice normalized urinary oxalate excretion and prevented oxalate crystalluria. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that, as in the human liver, the expressed wild-type human AGT1 was predominantly localized in mouse hepatocellular peroxisomes, whereas the most common mutant form of AGT1 (G170R) was localized predominantly in the mitochondria. PMID:17110443

  9. A novel single tetracycline-regulative adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax gene expression and cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Zhang, Lidong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Tongyu; Yin, Min; Xu, Kai; Ji, Lin; Roth, Jack A; Fang, Bingliang

    2002-07-18

    Using a binary adenoviral system, we recently showed that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter induces tumor-specific Bax gene expression. However, the strong cytotoxicity of Bax and other pro-apoptotic genes to packaging 293 cells has so far hindered construction of the desired single adenoviral vectors expressing toxic genes. We report here the construction of a single bicistronic adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax expression. The vector (Ad/gBax) utilizes the Tet-Off system and expresses a GFP/Bax fusion protein for easy detection. The hTERT promoter drives the expression of tTA, a transactivator capable of binding to TRE (tetracycline-responsive element) in the absence of tetracycline, which in turn induces expression of the GFP-Bax gene. The addition of tetracycline in 293 cells blocks the binding of tTA to TRE and substantially inhibits GFP-Bax expression and toxicity, thus allowing the packaging and production of Ad/gBax. Our data show that Ad/gBax could drive the high expression of GFP-Bax in tumor cells but not in normal cells and mouse tissues. Furthermore, the expression of GFP-Bax fusion protein elicited tumor-specific apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo at a level comparable to that induced by the binary system. Thus, Ad/gBax may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancers.

  10. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  11. Adenoviral gene vector tethering to nanoparticle surfaces results in receptor-independent cell entry and increased transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Chorny, Michael; Fishbein, Ilia; Alferiev, Ivan S; Nyanguile, Origene; Gaster, Richard; Levy, Robert J

    2006-09-01

    The present studies investigated the hypothesis that affinity immobilization of replication-defective adenoviruses (Ad) on the surfaces of biodegradable nanoparticles (NP) can improve transduction through uncoupling cellular uptake from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Ad was tethered to the surfaces of polylactide-based NP that were surface-activated using a photoreactive polyallylamine-benzophenone-pyridyldithiocarboxylate polymer, which enabled (via thiol chemistry) the covalent attachment of Ad-binding proteins, either the recombinant D1 domain of CAR or an adenoviral knob-specific monoclonal antibody. Gene transfer by NP-Ad complexes was studied in relation to cellular uptake as a function of cell type and the character of NP-Ad binding. NP-Ad complexes, but not Ad applied with or without control nonimmune IgG-modified NP, significantly increased green fluorescent protein reporter expression in endothelioma and endothelial and arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) in direct correlation to the extent of NP-Ad internalization. CAR-independent uptake of NP-Ad was confirmed by demonstrating inhibition of free Ad- but not NP-Ad complex-mediated transduction by knob protein. Complexes formulated with an Ad encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibited growth of cultured SMC to a significantly greater extent than those with (GFP)Ad or (NULL)Ad or free vector. It is concluded that Ad-specific affinity tethering to biodegradable NP can significantly increase the level of gene expression via a CAR-independent uptake mechanism.

  12. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  13. Adenoviral Gene Transfer of Hepatic Stimulator Substance Confers Resistance Against Hepatic Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury by Improving Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Jun; Li, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) has been suggested to protect liver cells from various toxins. However, the precise role of HSS in hepatic ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unknown. This study aims to elucidate whether overexpression of HSS could attenuate hepatic ischemia–reperfusion injury and its possible mechanisms. Both in vivo hepatic I/R injury in mice and in vitro hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) in a cell model were used to evaluate the effect of HSS protection after adenoviral gene transfer. Moreover, a possible mitochondrial mechanism of HSS protection was investigated. Efficient transfer of the HSS gene into liver inhibited hepatic I/R injury in mice, as evidenced by improvement in liver function tests, the preservation of hepatic morphology, and a reduction in hepatocyte apoptosis. HSS overexpression also inhibited H/R-induced cell death, as detected by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. The underlying mechanism of this hepatic protection might involve the attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial-dependent cell apoptosis, as shown by the good preservation of mitochondrial ultrastructure, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the inhibition of cytochrome c leakage and caspase activity. Moreover, the suppression of H/R-induced mitochondrial ROS production and the maintenance of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities may participate in this mechanism. This new function of HSS expands the possibility of its application for the prevention of I/R injury, such as hepatic resection and liver transplantation in clinical practice. PMID:23461564

  14. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  15. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  16. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  17. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human Apo A-I for gene therapy in LDLR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Leggiero, E; Astone, D; Cerullo, V; Lombardo, B; Mazzaccara, C; Labruna, G; Sacchetti, L; Salvatore, F; Croyle, M; Pastore, L

    2013-12-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors have great potential for gene therapy applications; however, their administration induces acute toxicity that impairs safe clinical applications. We previously observed that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors strongly reduces the acute response in murine and primate models. To evaluate whether PEGylated HD-Ad vectors combine reduced toxicity with the correction of pathological phenotypes, we administered an HD-Ad vector expressing the human apolipoprotein A-I (hApoA-I) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice (a model for familial hypercholesterolemia) fed a high-cholesterol diet. Mice were treated with high doses of HD-Ad-expressing apo A-I or its PEGylated version. Twelve weeks later, LDL levels were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels higher in mice treated with either of the vectors than in untreated mice. After terminal killing, the areas of atherosclerotic plaques were much smaller in the vector-treated mice than in the control animals. Moreover, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was lower and consequently the toxicity profile better in mice treated with PEGylated vector than in mice treated with the unmodified vector. This finding indicates that the reduction in toxicity resulting from PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors does not impair the correction of pathological phenotypes. It also supports the clinical potential of these vectors for the correction of genetic diseases.

  18. Composite Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated gene and siRNA delivery has been an appealing area to gene therapists when they attempt to treat the diseases by manipulating the genetic information in the target cells. However, the advances in materials science could not keep up with the demand for multifunctional nanomaterials to achieve desired delivery efficiency. Researchers have thus taken an alternative approach to incorporate various materials into single composite nanoparticle using different fabrication methods. This approach allows nanoparticles to possess defined nanostructures as well as multiple functionalities to overcome the critical extracellular and intracellular barriers to successful gene delivery. This chapter will highlight the advances of fabrication methods that have the most potential to translate nanoparticles from bench to bedside. Furthermore, a major class of composite nanoparticle–lipid-based composite nanoparticles will be classified based on the components and reviewed in details. PMID:25409605

  19. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  20. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  1. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation. PMID:27727248

  2. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  3. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Novo, Luís; Mastrobattista, Enrico; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority of these formulations are based on polycationic structures, due to their ability to interact with negatively charged nucleic acids to spontaneously form nanoparticles. In recent years, several polycationic systems have demonstrated high transfection in vitro. However, progress toward clinical applications has been slow, mainly because the cationic nature of these systems leads to intolerable toxicity levels, inappropriate biodistribution and unsatisfactory efficiency in vivo, particularly after systemic administration. Decationized polyplexes are a new class of gene delivery systems that have been developed as an alternative for conventional polycation-based systems. The major innovation introduced by decationized polyplexes is that these systems are based on neutral polymers, without any detrimental effect on the physicochemical stability or encapsulation ability, due to the transient presence of cationic charge and disulfide cross-links between the polymer chains by which the nucleic acids are physically entrapped in the particles. This editorial summarizes the most important features of decationized polyplexes and discusses potential implications for the development of new safe and efficient gene delivery systems.

  4. [Values and limits of adenoviral vectors for gene transfer in vivo].

    PubMed

    Briand, P; Kahn, A

    1993-10-01

    Review of the therapeutic use of DNA transfer to treat a certain number of hereditary diseases (such as adenosine deaminase deficiency) or acquired diseases. The strategies (ex vivo manipulation or direct in vivo transfer of the corrective gene), vectors (retrovirus, adenovirus, nonviral vectors), and diseases which can benefit from gene therapy are considered and discussed together with an evaluation of the risk of gene therapy.

  5. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place.

  6. Gene Therapy of Disseminated Breast Cancer Using Adenoviral Vectors Targeted Through Immunological Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    vectors encoding the firefly luciferase and 13-galactosidase reporter genes. In addition to these, an adenovirus vector encoding for the cytosine ... deaminase (CD) gene will be used to perform therapeutic studies. The CD enzyme converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a

  7. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  8. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  9. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  10. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  11. A soluble CAR-SCF fusion protein improves adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer to c-Kit-positive hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Akira; Okada, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kume, Akihiro; Takatoku, Masaaki; Komatsu, Norio; Hanazono, Yutaka; Ozawa, Keiya

    2003-11-01

    Although adenoviral vectors primarily derived from the adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) are widely used for many gene transfer applications, they cannot efficiently infect hematopoietic cells, since these cells do not express the coxsackie-adenoviral receptor (CAR). We have developed a soluble fusion protein that bridges adenoviral fibers and the c-Kit receptor to alter Ad5 tropism to immature hematopoietic cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein consists of the extracellular domains of CAR and stem cell factor (SCF). The human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell lines UT-7 and M07e, human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K-562, and erythroleukemia cell line TF-1 were used to assess CAR-SCF-assisted Ad5-mediated gene transfer. Hematopoietic cell lines were infected with an Ad5 vector (Ad5-eGFP) or a fiber-mutant Ad5/F35 (Ad5/F35-eGFP) expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene in the presence or absence of CAR-SCF. Twenty-four hours after infection, more than 80% of M07e cells infected in the presence of CAR-SCF were eGFP-positive, compared with very few eGFP-positive cells following Ad5-eGFP infection in the absence of CAR-SCF. The enhancement of Ad5-eGFP infection by CAR-SCF was greater than that caused by Ad5/F35-eGFP (50%). The ability of CAR-SCF to enhance Ad5-eGFP infectivity was highly dependent on cellular c-Kit expression levels. Furthermore, CAR-SCF also enhanced Ad5-mediated gene transfer into human primary CD34(+) cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein assists Ad5-mediated transduction to c-Kit(+) CAR(-) hematopoietic cells. The use of this fusion protein would enhance a utility of Ad5-mediated hematopoietic cell transduction strategies. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Delivery systems for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mali, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  13. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. “adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein”, “adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein” and “adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein”. Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and

  14. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-Il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. "adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein", "adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein" and "adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein". Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and effective gene

  15. Calcium Gluconate in Phosphate Buffered Saline Increases Gene Delivery with Adenovirus Type 5

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. Methods/Results We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. Conclusion In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline. PMID:20927353

  16. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  17. Retargeting of Gene Expression Using Endothelium Specific Hexon Modified Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Lu, Zhi Hong; Preuss, Meredith A.; Barnes, Justin A.; Stockard, Cecil R.; Grizzle, William E.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter were characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution. PMID:24210128

  18. Retargeting of gene expression using endothelium specific hexon modified adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, Sergey A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Hong Lu, Zhi; Preuss, Meredith A; Barnes, Justin A; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Curiel, David T

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter was characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution.

  19. Combination efficacy of doxorubicin and adenoviral methioninase gene therapy with prodrug selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Miki, Kenji; Xu, Mingxu; Yamamoto, Norio; Moossa, A R; Hoffman, R M

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an enzyme activation prodrug gene therapy strategy using the methionine alpha,gamma-lyase gene (MET) cloned from Pseudomonas putida, in combination with selenomethionine (SeMET) as a prodrug. MET gene transfer via a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-MET) converts the physiologic compound SeMET to highly toxic methylselenol. In this study, we have developed a combination therapy approach using Ad-MET/SeMET gene therapy and doxorubicin (DOX). The combination significantly delayed the growth of H460, an aggressively-growing human lung cancer cell line, in nude mice. H460 cells were injected intra-dermally in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were divided into 12 groups [Control (Ctrl), DOX, SeMET, SeMET + DOX, Ad-Ctrl, Ad-Ctrl + SeMET, Ad-Ctrl + DOX, Ad-Ctrl + SeMET + DOX, Ad-MET, Ad-MET + DOX, Ad-MET + SeMET, and Ad-MET + SeMET + DOX]. DOX (2 mg/kg body weight) was given intra-peritoneally twice at 7-day intervals. SeMET (1 microM/mouse) was given by intra-tumor injection everyday, starting the following day after transfection with adenovirus. Tumor growth in the untreated group showed a 10-fold increase in tumor volume after two weeks. In contrast, the increase was only 2.5-fold in the DOX + Ad-MET/SeMET group. The treatment with DOX alone at the low-dose used showed no effect compared to the control group. There was a 5.8-fold increase in tumor volume in mice treated with Ad-MET/SeMET gene therapy alone. The tumor doubling-time was increased to approximately 10 days with the combination therapy of Ad-MET + SeMET + DOX as opposed to 2-3 days in all other treatment groups.

  20. Adenoviral Gene Therapy for Diabetic Keratopathy: Effects on Wound Healing and Stem Cell Marker Expression in Human Organ-cultured Corneas and Limbal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kramerov, Andrei A; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh; Ljubimov, Alexander V

    2016-04-07

    The goal of this protocol is to describe molecular alterations in human diabetic corneas and demonstrate how they can be alleviated by adenoviral gene therapy in organ-cultured corneas. The diabetic corneal disease is a complication of diabetes with frequent abnormalities of corneal nerves and epithelial wound healing. We have also documented significantly altered expression of several putative epithelial stem cell markers in human diabetic corneas. To alleviate these changes, adenoviral gene therapy was successfully implemented using the upregulation of c-met proto-oncogene expression and/or the downregulation of proteinases matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) and cathepsin F. This therapy accelerated wound healing in diabetic corneas even when only the limbal stem cell compartment was transduced. The best results were obtained with combined treatment. For possible patient transplantation of normalized stem cells, an example is also presented of the optimization of gene transduction in stem cell-enriched cultures using polycationic enhancers. This approach may be useful not only for the selected genes but also for the other mediators of corneal epithelial wound healing and stem cell function.

  1. Lipid Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nonviral vectors which offer a safer and versatile alternative to viral vectors have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. However, their transfection efficacy or level of expression is substantially lower than viral vectors. Among various nonviral gene vectors, lipid nanoparticles are an ideal platform for the incorporation of safety and efficacy into a single delivery system. In this chapter, we highlight current lipidic vectors that have been developed for gene therapy of tumors and other diseases. The pharmacokinetic, toxic behaviors and clinic trials of some successful lipids particles are also presented. PMID:25409602

  2. Targeting adeno-associated virus and adenoviral gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Gang; Huang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Bu-Yun; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) heavily endangers human heath worldwide. HCC is one of most frequent cancers in China because patients with liver disease, such as chronic hepatitis, have the highest cancer susceptibility. Traditional therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy in advanced liver cancer, and novel strategies are urgently needed to improve the limited treatment options for HCC. This review summarizes the basic knowledge, current advances, and future challenges and prospects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and adenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy of HCC. This paper also reviews the clinical trials of gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, immunotherapy, toxicity and immunological barriers for AAV and adenoviruses, and proposes several alternative strategies to overcome the therapeutic barriers to using AAV and adenoviruses as vectors. PMID:26755879

  3. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases.

  4. Efficacy of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene in the treatment of lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    LI, KUN-LIN; KANG, JUN; ZHANG, PENG; LI, LI; WANG, YU-BO; CHEN, HENG-YI; HE, YONG

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion induced by lung cancer exerts a negative impact on quality of life and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of the recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene (rAd-p53) in the local treatment of lung cancer and its synergistic effect with chemotherapy. The present study retrospectively recruited 210 patients with lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion who had adopted a treatment strategy of platinum chemotherapy. Pleurodesis was performed via the injection of cisplatin or rAd-p53. Long-term follow-up was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effects of cisplatin and rAd-p53 administration on pleural effusion and other relevant clinical indicators. The short-term effect of pleurodesis was as follows: The efficacy rate of rAd-p53 therapy was significantly higher compared with cisplatin therapy (71.26 vs. 54.47%), and the efficacy of treatment with ≥2×1012 viral particles of rAd-p53 for pleurodesis was significantly greater than treatment with 40 mg cisplatin (P<0.05). Furthermore, efficacy analysis performed 6 and 12 months after pleurodesis indicated that the efficacy rate of rAd-p53 was significantly greater than that of cisplatin (P<0.05). A comparison of median progression-free survival (PFS) time identified a significant difference (P<0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (3.3 vs. 2.7 months); however, a comparison of median overall survival time identified no significant difference (P>0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (9.6 vs. 8.7 months). In addition, Cox regression analysis indicated that PFS was not affected by clinical indicators such as age, gender, prognostic staging and smoking status; however, PFS was affected by pathological subtype (adenocarcinoma or squamous carcinoma) in the rAd-p53 group. rAd-p53 administration for pleurodesis exerts long-term therapeutic effects on the local treatment of lung cancer. Thus, a combination of rAd-p53 and chemotherapy may exert a synergistic effect and

  5. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles: Applications in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Abbasi, Elham; Dadashzadeh, Kianoosh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the direct transfer of genetic material to tissues or cells for the treatment of inherited disorders and acquired diseases. For gene delivery, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are typically combined with a delivery platform to encapsulate the gene, and promote cell uptake. Delivery technologies that have been used with MNPs contain polymeric, viral, as well as non-viral platforms. In this review, we focus on targeted gene delivery using MNPs.

  7. Systemic and mucosal immune responses following oral adenoviral delivery of influenza vaccine to the human intestine by radio controlled capsule

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Leesun; Martinez, C. Josefina; Hodgson, Katie A.; Trager, George R.; Brandl, Jennifer R.; Sandefer, Erik P.; Doll, Walter J.; Liebowitz, Dave; Tucker, Sean N.

    2016-01-01

    There are several benefits of oral immunization including the ability to elicit mucosal immune responses that may protect against pathogens that invade through a mucosal surface. Our understanding of human immune biology is hampered by the difficulty in isolating mucosal cells from humans, and the fact that animal models may or may not completely mirror human intestinal immunobiology. In this human pharmacodynamic study, a novel adenovirus vector-based platform expressing influenza hemagglutinin was explored. We used radio-controlled capsules to deliver the vaccine to either the jejunum or the ileum. The resulting immune responses induced by immunization at each of the intestinal sites were investigated. Both intestinal sites were capable of inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses to influenza hemagglutinin, but ileum delivery induced higher numbers of antibody secreting cells of IgG and IgA isotypes, increased mucosal homing B cells, and higher number of vaccine responders. Overall, these data provided substantial insights into human mucosal inductive sites, and aided in the design and selection of indications that could be used with this oral vaccine platform. PMID:27881837

  8. A novel adenoviral vector labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for real-time tracking of viral delivery.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jonathan; Sonabend, Adam M; Ulasov, Ilya V; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Rozhkova, Elena A; Novosad, Valentyn; Dashnaw, Stephen; Brown, Truman; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2012-06-01

    In vivo tracking of gene therapy vectors challenges the investigation and improvement of biodistribution of these agents in the brain, a key feature for their targeting of infiltrative malignant gliomas. The glioma-targeting Ad5/3-cRGD gene therapy vector was covalently bound to super-paramagnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (SPION) to monitor its distribution by MRI. Transduction of labeled and unlabeled vectors was assessed on the U87 glioma cell line and normal human astrocytes (NHA), and was higher in U87 compared to NHA, but was similar between labeled and unlabeled virus. An in vivo study was performed by intracranial subcortical injection of labeled-Ad5/3-cRGD particles into a pig brain. The labeled vector appeared in vivo as a T2-weighted hyperintensity and a T2-gradient echo signal at the injection site, persisting up to 72 hours post-injection. We describe a glioma-targeting vector that is labeled with SPION, thereby allowing for MRI detection with no change in transduction capability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene therapy techniques for the delivery of endothelial nitric oxide synthase to the lung for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deng, W; Bivalacqua, T J; Champion, H C; Hellstrom, W J; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious, often fatal disease characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary vascular bed, increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and right heart failure. The increased vascular resistance in the pulmonary circulation is due to structural changes and increased vasoconstrictor tone. Although current therapies have prolonged survival, the long-term outcome is not favorable. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and is important in regulating vascular resistance and in vascular remodeling in the lung. NO deficiency due to endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PH. Therefore, local eNOS gene delivery to the lung is a promising approach for the treatment of PH. Adenoviral-mediated in vivo gene therapy and adult stem cell-based ex vivo gene therapy are two attractive current gene therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In this chapter we describe the use of two gene transfer techniques, i.e., adenoviral gene transfer of eNOS and eNOS gene-modified rat marrow stromal cells, for eNOS gene delivery to the lung of laboratory animals for the treatment of PH.

  10. Tuning Surface Charge and PEGylation of Biocompatible Polymers for Efficient Delivery of Nucleic Acid or Adenoviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Jaesung; Bui, Quang Nam; Li, Yi; Yun, Chae-Ok; Lee, Doo Sung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-08-19

    As an effective and safe strategy to overcome the limits of therapeutic nucleic acid or adenovirus (Ad) vectors for in vivo application, various technologies to modify the surface of vectors with nonimmunogenic/biocompatible polymers have been emerging in the field of gene therapy. However, the transfection efficacy of the polymer to transfer genetic materials is still relatively weak. To develop more advanced and effective polymers to deliver not only Ad vectors, but also nucleic acids, 6 biocompatible polymers were newly designed and synthesized to different sizes (2k, 3.4k, or 5k) of poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) and different numbers of amine groups (2 or 5) based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]-l-glutamate (PNLG). We characterized size distribution and surface charge of 6 PNLGs after complexation with either nucleic acid or Ad. Among all 6 PNLGs, the 5 amine group PNLG showed the strongest efficacy in delivering nucleic acid as well as Ad vectors. Interestingly, cellular uptake results showed higher uptake ability in Ad complexed with 2 amine group PNLG than Ad/5 amine group PNLG, suggesting that the size of Ad/PNLGs is more essential than the surface charge for cellular uptake in polymers with charges greater than 30 mV. Moreover, the endosome escape ability of Ad/PNLGs increased depending on the number of amine groups, but decreased by PEG size. Cancer cell killing efficacy and immune response studies of oncolytic Ad/PNLGs showed 5 amine group PNLG to be a more effective and safe carrier for delivering Ad. Overall, these studies provide new insights into the functional mechanism of polymer-based approaches to either nucleic acid or Ad/nanocomplex. Furthermore, the identified ideal biocompatible PNLG polymer formulation (5 amine/2k PEG for nucleic acid, 5 amine/5k PEG for Ad) demonstrated high transduction efficiency as well as therapeutic value (efficacy and safety) and thus has strong potential for in vivo therapeutic

  11. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Race, genes and preterm delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    High rates of preterm delivery (PTD) among African Americans are the leading cause of excess infant mortality among African Americans. Failure to fully explain racial disparity in PTD has led to speculation that genetic factors might contribute to this disparity. Current evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute to PTD, but this does not imply that genetic factors contribute to racial disparity in PTD. Environmental factors clearly contribute to PTD. Many of these factors acting over a women's life prior to pregnancy disproportionately affect African Americans and contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Thus, inferring genetic contribution to racial disparity in PTD by attempting to control for environmental factors measured at a single point in time is flawed. There is emerging evidence of gene-environment interactions for PTD, some of which disproportionately affect African Americans. There is also evidence of racial differences in the prevalence of polymorphisms potentially related to PTD. However, to date there is no direct evidence that these differences contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Given the complexity of polygenic conditions such as PTD, the possibility of any single gene contributing substantially to racial disparity in PTD seems remote. PMID:16334498

  13. GLIPR1 tumor suppressor gene expressed by adenoviral vector as neoadjuvant intraprostatic injection for localized intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer preceding radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Thompson, Timothy C; Jain, Rajul K; Ayala, Gustavo E; Kurosaka, Shinji; Edamura, Kohei; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Ren, Chengzhen; Goltsov, Alexei A; Mims, Martha P; Hayes, Teresa G; Ittmann, Michael M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Gee, Adrian; Miles, Brian J; Kadmon, Dov

    2011-11-15

    GLIPR1 is upregulated by p53 in prostate cancer cells and has preclinical antitumor activity. A phase I clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and activity of the neoadjuvant intraprostatic injection of GLIPR1 expressing adenovirus for intermediate or high-risk localized prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy (RP). Eligible men had localized prostate cancer (T1-T2c) with Gleason score greater than or equal to 7 or prostate-specific antigen 10 ng/mL or more and were candidates for RP. Patients received the adenoviral vector expressing the GLIPR1 gene by a single injection into the prostate followed four weeks later by RP. Six viral particle (vp) dose levels were evaluated: 10(10), 5 × 10(10), 10(11), 5 × 10(11), 10(12), and 5 × 10(12) vp. Nineteen patients with a median age of 64 years were recruited. Nine men had T1c, 4 had T2a, and 3 had T2b and T2c clinical stage. Toxicities included urinary tract infection (n = 3), flu-like syndrome (n = 3), fever (n = 1), dysuria (n = 1), and photophobia (n = 1). Laboratory toxicities were grade 1 elevated AST/ALT (n = 1) and elevations of PTT (n = 3, with 1 proven to be lupus anticoagulant). No pathologic complete remission was seen. Morphologic cytotoxic activity, induction of apoptosis, and nuclear p27(Kip1) upregulation were observed. Peripheral blood CD8(+), CD4(+), and CD3(+) T-lymphocytes were increased, with upregulation of their HLA-DR expression and elevations of serum IL-12. The intraprostatic administration of GLIPR1 tumor suppressor gene expressed by an adenoviral vector was safe in men, with localized intermediate or high-risk prostate cancer preceding RP. Preliminary evidence of biologic antitumor activity and systemic immune response was documented.

  14. Comparison of [18F]FHBG and [14C]FIAU for imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression: adenoviral infection vs stable transfection.

    PubMed

    Min, Jung-Jun; Iyer, Meera; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2003-11-01

    Earlier studies involving comparison of different reporter probes have shown conflicting results between pyrimidine nucleosides [e.g., 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta- d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU)] and acycloguanosine derivatives [e.g., penciclovir (PCV), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine (FHBG)]. We hypothesized that this reported discrepancy may be related to how the reporter gene is delivered to the cells-stably transfected vs adenoviral infection. We directly compared the uptake characteristics of [(18)F]FHBG, [(3)H]PCV, and [(14)C]FIAU in cell culture and in vivo using an adenoviral mediated gene transfer model and stably transfected cells. We further compared the uptake of three reporter probes using both HSV1-tk and a mutant HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells to assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination. [(14)C]FIAU accumulation was greater than that of [(3)H]PCV and [(18)F]FHBG in control cells and in HSV1-tk stably transfected cells ( P<0.001). After infection of C6 cells with AdCMV- HSV1-tk (1.5x10(8) pfu), [(18)F]FHBG and [(3)H]PCV accumulation was significantly greater than that of [(14)C]FIAU ( P<0.01). [(18)F]FHBG and [(3)H]PCV accumulated to a significantly greater extent than [(14)C]FIAU in C6-stb-sr39tk+ and AdCMV- HSV1-sr39tk infected C6 cells ( P<0.001). Results from the nude mice supported the results in cell culture. [(14)C]FIAU led to significantly higher %ID/g in C6-stb-tk+ xenografts than [(18)F]FHBG ( P<0.05); however, compared with [(14)C]FIAU, [(18)F]FHBG led to as high %ID/g in HSV1-tk expressing hepatocytes and to significantly greater %ID/g in C6-stb-sr39tk+ xenografts and HSV1-sr39tk expressing hepatocytes. Dynamic sequential images showed that [(18)F]FHBG was well retained in HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells (C6-stb-sr39tk+) for at least 4 h after injection, while it was rapidly cleared from HSV1-tk expressing cells (MH3924A-stb-tk+). [(14)C]FIAU accumulated in HSV1-tk stably expressing cells to a greater extent

  15. Microneedles: an innovative platform for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Joanne; Donnelly, Ryan F; McCarthy, Helen O

    2015-08-01

    The advent of microneedle (MN) technology has provided a revolutionary platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents, particularly in the field of gene therapy. For over 20 years, the area of gene therapy has undergone intense innovation and progression which has seen advancement of the technology from an experimental concept to a widely acknowledged strategy for the treatment and prevention of numerous disease states. However, the true potential of gene therapy has yet to be achieved due to limitations in formulation and delivery technologies beyond parenteral injection of the DNA. Microneedle-mediated delivery provides a unique platform for the delivery of DNA therapeutics clinically. It provides a means to overcome the skin barriers to gene delivery and deposit the DNA directly into the dermal layers, a key site for delivery of therapeutics to treat a wide range of skin and cutaneous diseases. Additionally, the skin is a tissue rich in immune sentinels, an ideal target for the delivery of a DNA vaccine directly to the desired target cell populations. This review details the advancement of MN-mediated DNA delivery from proof-of-concept to the delivery of DNA encoding clinically relevant proteins and antigens and examines the key considerations for the improvement of the technology and progress into a clinically applicable delivery system.

  16. Inhaled gene delivery: a formulation and delivery approach.

    PubMed

    Gomes Dos Reis, Larissa; Svolos, Maree; Hartwig, Benedikt; Windhab, Norbert; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Gene therapy is a potential alternative to treat a number of diseases. Different hurdles are associated with aerosol gene delivery due to the susceptibility of plasmid DNA (pDNA) structure to be degraded during the aerosolization process. Different strategies have been investigated in order to protect and efficiently deliver pDNA to the lungs using non-viral vectors. To date, no successful therapy involving non-viral vectors has been marketed, highlighting the need for further investigation in this field. Areas covered: This review is focused on the formulation and delivery of DNA to the lungs, using non-viral vectors. Aerosol gene formulations are divided according to the current delivery systems for the lung: nebulizers, dry powder inhalers and pressurized metered dose inhalers; highlighting its benefits, challenges and potential application. Expert opinion: Successful aerosol delivery is achieved when the supercoiled DNA structure is protected during aerosolization. A formulation strategy or compounds that can protect, stabilize and efficiently transfect DNA into the cells is desired in order to produce an effective, low-cost and safe formulation. Nebulizers and dry powder inhalers are the most promising approaches to be used for aerosol delivery, due to the lower shear forces involved. In this context it is also important to highlight the importance of considering the 'pDNA-formulation-device system' as an integral part of the formulation development for a successful nucleic acid delivery.

  17. Developing adenoviral vectors encoding therapeutic genes toxic to host cells: comparing binary and single-inducible vectors expressing truncated E2F-1.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Hao, Hongying; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, H Sam

    2010-02-20

    Adenoviral vectors are highly efficient at transferring genes into cells and are broadly used in cancer gene therapy. However, many therapeutic genes are toxic to vector host cells and thus inhibit vector production. The truncated form of E2F-1 (E2Ftr), which lacks the transactivation domain, can significantly induce cancer cell apoptosis, but is also toxic to HEK-293 cells and inhibits adenovirus replication. To overcome this, we have developed binary- and single-vector systems with a modified tetracycline-off inducible promoter to control E2Ftr expression. We compared several vectors and found that the structure of expression cassettes in vectors significantly affects E2Ftr expression. One construct expresses high levels of inducible E2Ftr and efficiently causes apoptotic cancer cell death by activation of caspase-3. The approach developed in this study may be applied in other viral vectors for encoding therapeutic genes that are toxic to their host cells and/or inhibit vector propagation.

  18. Current strategies for myocardial gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; Tomasulo, Catherine E.; Sumaroka, Marina; Fargnoli, Anthony; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods of cardiac gene delivery can be classified by the site of injection, interventional approach and type of cardiac circulation at the time of transfer. General criteria to assess the efficacy of a given delivery method include: global versus regional myocardial transduction, technical complexity and the pathophysiological effects associated with its use, delivery-related collateral expression and the delivery-associated inflammatory and immune response. Direct gene delivery (intramyocardial, endocardial, epicardial) may be useful for therapeutic angiogenesis and for focal arrhythmia therapy but with gene expression which is primarily limited to regions in close proximity to the injection site. An often unappreciated limitation of these techniques is that they are frequently associated with substantial systemic vector delivery. Percutaneous infusion of vector into the coronary arteries is minimally invasive and allows for transgene delivery to the whole myocardium. Unfortunately, efficiency of intracoronary delivery is highly variable and the short residence time of vector within the coronary circulation and significant collateral organ expression limit its clinical potential. Surgical techniques, including the incorporation of cardiopulmonary bypass with isolated cardiac recirculation, represent novel delivery strategies that may potentially overcome these limitations; yet, these techniques are complex with inherent morbidity that must be thoroughly evaluated before safe translation into clinical practice. Characteristics of the optimal technique for gene delivery include low morbidity, increased myocardial transcapillary gradient, extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation and exclusion of residual vector from the systemic circulation after delivery to minimize extracardiac expression and to mitigate a cellular immune response. This article is part of a Special Section entitled “Special Section: Cardiovascular Gene Therapy”. PMID

  19. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 Gene Delivery Ameliorates Post-Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Ravi; Nilles, Kathleen; Gibson, Gregory; Burkhead, Benjamin; Mathier, Michael; McNamara, Dennis; McTiernan, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Adenoviral-mediated (AdV-T2) overexpression of TIMP-2 would blunt ventricular remodeling and improve survival in a murine model of chronic ischemic injury. Methods Male mice (n=124) aged 10–14 weeks underwent either 1) left coronary artery ligation to induce myocardial infarction (MI group, n=36), 2) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of AdV-T2 immediately post-MI (MI+T2 group, n=30), 3) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of a control adenovirus (MI+Ct, n=38), or 4) received no intervention (controls, n=20). On post-MI day 7, surviving mice (n=79) underwent echocardiographic, immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis. Results In infarcted animals, the MI+T2 group demonstrated improved survival (p< 0.02), better preservation of developed pressure and ventricular diameter (p<0.04), and the lowest expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (P<0.04) compared with MI and MI+Ct groups.. All infarcted hearts displayed significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration (p<0.04 versus control, MI, or MI+T2), with infiltration highest in the MI+Ct group and lowest in the MI+T2 group (p<0.04). Conclusions Adenoviral mediated myocardial delivery of the TIMP-2 gene improves post-MI survival and limits adverse remodeling in a murine model of myocardial infarction. PMID:21348952

  20. History of Polymeric Gene Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wagner, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    As an option for genetic disease treatment and an alternative for traditional cancer chemotherapy, gene therapy achieves significant attention. Nucleic acid delivery, however, remains a main challenge in human gene therapy. Polymer-based delivery systems offer a safer and promising route for therapeutic gene delivery. Over the past five decades, various cationic polymers have been optimized for increasingly effective nucleic acid transfer. This resulted in a chemical evolution of cationic polymers from the first-generation polycations towards bioinspired multifunctional sequence-defined polymers and nanocomposites. With the increasing of knowledge in molecular biological processes and rapid progress of macromolecular chemistry, further improvement of polymeric nucleic acid delivery systems will provide effective tool for gene-based therapy in the near future.

  1. Stimuli-responsive polymers in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Erhan

    2005-07-01

    Recent interest in clinical therapy has been directed to deliver nucleic acids (DNA, RNA or short-chain oligonucleotides) that alter gene expression within a specific cell population, thereby manipulating cellular processes and responses, which in turn stimulate immune responses or tissue regeneration, or blocks expression at the level of transcription or translation for treatment of several diseases. Both ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery can be achieved mostly by using a delivery system (vector). Viral vectors exhibit high gene expression, but also have very significant side effects. Mainly cationic polymeric systems are used as nonviral vectors, although usually with low levels of transfection. Through the use of stimuli-responsive polymers as novel vectors for gene delivery, two benefits can be obtained: high gene expression efficiency and more selective gene expression.

  2. Inhibition of Experimental Liver Cirrhosis in Mice by Telomerase Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Chang, Sandy; Millard, Melissa; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerated telomere loss has been proposed to be a factor leading to end-stage organ failure in chronic diseases of high cellular turnover such as liver cirrhosis. To test this hypothesis directly, telomerase-deficient mice, null for the essential telomerase RNA (mTR) gene, were subjected to genetic, surgical, and chemical ablation of the liver. Telomere dysfunction was associated with defects in liver regeneration and accelerated the development of liver cirrhosis in response to chronic liver injury. Adenoviral delivery of mTR into the livers of mTR-/- mice with short dysfunctional telomeres restored telomerase activity and telomere function, alleviated cirrhotic pathology, and improved liver function. These studies indicate that telomere dysfunction contributes to chronic diseases of continual cellular loss-replacement and encourage the evaluation of ``telomerase therapy'' for such diseases.

  3. Diseases originate and terminate by genes: unraveling nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Khan, Wahid; Ramakrishna, Sistla

    2013-12-01

    The world is driving in to the era of transformation of chemical therapeutic molecules to biological genetic material therapeutics, and that is where the biological drugs especially "genes" come into existence. These genes worked as "magical bullets" to specifically silence faulty genes responsible for progression of diseases. Viral gene delivery research is far ahead of nonviral gene delivery technique. However, with more advancement in polymer science, new ways are opening for better and efficient nonviral gene delivery. But efficient delivery method is always considered as a bottleneck for gene delivery as success of which will decide the fate of gene in cells. During the past decade, it became evident that extracellular as well as intracellular barriers compromise the transfection efficiency of nonviral vectors. The challenge for gene therapy research is to pinpoint the rate-limiting steps in this complex process and implement strategies to overcome the biological physiochemical and metabolic barriers encountered during targeting. The synergy between studies that investigate the mechanism of breaking in and breaking out of nonviral gene delivery carrier through various extracellular and intracellular barriers with desired characteristics will enable the rational design of vehicles and revolutionize the treatment of various diseases.

  4. Adenoviral gene transfer of an NF-kappaB super-repressor increases collagen deposition in rodent cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Jeffrey; Efron, Philip A; Park, Julie E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Barbul, Adrian

    2005-11-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) plays an essential role in inflammation. To date, no studies have investigated the effect of inhibiting NF-kappaB-mediated inflammation on normal cutaneous wound healing. We tested this by locally administering an adenovirus recombinant that constitutively expresses a super-repressor isoform of inhibitory-kappaB (IkappaB) into rats undergoing a well-established model of dorsal wound healing. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats underwent insertion of a sponge-pump construct into a dorsal subcutaneous pocket. One group of rats received pumps filled with the adenovirus expressing I-kappaB (rAd-Ikappab), a second group received pumps filled with adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (rAd-gfp), and a third received pumps filled with normal saline (NS). Rats were killed in groups of 6 on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 postoperation. The wound fluid was analyzed for nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations. The wound fluid was assayed for hydroxyproline (OHP) content, an index of reparative collagen deposition. Administration of rAd-Ikappab for 7 days resulted in higher collagen deposition (OHP) compared with the rAd-gfp and NS groups. NOx levels were significantly higher in the rAd-gfp group on day 1 and marginally so on day 5. TNF-alpha quantitation analysis found no significant difference among the 3 groups. IkappaB expression through an adenoviral vector in the cutaneous wound may improve rodent healing, as shown by increased collagen deposition, through decreased inflammation. This mechanism appears to be TNF-alpha independent. Inhibition of NF-kappaB may reduce inflammation by reducing the local NOx concentrations.

  5. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  6. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation.

  7. Intracellular trafficking of hybrid gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Rahul K; Lazebnik, Mihael; Pack, Daniel W

    2015-06-10

    Viral and non-viral gene delivery vectors are in development for human gene therapy, but both exhibit disadvantages such as inadequate efficiency, lack of cell-specific targeting or safety concerns. We have recently reported the design of hybrid delivery vectors combining retrovirus-like particles with synthetic polymers or lipids that are efficient, provide sustained gene expression and are more stable compared to native retroviruses. To guide further development of this promising class of gene delivery vectors, we have investigated their mechanisms of intracellular trafficking. Moloney murine leukemia virus-like particles (M-VLPs) were complexed with chitosan (Chi) or liposomes (Lip) comprising DOTAP, DOPE and cholesterol to form the hybrid vectors (Chi/M-VLPs and Lip/M-VLPs, respectively). Transfection efficiency and cellular internalization of the vectors were quantified in the presence of a panel of inhibitors of various endocytic pathways. Intracellular transport and trafficking kinetics of the hybrid vectors were dependent on the synthetic component and used a combination of clathrin- and caveolar-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Chi/M-VLPs were slower to transfect compared to Lip/M-VLPs due to the delayed detachment of the synthetic component. The synthetic component of hybrid gene delivery vectors plays a significant role in their cellular interactions and processing and is a key parameter for the design of more efficient gene delivery vehicles.

  8. Autoregulated expression of p53 from an adenoviral vector confers superior tumor inhibition in a model of prostate carcinoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo Esaki; da Silva Soares, Rafael Bento; Costanzi-Strauss, Eugenia; Strauss, Bryan E

    2016-12-01

    Alternative treatments for cancer using gene therapy approaches have shown promising results and some have even reached the marketplace. Even so, additional improvements are needed, such as employing a strategically chosen promoter to drive expression of the transgene in the target cell. Previously, we described viral vectors where high-level transgene expression was achieved using a p53-responsive promoter. Here we present an adenoviral vector (AdPGp53) where p53 is employed to regulate its own expression and which outperforms a traditional vector when tested in a model of gene therapy for prostate cancer. The functionality of AdPGp53 and AdCMVp53 were compared in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. AdPGp53 conferred greatly enhanced levels of p53 protein and induction of the p53 target gene, p21, as well as superior cell killing by a mechanism consistent with apoptosis. DU145 cells were susceptible to induction of death with AdPGp53, yet PC3 cells were quite resistant. Though AdCMVp53 was shown to be reliable, extremely high-level expression of p53 offered by AdPGp53 was necessary for tumor suppressor activity in PC3 and DU145. In situ gene therapy experiments revealed tumor inhibition and increased overall survival in response to AdPGp53, but not AdCMVp53. Upon histologic examination, only AdPGp53 treatment was correlated with the detection of both p53 and TUNEL-positive cells. This study points to the importance of improved vector performance for gene therapy of prostate cancer.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Expression of pIX gene induced by transgene promoter: possible cause of host immune response in first-generation adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Michio; Komiya, Kazuo; Murata, Masashi; Kimura, Toru; Kanaoka, Masaharu; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu

    2007-10-01

    First-generation (FG) adenoviral vectors (AdVs) have been widely used not only for gene therapy but also for basic studies. Because vectors of this type lack the E1A gene that is essential for the expression of other viral genes, their expression levels in target cells have been considered low. However, we found that the viral pIX gene, located immediately downstream of the inserted expression unit of the transgene, was significantly coexpressed with the transgene in cells infected with FG AdV. Whereas CAG and SRalpha promoters activated the pIX promoter considerably through their enhancer effects, the EF1alpha promoter hardly did. Moreover, when the expression unit was inserted in the rightward orientation, not only the pIX protein but also a fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of transgene product and pIX were sometimes coexpressed with the transgene product through an aberrant splicing mechanism. In in vivo experiments, a LacZ-expressing AdV bearing the CAG promoter caused an elevation of alanine aminotransferase, but an AdV bearing the EF1alpha promoter produced no detectable levels. Whereas the FG AdV expressing human growth hormone under the control of the CAG promoter maintained a high hormone level for less than 1 month, the FG AdV under the control of the EF1alpha promoter maintained a high level for at least 6 months. These results suggest that pIX coexpression may be one of the main causes of AdV-induced immune responses, and that the EF1alpha promoter is probably valuable for the long-term expression of FG AdV. Thus, the in vivo utility of FG AdV should be reevaluated.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  13. Circumventing Antivector Immunity: Potential Use of Nonhuman Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Podgorski, Iva I.; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles. PMID:24499174

  14. Circumventing antivector immunity: potential use of nonhuman adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Podgorski, Iva I; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles.

  15. Polysaccharide-based Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Huh, Myung Sook; Lee, Eun Jung; Koo, Heebeom; Yhee, Ji Young; Oh, Keun Sang; Son, Sohee; Lee, Sojin; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles based on nanotechnology and biotechnology have emerged as efficient carriers for various biopharmaceutical agents including proteins and genes. In particular, polysaccharides have attracted interest of many researchers in the drug delivery field due to their advantages such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, and ease of modification. A number of polysaccharides including chitosan, hyaluronic acid, and dextran, and their derivatives have been widely used as polymeric backbones for the formation of nanoparticles, which can be provided as valuable gene delivery carriers. In this review, we introduce the chemical and physical natures of different polysaccharides particularly used in biomedical applications, and then discuss recent progress in the development of polysaccharide-based nanoparticles for gene delivery.

  16. Cardiac gene therapy: optimization of gene delivery techniques in vivo.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; White, Jennifer D; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods--including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques--with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity.

  17. Cardiac Gene Therapy: Optimization of Gene Delivery Techniques In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; White, Jennifer D.; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods—including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques—with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity. PMID:19947886

  18. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Introgen's adenoviral p53 gene therapy [INGN 201, ADVEXIN] is in clinical development for the treatment of various cancers. The p53 tumour suppressor gene is deleted or mutated in many tumour cells and is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human tumours. INGN 201 has been shown to kill cancer cells directly. In August 2002, Introgen announced plans to file an application for INGN 201 with the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of head and neck cancer; the European filing will be submitted simultaneously with the previously scheduled (planned for 2004) submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) for ADVEXIN to the US FDA. On 20 February 2003, INGN 201 received orphan drug designation from the US FDA for head and neck cancer. INGN 201 is available for licensing although Introgen favours retaining partial or full rights to the therapy in the US. Introgen Therapeutics and its collaborative partner for the p53 programme, Aventis Gencell, have been developing p53 gene therapy products. The agreement was originally signed by Rhône-Poulenc Rorer's Gencell division, which became Aventis Gencell after Rhône-Poulenc Rorer merged with Hoechst Marion Roussel to form Aventis Pharma. According to the original agreement, Introgen was responsible for phase I and preclinical development in North America, while Aventis Gencell was responsible for clinical trials conducted in Europe and for clinical trials in North America beyond phase I. In April 2001, Aventis Gencell and Introgen restructured their existing collaboration agreement for p53 gene therapy products. Aventis Gencell indicated that p53 research had suffered from internal competition for resources and was pulling back from its development agreement with Introgen for p53 gene therapy products. Introgen will assume responsibility for worldwide development of all p53 programmes and will obtain exclusive worldwide commercial rights to p53-based gene therapy

  19. Bioreducible polymers for gene silencing and delivery.

    PubMed

    Son, Sejin; Namgung, Ran; Kim, Jihoon; Singha, Kaushik; Kim, Won Jong

    2012-07-17

    Polymeric gene delivery vectors show great potential for the construction of the ideal gene delivery system. These systems harness their ability to incorporate versatile functional traits to overcome most impediments encountered in gene delivery: from the initial complexation to their target-specific release of the therapeutic nucleic acids at the cytosol. Among the numerous multifunctional polymers that have been designed and evaluated as gene delivery vectors, polymers with redox-sensitive (or bioreducible) functional domains have gained great attention in terms of their structural and functional traits. The redox environment plays a pivotal role in sustaining cellular homeostasis and natural redox potential gradients exist between extra- and intracellular space and between the exterior and interior of subcellular organelles. In some cases, researchers have designed the polymeric delivery vectors to exploit these gradients. For example, researchers have taken advantage of the high redox potential gradient between oxidizing extracellular space and the reducing environment of cytosolic compartments by integrating disulfide bonds into the polymer structure. Such polymers retain their cargo in the extracellular space but selectively release the therapeutic nucleic acids in the reducing space within the cytosol. Furthermore, bioreducible polymers form stable complex with nucleic acids, and researchers can fabricate these structures to impart several important features such as site-, timing-, and duration period-specific gene expression. Additionally, the introduction of disulfide bonds within these polymers promotes their biodegradability and limits their cytotoxicity. Many approaches have demonstrated the versatility of bioreducible gene delivery, but the underlying biological rationale of these systems remains poorly understood. The process of disulfide reduction depends on multiple variables in the cellular redox environment. Therefore, the quest to unravel various

  20. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  1. Non-viral gene delivery using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Andrew J; Shah, Parth N; Yun, Yang H

    2009-11-01

    Although the potential benefits of gene therapy for the treatment of acquired and inherited genetic diseases have been demonstrated through preclinical studies, the results of human gene therapy trials have been disappointing. Recombinant viruses are the primary vectors of choice because of their ability to protect genetic materials, cross cellular membranes, escape from endosomes and transport their genetic materials into the nucleus. Unfortunately, viral vectors have been unable to gain widespread clinical application because of their toxicity and immunogenicity. Consequently, the need for safer alternatives has led to the development of liposomes, cationic polyplexes, microparticles and nanoparticles. Although these alternative vectors have shown promise, degradable nanoparticles are the only non-viral vectors that can provide a targeted intracellular delivery with controlled release properties. Furthermore, the potential advantage of degradable nanoparticles over their non-degradable counterparts is the reduced toxicity and the avoidance of accumulation within the target tissue after repeated administration. In this article, current non-viral gene delivery devices are reviewed with a special emphasis on nanoparticle gene delivery systems. Also, the authors highlight their philosophy and efforts on the development of l-tyrosine-based polyphosphate nanoparticle-based non-viral gene delivery systems and assess the potential benefits and shortcomings of their approach.

  2. Therapeutic gene editing: delivery and regulatory perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Park, Gyu Thae; Jin, Hyerim; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Gene-editing technology is an emerging therapeutic modality for manipulating the eukaryotic genome by using target-sequence-specific engineered nucleases. Because of the exceptional advantages that gene-editing technology offers in facilitating the accurate correction of sequences in a genome, gene editing-based therapy is being aggressively developed as a next-generation therapeutic approach to treat a wide range of diseases. However, strategies for precise engineering and delivery of gene-editing nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease Cas9), present major obstacles to the development of gene-editing therapies, as with other gene-targeting therapeutics. Currently, viral and non-viral vectors are being studied for the delivery of these nucleases into cells in the form of DNA, mRNA, or proteins. Clinical trials are already ongoing, and in vivo studies are actively investigating the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. However, the concept of correcting the genome poses major concerns from a regulatory perspective, especially in terms of safety. This review addresses current research trends and delivery strategies for gene editing-based therapeutics in non-clinical and clinical settings and considers the associated regulatory issues. PMID:28392568

  3. Therapeutic gene editing: delivery and regulatory perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Park, Gyu Thae; Jin, Hyerim; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2017-04-10

    Gene-editing technology is an emerging therapeutic modality for manipulating the eukaryotic genome by using target-sequence-specific engineered nucleases. Because of the exceptional advantages that gene-editing technology offers in facilitating the accurate correction of sequences in a genome, gene editing-based therapy is being aggressively developed as a next-generation therapeutic approach to treat a wide range of diseases. However, strategies for precise engineering and delivery of gene-editing nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease Cas9), present major obstacles to the development of gene-editing therapies, as with other gene-targeting therapeutics. Currently, viral and non-viral vectors are being studied for the delivery of these nucleases into cells in the form of DNA, mRNA, or proteins. Clinical trials are already ongoing, and in vivo studies are actively investigating the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. However, the concept of correcting the genome poses major concerns from a regulatory perspective, especially in terms of safety. This review addresses current research trends and delivery strategies for gene editing-based therapeutics in non-clinical and clinical settings and considers the associated regulatory issues.

  4. Modified montmorillonite as vector for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Cheng, Winston T K; Kuo, Tzang-Fu

    2006-06-01

    Currently, gene delivery systems can be divided into two parts: viral or non-viral vectors. In general, viral vectors have a higher efficiency on gene delivery. However, they may sometimes provoke mutagenesis and carcinogenesis once re-activating in human body. Lots of non-viral vectors have been developed that tried to solve the problems happened on viral vectors. Unfortunately, most of non-viral vectors showed relatively lower transfection rate. The aim of this study is to develop a non-viral vector for gene delivery system. Montmorillonite (MMT) is one of clay minerals that consist of hydrated aluminum with Si-O tetrahedrons on the bottom of the layer and Al-O(OH)2 octahedrons on the top. The inter-layer space is about 12 A. The room is not enough to accommodate DNA for gene delivery. In the study, the cationic hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) will be intercalated into the interlayer of MMT as a layer expander to expand the layer space for DNA accommodation. The optimal condition for the preparation of DNA-HDTMA-MMT is as follows: 1 mg of 1.5CEC HDTMA-MMT was prepared under pH value of 10.7 and with soaking time for 2 h. The DNA molecules can be protected from nuclease degradation, which can be proven by the electrophoresis analysis. DNA was successfully transfected into the nucleus of human dermal fibroblast and expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene with green fluorescence emission. The HDTMA-MMT has a great potential as a vector for gene delivery in the future.

  5. Adenoviral vector tethering to metal surfaces via hydrolyzable cross-linkers for the modulation of vector release and transduction.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Chorny, Michael; Connolly, Jeanne M; Adamo, Richard F; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The use of arterial stents and other medical implants as a delivery platform for surface immobilized gene vectors allows for safe and efficient localized expression of therapeutic transgenes. In this study we investigate the use of hydrolyzable cross-linkers with distinct kinetics of hydrolysis for delivery of gene vectors from polyallylamine bisphosphonate-modified metal surfaces. Three cross-linkers with the estimated t1/2 of ester bonds hydrolysis of 5, 12 and 50 days demonstrated a cumulative 20%, 39% and 45% vector release, respectively, after 30 days exposure to physiological buffer at 37 °C. Transgene expression in endothelial and smooth muscles cells transduced with substrate immobilized adenovirus resulted in significantly different expression profiles for each individual cross-linker. Furthermore, immobilization of adenoviral vectors effectively extended their transduction effectiveness beyond the initial phase of release. Transgene expression driven by adenovirus-tethered stents in rat carotid arteries demonstrated that a faster rate of cross-linker hydrolysis resulted in higher expression levels at day 1, which declined by day 8 after stent implantation, while inversely, slower hydrolysis was associated with increased arterial expression at day 8 in comparison with day 1. In conclusion, adjustable release of transduction-competent adenoviral vectors from metallic surfaces can be achieved, both in vitro and in vivo, through surface immobilization of adenoviral vectors using hydrolyzable cross-linkers with structure-specific release kinetics.

  6. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Wasala, Nalinda B; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-10-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic materials for heart gene delivery. Several nonviral vectors (e.g. naked plasmids, plasmid lipid/polymer complexes and oligonucleotides) have been tested. Commonly used viral vectors include lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus. Among these, adeno-associated virus has shown many attractive features for pre-clinical experimentation in animal models of heart diseases. We review the history and evolution of these vectors for heart gene transfer. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Anti-viral state segregates two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: potential relevance for adenoviral gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a leading cause of cancer mortality for which novel gene therapy approaches relying on tumor-tropic adenoviruses are being tested. Methods We obtained the global transcriptional profiling of primary PDAC using RNA from eight xenografted primary PDAC, three primary PDAC bulk tissues, three chronic pancreatitis and three normal pancreatic tissues. The Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133A was used. The results of the expression profiles were validated applying immunohistochemical and western blot analysis on a set of 34 primary PDAC and 10 established PDAC cell lines. Permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, Adenovirus 5 and Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6, was assessed on PDAC cell lines. Results The analysis of the expression profiles allowed the identification of two clearly distinguishable phenotypes according to the expression of interferon-stimulated genes. The two phenotypes could be readily recognized by immunohistochemical detection of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein, whose expression reflects the activation of interferon dependent pathways. The two molecular phenotypes discovered in primary carcinomas were also observed among established pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, suggesting that these phenotypes are an intrinsic characteristic of cancer cells independent of their interaction with the host's microenvironment. The two pancreatic cancer phenotypes are characterized by different permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, as cell lines expressing interferon stimulated genes resisted to Adenovirus 5 mediated lysis in vitro. Similar results were observed when cells were transduced with Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6. Conclusion Our study identified two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic cancer, characterized by a differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes and easily recognized by the expression of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein. We suggest that the detection

  8. Regulation of epithelial differentiation in rat intestine by intraluminal delivery of an adenoviral vector or silencing RNA coding for Schlafen 3.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L; Yuan, Lisi; Sun, Kelian; Kunovska, Lyudmyla; Seregin, Sergey; Amalfitano, Andrea; Basson, Marc D

    2013-01-01

    Although we stimulate enterocytic proliferation to ameliorate short gut syndrome or mucosal atrophy, less effort has been directed at enterocytic differentiation. Schlafen 3 (Slfn3) is a poorly understood protein induced during IEC-6 enterocytic differentiation. We hypothesized that exogenous manipulation of Slfn3 would regulate enterocytic differentiation in vivo. Adenoviral vector coding for Slfn3 cDNA (Ad-GFP-Slfn3) or silencing RNA for Slfn3 (siSlfn3) was introduced intraluminally into rat intestine. We assessed Slfn3, villin, sucrase-isomaltase (SI), Dpp4, and Glut2 by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We also studied Slfn3 and these differentiation markers in atrophic defunctionalized jejunal mucosa and the crypt-villus axis of normal jejunum. Ad-GFP-Slfn3 but not Ad-GFP increased Slfn3, villin and Dpp4 expression in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Injecting Ad-GFP-Slfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo increased mucosal Slfn3 mRNA three days later vs. intraluminal Ad-GFP. This Slfn3 overexpression was associated with increases in all four differentiation markers. Injecting siSlfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo substantially reduced Slfn3 and all four intestinal mucosal differentiation markers three days later, as well as Dpp4 specific activity. Endogenous Slfn3 was reduced in atrophic mucosa from a blind-end Roux-en-Y anastomosis in parallel with differentiation marker expression together with AKT and p38 signaling. Slfn3 was more highly expressed in the villi than the crypts, paralleling Glut2, SI and Dpp4. Slfn3 is a key intracellular regulator of rat enterocytic differentiation. Understanding how Slfn3 works may identify targets to promote enterocytic differentiation and maintain mucosal function in vivo, facilitating enteral nutrition and improving survival in patients with mucosal atrophy or short gut syndrome.

  9. Regulation of Epithelial Differentiation in Rat Intestine by Intraluminal Delivery of an Adenoviral Vector or Silencing RNA Coding for Schlafen 3

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L.; Yuan, Lisi; Sun, Kelian; Kunovska, Lyudmyla; Seregin, Sergey; Amalfitano, Andrea; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Although we stimulate enterocytic proliferation to ameliorate short gut syndrome or mucosal atrophy, less effort has been directed at enterocytic differentiation. Schlafen 3 (Slfn3) is a poorly understood protein induced during IEC-6 enterocytic differentiation. We hypothesized that exogenous manipulation of Slfn3 would regulate enterocytic differentiation in vivo. Adenoviral vector coding for Slfn3 cDNA (Ad-GFP-Slfn3) or silencing RNA for Slfn3 (siSlfn3) was introduced intraluminally into rat intestine. We assessed Slfn3, villin, sucrase-isomaltase (SI), Dpp4, and Glut2 by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We also studied Slfn3 and these differentiation markers in atrophic defunctionalized jejunal mucosa and the crypt-villus axis of normal jejunum. Ad-GFP-Slfn3 but not Ad-GFP increased Slfn3, villin and Dpp4 expression in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Injecting Ad-GFP-Slfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo increased mucosal Slfn3 mRNA three days later vs. intraluminal Ad-GFP. This Slfn3 overexpression was associated with increases in all four differentiation markers. Injecting siSlfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo substantially reduced Slfn3 and all four intestinal mucosal differentiation markers three days later, as well as Dpp4 specific activity. Endogenous Slfn3 was reduced in atrophic mucosa from a blind-end Roux-en-Y anastomosis in parallel with differentiation marker expression together with AKT and p38 signaling. Slfn3 was more highly expressed in the villi than the crypts, paralleling Glut2, SI and Dpp4. Slfn3 is a key intracellular regulator of rat enterocytic differentiation. Understanding how Slfn3 works may identify targets to promote enterocytic differentiation and maintain mucosal function in vivo, facilitating enteral nutrition and improving survival in patients with mucosal atrophy or short gut syndrome. PMID:24244554

  10. Gene delivery technologies for cardiac applications

    PubMed Central

    Katz, MG; Fargnoli, AS; Pritchette, LA; Bridges, CR

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western society. Advances in understanding the molecular pathology of these diseases, the evolution of vector technology, as well as defining the targets for therapeutic interventions has placed these conditions within the reach of gene-based therapy. One of the cornerstones of limiting the effectiveness of gene therapy is the establishment of clinically relevant methods of genetic transfer. Recently there have been advances in direct and transvascular gene delivery methods with the use of new technologies. Current research efforts in IHD are focused primarily on the stimulation of angiogenesis, modify the coronary vascular environment and improve endothelial function with localized gene-eluting catheters and stents. In contrast to standard IHD treatments, gene therapy in HF primarily targets inhibition of apoptosis, reduction in adverse remodeling and increase in contractility through global cardiomyocyte transduction for maximal efficacy. This article will review a variety of gene-transfer strategies in models of coronary artery disease and HF and discuss the relative success of these strategies in improving the efficiency of vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery. PMID:22418063

  11. Gene delivery using liposome technology.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Suzuki, N; Ebihara, K; Morita, H; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, A; Sugaya, S; Serikawa, T; Tanaka, K

    1999-11-01

    Development of more reliable liposomal formulations and preparation methods which can be used for gene therapy instead of commonly used viral vectors is expected. We have already developed the freeze-dried empty (non-drug-containing) liposomes (FDEL) method for mass-production of liposomal products. After these freeze-dried empty liposomes are rehydrated with aqueous drug solutions, many kinds of drugs can be encapsulated highly efficiently, and particle size can be controlled well. This study evaluated the usefulness of this FDEL method for preparation of liposomes containing DNA with a particular attention to the stability of DNA. When the liposomes were prepared by the conventional lipid-film method on a relatively large scale with use of a Potter-homogenizer (a teflon homogenizer), significant degradation and conformational change of DNA was observed during homogenization. Loss of DNA was also significant after extrusion for sizing and sterilization; residual DNA in the final preparation was hardly detected. When the FDEL method was used, on the other hand, no degradation, conformational change or loss of DNA was observed, and particle size was easily controlled. Moreover, there was no significant difference in luciferase activity between the lipid-film method used on a small scale with use of a vortex mixer and the FDEL method after transfection of tumor cells (HRA, HEC-1A and Colo320DM) by the liposomes containing DNA (PGV-C). These findings suggest that the FDEL method is very useful for preparation of liposomes containing DNA.

  12. Cytotoxic effect of a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector with cytosine deaminase gene driven by L-plastin promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihwa; Kim, Sunja; Lee, Kyumhyang; Kim, Changmin; Chung, Injae

    2007-06-01

    Great expectations are set on gene therapy for the treatment of malignant hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in East Asia. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (AV) have been developed in which the L-plastin promoter (LP) regulates the expression of transgenes, in a tumor cell specific manner, resulting in an increase in the therapeutic index. The development of the AdLPCD vector, a replication-incompetent AV, containing a transcription unit of LP and E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD), was reported in our previous work. In the present study, the AdLPCD vector combined with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) administration was tested to see if it might have significant utility in the chemosensitization of L-plastin positive HCC. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Chang Liver, Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells) were investigated for the expression of LacZ after infecting the cells with the AdLPLacZ vector containing a 2.4 kb fragment of LP and the LacZ gene. Relatively high levels of LP activity were detected in HepG2, followed by Chang Liver cells; whereas, no promoter activity was found in Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells, as determined by AdLPLacZ infection followed by the beta-galactosidase assay. In addition, the results of RT-PCR assays for the detection of endogenous L-plastin mRNA in these cells lines correlated well with those of the beta-galactosidase activity after infection with AdLPLacZ. Based on these data, the cytotoxic effect of AdLPCD/5-FC was evaluated in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that the CD gene delivered by AV could sensitize HepG2 cells to the prodrug, 5-FC. However, the observed effects were insufficient to cause the death of most of cells. This suggests that the screening of patients for an AdLP/5-FC strategy based on AdLPLacZ data might not always guarantee a good therapeutic outcome.

  13. Future prospects for gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kuşcu, Lale; Sezer, Ali Demir

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy is the challenging area of biotechnology. Despite its promise for critical diseases, it has serious safety and efficiency issues, particularly with regards to gene transfer systems. Areas covered: We examined the current situation with gene transfer systems and addressed problems this technology. We then searched patent applications about in the area from the Patentscope online system, the international patent database. We analyzed the data obtained to get a general idea about gene delivery systems designed for future use and assessed approaches for more efficient, safer and valid delivery systems. Expert opinion: When quality assurance terms are fulfilled, some of these issues (genetic changes, mutations) could be minimized during the production process. Modification of vectors for improving their efficiency and safety or development of alternative transfer systems could be the solutions for these problems. Gene transfer technologies are important for gene therapy and should demonstrate effective, target-specific and acceptable safety profiles. For this reason, searching for alternatives to current systems is a necessity.

  14. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  15. Novel Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Rachel Jennifer

    The lung is an important target for gene and drug therapy of many diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), tubuerculosis (TB) and lung cancer. In fact, the pulmonary route has been employed as a means of delivering drugs for centuries, dating back 4000 years to India where inhaled vapors were used for medicinal purpose. Currently, pulmonary administration of small, hydrophobic drugs leads to rapid local and systemic absorption. However, delivery of large biomacromolecules, such as therapeutic genes, has not yet been accomplished. Here, I test the hypothesis that a rationally engineered nanoparticle (NP) vector can improve delivery of large biomacromolecules. . In this dissertation I tested this hypothesis using a hybrid NP delivery system consisting of a blend of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE), a cationic polymer that is particularly useful for delivery of nucleic acids.. PBAE/PLGA nanoparticles (15% PBAE) loaded with plasmid DNA were surface modified with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) via a PEGylated phospholipid linker. This optimized NP formulation was able to induce substantial intracellular uptake and transfect lung epithelial cells in vitro while imparting minimal cellular toxicity. In order to determine the most effective method to deliver these NPs to the lung I used fluorescently labeled particles to study the biodistribution of particles after administration to the lung of mice via various administration routes. I determined that the intranasal route was most effective. I further investigated this route and determined that an average of 37.1 +/- 15.1 % of lung cells had NP association after 4hrs. I also investigated the association of particles with different lung cell types like macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells and determined that our best particle formulations associated with approximately 80% of both of these cell types. To demonstrate the ability of the

  16. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  17. Validation of IKKβ as therapeutic target in airway inflammatory disease by adenoviral-mediated delivery of dominant-negative IKKβ to pulmonary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Catley, Matthew C; Chivers, Joanna E; Holden, Neil S; Barnes, Peter J; Newton, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the lungs and the transcription factor NF-κB regulates the production of numerous inflammatory mediators that may have a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Hence, the signalling pathways leading to NF-κB activation are considered prime targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. The prevention of NF-κB activity in mice, through the knockout of IKKβ or p65, causes fatal liver degeneration in utero making it difficult to determine the full implications of inhibiting NF-κB activity in tissues physiologically relevant to human diseases. This study used adenovirus delivery of a dominant inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBαΔN) and dominant-negative IKKα (IKKα(KM)) and IKKβ (IKKβ(KA)) to investigate the role of the individual IKKs in NF-κB activation and inflammatory gene transcription by human pulmonary A549 cells. Overexpression of IKKβ(KA) or IκBαΔN prevented NF-κB-dependent transcription and DNA binding. IKKβ(KA) also prevented IκBα kinase activity. Similarly, IKKβ(KA) and IκBαΔN overexpression also inhibited IL-1β- and TNFα-dependent increases in ICAM-1, IL-8 and GM-CSF in addition to IL-1β-mediated increases in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, whereas IKKα(KM) overexpression had little effect on these outputs. IKKβ(KA) also reduced cell viability and induced caspase-3 and PARP cleavage regardless of the stimuli, indicating the induction of apoptosis. This effect seemed to be directly related to IKKβ kinase activity since IκBαΔN only induced PARP cleavage in TNFα-treated cells. These results demonstrate that inhibition of IKKβ and NF-κB suppresses inflammatory mediator production and reduces A549 cell viability. Thus, novel therapies that target IKKβ could have potent anti-inflammatory effects and may be beneficial in the treatment of certain cancers. PMID:15723090

  18. Polymers for gene delivery across length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, David

    2006-06-01

    A number of human diseases stem from defective genes. One approach to treating such diseases is to replace, or override, the defective genes with normal genes, an approach called 'gene therapy'. However, the introduction of correctly functioning DNA into cells is a non-trivial matter, and cells must be coaxed to internalize, and then use, the DNA in the desired manner. A number of polymer-based synthetic systems, or 'vectors', have been developed to entice cells to use exogenous DNA. These systems work across the nano, micro and macro length scales, and have been under continuous development for two decades, with varying degrees of success. The design criteria for the construction of more-effective delivery vectors at each length scale are continually evolving. This review focuses on the most recent developments in polymer-based vector design at each length scale.

  19. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  20. Adenoviral vector-based strategies for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Tandon, Manish; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2009-01-01

    Definitive treatment of cancer has eluded scientists for decades. Current therapeutic modalities like surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and receptor-targeted antibodies have varied degree of success and generally have moderate to severe side effects. Gene therapy is one of the novel and promising approaches for therapeutic intervention of cancer. Viral vectors in general and adenoviral (Ad) vectors in particular are efficient natural gene delivery systems and are one of the obvious choices for cancer gene therapy. Clinical and preclinical findings with a wide variety of approaches like tumor suppressor and suicide gene therapy, oncolysis, immunotherapy, anti-angiogenesis and RNA interference using Ad vectors have been quite promising, but there are still many hurdles to overcome. Shortcomings like increased immunogenicity, prevalence of preexisting anti-Ad immunity in human population and lack of specific targeting limit the clinical usefulness of Ad vectors. In recent years, extensive research efforts have been made to overcome these limitations through a variety of approaches including the use of conditionally-replicating Ad and specific targeting of tumor cells. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of Ad vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:20160875

  1. Nanoparticle motivated gene delivery for ophthalmic application

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Rajendra Narayan; Zheng, Min; Han, Zongchao

    2015-01-01

    Ophthalmic gene therapy is an intellectual and intentional manipulation of desired gene expression into the specific cells of an eye for the treatment of ophthalmic (ocular) genetic dystrophies and pathological conditions. Exogenous nucleic acids such as DNA, small interfering RNA (siRNA), micro RNA (miRNA), etc., are used for the purpose of managing expression of the desired therapeutic proteins in ocular tissues. The delivery of unprotected nucleic acids into the cells is limited due to exogenous and endogenous degradation modalities. Nanotechnology, a promising and sophisticated cutting edge tool, works as a protective shelter for these therapeutic nucleic acids. They are able to be safely delivered to the required cells in order to modulate anticipated protein expression. To this end, nanotechnology is seen as a potential and promising strategy in the field of ocular gene delivery. This review focused on current nanotechnology modalities and other promising non-viral strategies being used to deliver therapeutic genes in order to treat various devastating ocular diseases. PMID:26109528

  2. Specific transcription of an adenoviral gene that possesses no TATA sequence homology in extracts of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Leong, K; Flint, S J

    1984-09-25

    Transcription of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) IVa2 gene, which contains no TATA-like sequence in the region immediately upstream of the IVa2 cap sites (Baker, C. C., and Ziff, E. B. (1981) J. Mol. Biol. 149, 189-221), has been examined in extracts of HeLa cells (Manley, J. L., Fire, A., Cano, A., Sharp, P. A., and Gefter, M.L. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 3855-3859). Run-off transcripts of the predicted length of those initiated at the IVa2 cap sites were synthesized from different Ad2 DNA templates, each of which also contained the major late transcriptional control region. Mapping of the 5' ends of the RNA made from one template by a nuclease protection assay established the fidelity of initiation of IVa2 transcription in vitro. The efficiency of IVa2 expression in whole HeLa extracts was influenced quite dramatically by monovalent and divalent metal ion concentrations and the concentration of extract protein present in the reaction mixture. Under certain conditions, IVa2 run-off transcripts were made almost as efficiently as those from the Ad2 major late transcriptional control region. However, conditions promoting optimal IVa2 transcription in vitro did not favor recognition of the major late transcriptional control region, and vice versa: the synthesis of IVa2 and major late run-off transcripts responded differently to all parameters tested.

  3. Myocardial β2-adrenoceptor gene delivery promotes coordinated cardiac adaptive remodelling and angiogenesis in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rengo, G; Zincarelli, C; Femminella, GD; Liccardo, D; Pagano, G; de Lucia, C; Altobelli, GG; Cimini, V; Ruggiero, D; Perrone-Filardi, P; Gao, E; Ferrara, N; Lymperopoulos, A; Koch, WJ; Leosco, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We investigated whether β2-adrenoceptor overexpression could promote angiogenesis and improve blood perfusion and left ventricular (LV) remodeling of the failing heart. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We explored the angiogenic effects of β2-adrenoceptor overexpression in a rat model of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). Cardiac adenoviral-mediated β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was obtained via direct intramyocardial injection 4-weeks post-MI. Adenovirus(Ad)-GFP and saline injected rats served as controls. Furthermore, we extended our observation to β2-adrenoceptor −/− mice undergoing MI. KEY RESULTS Transgenes were robustly expressed in the LV at 2 weeks post-gene therapy, whereas their expression was minimal at 4-weeks post-gene delivery. In HF rats, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor overexpression resulted in enhanced basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cardiac contractility at 2-weeks post-gene delivery. At 4 weeks post-gene transfer, Ad-β2-adrenoceptor HF rats showed improved LV remodeling and cardiac function. Importantly, β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was associated with a markedly increased capillary and arteriolar length density and enhanced in vivo myocardial blood flow and coronary reserve. At the molecular level, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor gene transfer induced the activation of the VEGF/PKB/eNOS pro-angiogenic pathway. In β2-adrenoceptor−/− mice, we found a ∼25% reduction in cardiac capillary density compared with β2-adrenoceptor+/+ mice. The lack of β2-adrenoceptors was associated with a higher mortality rate at 30 days and LV dilatation, and a worse global cardiac contractility compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION β2-Adrenoceptors play an important role in the regulation of the angiogenic response in HF. The activation of VEGF/PKB/eNOS pathway seems to be strongly involved in this mechanism. PMID:22452704

  4. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  5. Fetal muscle gene therapy/gene delivery in large animals.

    PubMed

    Abi-Nader, Khalil N; David, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to the fetal muscles is a potential strategy for the early treatment of muscular dystrophies. In utero muscle gene therapy can also be used to treat other genetic disorders such as hemophilia, where the missing clotting proteins may be secreted from the treated muscle. In the past few years, studies in small animal models have raised the hopes that a phenotypic cure can be obtained after fetal application of gene therapy. Studies of efficacy and safety in large animals are, however, essential before clinical application can be considered in the human fetus. For this reason, the development of clinically applicable strategies for the delivery of gene therapy to the fetal muscles is of prime importance. In this chapter, we describe the protocols for in utero ultrasound-guided gene delivery to the ovine fetal muscle in early gestation. In particular, procedures to inject skeletal muscle groups such as the thigh and thoracic musculature and targeting the diaphragm in the fetus are described in detail.

  6. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  7. FUNCTIONAL NANOPARTICLES FOR MOLECULAR IMAGING GUIDED GENE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has great potential to bring tremendous changes in treatment of various diseases and disorders. However, one of the impediments to successful gene therapy is the inefficient delivery of genes to target tissues and the inability to monitor delivery of genes and therapeutic responses at the targeted site. The emergence of molecular imaging strategies has been pivotal in optimizing gene therapy; since it can allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of gene delivery noninvasively and spatiotemporally. Due to the unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials, numerous functional nanoparticles show promise in accomplishing gene delivery with the necessary feature of visualizing the delivery. In this review, recent developments of nanoparticles for molecular imaging guided gene delivery are summarized. PMID:22473061

  8. Synthetic virology: engineering viruses for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Caitlin M; Kuypers, Brianna E; Lam, Michael T; Robinson, Tawana M; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or 'bionic' viruses, feature engineered components, or 'parts', that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies--rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational--have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavors will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Synthetic Virology: Engineering Viruses for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Caitlin M.; Kuypers, Brianna E.; Lam, Michael T.; Robinson, Tawana M.; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or “bionic” viruses, feature engineered components, or “parts”, that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies – rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational – have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavours will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. PMID:25195922

  10. Lipid Nanoparticles for Ocular Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Rajala, Raju V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Lipids contain hydrocarbons and are the building blocks of cells. Lipids can naturally form themselves into nano-films and nano-structures, micelles, reverse micelles, and liposomes. Micelles or reverse micelles are monolayer structures, whereas liposomes are bilayer structures. Liposomes have been recognized as carriers for drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles and lipoplex (liposome-polycation-DNA complex), also called lipid nanoparticles, are currently used to deliver drugs and genes to ocular tissues. A solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) is typically spherical, and possesses a solid lipid core matrix that can solubilize lipophilic molecules. The lipid nanoparticle, called the liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic protamine-DNA complex. The LPD nanoparticles contain a highly condensed DNA core surrounded by lipid bilayers. SLNs are extensively used to deliver drugs to the cornea. LPD nanoparticles are used to target the retina. Age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are the most common retinal diseases in humans. There have also been promising results achieved recently with LPD nanoparticles to deliver functional genes and micro RNA to treat retinal diseases. Here, we review recent advances in ocular drug and gene delivery employing lipid nanoparticles. PMID:26062170

  11. pH shift assembly of adenoviral serotype 5 capsid protein nanosystems for enhanced delivery of nanoparticles, proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vidhya R; Upadhyay, Arun K; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-11-28

    Empty adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) capsids devoid of viral genome were developed as a novel delivery system for nanoparticles, proteins, and nucleic acids. Ad5 capsids of 110 nm diameter undergo an increase in particle size to 1637 nm in 1mM acetic acid at pH4.0 and then shrink to 60 nm, following pH reversal to 7.4. These pH shifts induced reversible changes in capsid zeta potential and secondary structure and irreversible changes in tertiary structure of capsid proteins. Using pH shift dependent changes in capsid size and structure, 20 nm fluorescent nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugated siRNA were encapsulated with high efficiency in Ad5 capsids, as confirmed by electron microscopy and/or flow cytometry. HEK cell uptake with capsid delivery system was 7.8-, 7.4-, and 2.9-fold greater for nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa-siRNA, respectively, when compared to plain solutes. Physical mixtures of capsids and fluorescent solutes exhibited less capsid associated fluorescence intensity and cell uptake. Further, unlike physical mixture, pH shift assembled Ad5 capsids protected siRNA from RNase degradation. Ad5 capsids before and after pH shift exhibited endolysosomal escape. Thus, empty Ad5 capsids can encapsulate a variety of solutes based on pH shift assembly, resulting in enhanced cellular delivery. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyethylene glycol-grafted polyethylenimine used to enhance adenovirus gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kumar; Pal, Ivy; Ramsey, Joshua D

    2013-07-01

    An improved adenoviral-based gene delivery vector was developed by complexing adenovirus (Ad) with a biocompatible, grafted copolymer PEG-g-PEI composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Although an Ad-based gene vector is considered relatively safe, its native tropism, tendency to elicit an immune response, and susceptibility to inactivating antibodies makes the virus less than ideal. The goal of the current study was to determine whether Ad could be complexed with a PEG-g-PEI copolymer that would enable the virus to transduce cells lacking the Ad receptor, while avoiding the issues commonly associated with PEI. A copolymer library was synthesized using 2 kDa PEG and either linear or branched PEI (25 kDa) with a PEG to PEI grafting ratio of 10, 20, or 30. The results of the study indicate that PEG-g-PEI/Ad complexes are indeed able to transduce CAR-negative NIH 3T3 cells. The results also demonstrate that the PEG-g-PEI/Ad complexes are less toxic, less hemolytic, and more appropriately sized than PEI/Ad complexes.

  13. Ocular Localization and Transduction by Adenoviral Vectors Are Serotype-Dependent and Can Be Modified by Inclusion of RGD Fiber Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Kazuhiro; Mori, Keisuke; Shoji, Takuhei; Omata, Hidekazu; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Brough, Douglas E.; Wei, Lisa L.; Yoneya, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate localization and transgene expression from adenoviral vector of serotypes 5, 35, and 28, ± an RGD motif in the fiber following intravitreal or subretinal administration. Methods Ocular transduction by adenoviral vector serotypes ± RGD was studied in the eyes of mice receiving an intravitreous or subretinal injection. Each serotype expressed a CMV-GFP expression cassette and histological sections of eyes were examined. Transgene expression levels were examined using luciferase (Luc) regulated by the CMV promoter. Results GFP localization studies revealed that serotypes 5 and 28 given intravitreously transduced corneal endothelial, trabecular, and iris cells. Intravitreous delivery of the unmodified Ad35 serotype transduced only trabecular meshwork cells, but, the modification of the RGD motif into the fiber of the Ad35 viral vector base expanded transduction to corneal endothelial and iris cells. Incorporation of the RGD motif into the fiber knob with deletion of RGD from the penton base did not affect the transduction ability of the Ad5 vector base. Subretinal studies showed that RGD in the Ad5 knob shifted transduction from RPE cells to photoreceptor cells. Using a CMV-Luc expression cassette, intravitreous delivery of all the tested vectors, such as Ad5-, Ad35- and Ad28- resulted in an initial rapid induction of luciferase activity that thereafter declined. Subretinal administration of vectors showed a marked difference in transgene activity. Ad35-Luc gene expression peaked at 7 days and remained elevated for 6 months. Ad28-Luc expression was high after 1 day and remained sustained for one month. Conclusions Different adenoviral vector serotypes ± modifications transduce different cells within the eye. Transgene expression can be brief or extended and is serotype and delivery route dependent. Thus, adenoviral vectors provide a versatile platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents for ocular diseases. PMID:25232844

  14. Induction of Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Mouse Model following Gene Fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan Virus Gn and S0.7 in an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Li, Puyuan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV) glycoprotein (GP) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359–610 aa, HSP70C) to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1–274-S0.7). C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7) and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV. PMID:24505421

  15. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are superior in vitro to first-generation vectors for endothelial cell-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua M; Tang, Chongren; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David A

    2010-12-01

    Arterial endothelial cells (EC) are attractive targets for gene therapy of atherosclerosis because they are accessible to hematogenous and catheter-based vector delivery and overlie atherosclerotic plaques. Vector-mediated expression-in EC-of proteins that mediate cholesterol transfer out of the artery wall and decrease inflammation could prevent and reverse atherosclerosis. However, clinical application of this strategy is limited by lack of a suitable gene-transfer vector. First-generation adenovirus (FGAd) is useful for EC gene transfer in proof-of-concept studies, but is unsuitable for atheroprotective human gene therapy because of limited duration of expression and proinflammatory effects. Moreover, others have reported detrimental effects of FGAd on critical aspects of EC physiology including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) either alone or expressing an atheroprotective gene [apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)] could circumvent these limitations. In contrast to control FGAd, HDAd did not alter any of several critical EC physiologic functions (including proliferation, migration, apoptosis, metabolic activity, and nitric oxide (NO) production) and did not stimulate proinflammatory pathways [including expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Expression of apoA-I by HDAd reduced EC VCAM-1 expression. HDAd is a promising vector and apoA-I is a promising gene for atheroprotective human gene therapy delivered via EC.

  16. [Developments in gene delivery vectors for ocular gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Khabou, Hanen; Dalkara, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Its remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in clinical trials for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was mainly due to the favorable characteristics of the retina as a target organ. The eye offers several advantages as it is readily accessible and has some degree of immune privilege making it suitable for application of viral vectors. The viral vectors most frequently used for retinal gene delivery are lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Here we will discuss the use of these viral vectors in retinal gene delivery with a strong focus on favorable properties of AAV. Thanks to its small size, AAV diffuses well in the inter-neural matrix making it suitable for applications in neural retina. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases using AAV as a vector. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent cellular targets for such therapies and the AAV toolkit that has been built to target these cells successfully. We will also discuss some of the challenges that we face in translating AAV-based gene therapies to the clinic.

  17. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, Motoya; Monte, Federica del; Kawase, Yoshiaki; MacNeill, Briain D.; McGregor, Jennifer; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Hoshino, Kozo; Tsuji, Tsuyoshi; De Grand, Alec M.; Gwathmey, Judith K.; Frangioni, John V.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2005-01-01

    Hayase, Motoya, Federica del Monte, Yoshiaki Kawase, Brian D. MacNeill, Jennifer McGregor, Ryuichi Yoneyama, Kozo Hoshino, Tsuyoshi Tsuji, Alec M. De Grand, Judith K. Gwathmey, John V. Frangioni, and Roger J. Hajjar. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288: H2995–H3000, 2005; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00703.2004.—The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous antegrade myocardial gene transfer (PAMGT). A consistent and safe technique for in vivo gene transfer is required for clinical application of myocardial gene therapy. PAMGT with concomitant coronary venous blockade was performed in 12 swine. The myocardium was preconditioned with 1 min of occlusion of the left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries. The anterior interventricular vein was occluded during left anterior descending artery delivery, and the great cardiac vein at the entrance of the middle cardiac vein was occluded during left circumflex artery delivery. With arterial and venous balloons inflated (3 min) and after adenosine (25 μg) injection, PAMGT was performed by antegrade injection of an adenoviral solution (1 ml of 1011 plaque-forming units in each coronary artery) carrying β-galactosidase or saline through the center lumen of the angioplasty balloon. In one set of animals, PAMGT was performed with selective coronary vein blockade (n = 9); in another set of animals, PAMGT was performed without coronary vein blockade (n = 5). At 1 wk after gene delivery, the animals were killed. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis was performed in the left and right ventricular walls. PAMGT was successfully performed in all animals with and without concomitant occlusion of the coronary veins. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis showed that PAMGT with coronary blockade was superior to PAMGT without coronary blockade. β-Galactosidase activity increased significantly in the

  18. Emerging adenoviral vectors for stable correction of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jager, Lorenz; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2007-08-01

    Recent drawbacks in treating patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders with retroviral vectors underline the importance of generating novel tools for stable transduction of mammalian cells. Substantial progress has been made over the recent years which may offer important steps towards stable and more importantly safer correction of genetic diseases. This article discusses recent advances for stable transduction of target cells based on adenoviral gene transfer. There is accumulating evidence that recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) based on various human serotypes with a broad cellular tropism and adenoviruses (Ads) from different species will play an important role in future gene therapy applications. In combination with recombinant AdVs for somatic integration these gene transfer vectors offer high transduction efficiencies with potentially safer integration patterns. Other approaches for persistent transgene expression include excision of stable episomes from the adenoviral vector genome, but also long-term persistence of the complete adenoviral vector genome as an episomal DNA molecule was demonstrated and exemplified by the treatment of various genetic diseases in small and large animal models. This review displays advantages but also limitations of these Ad based vector systems. This is the perfect time to pursue such approaches because alternative strategies for stable transduction of mammalian cells undergoing many cell divisions are urgently needed. Looking into the future, we believe that a combination of different components from different viral vectors in concert with non-viral vector systems will be successful in designing significantly optimized transfer vehicles for a broad range of different genetic diseases.

  19. Intradermal delivery of adenoviral type-35 vectors leads to high efficiency transduction of mature, CD8+ T cell-stimulating skin-emigrated dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, Tanja D; Ophorst, Olga J A E; Goudsmit, Jaap; Verhaagh, Sandra; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Radosevic, Katarina; Havenga, Menzo J E; Scheper, Rik J

    2006-08-15

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad) type 35 (rAd35) shows great promise as vaccine carrier with the advantage of low pre-existing immunity in human populations, in contrast to the more commonly used rAd5 vector. The rAd35 vector uses CD46 as a high-affinity receptor, which, unlike the rAd5 receptor, is expressed on human dendritic cells (DC), the most powerful APCs identified to date. In this study, we show that in contrast to rAd5, rAd35 infects migrated and mature CD83+ cutaneous DC with high efficiency (up to 80%), when delivered intradermally in an established human skin explant model. The high transduction efficiency is in line with high expression levels of CD46 detected on migratory cutaneous DC, which proved to be further increased upon intradermal administration of GM-CSF and IL-4. As compared with Ad5, these Ad35 infection characteristics translate into higher absolute numbers of skin-emigrated DC per explant that both express the transgene and are phenotypically mature. Finally, we demonstrate that upon intracutaneous delivery of a rAd35 vaccine encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium falciparum, emigrated DC functionally express and process CS-derived epitopes and are capable of activating specific CD8+ effector T cells, as evidenced by activation of an HLA-A2-restricted CS-specific CD8+ T cell clone. Collectively, these data demonstrate the utility of rAd35 vectors for efficient in vivo human DC transduction.

  20. Microfluidic methods for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is a compelling technology that shows considerable promise in applications ranging from gene expression profiling to cell-based assays. Owing to its capacity to enable generation of single droplets and multiple droplet arrays with precisely controlled composition and a narrow size distribution, recently microfluidics has been exploited for delivery of genes. This article provides an overview of recent advances in microfluidic gene delivery, and speculates the prospects for further research. The objectives of this article are to illustrate the potential roles played by microfluidics in gene delivery research, and to shed new light on strategies to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy.

  1. Overexpression of IL-1beta by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in the rat brain causes a prolonged hepatic chemokine response, axonal injury and the suppression of spontaneous behaviour.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sandra J; Deacon, Rob M J; Jiang, Yanyan; Ferrari, Carina; Pitossi, Fernando J; Anthony, Daniel C

    2007-08-01

    Acute brain injury induces early and transient hepatic expression of chemokines, which amplify the injury response and give rise to movement of leukocytes into the blood and subsequently the brain and liver. Here, we sought to determine whether an ongoing injury stimulus within the brain would continue to drive the hepatic chemokine response and how it impacts on behaviour and CNS integrity. We generated chronic IL-1beta expression in rat brain by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer, which resulted in chronic leukocyte recruitment, axonal injury and prolonged depression of spontaneous behaviour. IL-1beta could not be detected in circulating blood, but a chronic systemic response was established, including extended production of hepatic and circulating chemokines, leukocytosis, liver damage, weight loss, decreased serum albumin and marked liver leukocyte recruitment. Thus, hepatic chemokine synthesis is a feature of active chronic CNS disease and provides an accessible target for the suppression of CNS inflammation.

  2. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren'an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted.

  3. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren’an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted. PMID:26527860

  4. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  5. Production and clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for specific treatment of numerous gene-associated human diseases by intentionally altering the gene expression in pathological cells. A successful clinical application of gene-based therapy depends on an efficient gene delivery system. Many efforts have been attempted to improve the safety and efficiency of gene-based therapies. Nanoparticles have been proved to be the most promising vehicles for clinical gene therapy due to their tunable size, shape, surface, and biological behaviors. In this review, the clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery will be particularly highlighted. Several promising candidates, which are closest to clinical applications, will be briefly reviewed. Then, the recent developments of nanoparticles for clinical gene therapy will be identified and summarized. Finally, the development of nanoparticles for clinical gene delivery in future will be prospected. PMID:27088105

  6. Gene delivery with viral vectors for cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yu; Jing, Zheng; Stetler, Ruth Anne; Cao, Guodong

    2013-01-01

    Recent achievements in the understanding of molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) injury have made gene transfer a promising approach for various neurological disorders, including cerebrovascular diseases. However, special obstacles, including the post-mitotic nature of neurons and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), constitute key challenges for gene delivery to the CNS. Despite the various limitations in current gene delivery systems, a spectrum of viral vectors has been successfully used to deliver genes to the CNS. Furthermore, recent advancements in vector engineering have improved the safety and delivery of viral vectors. Numerous viral vector-based clinical trials for neurological disorders have been initiated. This review will summarize the current implementation of viral gene delivery in the context of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In particular, we will discuss the potentially feasible ways in which viral vectors can be manipulated and exploited for use in neural delivery and therapy.

  7. Gene delivery in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y L; Chen, X G; W T, Godbey

    2015-11-01

    As a promising strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, gene delivery has been used for regenerative medicine applications to create or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Gene delivery has been successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo in these applications. Excellent proliferation capabilities and differentiation potentials render certain cells as excellent candidates for ex vivo gene delivery for regenerative medicine applications, which is why multipotent and pluripotent cells have been intensely studied in this vein. In this review, gene delivery is discussed in detail, along with its applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A definition of a stem cell is compared to a definition of a stem property, and both provide the foundation for an in-depth look at gene delivery investigations from a germ lineage angle.

  8. Getting the most from gene delivery by repeated DNA transfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Maura; Marchini, Cristina; Badillo Pazmay, Gretta Veronica; Andreani, Cristina; Bartolacci, Caterina; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular delivery of reporter genes causes cells to be luminescent or fluorescent, this condition being of tremendous relevance in applied physics research. Potential applications range from the study of spatial distribution and dynamics of plasma membrane and cytosolic proteins up to the rational design of nanocarriers for gene therapy. Since efficiency of gene delivery is the main limit in most biophysical studies, versatile methods that can maximize gene expression are urgently needed. Here, we describe a robust methodology based on repeated gene delivery in mammalian cells. We find this procedure to be much more efficient than the more traditional route of gene delivery making it possible to get high-quality data without affecting cell viability. Implications for biophysical investigations are discussed.

  9. Investigation of a thiolated polymer in gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalocostantis, Irene

    Thiol-containing bioreducible polymers show significant potential as delivery vectors in gene therapy, a rapidly growing field which seeks to treat genetic-based disorders by delivering functional synthetic genes to diseased cells. Studies have shown that thiolated polymers exhibit improved biodegradability and prolonged in vivo circulation times over non-thiolated polymers. However, the extent to which thiol concentrations impact the carrier's delivery potential has not been well explored. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate how relative concentrations of free thiols and disulfide crosslinks impact a polymeric carriers delivery performance with respect to DNA packaging, complex stability, cargo protection, gene release, internalization efficiency and cytotoxicity. To accomplish this goal, several fluorescent polymers containing varying concentrations of thiol groups were synthesized by conjugating thiol-pendant chains onto the primary amines of cationic poly(allylamine). In vitro delivery assays and characterization techniques were employed to assess the effect of thiols in gene delivery.

  10. Recent progresses in gene delivery-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Han; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Gene therapy has converged with bone engineering over the past decade, by which a variety of therapeutic genes have been delivered to stimulate bone repair. These genes can be administered via in vivo or ex vivo approach using either viral or nonviral vectors. This article reviews the fundamental aspects and recent progresses in the gene therapy-based bone engineering, with emphasis on the new genes, viral vectors and gene delivery approaches. © 2013.

  11. Cardiac Gene Delivery in Large Animal Models: Antegrade Techniques.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Leonardson, Lauren; Hajjar, Roger J; Ishikawa, Kiyotake

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous antegrade coronary injection is among the least invasive cardiac selective gene delivery methods. However, transduction efficiency is quite low with a simple bolus antegrade injection. In order to improve the transduction efficiency using antegrade delivery, several additional approaches have been proposed.In this chapter, we briefly discuss important elements associated with intracoronary delivery methods and present protocols for three different catheter-based antegrade delivery techniques in a preclinical large animal model. Despite the lower transduction efficacy relative to more invasive delivery techniques, antegrade techniques have the advantage of being clinically well established and having safer profiles which is important when treating patients with cardiac disease.

  12. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  13. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of adenovirus design and production.

    PubMed

    Alba, Raul; Baker, Andrew H; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviruses have many attributes, which have made them one of the most widely investigated vectors for gene therapy applications. These include ease of genetic manipulation to produce replication-deficient vectors, ability to readily generate high titer stocks, efficiency of gene delivery into many cell types, and ability to encode large genetic inserts. Recent advances in adenoviral vector engineering have included the ability to genetically manipulate the tropism of the vector by engineering of the major capsid proteins, particularly fiber and hexon. Furthermore, simple replication-deficient adenoviral vectors deleted for expression of a single gene have been complemented by the development of systems in which the majority of adenoviral genes are deleted, generating sophisticated Ad vectors which can mediate sustained transgene expression following a single delivery. This chapter outlines methods for developing simple transgene over expressing Ad vectors and detailed strategies to engineer mutations into the major capsid proteins.

  14. Overcoming Nonviral Gene Delivery Barriers: Perspective and Future

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Charles H.; Chen, Chih-Kaung; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Rane, Snehal; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2013-01-01

    A key end goal of gene delivery research is to develop clinically-relevant vectors that can be used to combat elusive diseases such as AIDS. Despite promising engineering strategies, efficiency and ultimately gene modulation efficacy of nonviral vectors have been hindered by numerous in vitro and in vivo barriers that have resulted in sub-viral performance. In this perspective, we concentrate on the gene delivery barriers associated with the two most common classes of nonviral vectors, cationic-based lipids and polymers. We present the existing delivery barriers and summarize current vector-specific strategies to overcome said barriers. PMID:24093932

  15. Biodegradable polyphosphoester micelles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Mao, Hai-Quan; Li, Weiping; Lin, Kevin Y; Leong, Kam W

    2004-08-01

    A new biodegradable polyphosphoester, poly[[(cholesteryl oxocarbonylamido ethyl) methyl bis(ethylene) ammonium iodide] ethyl phosphate] (PCEP) was synthesized and investigated for gene delivery. Carrying a positive charge in its backbone and a lipophilic cholesterol structure in the side chain, PCEP self-assembled into micelles in aqueous buffer at room temperature with an average size of 60-100 nm. It could bind and protect plasmid DNA from nuclease digestion. Cell proliferation assay indicated a lower cytotoxicity for PCEP than for poly-L-lysine and Lipofectamine. The IC50 determined by the WST-1 assay was 69.8, 51.6, and 12.1 microg/mL for PCEP, Lipofectamine, and poly-L-lysine, respectively. PCEP efficiently delivered DNA to several cell lines such as HEK293, Caco-2, and HeLa. The highest efficiency was achieved when PCEP/DNA complex was prepared in Opti-MEM with a +/- charge ratio of 1.5-2. The transfection efficiency did not change significantly when the complex was used 3 days after preparation. The addition of chloroquine to the formulation increased transfection efficiency 10- to 50-fold compared to the complex alone. In vivo studies showed a luciferase expression by PCEP/DNA complexes in muscle increasing with time during 3 months, although the expression level was lower than that by direct injection of naked DNA. In addition to biodegradability and lower toxicity, the PCEP micelle carrier offers structural versatility. The backbone charge density and the side chain lipophilicity are two parameters that can be varied through copolymerization and monomer variation to optimize the transfection efficiency.

  16. Adenoviral E4 Gene Stimulates Secretion of Pigmental Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF) that Maintains Long-term Survival of Human Glomerulus-derived Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Kumari, Namita; Obuhkov, Yuri; Nekhai, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    Renal glomerular endothelial cells are specialized cells with an important role in physiological filtration and glomerular disease. However, maintenance of human primary endothelial cells requires stimulation with serum and growth factors that often results in modification of the cells properties. Previously, expression of early adenovirus region E4 was shown to help maintaining long-term survival of human endothelial cells in serum free media without addition of growth factors. In the current study, we showed that media conditioned with human epithelial cells stably transfected with Ad E4 region also supported survival of human glomerulus-derived endothelial cells in serum-free media. Mass-spectrometry analysis of the conditioned media identified pigmental epithelium derived factor (PEDF) as a major component of the conditioned media. PEDF expression in 293-E4 cells was validated by RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA analysis. PEDF expression was detected in mouse glomeruli. Supplementation with recombinant PEDF supported survival of primary endothelial cells and the cells transformed with SV40 large T antigen in serum-free media, and extended the life-span of both cell cultures. PEDF did not inhibit FGF-2 stimulated growth and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells. Thus we demonstrated that adenoviral E4 region stimulated expression and secretion of PEDF by human renal epithelial cells that acted as a survival factor for glomerulus-derived endothelial cells. PMID:22915824

  17. Adenoviral Gene Transfer of PLD1-D4 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Mice by Disrupting Phospholipase D1 Interaction with PED/PEA-15

    PubMed Central

    Fiory, Francesca; Nigro, Cecilia; Ulianich, Luca; Castanò, Ilenia; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Terracciano, Daniela; Pastore, Lucio; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco; Miele, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15) causes insulin resistance by interacting with the D4 domain of phospholipase D1 (PLD1). Indeed, the disruption of this association restores insulin sensitivity in cultured cells over-expressing PED/PEA-15. Whether the displacement of PLD1 from PED/PEA-15 improves insulin sensitivity in vivo has not been explored yet. In this work we show that treatment with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human D4 cDNA (Ad-D4) restores normal glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Tg ped/pea-15) by improving both insulin sensitivity and secretion. In skeletal muscle of these mice, D4 over-expression inhibited PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction, decreased Protein Kinase C alpha activation and restored insulin induced Protein Kinase C zeta activation, leading to amelioration of insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Interestingly, Ad-D4 administration improved insulin sensitivity also in high-fat diet treated obese C57Bl/6 mice. We conclude that PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction may represent a novel target for interventions aiming at improving glucose tolerance. PMID:23585839

  18. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  19. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene delivery enhances antitumor effects of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir system in a model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, T; Nakamoto, Y; Sakai, Y; Tsuchiyama, T; Yagita, H; Mukaida, N; Kaneko, S

    2006-04-01

    Suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system is a well-characterized tool for cancer gene therapy; however, it does not yet exhibit sufficient efficacy to cure patients of malignancies. We have reported that adenovirally delivered monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 augmented the antitumor effects of the HSV-tk/GCV system in an athymic nude mouse model. The current study, which uses an immunocompetent mouse model of colon cancer, was designed to evaluate the antitumor effects of MCP-1 gene delivery in conjunction with this suicide gene therapy system. Subcutaneous tumor foci were directly transduced with both recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) expressing an HSV-tk gene and either of the MCP-1, CD80 and LacZ genes, followed by GCV administration. The growth of tumors was markedly suppressed by codelivery of HSV-tk and MCP-1 genes, which was exclusively associated with the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages, T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine gene expression and cytotoxic activity of the splenocytes. Furthermore, the antitumor effects were more efficient than that obtained by the combination of HSV-tk and CD80 genes. These results suggest an immunomodulatory effect of MCP-1 in the context of suicide gene therapy of colon cancer via orchestration of innate and acquired immune responses.

  1. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spatiotemporal tracking of oligonucleotides in vitro and even a few cases in vivo. Major concerns remain to be addressed including cytotoxicity, particularly of quantum dots; effective dosage of nanoparticles for optimal theranostic effect; development of real-time in vivo imaging; and further improvement of gene therapy efficacy. PMID:23606894

  2. A reproducible and quantifiable model of choroidal neovascularization induced by VEGF A165 after subretinal adenoviral gene transfer in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Kreppel, Florian; Beck, Susanne; Heiduschka, Peter; Brito, Veronica; Schnichels, Sven; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165 delivered using a high capacity adenoviral vector (HC Ad.VEGF-A) on vascular growth and pathological changes in the rabbit eye. To combine different detection methods of VEGF-A165 overexpression-induced neovascularization in the rabbit. Methods HC Ad.VEGF-A165 was constructed and injected at 5x106 infectious units (iu) into the subretinal space of rabbit eyes. Two and four weeks postinjection, the development of neovascularization and the expression of HC Ad-transduced VEGF-A165 protein were followed up in vivo by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies and ex vivo by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry Results We observed a choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with leakage in 83% of the rabbit eyes. Our findings present clear indications that there is a significant effect on the endothelial cells of the choriocapillaris after subretinal transduction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with VEGF-A165 vector. The choroidal endothelial cells were activated, adherent junctions opened, and the fenestration was minimized, while the extracellular matrix localized between the RPE and the endothelium of the choriocapillaris was enlarged toward the lumen of the vessels, inducing a deep invagination of the endothelial cells into the vessel lumen. They also proliferated and formed pathological vessels in the subretinal space. Moreover,there was an increased expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and VEGF-A accompanied by macrophage stimulation, retinal edema, and photoreceptor loss. Conclusions This is the first model of VEGF-induced CNV in the rabbit in which the pathological events following overexpression of VEGF by RPE cells have been described in detail. Many of the features of our experimental CNV resemble those observed clinically in patients having wet age-related macular degeneration. PMID:18682809

  3. Next Generation Delivery System for Proteins and Genes of Therapeutic Purpose: Why and How?

    PubMed Central

    Priya Doss, C. George; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and genes of therapeutic interests in conjunction with different delivery systems are growing towards new heights. “Next generation delivery systems” may provide more efficient platform for delivery of proteins and genes. In the present review, snapshots about the benefits of proteins or gene therapy, general procedures for therapeutic protein or gene delivery system, and different next generation delivery system such as liposome, PEGylation, HESylation, and nanoparticle based delivery have been depicted with their detailed explanation. PMID:25126554

  4. Biodegradable polymer-metal complexes for gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Hosseinkhani, Mohsen

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of genes and drugs into cells has increasingly attracted attention for the generation of genetically engineered cells. Successful drug delivery will have enormous academic, clinical, and practical impacts on gene therapy, cell and molecular biology, pharmaceutical and food industries, and bio-production. The major aim of gene therapy is to deliver genetic materials into cells effectively, genetically modifying and repairing cell functions with the possibility of inducing therapeutic healing of disease. The genetic material includes DNA, RNA, antisense, decoy DNA, and ribozymes. The aim is that the appropriate transfection would allow diseased cells to return to a healthy condition. The genetic manipulation is often manifested in the mechanisms of intracellular actions of genes and proteins, and may play an important role in making clear the key genes associated with various diseases. Based on fundamental and scientific knowledge, the delivery technology of genetic material should be applicable to producing various proteins of pharmaceutical value (e.g. cytokines, growth factors, and antibodies) and also to producing seeds resistant to harmful insects and cold weather damage. This implies that the cells might be enhanced to produce valuable pharmaceutical and food products. For each approach, it is important, for successful gene expression, to select an appropriate gene to be delivered as well as to develop the gene delivery technology to enhance transfection efficiency. This review will provide an overview of the enhanced gene expression of plasmid DNA complexed with new non-viral gene delivery vehicles by biodegradable biopolymer-metal complex, introducing our recent research data to emphasize the technical feasibility of biopolymer-metal complexes in gene therapy and biotechnology.

  5. Nanoscale structure of protamine/DNA complexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Simona; Brocca, Paola; Del Favero, Elena; Rondelli, Valeria; Cantù, Laura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the internal packing of gene carriers is a key-factor to realize both gene protection during transport and de-complexation at the delivery site. Here, we investigate the structure of complexes formed by DNA fragments and protamine, applied in gene delivery. We found that complexes are charge- and size-tunable aggregates, depending on the protamine/DNA ratio, hundred nanometers in size. Their compactness and fractal structure depend on the length of the DNA fragments. Accordingly, on the local scale, the sites of protamine/DNA complexation assume different morphologies, seemingly displaying clumping ability for the DNA network only for shorter DNA fragments.

  6. Induction of Immunological Tolerance to Adenoviral Vectors by Using a Novel Dendritic Cell-Based Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Oliver, Jordan R.; Duan, Rongqi; Zhang, Li; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    The success of helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector-mediated lung gene therapy is hampered by the host immune response, which limits pulmonary transgene expression following multiple rounds of vector readminstration. Here, we show that HD-Ad-mediated pulmonary gene expression is sustained even upon three rounds of readministration to immunodeficient mice, highlighting the need to suppress the adaptive immune response for sustained gene expression following vector readministration. Therefore, we devised a dendritic cell (DC)-based strategy for induction of immunological tolerance toward HD-Ad vectors. DCs derived in the presence of interleukin-10 (IL-10) are refractory to HD-Ad-induced maturation and instead facilitate generation of IL-10-producing Tr1 regulatory T cells which suppress HD-Ad-induced T cell proliferation. Delivery of HD-Ad-pulsed, IL-10-modified DCs to mice induces long-lasting immunological tolerance to HD-Ad vectors, whereby pulmonary DC maturation, the T cell response, and antibody response to HD-Ad vectors are suppressed even after three rounds of pulmonary HD-Ad readministration. Moreover, sustained transgene expression is also observed in the lungs of mice immunized with HD-Ad-pulsed, IL-10-modified DCs even after three rounds of pulmonary HD-Ad delivery. Taken together, these studies identify the use of DCs generated in the presence of IL-10 as a novel strategy to induce long-lasting immune tolerance to HD-Ad vectors. PMID:22258241

  7. Characterisation of gene delivery using liposomal bubbles and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshima, Risa; Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Kudo, Nobuki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    The combination of nano/microbubbles and ultrasound is a novel technique for a non-viral gene deliver. We have previously developed novel ultrasound sensitive liposomes (Bubble liposomes) which contain the ultrasound imaging gas perfluoropropane. In this study, Bubble liposomes were compared with cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complexes as potential gene delivery carriers into tumors in vivo. The delivery of genes by bubble liposomes depended on the intensity of the applied ultrasound. The transfection efficiency plateaued at 0.7 W/cm2 ultrasound intensity. Bubble liposomes efficiently transferred genes into cultured cells even when the cells were exposed to ultrasound for only 1 s. In addition, bubble liposomes were able to introduce the luciferase gene more effectively than CL-DNA complexes into mouse ascites tumor cells. We conclude that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound is a good method for gene transfer in vivo.

  8. Bioengineered Silk Protein-Based Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Silk proteins self-assemble into mechanically robust material structures that are also biodegradable and non-cytotoxic, suggesting utility for gene delivery. Since silk proteins can also be tailored in terms of chemistry, molecular weight and other design features via genetic engineering, further control of this system for gene delivery can be considered. In the present study, silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered with poly(l-lysine) domains for gene delivery. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine based block copolymers with plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared for gene delivery to human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The polymers self-assembled in solution and complexed plasmid DNA through ionic interactions. The pDNA complexes with 30-lysine residues prepared at a polymer/nucleotide ratio of 10 and with a solution diameter of 380 nm, showed the highest efficiency for transfection. The pDNA complexes were also immobilized on silk films and demonstrated direct cell transfection from these surfaces. The results demonstrate the potential of bioengineered silk proteins as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:19577803

  9. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  10. Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The massive amount of human genetic information already available has accelerated the identification of target genes, making gene and nucleic acid therapy the next generation of medicine. Nanoparticle (NP)-based anticancer gene therapy treatment has received significant interest in this evolving field. Recent advances in vector technology have improved gene transfection efficiencies of nonviral vectors to a level similar to viruses. This review serves as an introduction to surface modifications of NPs based on polymeric structural improvements and target moieties. A discussion regarding the future perspective of multifunctional NPs in cancer therapy is also included. PMID:25531409

  11. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

  12. Micelles and nanoparticles for ultrasonic drug and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2008-06-30

    Drug delivery research employing micelles and nanoparticles has expanded in recent years. Of particular interest is the use of these nanovehicles that deliver high concentrations of cytotoxic drugs to diseased tissues selectively, thus reducing the agent's side effects on the rest of the body. Ultrasound, traditionally used in diagnostic medicine, is finding a place in drug delivery in connection with these nanoparticles. In addition to their non-invasive nature and the fact that they can be focused on targeted tissues, acoustic waves have been credited with releasing pharmacological agents from nanocarriers, as well as rendering cell membranes more permeable. In this article, we summarize new technologies that combine the use of nanoparticles with acoustic power both in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasonic drug delivery from micelles usually employs polyether block copolymers and has been found effective in vivo for treating tumors. Ultrasound releases drug from micelles, most probably via shear stress and shock waves from the collapse of cavitation bubbles. Liquid emulsions and solid nanoparticles are used with ultrasound to deliver genes in vitro and in vivo. The small packaging allows nanoparticles to extravasate into tumor tissues. Ultrasonic drug and gene delivery from nanocarriers has tremendous potential because of the wide variety of drugs and genes that could be delivered to targeted tissues by fairly non-invasive means.

  13. Micelles and Nanoparticles for Ultrasonic Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Drug delivery research employing micelles and nanoparticles has expanded in recent years. Of particular interest is the use of these nanovehicles that deliver high concentrations of cytotoxic drugs to diseased tissues selectively, thus reducing the agent’s side effects on the rest of the body. Ultrasound, traditionally used in diagnostic medicine, is finding a place in drug delivery in connection with these nanoparticles. In addition to their non-invasive nature and the fact that they can be focused on targeted tissues, acoustic waves have been credited with releasing pharmacological agents from nanocarriers, as well as rendering cell membranes more permeable. In this article, we summarize new technologies that combine the use of nanoparticles with acoustic power both in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasonic drug delivery from micelles usually employs polyether block copolymers, and has been found effective in vivo for treating tumors. Ultrasound releases drug from micelles, most probably via shear stress and shock waves from collapse of cavitation bubbles. Liquid emulsions and solid nanoparticles are used with ultrasound to deliver genes in vitro and in vivo. The small packaging allows nanoparticles to extravasate into tumor tissues. Ultrasonic drug and gene delivery from nano-carriers has tremendous potential because of the wide variety of drugs and genes that could be delivered to targeted tissues by fairly non-invasive means. PMID:18486269

  14. Surface modification of nonviral nanocarriers for enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Charles; Durocher, Yves; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical nanotechnology has given a new lease of life to gene therapy with the ever-developing and ever-diversifying nonviral gene delivery nanocarriers. These are designed to pass a series of barriers in order to bring their nucleic acid cargo to the right subcellular location of particular cells. For a given application, each barrier has its dedicated strategy, which translates into a physicochemical, biological and temporal identity of the nanocarrier surface. Different strategies have thus been explored to implement adequate surface identities on nanocarriers over time for systemic delivery. In that context, this review will mainly focus on organic nanocarriers, for which these strategies will be described and discussed.

  15. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  16. Biomaterial Scaffolds for Controlled, Localized Gene Delivery of Regenerative Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Robert Michael; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Biomaterials play central roles in tissue regeneration by maintaining a space for tissue growth and facilitating its integration with the host. The regenerative capacity of materials can be enhanced through delivery of factors that promote tissue formation. Gene delivery is a versatile strategy to obtain sustained production of tissue inductive factors. Biomaterial scaffolds capable of gene delivery have been shown to induce transgene expression and tissue growth. Critical Issues The widespread application of biomaterial scaffold systems requires identifying the design principles for the material and vectors that modulate transgene expression temporally and spatially. These technologies and others will ultimately enable spatial and temporal control over expression to recreate the cellular organization and gene expression required for formation of complex tissues. Recent Advances The design parameters for the biomaterials and vectors that modulate the extent and duration of transgene expression and the distribution of transgene-expressing cells within and around the injury are emerging. The cellular interactions with the biomaterial, such as adhesion or migration rate, can influence expression. Furthermore, modulating the interaction between the vector and biomaterial can control vector release while minimizing the exposure to harsh processing conditions. Future Directions Biomaterial scaffolds that deliver genes encoding for regenerative factors may provide a platform for regenerating complex tissues such as skin, blood vessels, and nerves. Biomaterials capable of localized gene delivery can synergistically target multiple cell processes and will have application to the regeneration of many tissues, with great promise for clinical therapies. PMID:24527333

  17. Practical delivery of genes to the marketplace.

    PubMed

    Fischhoff, David A; Cline, Molly N

    2009-01-01

    Although new technologies in genomics are powerful tools for discovering genes and gaining insight into their function, discovery of a gene itself does not ensure its practical application. Commercialization of transgenic crop plants has now taken place for more than a decade. Plant biotechnology, which can be seen as an extension of traditional plant breeding for crop improvement, offers one way to boost food, feed, fiber, and fuel production and has provided significant environmental and economic benefits. Like plant breeding, biotechnology introduces new traits with specific benefits into plants, and does so in a selective, precise, and controlled manner. Several steps are necessary before commercializing a crop with a biotechnology trait, including not only gene discovery and product development but also regulatory clearance, stewardship evaluation, and stakeholder dialogue. Examples will be drawn from the work at Monsanto on the development and commercialization of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans, which is representative of the first wave of agronomic traits.

  18. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  19. Efficient, Long-term Hepatic Gene Transfer Using Clinically Relevant HDAd Doses by Balloon Occlusion Catheter Delivery in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Stapleton, Gary E; Law, Mark; Breinholt, John; Palmer, Donna J; Zuo, Yu; Grove, Nathan C; Finegold, Milton J; Rice, Karen; Beaudet, Arthur L; Mullins, Charles E; Ng, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) are devoid of all viral coding sequences and are thus an improvement over early generation Ad because they can provide long-term transgene expression in vivo without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic intravenous injection, and this unfortunately results in dose-dependent acute toxicity. To overcome this important obstacle, we have developed a minimally invasive method to preferentially deliver HDAd into the liver of nonhuman primates. Briefly, a balloon occlusion catheter was percutaneously positioned in the inferior vena cava to occlude hepatic venous outflow. HDAd was injected directly into the occluded liver via a percutaneously placed hepatic artery catheter. Compared to systemic vector injection, this approach resulted in substantially higher hepatic transduction efficiency using clinically relevant low vector doses and was accompanied by mild-to-moderate acute but transient toxicities. Transgene expression was sustained for up to 964 days. These results suggest that our minimally invasive method of delivery can significantly improve the vector's therapeutic index and may be a first step toward clinical application of HDAd for liver-directed gene therapy. PMID:19050700

  20. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  1. Ex Vivo Culture of Patient Tissue & Examination of Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial. PMID:21326169

  2. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mellott, Adam J.; Forrest, M. Laird; Detamore, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that “fits-all” cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications. PMID:23099792

  3. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Adam J; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that "fits-all" cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications.

  4. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  5. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers. PMID:25202710

  6. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-17

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  7. The Evolution of Adenoviral Vectors through Genetic and Chemical Surface Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges. PMID:24549268

  8. Delivery of gene-expressing fragments using quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced the gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/geneconstruct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as 1) the reading direction of gene fragments, 2) the quantity of gene fragments attached on the surface of QD-constructs, 3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of QD/gene-constructs, and 4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene fragments. Using this QD/geneconstruct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs was disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes. These results suggest that inappropriate treatment and disposal of QDs may still have risks to the environmental pollution including human health under certain conditions. Here we propose the further research for the immune and physiological responses in not only immune cells but also other cells, in order to clear the effect of all other nanoscale products as well as nanocrystal

  9. Hyperbranched cationic amylopectin derivatives for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanfang; Yang, Bin; Ren, Xianyue; Liu, Zhenzhen; Deng, Zheng; Chen, Luming; Deng, Yubin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yang, Liqun

    2012-06-01

    A series of hyperbranched cationic amylopectin derivatives conjugated with 1,2-ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine and 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine residues, named as EDA-Amp, DETA-Amp and DMAPA-Amp, were synthesized by the N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole activation method at room temperature. Their structures were characterized by FTIR and (1)H NMR analyses, and their buffering capability was assessed by acid-base titration. The amylopectin derivatives exhibited better blood compatibility and lower cytotoxicity when compared to branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) in the hemolysis and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy confirmed that the amylopectin derivatives exhibited lower damage for erythrocytes than bPEI. The amylopectin derivatives could bind and condense plasmid DNA (pDNA) to form the complexes with the size ranging from 100 to 300 nm. The resultant complexes showed higher transfection efficiency in 293T cells than in A549 cells. The DMAPA-Amp derivative-mediated gene transfection for Forkhead box O1 exhibited higher protein expression than that of the EDA-Amp and DETA-Amp derivatives in 293T cells, which was analyzed by western blot, flow cytometry and Hoechst staining assay. On the basis of these data, amylopectin derivatives exhibit potential as nonviral gene vectors. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Specific gene delivery to liver sinusoidal and artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abel, Tobias; El Filali, Ebtisam; Waern, Johan; Schneider, Irene C; Yuan, Qinggong; Münch, Robert C; Hick, Meike; Warnecke, Gregor; Madrahimov, Nodir; Kontermann, Roland E; Schüttrumpf, Jörg; Müller, Ulrike C; Seppen, Jurgen; Ott, Michael; Buchholz, Christian J

    2013-09-19

    Different types of endothelial cells (EC) fulfill distinct tasks depending on their microenvironment. ECs are therefore difficult to genetically manipulate ex vivo for functional studies or gene therapy. We assessed lentiviral vectors (LVs) targeted to the EC surface marker CD105 for in vivo gene delivery. The mouse CD105-specific vector, mCD105-LV, transduced only CD105-positive cells in primary liver cell cultures. Upon systemic injection, strong reporter gene expression was detected in liver where mCD105-LV specifically transduced liver sinusoidal ECs (LSECs) but not Kupffer cells, which were mainly transduced by nontargeted LVs. Tumor ECs were specifically targeted upon intratumoral vector injection. Delivery of the erythropoietin gene with mCD105-LV resulted in substantially increased erythropoietin and hematocrit levels. The human CD105-specific vector (huCD105-LV) transduced exclusively human LSECs in mice transplanted with human liver ECs. Interestingly, when applied at higher dose and in absence of target cells in the liver, huCD105-LV transduced ECs of a human artery transplanted into the descending mouse aorta. The data demonstrate for the first time targeted gene delivery to specialized ECs upon systemic vector administration. This strategy offers novel options to better understand the physiological functions of ECs and to treat genetic diseases such as those affecting blood factors.

  11. Application of Ferriferous Oxide Modified by Chitosan in Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yu; Yuan, Tun; Zhang, Zhongwei; Li, Mingyuan; Yang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to improve the traditional gene carriers are still required. Here we explore Fe3O4 modified with degradable polymers that enhances gene delivery and target delivery using permanent magnetic field. Two magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with chitosan (CTS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were synthesized by means of controlled chemical coprecipitation. Plasmid pEGFP was encapsulated as a reported gene. The ferriferous oxide complexes were approximately spherical; surface charge of CTS-Fe3O4 and PEG-Fe3O4 was about 20 mv and 0 mv, respectively. The controlled release of DNA from the CTS-Fe3O4 nanoparticles was observed. Concurrently, a desired Fe3O4 concentration of less than 2 mM was verified as safe by means of a cytotoxicity test in vitro. Presence of the permanent magnetic field significantly increased the transfection efficiency. Furthermore, the passive target property and safety of magnetic nanoparticles were also demonstrated in an in vivo test. The novel gene delivery system was proved to be an effective tool required for future target expression and gene therapy in vivo. PMID:23326667

  12. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-05-21

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study.

  13. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study. PMID:25045521

  14. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Kaisa-Emilia; Airenne, Kari; Ylä-Herttulala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism. PMID:25912715

  15. Functional lipids and lipoplexes for improved gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic lipids are the most common non-viral vectors used in gene delivery with a few currently being investigated in clinical trials. However, like most other synthetic vectors, these vectors suffer from low transfection efficiencies. Among the various approaches to address this challenge, functional lipids (i.e., lipids responding to a stimuli) offer a myriad of opportunities for basic studies of nucleic acid–lipid interactions and for in vitro and in vivo delivery of nucleic acid for a specific biological/medical application. This manuscript reviews recent advances in pH, redox, and charge-reversal sensitive lipids. PMID:21621581

  16. Chitosan nanoparticles for oral drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Katherine; Leong, Kam W

    2006-01-01

    Chitosan is a widely available, mucoadhesive polymer that is able to increase cellular permeability and improve the bioavailability of orally administered protein drugs. It can also be readily formed into nanoparticles able to entrap drugs or condense plasmid DNA. Studies on the formulation and oral delivery of such chitosan nanoparticles have demonstrated their efficacy in enhancing drug uptake and promoting gene expression. This review summarizes some of these findings and highlights the potential of chitosan as a component of oral delivery systems. PMID:17722528

  17. Gene delivery by dendrimers operates via a cholesterol dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Manunta, Maria; Tan, Peng Hong; Sagoo, Pervinder; Kashefi, Kirk; George, Andrew J T

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of dendrimer-DNA complexes is an important prerequisite for improving the transfection efficiency of non-viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Dendrimers are synthetic polymers used for gene transfer. Although these cationic molecules show promise as versatile DNA carriers, very little is known about the mechanism of gene delivery. This paper investigates how the uptake occurs, using an endothelial cell line as model, and evaluates whether the internalization of dendriplexes takes place randomly on the cell surface or at preferential sites such as membrane rafts. Following extraction of plasma membrane cholesterol, the transfection efficiency of the gene delivered by dendrimers was drastically decreased. Replenishment of membrane cholesterol restored the gene expression. The binding and especially internalization of dendriplexes was strongly reduced by cholesterol depletion before transfection. However, cholesterol removal after transfection did not inhibit expression of the delivered gene. Fluorescent dendriplexes co-localize with the ganglioside GM1 present into membrane rafts in both an immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopy studies. These data strongly suggest that membrane cholesterol and raft integrity are physiologically relevant for the cellular uptake of dendrimer-DNA complexes. Hence these findings provide evidence that membrane rafts are important for the internalization of non-viral vectors in gene therapy.

  18. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  19. Reducible, Dibromomaleimide-linked Polymers for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, James-Kevin Y.; Choi, Jennifer L.; Wei, Hua; Schellinger, Joan G.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycations have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles both in vitro and in vivo; however, their cytotoxicity has been associated with increasing molecular weight. Polymers that can be rapidly degraded after internalization are typically better tolerated by mammalian cells compared to their non-degradable counterparts. Here, we report the use of a dibromomaleimide-alkyne (DBM-alkyne) linking agent to reversibly bridge cationic polymer segments for gene delivery and to provide site-specific functionalization by azidealkyne cycloaddition chemistry. A panel of reducible and non-reducible, statistical copolymers of (2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) were synthesized and evaluated. When complexed with plasmid DNA, the reducible and non-reducible polymers had comparable DNA condensation properties, sizes, and transfection efficiencies. When comparing cytotoxicity, the DBM-linked, reducible polymers were significantly less toxic than the non-reducible polymers. To demonstrate polymer functionalization by click chemistry, the DBM-linked polymers were tagged with an azidefluorophore and were used to monitor cellular uptake. Overall, this polymer system introduces the use of a reversible linker, DBM-alkyne, to the area of gene delivery and allows for facile, orthogonal, and site-specific functionalization of gene delivery vehicles. PMID:26214195

  20. Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polymers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, James-Kevin Y; Choi, Jennifer L; Wei, Hua; Schellinger, Joan G; Pun, Suzie H

    2015-01-01

    Polycations have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles both in vitro and in vivo; however, their cytotoxicity has been associated with increasing molecular weight. Polymers that can be rapidly degraded after internalization are typically better tolerated by mammalian cells compared to their non-degradable counterparts. Here, we report the use of a dibromomaleimide-alkyne (DBM-alkyne) linking agent to reversibly bridge cationic polymer segments for gene delivery and to provide site-specific functionalization by azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry. A panel of reducible and non-reducible, statistical copolymers of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) were synthesized and evaluated. When complexed with plasmid DNA, the reducible and non-reducible polymers had comparable DNA condensation properties, sizes, and transfection efficiencies. When comparing cytotoxicity, the DBM-linked, reducible polymers were significantly less toxic than the non-reducible polymers. To demonstrate polymer functionalization by click chemistry, the DBM-linked polymers were tagged with an azide-fluorophore and were used to monitor cellular uptake. Overall, this polymer system introduces the use of a reversible linker, DBM-alkyne, to the area of gene delivery and allows for facile, orthogonal, and site-specific functionalization of gene delivery vehicles.

  1. Gene delivery to periodontal tissue using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sugano, M; Negishi, Y; Endo-Takahashi, Y; Hamano, N; Usui, M; Suzuki, R; Maruyama, K; Aramaki, Y; Yamamoto, M

    2014-06-01

    Periodontitis is the most common inflammatory disease caused by oral biofilm infection. For efficient periodontal treatment, it is important to enhance the outcome of existing regenerative therapies. The physical action of an ultrasound may be able to deliver a therapeutic gene or drugs into the local area of the periodontium being treated for periodontal regeneration. Previously, we developed "Bubble liposomes" as a useful carrier for gene or drug delivery, and reported that delivery efficiency was increased with high-frequency ultrasound in vitro and in vivo. Hence, the aim of the present study was to examine the possibility of delivering genes into gingival tissues using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound. We attempted to deliver naked plasmid DNA encoding luciferase or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the lower labial gingiva of Wistar rats using Bubble liposomes, with or without ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound parameters were optimized for intensity (0-4.0 W/cm(2) ) and exposure time (0-120 s) to establish the most efficient conditions for exposure. The efficacy and duration of gene expression in the gingiva were investigated using a luciferase assay and fluorescence microscopy. The strongest relative luciferase activity was observed when rats were treated under the following ultrasound conditions: 2.0 W/cm(2) intensity and 30 s of exposure time. Relative luciferase activity, 1 d after gene delivery, was significantly higher in gingiva treated using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound than in gingiva of the other treatment groups. Histological analysis also showed that distinct EGFP-expressing cells were observed in transfected gingiva when rats were treated under optimized conditions. From these results, the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound provides an efficient technique for delivering plasmid DNA into the gingiva. This technique can be applied for the delivery of a variety of therapeutic molecules into target tissue, and may serve as a

  2. Layered double hydroxide nanoparticles in gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ladewig, Katharina; Xu, Zhi Ping; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2009-09-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been known for many decades as catalyst and ceramic precursors, traps for anionic pollutants, catalysts and additives for polymers, but their successful synthesis on the nanometer scale a few years ago opened up a whole new field for their application in nanomedicine. The delivery of drugs and other therapeutic/bioactive molecules (e.g., peptides, proteins, nucleic acids) to mammalian cells is an area of research that is of tremendous importance to medicine and provides manifold applications for any new developments in the area of nanotechnology. Among the many different nanoparticles that have been shown to facilitate gene and/or drug delivery, LDH nanoparticles have attracted particular attention owing to their many desirable properties. This review aims to report recent progress in gene and drug delivery using LDH nanoparticles. It summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of using LDH nanoparticles as carriers for nucleic acids and drugs against the general background of bottlenecks that are encountered by cellular delivery systems. It describes further the models that have been proposed for the internalization of LDH nanoparticles into cells so far and discusses the intracellular fate of the particles and their cargo. The authors offer some remarks on how this field of research will progress in the near future and which challenges need to be overcome before LDH nanoparticles can be used in a clinical setting.

  3. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  4. Novel cholesterol-based cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, Darya A; Maslov, Mikhail A; Serikov, Roman N; Morozova, Nina G; Serebrenikova, Galina A; Sheglov, Dmitry V; Latyshev, Alexander V; Vlassov, Valentin V; Zenkova, Marina A

    2009-11-12

    Gene therapy based on gene delivery is a promising strategy for the treatment of human disease. Here we present data on structure/biological activity of new biodegradable cholesterol-based cationic lipids with various heterocyclic cationic head groups and linker types. Enhanced accumulation of nucleic acids in the cells mediated by the lipids was demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Light scattering and atomic force microscopy were used to find structure/transfection activity correlations for the lipids. We found that the ability of the lipids to stimulate intracellular accumulation of the oligodeoxyribonucleotides and plasmid DNA correlates well with their ability to form in solution lipid/NA complexes of sizes that do not exceed 100 nm. Screening of the lipids revealed the most promising transfection agents both in terms of low toxicity and efficient delivery: cholesterol-based lipids with positively charged pyridine and methyl imidazole head groups and either the ester or carbamate linker.

  5. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  6. Adenoviral transduction supports matrix expression of alginate cultured articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pohle, D; Kasch, R; Herlyn, P; Bader, R; Mittlmeier, T; Pützer, B M; Müller-Hilke, B

    2012-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of adenoviral (Ad) transduction of human primary chondrocyte on transgene expression and matrix production. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from healthy articular cartilage and from cartilage with mild osteoarthritis (OA), transduced with an Ad vector and either immediately cultured in alginate or expanded in monolayer before alginate culture. Proteoglycan production was measured using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Viral infection of primary chondrocytes results in a stable long time transgene expression for up to 13 weeks. Ad transduction does not significantly alter gene expression and matrix production if chondrocytes are immediately embedded in alginate. However, if expanded prior to three dimension (3D) culture in alginate, chondrocytes produce not only more proteoglycans compared to non-transduced controls, but also display an increased anabolic and decreased catabolic activity compared to non-transduced controls. We therefore suggest that successful autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) should combine adenoviral transduction of primary chondrocytes with expansion in monolayer followed by 3D culture. Future studies will be needed to investigate whether the subsequent matrix production can be further improved by using Ad vectors bearing genes encoding matrix proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characterization of novel cationic amphiphiles for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    Gene therapy has drawn vast interest for treating, preventing, or controlling a myriad of diseases. The two most common methods for gene delivery use either synthetic or viral vectors. Viral vectors (infection) are by far the most effective and efficient means of DNA delivery, but their use is tempered by safety and immunogenicity concerns. Consequently, there has been a significant effort to develop and evaluate non- viral vectors, which include cationic amphiphiles and polymers, and more recently anionic amphiphiles. Non-viral vectors have the advantages of ease of production, better stability and low immunogenicity. At the same time, they also have a number of limitations, including low in vitro and in vivo transfection efficiencies, and cytotoxicity in many instances. My research project has been focused on design, development and characterizations of novel amphiphilic lipids for gene delivery. Through rational design and characterization of the amphiphile structures, it not only yielded vectors showing high transfection activities, but also provided information of the structure-activity relationship. These results provide us with a better understanding on the transfection process and future directions to further optimize the amphiphile structures. More specifically, my dissertation research included the following three parts: (i) characterization of novel lipopeptides possessing di- or tri- peptide head groups; (ii) determination of the effect of spacer (between the cationic domain and the hydrophobic domain of charge-reversal amphiphiles) length, rigidity and hydrophilicity on gene delivery; (iii) identification of the cellular uptake pathway and the transfection mechanism of a known enzyme-sensitive charge-reversal amphiphile.

  8. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrapleural Adenoviral-mediated Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor Gene Transfer Suppresses the Progression of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Keshava, Shiva; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive thoracic cancer with a high mortality rate as it responds poorly to standard therapeutic interventions. Our recent studies showed that expression of endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) in MPM cells suppresses tumorigenicity. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanism by which EPCR suppresses MPM tumor growth and evaluate whether EPCR gene therapy could suppress the progression of MPM in a mouse model of MPM. Measurement of cytokines from the pleural lavage showed that mice implanted with MPM cells expressing EPCR had elevated levels of IFNγ and TNFα compared to mice implanted with MPM cells lacking EPCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that EPCR expression renders MPM cells highly susceptible to IFNγ + TNFα-induced apoptosis. Intrapleural injection of Ad.EPCR into mice with an established MPM originating from MPM cells lacking EPCR reduced the progression of tumor growth. Ad.EPCR treatment elicited recruitment of macrophages and NK cells into the tumor microenvironment and increased IFNγ and TNFα levels in the pleural space. Ad.EPCR treatment resulted in a marked increase in tumor cell apoptosis. In summary, our data show that EPCR expression in MPM cells promotes tumor cell apoptosis, and intrapleural EPCR gene therapy suppresses MPM progression. PMID:27833109

  10. Long-term survival of cardiac allografts induced by cyclophosphamide combined with CTLA4Ig-gene transfer mediated by adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Ma, J B; Jin, Y Z; Feng, Y G; Hao, J; Gao, X; Xie, S S

    2006-11-01

    There is a need to achieve donor-specific tolerance in clinical organ transplantation, where potential benefits remain overshadowed by chronic rejection and the side-effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. It is known that the mature immune system in mice can be reprogrammed to accept a foreign graft as if it was "self". The AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer (SC) + cyclophosphamide (CP) treatment alone prolongs allograft survival but does not induce tolerance. However, in our study, the AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer combined with SC + CP treatment yielded significantly prolonged mean survival times (149.7 +/- 18.0 days), while those in the untreated or AdLacZ treated mice were rejected in normal fashion (5.3 +/- 0.5 and 5.2 +/- 0.4 days, respectively), and survival in the AdCTLA4Ig or SC + CP treated groups were 45.7 +/- 9.6 or 50.2 +/- 5.3 days, respectively. In conclusion, a protocol of AdCTLA4Ig + SC + CP improved the survival of DA-->LEW cardiac allografts.

  11. Hybrid Nanomaterial Complexes for Advanced Phage-guided Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yata, Teerapong; Lee, Koon-Yang; Dharakul, Tararaj; Songsivilai, Sirirurg; Bismarck, Alexander; Mintz, Paul J; Hajitou, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Developing nanomaterials that are effective, safe, and selective for gene transfer applications is challenging. Bacteriophages (phage), viruses that infect bacteria only, have shown promise for targeted gene transfer applications. Unfortunately, limited progress has been achieved in improving their potential to overcome mammalian cellular barriers. We hypothesized that chemical modification of the bacteriophage capsid could be applied to improve targeted gene delivery by phage vectors into mammalian cells. Here, we introduce a novel hybrid system consisting of two classes of nanomaterial systems, cationic polymers and M13 bacteriophage virus particles genetically engineered to display a tumor-targeting ligand and carry a transgene cassette. We demonstrate that the phage complex with cationic polymers generates positively charged phage and large aggregates that show enhanced cell surface attachment, buffering capacity, and improved transgene expression while retaining cell type specificity. Moreover, phage/polymer complexes carrying a therapeutic gene achieve greater cancer cell killing than phage alone. This new class of hybrid nanomaterial platform can advance targeted gene delivery applications by bacteriophage. PMID:25118171

  12. Smart Micro/Nano-robotic Systems for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Alireza; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat

    2017-01-01

    Small scale robotics have attracted growing attention for the prospect of targeting and accessing cell-sized sites, necessary for high precision biomedical applications and drug/gene delivery. The loss of controlled gene therapy, inducing systemic side effects and reduced therapeutic efficiency, can be settled utilizing these intelligent carriers. Newly proposed solutions for the main challenges of control, power supplying, gene release and final carrier extraction/degradation have shifted these smart miniature robots to the point of being employed for practical applications of transferring oligonucleotides (pDNA, siRNA, mRNA, etc.) in near future. In this paper, different scenarios and their endeavors to address the vital working demands and steps, in particular, carrier attachment and release, cell internalization, manipulation concerns as well as actuation systems are discussed.This review highlights some promising experimental results showing controlled gene release of robotic systems in comparison with current non-specific gene delivery methods. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Recent advances in nonviral vectors for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xia; Huang, Leaf

    2012-07-17

    Gene therapy has long been regarded a promising treatment for many diseases, whether acquired (such as AIDS or cancer) or inherited through a genetic disorder. A drug based on a nucleic acid, however, must be delivered to the interior of the target cell while surviving an array of biological defenses honed by evolution. Successful gene therapy is thus dependent on the development of an efficient delivery vector. Researchers have pursued two major vehicles for gene delivery: viral and nonviral (synthetic) vectors. Although viral vectors currently offer greater efficiency, nonviral vectors, which are typically based on cationic lipids or polymers, are preferred because of safety concerns with viral vectors. So far, nonviral vectors can readily transfect cells in culture, but efficient nanomedicines remain far removed from the clinic. Overcoming the obstacles associated with nonviral vectors to improve the delivery efficiency and therapeutic effect of nucleic acids is thus an active area of current research. The difficulties are manifold, including the strong interaction of cationic delivery vehicles with blood components, uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), toxicity, and managing the targeting ability of the carriers with respect to the cells of interest. Modifying the surface with poly(ethylene glycol), that is, PEGylation, is the predominant method used to reduce the binding of plasma proteins to nonviral vectors and minimize clearance by the RES after intravenous administration. Nanoparticles that are not rapidly cleared from the circulation accumulate in the tumors because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and the targeting ligands attached to the distal end of the PEGylated components allow binding to the receptors on the target cell surface. Neutral and anionic liposomes have been also developed for systemic delivery of nucleic acids in experimental animal models. Other approaches include (i) designing and synthesizing novel

  14. Hyaluronic acid enhances gene delivery into the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Cortez, Sarah R; Wiler, James A; Swiderski, Donald L; Raphael, Yehoash

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear gene therapy can be a new avenue for the treatment of severe hearing loss by inducing regeneration or phenotypic rescue. One necessary step to establish this therapy is the development of a safe and feasible inoculation surgery, ideally without drilling the bony cochlear wall. The round window membrane (RWM) is accessible in the middle-ear space, but viral vectors placed on this membrane do not readily cross the membrane to the cochlear tissues. In an attempt to enhance permeability of the RWM, we applied hyaluronic acid (HA), a nontoxic and biodegradable reagent, onto the RWM of guinea pigs, prior to delivering an adenovirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter gene (Ad-eGFP) at the same site. We examined distribution of eGFP in the cochlea 1 week after treatment, comparing delivery of the vector via the RWM, with or without HA, to delivery by a cochleostomy into the perilymph. We found that cochlear tissue treated with HA-assisted delivery of Ad-eGFP demonstrated wider expression of transgenes in cochlear cells than did tissue treated by cochleostomy injection. HA-assisted vector delivery facilitated expression in cells lining the scala media, which are less accessible and not transduced after perilymphatic injection. We assessed auditory function by measuring auditory brainstem responses and determined that thresholds were significantly better in the ears treated with HA-assisted Ad-eGFP placement on the RWM as compared with cochleostomy. Together, these data demonstrate that HA-assisted delivery of viral vectors provides an atraumatic and clinically feasible method to introduce transgenes into cochlear cells, thereby enhancing both research methods and future clinical application.

  15. Adenoviral mediated interferon-alpha 2b gene therapy suppresses the pro-angiogenic effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Adam, Liana; Black, Peter C; Kassouf, Wassim; Eve, Beryl; McConkey, David; Munsell, Mark F; Benedict, William F; Dinney, Colin P N

    2007-05-01

    Intravesical adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha gene transfer has a potent therapeutic effect against superficial human bladder carcinoma xenografts growing in the bladder of athymic nude mice. We determined whether the inhibition of angiogenesis might contribute to the antitumor effect. We treated several human urothelial carcinoma cells with adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha 2b and monitored its effects on the production of angiogenic factors using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analysis and a gel shift based transcription factor array. To assess the role of adenovirus mediated interferon 2b in angiogenic activity we used in vitro invasion assays and evaluated the anti-angiogenic effects of adenovirus mediated interferon gene therapy in an orthotopic murine model of human superficial bladder cancer. In adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha infected 253J B-V cells vascular endothelial growth factor was decreased and anti-angiogenic interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 was up-regulated. In contrast, the addition of as much as 100,000 IU recombinant interferon had no apparent effect on vascular endothelial growth factor production. Conditioned medium derived from adenovirus mediated interferon 2b infected 253J B-V cells greatly decreased the invasive potential of human endothelial cells and down-regulated their matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression compared to controls. Furthermore, adenovirus mediated interferon 2b blocked pro-angiogenic nuclear signals, such as the transcription factors activating protein-1 and 2, stimulating protein-1, nuclear factor kappaB and c-myb. In vivo experiments revealed significant vascular endothelial growth factor down-regulation and decreased tumor vessel density in the adenovirus mediated interferon 2b treated group compared to controls. Treatment with adenovirus mediated interferon 2b increases the angiostatic activity of the bladder cancer microenvironment

  16. Rationale for the selection of an aerosol delivery system for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Yvonne K; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Lengsfeld, Corinne S

    2006-01-01

    Genetic therapeutics show great promise toward the treatment of illnesses associated with the lungs; however, current methods of delivery such as jet and ultrasonic nebulization decrease the activity and effectiveness of these treatments. Extremely low transfection rates exhibited by non-complexed plasmid DNA in these nebulizers have been primarily attributed to poor translocation and loss of molecular integrity as a consequence of shear-induced degradation. Current research focusing on methods to increase transfection rates via the pulmonary delivery route has largely concentrated on the incorporation of carbon dioxide in the air stream to increase breath depth as well as the addition of cationic agents that condense DNA into compact, ordered complexes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several classic as well as the latest atomization devices on the structure of non-complexed DNA. Various sizes of plasmid and cosmid DNA were processed through an electrostatic spray, ultrasonic nebulizer, vibrating mesh nebulizer, and jet nebulizer. Results varied dramatically based upon atomization device as well as DNA size. This may explain the inefficiency experienced by genetic therapeutics during pulmonary delivery. More importantly, this suggests that the selection of an atomization device should consider DNA size in order to achieve optimal gene delivery to the lungs.

  17. Multivalent dendrimer vectors with DNA intercalation motifs for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Kenny; Coulter, Alexa; Tang, Shengzhuang; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2014-11-10

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers constitute an important class of nonviral, cationic vectors in gene delivery. Here we report on a new concept for dendrimer vector design based on the incorporation of dual binding motifs: DNA intercalation, and receptor recognition for targeted delivery. We prepared a series of dendrimer conjugates derived from a fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer, each conjugated with multiple folate (FA) or riboflavin (RF) ligands for cell receptor targeting, and with 3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridinium ("DAPP")-derived ligands for anchoring a DNA payload. Polyplexes of each dendrimer with calf thymus dsDNA were made and characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement. These studies provided evidence supporting polyplex formation based on the observation of tight DNA-dendrimer adhesion, and changes in particle size and surface charge upon coincubation. Further SPR studies to investigate the adhesion of the polyplex to a model surface immobilized with folate binding protein (FBP), demonstrated that the DNA payload has only a minimal effect on the receptor binding activity of the polyplex: KD = 0.22 nM for G5(FA)(DAPP) versus 0.98 nM for its polyplex. Finally, we performed in vitro transfection assays to determine the efficiency of conjugate mediated delivery of a luciferase-encoding plasmid into the KB cancer cell line and showed that RF-conjugated dendrimers were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more effective in enhancing luciferase gene transfection than a plasmid only control. In summary, this study serves as a proof of concept for DNA-ligand intercalation as a motif in the design of multivalent dendrimer vectors for targeted gene delivery.

  18. Transduction of Brain Dopamine Neurons by Adenoviral Vectors Is Modulated by CAR Expression: Rationale for Tropism Modified Vectors in PD Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Travis B.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Glandon, Anya M.; Curiel, David T.; Standaert, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad) vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)–based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN) in wild type (wt) and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the development

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fillat, Cristina; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed. PMID:24212620

  20. [Deletion of IV a2 gene from adenoviral genome by lambda-Red recombinase system and packaging of the recombinant adenovirus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Fan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Liu, Xue-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Ruan, Li

    2011-05-01

    This investigation is to delete the most of the coding sequence (1104 bp) of the IV a2 gene in an adenovirus genome by a lambda-Red recombinase system-mediated PCR-targeting approach and rescue a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion. First, the template pAK of PCR targeting, containing kanamycin cassette, was constructed. Then, a linear fragment for PCR targeting, which had 39 bp homologous arms at both of its terminus, was amplified by PCR from the pAK. The pFG140 and the linear fragment were electroporated into E. coli BW25113/pIJ790 sequentially and the recombinant pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) was established by homologous recombination between the linear fragment and the pFG140 with aid of X-Red recombinase. The precise deletion of 1 104 bp fragment from IV a2 was confirmed by restriction endonucleases digestion and DNA sequencing. ORF of IV a2 was amplified by PCR from pFG140 and then cloned into the pAAV2neo vector. The recombinant adenovirus Ad5delta IV a2 (1104) was rescued by co-transfection of pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) and pAAV2neo-IV a2 into HEK293 cells. It was shown by Western Blot that IV a2 could not be detected in the Ad5deltaIV a2 (1104)- infected HEK293 cells. This study established a PCR-targeting strategy for manipulating adenovirus genome directly by a lambda-Red recombinase system, and a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion was obtained.

  1. Nanomedicines for Back of the Eye Drug Delivery, Gene Delivery, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B.; Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Ravi, Rashmi Pacha; Durazo, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment and management of diseases of the posterior segment of the eye such as diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, retinitis pigmentosa, and choroidal neovascularization is a challenging task due to the anatomy and physiology of ocular barriers. For instance, traditional routes of drug delivery for therapeutic treatment are hindered by poor intraocular penetration and/or rapid ocular elimination. One possible approach to improve ocular therapy is to employ nanotechnology. Nanomedicines, products of nanotechnology, having at least one dimension in the nanoscale include nanoparticles, micelles, nanotubes, and dendrimers, with and without targeting ligands, are making a significant impact in the fields of ocular drug delivery, gene delivery, and imaging, the focus of this review. Key applications of nanotechnology discussed in this review include a) bioadhesive nanomedicines; b) functionalized nanomedicines that enhance target recognition and/or cell entry; c) nanomedicines capable of controlled release of the payload; d) nanomedicines capable of enhancing gene transfection and duration of transfection; f) nanomedicines responsive to stimuli including light, heat, ultrasound, electrical signals, pH, and oxidative stress; g) diversely sized and colored nanoparticles for imaging, and h) nanowires for retinal prostheses. Additionally, nanofabricated delivery systems including implants, films, microparticles, and nanoparticles are described. Although the above nanomedicines may be administered by various routes including topical, intravitreal, intravenous, transscleral, suprachoroidal, and subretinal routes, each nanomedicine should be tailored for the disease, drug, and site of administration. In addition to the nature of materials used in nanomedicine design, depending on the site of nanomedicine administration, clearance and toxicity are expected to differ. PMID:23603534

  2. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  3. Gene delivery: intelligent but just at the beginning.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, E; Dinçer, S; Türk, M

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is used to treat genetic disorders, which may be achieved both ex vivo and in vivo. Gene-delivery systems usually include a carrier system which both protects the gene expression plasmid and allows its extracellular and intracellular trafficking. Viruses are used in most of the clinical trials today; however, they do have important drawbacks. Non-viral vectors based on lipids, water-soluble polycations, other non-condensing polymers and nano- or microparticles/capsules have been proposed. Cationic polymers, especially carrying novel targeting ligands. are receiving increasing attention. Intelligent polymers with temperature, pH, and light sensitivities for a controllable and effective non-viral transfection have recently been introduced but are just at the beginning. Our preliminary studies showed that block copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylic acid with poly(ethylene imine) could be one example of these novel non-viral vectors.

  4. Current Status of Gene Delivery and Gene Therapy in Lacrimal Gland using Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Shivaram; Thomas, Padmaja B.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Schechter, Joel E.; Stevenson, Douglas; Mircheff, Austin K.; Trousdale*, Melvin D.

    2006-01-01

    Gene delivery is one of the biggest challenges in the field of gene therapy. It involves the efficient transfer of transgenes into somatic cells for therapeutic purposes. A few major drawbacks in gene delivery include inefficient gene transfer and lack of sustained transgene expression. However, the classical method of using viral vectors for gene transfer has circumvented some of these issues. Several kinds of viruses, including retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and herpes simplex virus, have been manipulated for use in gene transfer and gene therapy applications. The transfer of genetic material into lacrimal epithelial cells and tissues, both in vitro and in vivo, has been critical for the study of tear secretory mechanisms and autoimmunity of the lacrimal gland. These studies will help in the development of therapeutic interventions for autoimmune disorders such as Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eye syndromes which are associated with lacrimal dysfunction. These studies are also critical for future endeavors which utilize the lacrimal gland as a reservoir for the production of therapeutic factors which can be released in tears, providing treatment for diseases of the cornea and posterior segment. This review will discuss the developments related to gene delivery and gene therapy in the lacrimal gland using several viral vector systems. PMID:17056149

  5. Hydrogels: a journey from diapers to gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Pooja; Srivastava, Alok Ranjan; Pandey, Priyanka; Chawla, Viney

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels are the biomaterials comprising network of natural or synthetic polymers capable of absorbing large amount of water. Hydrogels are "Smart Gels" or "Intelligent Gels" which can be made to respond to the various environmental conditions like temperature, pH, magnetic/electric field, ionic strength, inflammation, external stress etc. There are numerous potential applications of hydrogels in modern day life ranging from a diaper to gene delivery. This review succinctly describes the classification, properties and preparation methods along with numerous diverse applications of hydrogels like agricultural hydrogels, hydrogel for drug delivery, sensing, dental adhesives, wound healing and tissue regeneration, diet aid and gastric retention and in tissue engineering etc. Hydrogels can be regarded as highly valuable biomaterials for human-beings.

  6. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  7. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy.

  8. Use of Polymer Micro-Structures for Drug & Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ben

    2005-03-01

    The design of polymer microstructures, including polyelectrolyte-surfactant complex formation, plays an important role in the protection and controlled release of drugs & DNA fragments. Two examples are presented: one for drug release and one for gene delivery. Non-viral gene therapy is a challenging problem that has not yet met much success even though numerous attempts have been made. The gene delivery illustration aims to present one specific approach on how DNA fragments can be delivered to a cell by using an electro-spun scaffold as a carrier, i.e., to consider how DNA fragments can be trapped into a scaffold for subsequent release and transfection. Our scheme is to capture the DNA fragments by taking advantage of the DNA coil-to-globule transition and to encapsulate the condensed DNA globule by using block copolymers. The supra-molecular capsule can then be incorporated into a nano-structured biodegradable polymer scaffold by means of electro-spinning. Subsequent DNA release to cells that adhere to the scaffolds was measured by using fluorescence microscopy.AcknowledgementsFinancial Support:National Science Foundation, Polymers Program (DMR9984102 & Creativity Extension Award), Center for Biotechnology at Stony Brook, ITG Grant, and NIH SBIR Grant to STAR.Main contributors include Professors Benjamin S. Hsiao and Michael Hadjiargyrou, Drs. Dufei Fang, Dehai Liang and Kwangsok Kim, Ms. K. Luu and Mr. J. Chiu.

  9. Nanoparticles facilitate gene delivery to microorganisms via an electrospray process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Bing; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Chen, Da-Ren; Tang, Yinjie J

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we developed a technique for delivering genes to microorganisms via electrospray of gold nanoparticles. During the electrospray process, charged monodisperse nano-droplets (a mixture of pET30a-GFP plasmid and nano-sized gold particles) were accelerated and deposited on a thin layer of non-competent Escherichia coli cells. Via antibiotic selection, transformed cells containing green fluorescent protein appeared on the agar plates. PCR amplification and restriction enzyme analysis further confirmed that pET30a-GFP plasmid had successfully been delivered into the non-competent E. coli cells. The transformation efficiencies were optimized under different electrospray conditions. Among several electrospray buffer solutions, CaCl(2) (0.01M) was found to be the best for gene delivery. Furthermore, gold nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm diameter) significantly improved plasmid transformation efficiency by 5-7 fold (up to 2×10(6) CFU/μg plasmid) compared with that obtained using naked plasmid. Electronic microscopy images and gel electrophoresis showed that the morphology of plasmids remained unchanged during the electrospray process, but cellular membrane integrity was reduced after being electrosprayed with gold NPs and CaCl(2) buffer solutions. This gene delivery method has the potential to work for many other microorganisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sperm as a noninvasive gene delivery system for preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Chan, P J; Kalugdan, T; Su, B C; Whitney, E A; Perrott, W; Tredway, D R; King, A

    1995-05-01

    To determine if sperm could be manipulated to be a noninvasive transport carrier for the delivery of gene fragments to the blastocyst. Sperm cells carrying foreign DNA fragments from human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, and 33 were allowed to migrate from one end of an artificial reproductive tube and to come in contact with hatching mouse blastocysts at the other end of the tube. The blastocysts were then washed and analyzed for the presence of the foreign DNA fragments. Clinical and academic research environment. Detection of amplified products from transferred foreign DNA using the polymerase chain reaction and primers targeted at the E6-E7 region for different HPV types. Polymerase chain reaction analyses showed transference of DNA HPV type 18 to the blastocysts. Not all types of DNA fragments were transferred equally. The results suggested the possibility of using sperm as a noninvasive gene delivery system for passing on gene fragments to preimplantation embryos. It was demonstrated that certain DNA fragments were easier to deliver than others, indicating the necessity for exploring all the factors involved in the mechanism of the transference process. The study also serves to highlight the possibility of unintentional transmission of viral or bacterial DNA to the developing embryo via the sperm.

  11. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu

    Combination drug and gene therapy shows promise in cancer treatment. However, the success of such strategy requires careful selection of the therapeutic agents, as well as development of efficient delivery vectors. BENSpm (N 1, N11-bisethylnorspermine), a polyamine analogue targeting the intracellular polyamine pathway, draws our special attention because of the following reasons: (1) polyamine pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancer; (2) BENSpm exhibits multiple functions to interfere with the polyamine pathway, such as to up-regulate polyamine metabolism enzymes and down-regulate polyamine biosynthesis enzymes. Therefore BENSpm depletes all natural polyamines and leads to apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in a wide range of cancers; (3) preclinical studies proved that BENSpm can act synergistically with various chemotherapy agents, making it a promising candidate in combination therapy; (4) multiple positive charges in BENSpm enable it as a suitable building block for cationic polymers, which can be further applied to gene delivery. In this dissertation, our goal was to design dual-function delivery vector based on BENSpm that can function as a gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as an active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We first demonstrated strong synergism between BENSpm and a potential therapeutic gene product TRAIL. Strong synergism was obtained in both estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant dose reduction of TRAIL in combination with BENSpm in MDA-MB-231 cells, together with the fact that BENSpm rendered MCF-7 cells more sensitive to TRAIL treatment verified our rationale of designing BENSpm-based delivery platform. This was expected to be beneficial for overcoming drug resistance in chemotherapy, as well as boosting the therapeutic effect of therapeutic genes. We first designed a lipid-based BENSpm dual vector (Lipo

  12. Arginoplexes: an arginine-anchored nanoliposomal carrier for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan; Tyagi, Monica; Monpara, Jasmin; Vora, Lalit; Gupta, Sanjay; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    There is a need of an efficient and safe non-viral gene delivery carrier due to promising future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics in the treatment of intractable diseases. Cytotoxicity and cost are the major concerns with current quaternary ammonium-based cationic liposomes. The major aim of current research work was development and in vitro evaluation of arginine-anchored nanoliposomes for gene delivery. l-Arginine-fatty acid conjugate was synthesized and characterized using IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. Synthesized conjugate—lauroyl arginine ethyl ester (LAE) was successfully incorporated into liposomes. Effect of nanocarrier composition on DNA binding was evaluated by preparing solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and self nanoemulsifying system (SNES) using same LAE concentration. Effect of cationic head on DNA binding was also evaluated. Arginine-anchored nanoliposomes—arginoplexes (APX) showed superior DNA-binding affinity. Surface PEG was expected to cause hindrance in DNA binding in SLNs and SNES. Guanidino group was found to be a better cationic head for DNA binding compared to primary amine or quaternary amine. Gel retardation assay was performed to optimize the ratio of DNA to LAE in nanocarrier. Serum stability, haemolysis, cytotoxicity, and transfection studies were carried out to evaluate APX. Binding of DNA to APX was found to be stable in the presence of serum, and no degradation of DNA was observed. APX containing 2 mg/ml LAE which exhibited particle size of 72 nm with zeta potential of +57.5 mV, showed lower cytotoxicity and better transfection. APX can be a promising carrier for gene delivery.

  13. Click assembly of magnetic nanovectors for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Souvik; Gordon, Laura E.; Clark, Geoffrey J.; Nantz, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with quaternary ammonium ion-based aminooxy and oxime ether substrates provides a flexible route for generating magnetic gene delivery vectors. Using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, our findings show that pDNA magnetoplexes derived from the lipid-coated nanoparticle formulation dMLP transfect in the presence of 10% serum with or without magnetic assistance at significantly higher levels than a commonly used cationic liposome formulation, based on luciferase assay. The present ionpairing, click chemistry approach furnishes Fe3O4 nanoparticles with lipid layers. The resultant magnetic nanovectors serve as transfection enhancers for otherwise transfection-inactive materials. PMID:21255832

  14. Design of serum compatible tetrary complexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Bahadur K C, Remant; Thapa, Bindu; Xu, Peisheng

    2012-05-01

    A novel gene delivery system, called PoSC, consisting of PEI, PSP, and HA is described. In contrast to the DNA/PEI/HA ternary system whose transfection efficiency decreases significantly with increasing serum concentration, PoSC exhibits a high transfection efficiency of about 51 and 87% for NIH3T3 and HCT116 cells, respectively, at 50% serum concentration. Furthermore, PoSC shows no cytotoxic effect at its working concentration. The overall results suggest that HA adsorption on cationic complexes enhances the transfection efficiency, while PSP is essential for high transfection efficiency at higher serum concentration.

  15. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  16. Modified pectin-based carrier for gene delivery: Cellular barriers in gene delivery course

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharides as DNA carriers has high potential for gene therapy applications. Pectin is a structural plant polysaccharide heterogeneous with respect to its chemical structure. It contains branches rich in galactose residues which serve as potential liga...

  17. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  18. AAV2-mediated gene delivery to monkey putamen: Evaluation of an infusion device and delivery parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanftner, Laura M.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Suzuki, Brian M.; Smith, Peter H.; Vijay, Sharmila; Vargas, Joseph A.; Forsayeth, John R.; Cunningham, Janet; Bankiewicz, Krys S.; Kao, Haihwa; Bernal, Jan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Johnson, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a modified infusion procedure and a novel infusion device designed for use in humans (Clinical Device B) were evaluated for delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) to brain. The device is composed of 1.2 m of fused silica inserted through a 24.6-cm surgical steel cannula designed to fit a standard Leksell® clinical stereotaxic frame and micro-infusion syringe pump. AAV2 encoding the human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene (AAV-hAADC-2) was infused into the putamen of 4 normal rhesus monkeys as a supportive study for a clinical trial in Parkinson&apos ;s disease (PD) patients. Two infusion protocols were tested: a ramped procedure (slow stepwise increases in rate from 0.2 μL/min to 1μL/min), thought to be essential for convection-enhanced delivery (CED), and a non-ramped infusion at a constant rate of 1 μL/min. The primary endpoints were safety evaluation of the infusion procedures and assessment of transgene expression at 5.5 weeks post-infusion. Clinical observations after vector infusions revealed no behavioral abnormalities during the study period. No differences in gross pathology with either the ramped or non-ramped infusion procedure were observed. Histopathology of the putamen was comparable with both procedures, and revealed only minimal localized inflammatory tissue reaction along the needle track in response to cannula placement and vector infusion. AADC immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vector was distributed throughout the putamen, with no significant difference in volume of immunostaining with either infusion procedure. Serum antibody levels against AAV2 vector exhibited a minor increase after infusion. These results validate the clinical utility of this new infusion device and non-ramped infusion conditions for intraputamenal gene therapy, and have the potential to impact a number of human diseases in which delivery of therapeutics to brain is indicated. PMID:16022872

  19. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-07-19

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose.

  20. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose. PMID:27434682

  1. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose.

  2. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-01-01

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations. PMID:18474406

  3. Fenton-treated functionalized diamond nanoparticles as gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Martín, Roberto; Alvaro, Mercedes; Herance, José Raúl; García, Hermenegildo

    2010-01-26

    When raw diamond nanoparticles (Dnp, 7 nm average particle size) obtained from detonation are submitted to harsh Fenton-treatment, the resulting material becomes free of amorphous soot matter and the process maintains the crystallinity, reduces the particle size (4 nm average particle size), increases the surface OH population, and increases water solubility. All these changes are beneficial for subsequent Dnp covalent functionalization and for the ability of Dnp to cross cell membranes. Fenton-treated Dnps have been functionalized with thionine and the resulting sample has been observed in HeLa cell nuclei. A triethylammonium-functionalized Dnp pairs electrostatically with a plasmid having the green fluorescent protein gene and acts as gene delivery system permitting the plasmid to cross HeLa cell membrane, something that does not occur for the plasmid alone without assistance of polycationic Dnp.

  4. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-02

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases.

  5. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-06-30

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations.

  6. Modification of nanostructured calcium carbonate for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chao-Qun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a facile method to modify nanostructured calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gene delivery systems by adding calcium phosphate (CaP) component was developed. CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation of Ca(2+) ions with plasmid DNA in the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. For comparison, CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates were also prepared. The effects of carbonate ion/phosphate ion (CO3(2-)/PO4(3-)) ratio on the particle size and gene delivery efficiency were investigated. With an appropriate CO3(2-)/PO4(3-) ratio, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate ions could control the size of co-precipitates effectively, and CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles with a decreased size and improved stability could be obtained. The in vitro gene transfections mediated by different nanoparticles in 293T cells and HeLa cells were carried out, using pGL3-Luc as a reporter plasmid. The gene transfection efficiency of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles could be significantly improved as compared with CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates. The confocal microscopy study indicated that the cellular uptake and nuclear localization of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were significantly enhanced as compared with unmodified CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  8. Gene Delivery Nanoparticles Fabricated by Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Aaron S.; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2010-01-01

    Non-viral polymeric gene delivery systems offer increased protection from nuclease degradation, enhanced plasmid DNA (pDNA) uptake, and controlled dosing to sustain the duration of pDNA administration. Such gene delivery systems can be formulated from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers such as poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). Experimental loading of hydrophilic macromolecules such as pDNA is low in polymeric particles. The study purpose was to develop a supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions (SFEE) process based on CO2 for preparing pEGFP-PLGA nanoparticles with high plasmid loading and loading efficiency. Another objective was to determine the efficacy of pFlt23k, an anti-angiogenic pDNA capable of inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, following nanoparticle formation using the SFEE process. Results indicated that the SFEE process allows high actual loading of pDNA (19.7% w/w), high loading efficiency (> 98%), and low residual solvents (< 50 ppm), due to rapid particle formation from efficient solvent removal provided by the SFEE process. pFlt23K-PLGA nanoparticles were capable of in vitro transfection, significantly reducing secreted VEGF from human lung alveolar epithelial cells (A549) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. pFlt23K-PLGA nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxicity and are of potential value in treating neovascular disorders wherein VEGF levels are elevated. PMID:20025945

  9. Gene therapy in skin: choosing the optimal viral vector.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esther H; Cross, Kevin J; Bomsztyk, Elan D; Lyden, David C; Spector, Jason A

    2009-05-01

    Skin is an ideal gene therapy target because it is readily accessible and is involved in many pathologic processes. Viruses are the most common gene vectors, however, few comparative studies exist examining their efficacy in skin. This study evaluates adenovirus serotype 5, adeno-associated virus type 2 and 5, MMLV-derived retrovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus-1 derived lentivirus for gene vector activity in human dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines. Human immunodeficiency virus-1-based lentiviral vector resulted in over 90% transduction in all cell lines tested. Transduced cells maintained reporter expression over several passages after a single exposure. In contrast, gene activity fell rapidly over cell divisions with adenoviral and adeno-associated vectors. Therefore, lentiviral vectors are the delivery mechanism of choice for long-term therapeutic gene expression in dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines, whereas adenoviral or adeno-associated vectors may be preferred for short-term therapy.

  10. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  11. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    To test the safety and efficacy of somatostatin gene delivery as a potential therapeutic approach to epilepsy, an established rodent model is used in...reliably. Animals tested during the reporting period establish that somatostatin gene delivery after development of maximal seizure susceptibility can...observed when gene delivery preceded kindling, but comparable to extant antiepileptic medication. Responder and non-responder cohorts cannot be

  12. Characterization of reducible peptide oligomers as carriers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton; Egorova, Anna; Laukkanen, Antti; Baranov, Vladislav; Urtti, Arto

    2013-01-30

    The stability of DNA-polyplexes and intracellular DNA release are important features of gene delivery systems. To study these features, we have evaluated reducible cysteine-flanked linear lysine and arginine-rich peptides, modified with histidine residues. The reducible disulfide bonds in cysteine flanked peptides and histidine residues should augment DNA release from the peptide-DNA complexes upon disintegration of the reducible bonds. Template polymerization and oxidative polycondensation were applied to obtain peptide oligomers used for DNA-polyplex preparation. The peptides and DNA-peptide complexes were investigated with physical, chemical and transfection measurements. Physicochemical and transfection properties of DNA-polyplexes depended on the amino acid sequence of the peptidic polymers and type of the polymerization. MALDI-TOF analysis of oxidatively polycondensed products revealed several forms of peptide oligomers corresponding to 5-8 amino acid monomers. DNA-peptide particles based on template-polymerized complexes were more resistant to relaxation by negatively charged heparan sulfate than polyplexes formed with oxidatively condensed peptides. Complexes of DNA with the polycations prepared by oxidative polycondensation exhibited a 100-1000-fold higher level of gene expression compared to DNA/template-polymerized peptide complexes. The most efficient transgene expression was shown with arginine-rich polyplexes. Transfection efficacy of the arginine-rich polyplexes was even 10-fold better than that of DNA/PEI complexes. On average, polyplexes based on cysteine-flanked peptide oligomers showed lower cytotoxicity than non-reducible high molecular weight polylysine/DNA particles. We conclude that reducible peptide oligomers provide efficient DNA transfection and have the potential as vehicles for gene delivery.

  13. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  14. Functionalized nanoparticles for AMF-induced gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Souvik

    The properties and broad applications of nano-magnetic colloids have generated much interest in recent years. Specially, Fe3O4 nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention since their magnetic properties can be used for hyperthermia treatment or drug targeting. For example, enhanced levels of intracellular gene delivery can be achieved using Fe3O4 nano-vectors in the presence of an external magnetic field, a process known as 'magnetofection'. The low cytotoxicity, tunable particle size, ease of surface functionalization, and ability to generate thermal energy using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF) are properties have propelled Fe3O4 research to the forefront of nanoparticle research. The strategy of nanoparticle-mediated, AMF-induced heat generation has been used to effect intracellular hyperthermia. One application of this 'magnetic hyperthermia' is heat activated local delivery of a therapeutic effector (e.g.; drug or polynucleotide). This thesis describes the development of a magnetic nano-vector for AMF-induced, heat-activated pDNA and small molecule delivery. The use of heat-inducible vectors, such as heat shock protein ( hsp) genes, is a promising mode of gene therapy that would restrict gene expression to a local region by focusing a heat stimulus only at a target region. We thus aimed to design an Fe3O4 nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer vehicle for AMF-induced localized gene expression. We opted to use 'click' oximation techniques to assemble the magnetic gene transfer vector. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis, characterization, and transfection studies of the oxime ether lipid-based nano-magnetic vectors MLP and dMLP. The synthesis and characterization of a novel series of quaternary ammonium aminooxy reagents (2.1--2.4) is described. These cationic aminooxy compounds were loaded onto nanoparticles for ligation with carbonyl groups and also to impart a net positive charge on the nanoparticle surface. Our studies indicated that the

  15. Surface immobilization of hexa-histidine-tagged adeno-associated viral vectors for localized gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jang, J-H; Koerber, J T; Gujraty, K; Bethi, S R; Kane, R S; Schaffer, D V

    2010-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, which are undergoing broad exploration in clinical trials, have significant promise for therapeutic gene delivery because of their safety and delivery efficiency. Gene delivery technologies capable of mediating localized gene expression may further enhance the potential of AAV in a variety of therapeutic applications by reducing spread outside a target region, which may thereby reduce off-target side effects. We have genetically engineered an AAV variant capable of binding to surfaces with high affinity through a hexa-histidine metal-binding interaction. This immobilized AAV vector system mediates high-efficiency delivery to cells that contact the surface and thus may have promise for localized gene delivery, which may aid numerous applications of AAV delivery to gene therapy.

  16. Strategies for retargeted gene delivery using vectors derived from lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Cosset, Francois-Loic

    2004-12-01

    With the development of the first viral vector systems 20 years ago [Mann et al., 1983; Watanabe and Temin, 1983] gene therapy strategies have come to the forefront of novel therapeutics [Cavazzana-Calvo et al., 2000]. A deeper understanding of vector biology and the molecular mechanisms of disease alongside tremendous advances in vector technology have significantly advanced the field of human gene therapy. Over the last few years several challenges needed to be overcome in order to bring gene therapy strategies closer to the clinic. These hurdles include the preparation of large amounts of stable, high titre vectors, minimising vector-related immunology and last but not least targeting infection and transgene expression to tissue or cells, which in many cases are not or only slowly dividing. Viral vectors are useful vehicles for the delivery of foreign genes into target cells, and retroviral vectors have been popular because of their ability to integrate into the host cell genome and maintain persistent gene expression. Moreover, lentiviruses, members of the retroviral family, have the ability to infect cells at both mitotic and post-mitotic stages of the cell cycle thus opening up the possibility to target non-dividing target cells and tissues. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) based vectors have been used in vitro and in vivo in a number of situations, however, safety concerns still exist, and therefore the development of vector systems based on primate as well as non-primate lentiviruses is ongoing. Concomitantly with lentiviral vector design, much has been learned about the incorporation of heterologous env proteins on lentiviral cores in order to combine specific targeting properties of envelope glycoproteins with the biological properties of lentiviral vectors. In this review article we will give an overview over advantages lentiviral vector systems offer. We will then discuss the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral

  17. Cyclen-based lipidic oligomers as potential gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Qiang; Ren, Laifeng; Chen, Qian-Ming; Guo, Liandi; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-03-01

    A series of cyclen-based linear oligomers bearing hydrophobic long chains (lipopolymers Cy-LC, where Cy and LC represent cyclen-based linear backbone and hydrophobic long chain substituents, respectively) were designed and synthesized. The effects of type and degree of substitution (DS) of hydrophobic long chains on the transfection efficiency were systematically studied. The nitrogen atoms with relatively strong basicity on the cyclen ensure their good DNA binding ability, which was confirmed by gel retardation and ethidium bromide exclusion assays. Lipopolyplexes could be formed as nanoparticles with suitable sizes and zeta potentials for gene transfection. In vitro gene delivery experiments revealed that the linoleic acid (LIN) substituted material Cy-LIN has better transfection efficiency than 25 kDa polyethylenimine in the absence or in the presence of serum. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and hemolysis assays showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility of the lipopolyplexes. Fluorescent labeled DNA was used to study the cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of transfected DNA. Flow cytometry results suggested that a long chain is necessary for efficient cellular uptake, and images from confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that after 4h transfection, most of the fluorescent labeled DNA accumulated in the perinuclear region, which was required for efficient gene expression. Moreover, it was also found that the DS of the hydrophobic moiety can adjust the balance between DNA binding ability and dissociation of polyplexes, significantly affecting the transfection efficiency.

  18. Magnetofection: A Reproducible Method for Gene Delivery to Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prosen, Lara; Prijic, Sara; Music, Branka; Lavrencak, Jaka; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Magnetofection is a nanoparticle-mediated approach for transfection of cells, tissues, and tumors. Specific interest is in using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as delivery system of therapeutic genes. Magnetofection has already been described in some proof-of-principle studies; however, fine tuning of the synthesis of SPIONs is necessary for its broader application. Physicochemical properties of SPIONs, synthesized by the co-precipitation in an alkaline aqueous medium, were tested after varying different parameters of the synthesis procedure. The storage time of iron(II) sulfate salt, the type of purified water, and the synthesis temperature did not affect physicochemical properties of SPIONs. Also, varying the parameters of the synthesis procedure did not influence magnetofection efficacy. However, for the pronounced gene expression encoded by plasmid DNA it was crucial to functionalize poly(acrylic) acid-stabilized SPIONs (SPIONs-PAA) with polyethyleneimine (PEI) without the adjustment of its elementary alkaline pH water solution to the physiological pH. In conclusion, the co-precipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) sulfate salts with subsequent PAA stabilization, PEI functionalization, and plasmid DNA binding is a robust method resulting in a reproducible and efficient magnetofection. To achieve high gene expression is important, however, the pH of PEI water solution for SPIONs-PAA functionalization, which should be in the alkaline range. PMID:23862136

  19. AAV Hybrid Serotypes: Improved Vectors for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made on studying and engineering adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid, in order to increase efficiency in targeting specific cell types that are non-permissive to wild type (wt) viruses and to improve efficacy in infecting only the cell type of interest. With our previous knowledge of the viral properties of the naturally occurring serotypes and the elucidation of their capsid structures, we can now generate capsid mutants, or hybrid serotypes, by various methods and strategies. In this review, we summarize the studies performed on AAV retargeting, and categorize the available hybrid serotypes to date, based on the type of modification: 1) transcapsidation, 2) adsorption of bi-specific antibody to capsid surface, 3) mosaic capsid, and 4) chimeric capsid. Not only these hybrid serotypes could achieve high efficiency of gene delivery to a specific targeted cell type, which can be better-tailored for a particular clinical application, but also serve as a tool for studying AAV biology such as receptor binding, trafficking and genome delivery into the nucleus. PMID:15975007

  20. A novel gene delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian; Duffy, Angela M; Gould Fogerite, Susan; Krause-Elsmore, Sara; Lu, Ruying; Shang, Gaofeng; Chen, Zi-Wei; Mannino, Raphael J; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Harmey, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    Although gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of both acquired and genetic diseases, its development has been limited by practical considerations. Non-viral efficacy of delivery remains quite poor. We are investigating the feasibility of a novel lipid-based delivery system, cochleates, to deliver transgenes to mammalian cells. Rhodamine-labelled empty cochleates were incubated with two cell-lines (4T1 adenocarcinoma and H36.12 macrophage hybridoma) and primary macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Cochleates containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression plasmid were incubated with 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. Cellular uptake of labelled cochleates or transgene GFP expression were visualised with fluorescence microscopy. 4T1 and H36.12 lines showed 39% and 23.1% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages had 48+/-5.38% and 51.46+/-15.6% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates in vitro. In vivo 25.69+/-0.127% of peritoneal macrophages were rhodamine-positive after intra-peritoneal injection of rhodamine-cochleates. 19.49+/-10.12% of 4T1 cells expressed GFP. Cochleates may therefore be an effective, non-toxic and non-immunogenic method to introduce transgenes in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  2. Clinically applicable procedure for gene delivery to fetal gut by ultrasound-guided gastric injection: toward prenatal prevention of early-onset intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    David, A L; Peebles, D M; Gregory, L; Waddington, S N; Themis, M; Weisz, B; Ruthe, A; Lawrence, L; Cook, T; Rodeck, C H; Coutelle, C

    2006-07-01

    Targeting gene therapy vectors to the fetal intestinal tract could provide a novel means toward prevention of the early postnatal intestinal pathology of cystic fibrosis and other conditions, such as congenital enteropathy, that cause intestinal failure. Among these conditions, cystic fibrosis is by far the most common lethal genetic disease. It is caused by a functional absence or deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and manifests in the gut as meconium ileus. Prenatal treatment of genetic disease may avoid early-onset tissue damage and immune sensitization, and may target cells that are less accessible in the adult. We investigated gene transfer to the fetal gut, using a minimally invasive injection technique. First-generation replication-deficient adenoviral vectors encoding the beta-galactosidase gene and transduction-enhancing agents were injected into the stomach of early-gestation fetal sheep (n = 8, 60 days of gestation; term, 145 days) under ultrasound guidance. Reporter gene expression was observed 2 days after injection in the villi of the gastrointestinal epithelia after 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside staining and beta-galactosidase immunohistochemistry of fetal tissues. Expression of beta-galactosidase, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was enhanced after pretreatment of the fetal gut with sodium caprate, which opens tight junctions, and after adenovirus complexation with DEAE-dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus. Instillation of the fluorocarbon perflubron after virus delivery resulted in tissue transduction from the fetal stomach to the colon. Using a clinically relevant technique, we have demonstrated widespread gene transfer to the fetal gastrointestinal epithelia.

  3. Electrosonic ejector microarray for drug and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zarnitsyn, Vladimir G; Meacham, J Mark; Varady, Mark J; Hao, Chunhai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2008-04-01

    We report on development and experimental characterization of a novel cell manipulation device-the electrosonic ejector microarray-which establishes a pathway for drug and/or gene delivery with control of biophysical action on the length scale of an individual cell. The device comprises a piezoelectric transducer for ultrasound wave generation, a reservoir for storing the sample mixture and a set of acoustic horn structures that form a nozzle array for focused application of mechanical energy. The nozzles are micromachined in silicon or plastic using simple and economical batch fabrication processes. When the device is driven at a particular resonant frequency of the acoustic horn structures, the sample mixture of cells and desired transfection agents/molecules suspended in culture medium is ejected from orifices located at the nozzle tips. During sample ejection, focused mechanical forces (pressure and shear) are generated on a microsecond time scale (dictated by nozzle size/geometry and ejection velocity) resulting in identical "active" microenvironments for each ejected cell. This process enables a number of cellular bioeffects, from uptake of small molecules and gene delivery/transfection to cell lysis. Specifically, we demonstrate successful calcein uptake and transfection of DNA plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into human malignant glioma cells (cell line LN443) using electrosonic microarrays with 36, 45 and 50 mum diameter nozzle orifices and operating at ultrasound frequencies between 0.91 and 0.98 MHz. Our results suggest that efficacy and the extent of bioeffects are mainly controlled by nozzle orifice size and the localized intensity of the applied acoustic field.

  4. Gene delivery to the lungs: pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Villate-Beitia, Ilia; Zarate, Jon; Puras, Gustavo; Pedraz, José Luis

    2017-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder where the defective gene, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), is well identified. Moreover, the respiratory tract can be targeted through noninvasive aerosolized formulations for inhalation. Therefore, gene therapy is considered a plausible strategy to address this disease. Conventional gene therapy strategies rely on the addition of a correct copy of the CFTR gene into affected cells in order to restore the channel activity. In recent years, genome correction strategies have emerged, such as zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats associated to Cas9 nucleases. These gene editing tools aim to repair the mutated gene at its original genomic locus with high specificity. Besides, the success of gene therapy critically depends on the nucleic acids carriers. To date, several clinical studies have been carried out to add corrected copies of the CFTR gene into target cells using viral and non-viral vectors, some of them with encouraging results. Regarding genome editing systems, preliminary in vitro studies have been performed in order to repair the CFTR gene. In this review, after briefly introducing the basis of CF, we discuss the up-to-date gene therapy strategies to address the disease. The review focuses on the main factors to take into consideration when developing gene delivery strategies, such as the design of vectors and plasmid DNA, in vitro/in vivo tests, translation to human use, administration methods, manufacturing conditions and regulatory issues.

  5. Adenoviral vectors encoding CRISPR/Cas9 multiplexes rescue dystrophin synthesis in unselected populations of DMD muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M.; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A. F. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disrupting the reading frame of the ~2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene cause a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Genome editing based on paired RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) from CRISPR/Cas9 systems has been proposed for permanently repairing faulty DMD loci. However, such multiplexing strategies require the development and testing of delivery systems capable of introducing the various gene editing tools into target cells. Here, we investigated the suitability of adenoviral vectors (AdVs) for multiplexed DMD editing by packaging in single vector particles expression units encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease and sequence-specific gRNA pairs. These RGN components were customized to trigger short- and long-range intragenic DMD excisions encompassing reading frame-disrupting exons in patient-derived muscle progenitor cells. By allowing synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the various RGN components, we demonstrate that dual RGN-encoding AdVs can correct over 10% of target DMD alleles, readily leading to the detection of Becker-like dystrophin proteins in unselected muscle cell populations. Moreover, we report that AdV-based gene editing can be tailored for removing mutations located within the over 500-kb major DMD mutational hotspot. Hence, this single DMD editing strategy can in principle tackle a broad spectrum of mutations present in more than 60% of patients with DMD. PMID:27845387

  6. Biological delivery approaches for gene therapy: strategies to potentiate efficacy and enhance specificity.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Rafati, Sima

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays many therapeutic agents such as suicide genes, anti-angiogenesis agents, cytokines, chemokines and other therapeutic genes were delivered to cancer cells. Various biological delivery systems have been applied for directing therapeutic gene to target cells. Some of these successful preclinical studies, steps forward to clinical trials and a few are examined in phase III clinical trials. In this review, the biological gene delivery systems were categorized into microorganism and cell based delivery systems. Viral, bacterial, yeast and parasite are among microorganism based delivery systems which are expanded in this review. In cell based approach, different strategies such as tumor cells, stem cells, dendritic cells and sertoli cells will be discussed. Different drawbacks are associated with each delivery system; therefore, many strategies have been improved and potentiated their direction toward specific target cells. Herein, further to the principle of each delivery system, the progresses of these approaches for development of newer generation are discussed.

  7. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. W.; Liu, G.; Hong, R. Y.; Li, H. Z.; Li, Y. G.; Wei, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  8. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug and Gene Delivery Systems: Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely applied as advanced drug and gene delivery nanosystems. Among them, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted great attention as colloidal drug delivery systems for incorporating hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs and various macromolecules as well as proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, SLNs offer great promise for controlled and site specific drug and gene delivery. This article includes general information about SLN structures and properties, production procedures, characterization. In addition, recent progress on development of drug and gene delivery systems using SLNs was reviewed. PMID:26236652

  9. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Ribonucleoprotein for Efficient Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Lee, Yi-Wei; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-28

    Genome editing through the delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9-RNP) reduces unwanted gene targeting and avoids integrational mutagenesis that can occur through gene delivery strategies. Direct and efficient delivery of Cas9-RNP into the cytosol followed by translocation to the nucleus remains a challenge. Here, we report a remarkably highly efficient (∼90%) direct cytoplasmic/nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complexed with a guide RNA (sgRNA) through the coengineering of Cas9 protein and carrier nanoparticles. This construct provides effective (∼30%) gene editing efficiency and opens up opportunities in studying genome dynamics.

  10. In vitro non-viral gene delivery with nanofibrous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dehai; Luu, Yen K.; Kim, Kwangsok; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Chu, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular and intracellular barriers typically prevent non-viral gene vectors from having an effective transfection efficiency. Formulation of a gene delivery vehicle that can overcome the barriers is a key step for successful tissue regeneration. We have developed a novel core-shelled DNA nanoparticle by invoking solvent-induced condensation of plasmid DNA (β-galactosidase or GFP) in a solvent mixture [94% N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + 6% 1× TE buffer] and subsequent encapsulation of the condensed DNA globule in a triblock copolymer, polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (L8E78L8), in the same solvent environment. The polylactide shell protects the encapsulated DNA from degradation during electrospinning of a mixture of encapsulated DNA nanoparticles and biodegradable PLGA (a random copolymer of lactide and glycolide) to form a nanofibrous non-woven scaffold using the same solution mixture. The bioactive plasmid DNA can then be released in an intact form from the scaffold with a controlled release rate and transfect cells in vitro. PMID:16269820

  11. Lentivirus-Based Stable Gene Delivery into Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Maru, Yoshiaki; Orihashi, Kaoru; Hippo, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery works efficiently for the majority of mammalian cells cultured under standard two-dimensional conditions. By contrast, intestinal epithelial organoids embedded into three-dimensional extracellular matrix appear to be resistant to lentiviral transduction. We observed that Matrigel, a matrix that reconstitutes a basement membrane and is indispensable for cell survival and proliferation, prevents lentiviruses from binding to intestinal cells. In this chapter, we describe a simple method of a highly efficient gene transduction into intestinal organoids. This method involves organoid dispersion into single intestinal epithelial cells, mixing these individual cells with lentiviral particles, plating on Matrigel, and subsequent re-embedding into Matrigel. Under these conditions, the majority of the cells are exposed to the virus in the absence of the matrix barrier while remaining attached to the matrix. Using a GFP-labeled lentivirus, we demonstrate that this method allows for highly efficient infection of intestinal organoids after overnight incubation of Matrigel-attached cells with lentiviral particles.

  12. Nonionic polymeric micelles for oral gene delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shwu-Fen; Chang, Han-Yi; Tong, Yaw-Chong; Chen, Sy-Hann; Hsaio, Fei-Chin; Lu, Shao-Chun; Liaw, Jiahorng

    2004-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using nonionic polymeric micelles of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) as a carrier for oral DNA delivery in vivo. The size and appearance of DNA/PEO-PPO-PEO polymeric micelles were examined, respectively, by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy, and their zeta potential was measured. Expression of the delivered lacZ gene in various tissues of nude mice was assessed qualitatively by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside staining of sections and quantitatively by measuring enzyme activity in tissue extracts, using the substrate of beta-galactosidase, chlorophenol red-beta-D-galactopyranoside. In addition, the types of cells expressing the lacZ gene in the duodenum were identified by histological analysis. DNA/PEO-PPO-PEO polymeric micelles are a single population of rounded micelles with a mean diameter of 170 nm and a zeta potential of -4.3 mV. Duodenal penetration of DNA/PEO-PPO-PEO polymeric micelles was evaluated in vitro by calculating the apparent permeability coefficient. The results showed a dose-independent penetration rate of (5.75 +/- 0.37) x 10(-5) cm/sec at low DNA concentrations (0.026-0.26 microg/microl), but a decrease to (2.89 +/- 0.37) x 10(-5) cm/sec at a concentration of 1.3 microg/microl. Furthermore, when 10 mM RGD peptide or 10 mM EDTA was administered before and concurrent with the administration of DNA/PEO-PPO-PEO polymeric micelles, transport was inhibited ([0.95 +/- 0.57] x 10(-5) cm/sec) by blocking endocytosis or enhanced ([29.8 +/- 5.7] x 10(-5) cm/sec) by opening tight junctions, respectively. After oral administration of six doses at 8-hr intervals, the highest expression of transferred gene lacZ was seen 48 hr after administration of the first dose, with gene expression detected in the villi, crypts, and goblet cells of the duodenum and in the crypt cells of the stomach. Reporter gene activity was

  13. A sight on the current nanoparticle-based gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Jafari, Samira; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, gene delivery for therapeutic objects is considered one of the most promising strategies to cure both the genetic and acquired diseases of human. The design of efficient gene delivery vectors possessing the high transfection efficiencies and low cytotoxicity is considered the major challenge for delivering a target gene to specific tissues or cells. On this base, the investigations on non-viral gene vectors with the ability to overcome physiological barriers are increasing. Among the non-viral vectors, nanoparticles showed remarkable properties regarding gene delivery such as the ability to target the specific tissue or cells, protect target gene against nuclease degradation, improve DNA stability, and increase the transformation efficiency or safety. This review attempts to represent a current nanoparticle based on its lipid, polymer, hybrid, and inorganic properties. Among them, hybrids, as efficient vectors, are utilized in gene delivery in terms of materials (synthetic or natural), design, and in vitro/ in vivo transformation efficiency.

  14. Gene delivery systems by the combination of lipid bubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-11-28

    Gene therapy is promising for the treatment of many diseases including cancers and genetic diseases. From the viewpoint of safety, ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery with nano/ microbubbles was recently developed as a novel non-viral vector system. US-mediated gene delivery using nano/microbubbles are able to produce transient changes in the permeability of the cell membrane after US-induced cavitation while reducing cellular damage and enables the tissue-specific or the site-specific intracellular delivery of gene both in vitro and in vivo. We have recently developed novel lipid nanobubbles (Lipid Bubbles). These nanobubbles can also be used to enhance the efficacy of the US-mediated genes (plasmid DNA, siRNA, and miRNA etc.) delivery. In this review, we describe US-mediated delivery systems combined with nano/microbubbles and discuss their feasibility as non-viral vector systems.

  15. Analysis of novel nonviral gene transfer systems for gene delivery to cells of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Orth, Patrick; Weimer, Anja; Kaul, Gunter; Kohn, Dieter; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of novel nonviral gene delivery systems in cells of musculoskeletal origin. Primary cultures of lapine skeletal muscle cells, lapine articular chondrocytes, human cells from fibrous dysplasia and cell lines established from human osteosarcoma (SAOS-2), chondrosarcoma (CS-1), murine skeletal myoblasts (L8) and fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) were transfected with the P. pyralis luc or the E. coli lacZ genes using Nanofectin 1 and 2, Superfect, JetPEI, GeneJammer, Effectene, TransPass D2, FuGENE 6, Lipofectamine 2000, Dreamfect, Metafectene, Escort III, and calcium phosphate. Maximal transfection efficiency in lapine skeletal muscle cells was of 60.8 +/- 21.2% using Dreamfect, 38.9 +/- 5.0% in articular chondrocytes using Gene Jammer, 5.2 +/- 8.0% in human cells from fibrous dysplasia using Lipofectamine 2000, 12.7 +/- 16.2% in SAOS-2 cells using FuGENE 6, 29.9 +/- 3.5% in CS-1 cells using Lipofectamine 2000, 70.7 +/- 8.6% in L8 cells using FuGENE 6, and 48.9 +/- 13.0% in NIH 3T3 cells using Metafectene. When the cells were transfected with a human IGF-I gene, significant amounts of the IGF-I protein were secreted. These results indicate that relatively high levels of transfection can be achieved using novel nonviral gene transfer methods.

  16. Inhibitory effect of adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of p21WAF1/CIP1 on retinal vascular endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation in cultured Rhesus monkey cells (RF/6A).

    PubMed

    Han, Jindong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yan, Hua

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect(s) of adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated delivery of p21(WAF1/CIP1) (Ad-p21) on proliferation and tube formation in Rhesus monkey choroid-retina vascular endothelial cells (RF/6A). In vitro-cultured RF/6A cells were divided into three groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), Ad-p21-transfected, and negative control. Plasmid vectors were transfected via Ad-p21. The mRNA and protein expressions of p21 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in RF/6A cells were measured by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses. Cell-cycle distributions were analyzed by flow cytometry. Matrigel was used as a matrix for endothelial cell tube formation. Expressions of p21 mRNA and protein were greater, and expressions of CDK2 mRNA and protein lower, in the Ad-p21-transfected group than in either the PBS or negative control groups. Cell-cycle distribution analysis indicated that the proportion of G0/G1 cells was significantly higher in the Ad-p21 transfected group than in either the PBS or negative control groups (p = 0.000). There were significantly fewer endothelial cell tubes in the Ad-p21-transfected group than in either the PBS or negative control groups (p = 0.004). Ad-p21 inhibits RF/6A cell proliferation and tube formation. The underlying mechanism to account for this may be that overexpression of p21 arrests the cell-cycle transition from the G1- to the S-phase via inhibition of CDK2 activity.

  17. Comparison of two kinds of nanomedicine for targeted gene therapy: premodified or postmodified gene delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhaoshun; Sun, Cong; Yin, Zhaohui; Zhou, Fang; Ge, Linfu; Liu, Ximin; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The applications of ligand-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nanocarriers have now emerged, as well as recognized strategies to provide the vectors with active targeting properties. In this research, premodification and postmodification were compared using the same ligand, ie, a novel conjugated mannan-containing PEG and L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Methods Premodified and postmodified solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared and the characteristics of the two kinds of vehicles were evaluated. The modified vectors were then administered intravenously to rats and the in vivo targeting behavior of the complexes was investigated in liver macrophages. Results By carefully formulating the carriers with an optimal ratio of mannan-containing PEG-PE, postmodified vehicles displayed more efficient gene expression in rat Kupffer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Postmodified gene carriers are superior to premodified gene vectors, although the latter is also promising for targeted gene delivery. This discovery could guide our future research. PMID:22619539

  18. PLGA Nanoparticles for Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery to Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Marxa; Esenaliev, Rinat

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on novel approaches in the field of nanotechnology-based carriers utilizing ultrasound stimuli as a means to spatially target gene delivery in vivo, using nanoparticles made with either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or other polymers. We specifically discuss the potential for gene delivery by particles that are echogenic (amenable to destruction by ultrasound) composed either of polymers (PLGA, polystyrene) or other contrast agent materials (Optison, SonoVue microbubbles). The use of ultrasound is an efficient tool to further enhance gene delivery by PLGA or other echogenic particles in vivo. Echogenic PLGA nanoparticles are an attractive strategy for ultrasound-mediated gene delivery since this polymer is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for drug delivery and diagnostics in cancer, cardiovascular disease, and also other applications such as vaccines and tissue engineering. This paper will review recent successes and the potential of applying PLGA nanoparticles for gene delivery, which include (a) echogenic PLGA used with ultrasound to enhance local gene delivery in tumors or muscle and (b) PLGA nanoparticles currently under development, which could benefit in the future from ultrasound-enhanced tumor targeted gene delivery. PMID:22506124

  19. Molecular Recognition Enables Nanosubstrate-Mediated Delivery of Gene-Encapsulated Nanoparticles with High Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Substrate-mediated gene delivery is a promising method due to its unique ability to preconcentrate exogenous genes onto designated substrates. However, many challenges remain to enable continuous and multiround delivery of the gene using the same substrates without depositing payloads and immobilizing cells in each round of delivery. Herein we introduce a gene delivery system, nanosubstrate-mediated delivery (NSMD) platform, based on two functional components with nanoscale features, including (1) DNA⊂SNPs, supramolecular nanoparticle (SNP) vectors for gene encapsulation, and (2) Ad-SiNWS, adamantane (Ad)-grafted silicon nanowire substrates. The multivalent molecular recognition between the Ad motifs on Ad-SiNWS and the β-cyclodextrin (CD) motifs on DNA⊂SNPs leads to dynamic assembly and local enrichment of DNA⊂SNPs from the surrounding medium onto Ad-SiNWS. Subsequently, once cells settled on the substrate, DNA⊂SNPs enriched on Ad-SiNWS were introduced through the cell membranes by intimate contact with individual nanowires on Ad-SiNWS, resulting in a highly efficient delivery of exogenous genes. Most importantly, sequential delivery of multiple batches of exogenous genes on the same batch cells settled on Ad-SiNWS was realized by sequential additions of the corresponding DNA⊂SNPs with equivalent efficiency. Moreover, using the NSMD platform in vivo, cells recruited on subcutaneously transplanted Ad-SiNWS were also efficiently transfected with exogenous genes loaded into SNPs, validating the in vivo feasibility of this system. We believe that this nanosubstrate-mediated delivery platform will provide a superior system for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery and can be further used for the encapsulation and delivery of other biomolecules. PMID:24708312

  20. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review. PMID:28228799

  1. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for non-viral gene delivery and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ruijun; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Jinghan; Hou, Yanglong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy is becoming a promising strategy to treat various kinds of genetic and acquired diseases. However, the development of safe, efficient, and targetable gene delivery systems remains a major challenge in gene therapy. The unique material characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), including high surface area, facile surface modification, controllable size, and excellent magnetic properties, make them promising candidates for gene delivery. The engineered MNPs with modifiable functional surfaces and bioactive cores can result in several advantageous diagnostic and therapeutic properties including enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity, long permeation and retention in the circulatory system, specific delivery of therapeutic genes to target sites. In this review, the updated research on the preparation and surface modification of MNPs for gene delivery is summarized.

  2. Adenovector GAD65 gene delivery into the rat trigeminal ganglion produces orofacial analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vit, Jean-Philippe; Ohara, Peter T; Sundberg, Christopher; Rubi, Blanca; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background Our goal is to use gene therapy to alleviate pain by targeting glial cells. In an animal model of facial pain we tested the effect of transfecting the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) gene into satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion by using a serotype 5 adenovector with high tropisms for glial cells. We postulated that GABA produced from the expression of GAD would reduce pain behavior by acting on GABA receptors on neurons within the ganglion. Results Injection of adenoviral vectors (AdGAD65) directly into the trigeminal ganglion leads to sustained expression of the GAD65 isoform over the 4 weeks observation period. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that adenovirus-mediated GAD65 expression and GABA synthesis were mainly in SGCs. GABAA and GABAB receptors were both seen in sensory neurons, yet only GABAA receptors decorated the neuronal surface. GABA receptors were not found on SGCs. Six days after injection of AdGAD65 into the trigeminal ganglion, there was a statistically significant decrease of pain behavior in the orofacial formalin test, a model of inflammatory pain. Rats injected with control virus (AdGFP or AdLacZ) had no reduction in their pain behavior. AdGAD65-dependent analgesia was blocked by bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, but not by CGP46381, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. Conclusion Transfection of glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion with the GAD gene blocks pain behavior by acting on GABAA receptors on neuronal perikarya. PMID:19656360

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Approach to the Selective Delivery of Gene Silencing in Cancer—The Case for Combined Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Rita; Fernandes, Alexandra R.; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy arises as a great promise for cancer therapeutics due to its potential to silence genes involved in tumor development. In fact, there are some pivotal gene drivers that suffer critical alterations leading to cell transformation and ultimately to tumor growth. In this vein, gene silencing has been proposed as an active tool to selectively silence these molecular triggers of cancer, thus improving treatment. However, naked nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences are reported to have a short lifetime in the body, promptly degraded by circulating enzymes, which in turn speed up elimination and decrease the therapeutic potential of these drugs. The use of nanoparticles for the effective delivery of these silencers to the specific target locations has allowed researchers to overcome this issue. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used as attractive vehicles for the target-specific delivery of gene-silencing moieties, alone or in combination with other drugs. We shall discuss current trends in AuNP-based delivery of gene-silencing tools, considering the promising road ahead without overlooking existing concerns for their translation to clinics. PMID:28257109

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Approach to the Selective Delivery of Gene Silencing in Cancer-The Case for Combined Delivery?

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rita; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-03-02

    Gene therapy arises as a great promise for cancer therapeutics due to its potential to silence genes involved in tumor development. In fact, there are some pivotal gene drivers that suffer critical alterations leading to cell transformation and ultimately to tumor growth. In this vein, gene silencing has been proposed as an active tool to selectively silence these molecular triggers of cancer, thus improving treatment. However, naked nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences are reported to have a short lifetime in the body, promptly degraded by circulating enzymes, which in turn speed up elimination and decrease the therapeutic potential of these drugs. The use of nanoparticles for the effective delivery of these silencers to the specific target locations has allowed researchers to overcome this issue. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used as attractive vehicles for the target-specific delivery of gene-silencing moieties, alone or in combination with other drugs. We shall discuss current trends in AuNP-based delivery of gene-silencing tools, considering the promising road ahead without overlooking existing concerns for their translation to clinics.

  5. Encapsulation of adenoviral vectors into chitosan-bile salt microparticles for mucosal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lameiro, Maria Helena; Malpique, Rita; Silva, Ana Carina; Alves, Paula M; Melo, Eurico

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study is the incorporation of adenoviral vectors into a microparticulate system adequate for mucosal delivery. Microencapsulation of the vectors was accomplished by ionotropic coacervation of chitosan, using bile salts as counter-anion. The process was optimized in order to promote high encapsulation efficiency, with a minimal loss of viral infectivity. The maintenance of sterility during all the encapsulation procedure was also taken into account. The principle relies on the simple addition of a solution containing adenoviral vectors to a solution of neutralized chitosan, under stirring. Some surfactants were added to the chitosan solution, to improve the efficiency of this process, such as Tween 80, and Pluronic F68 at 1% (w/v). Encapsulation efficiency higher than 84% was achieved with formulations containing sodium deoxycholate as counter-anion and Pluronic F68 as dispersant agent. The infectivity of the adenoviral vectors incorporated into microparticles was assessed by release assays in PBS and by direct inoculation in 293 and Caco-2 cells. The release in aqueous media was negligible but, when in contact with monolayers of the cells, an effective release of bioactive adenovirus was obtained. Our work shows that encapsulation in microparticles, not only appear to protect the adenovirus from the external medium, namely from low pH, but can also delay their release that is fully dependent on cell contact, an advantage for mucosal vaccination purposes. The formulations developed are able to maintain AdV infectivity and permit a delayed release of the bioactives that is promoted by digestion in situ of the microparticles by the cell monolayers. The onset of delivery is, that way, host-controlled. In view of these results, these formulations showed good properties for mucosal adenovirus delivery.

  6. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  7. Ultrasound-targeted HSVtk and Timp3 gene delivery for synergistically enhanced antitumor effects in hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, B-F; Wu, J; Zhang, Y; Sung, H-W; Xie, J; Li, R-K

    2013-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy has great potential for decreasing tumor-induced mortality but has been clinically limited by non-targeted and insufficient gene transfer. We evaluated gene therapy targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene system and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (Timp3) gene. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) targeted gene delivery to the tumor tissue, and the α-fetoprotein promoter targeted HSVtk expression to the HCC cells. Human HepG2 cells transfected with the HSVtk or Timp3 gene demonstrated a reduction in cell viability by >40% compared with the vector control. Cell viability was further inhibited by over 50% with co-transfection of the genes. HepG2 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic mice to induce tumors. UTMD-mediated delivery of HSVtk or Timp3 suppressed tumor growth by >45% and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals (P<0.01 vs vector control). Co-delivery of the genes resulted in a further 30% improvement in tumor suppression and significant extension of animal survival (P<0.01 vs vector control). Targeted gene delivery increased the number of apoptotic cells and decreased the vascular density of the tumors. Targeted co-delivery of the genes synergistically improved the antitumor effects and may provide an effective therapy for HCC.

  8. Temporally controlled multiple-gene delivery in scaffolds: A promising strategy to enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Xu, Lihua; Li, Yiming; Ma, Jianfeng

    2011-02-01

    Bone defects sometimes require more effective repair regimens than conventional clinical therapies can provide. On account of this, tissue-engineered scaffolds have emerged as a promising alternative. Scaffolds that release genes encoding growth factors (GFs) offer additional benefits for bone regeneration in comparison with scaffolds providing protein delivery. The present gene delivery systems focus on unitary or dual genes delivery without controlled release. In the meantime, evidences indicate that bone formation is a complex cascade of events, in which time-dependent expression of multiple growth factors is involved. In our hypothesis, a temporally controlled, multi-gene delivery system embedded in a scaffold matrix can be fabricated; such a system is capable of mimicking the expression of growth factor profile in osteogenesis. Consequently, bone regeneration can be promoted by sequential gene expression of multiple growth factors.

  9. Discovery of Cationic Polymers for Non-viral Gene Delivery using Combinatorial Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Sutapa; Ramos, James; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Taylor, David; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Montanez, Gabriela; Rege, Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive treatment option for diseases of genetic origin, including several cancers and cardiovascular diseases. While viruses are effective vectors for delivering exogenous genes to cells, concerns related to insertional mutagenesis, immunogenicity, lack of tropism, decay and high production costs necessitate the discovery of non-viral methods. Significant efforts have been focused on cationic polymers as non-viral alternatives for gene delivery. Recent studies have employed combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening methods for enhancing the efficacy of gene delivery, biocompatibility of the delivery vehicle, and overcoming cellular level barriers as they relate to polymer-mediated transgene uptake, transport, transcription, and expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening of cationic polymer libraries for the discovery of efficient and safe gene delivery systems. PMID:21843141

  10. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Kohei; Shinagawa, Yoko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application. PMID:26308044

  11. Baculovirus as a gene delivery vector for cartilage and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Luo, Wen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Han; Sung, Li-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Baculovirus is an effective vector for gene delivery into various mammalian cells, including chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and has been employed for diverse applications. By gene delivery and expression of the growth factor, recombinant baculovirus has been shown to modulate the differentiation state of the cells and stimulates the production of extracellular matrix and tissue formation, hence repairing the damaged cartilage and bone in vivo. This article reviews the studies pertaining to the applications of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in cartilage and bone tissue engineering and discusses recent progress, future applications and potential hurdles.

  12. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid complexes for gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Kai K.; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Leal, Cecília

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are studied worldwide as carriers of DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) for gene delivery and gene silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency and silencing efficiency by cationic liposome carriers requires a comprehensive understanding of the structures of CL–nucleic acid complexes and the nature of their interactions with cell membranes as well as events leading to release of active nucleic acids within the cytoplasm. Synchrotron x-ray scattering has revealed that CL–nucleic acid complexes spontaneously assemble into distinct liquid crystalline phases including the lamellar, inverse hexagonal, hexagonal, and gyroid cubic phases, and fluorescence microscopy has revealed CL–DNA pathways and interactions with cells. The combining of custom synthesis with characterization techniques and gene expression and silencing assays has begun to unveil structure–function relations in vitro. As a recent example, this review will briefly describe experiments with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA nanoparticles. The functionalization, which is achieved through custom synthesis, is intended to address and overcome cell targeting and endosomal escape barriers to nucleic acid delivery faced by PEGylated nanoparticles designed for in vivo applications. PMID:25587216

  13. Nonviral gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells using cationic liposomes for gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Madeira, C; Mendes, R D; Ribeiro, S C; Boura, J S; Aires-Barros, M R; da Silva, C L; Cabral, J M S

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for application in several therapies due to their unique biological characteristics. In order to harness their full potential in cell-or gene-based therapies it might be advantageous to enhance some of their features through gene delivery strategies. Accordingly, we are interested in developing an efficient and safe methodology to genetically engineer human bone marrow MSC (BM MSC), enhancing their therapeutic efficacy in Regenerative Medicine. The plasmid DNA delivery was optimized using a cationic liposome-based reagent. Transfection efficiencies ranged from approximately 2% to approximately 35%, resulting from using a Lipid/DNA ratio of 1.25 with a transgene expression of 7 days. Importantly, the number of plasmid copies in different cell passages was quantified for the first time and approximately 20,000 plasmid copies/cell were obtained independently of cell passage. As transfected MSC have shown high viabilities (>90%) and recoveries (>52%) while maintaining their multipotency, this might be an advantageous transfection strategy when the goal is to express a therapeutic gene in a safe and transient way.

  14. Image-guided, Intravascular Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery to Skeletal Muscle in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2009-01-01

    Development of an effective, safe, and convenient method for gene delivery to muscle is a critical step toward gene therapy for muscle-associated diseases. Toward this end, we have explored the possibility of combining the image-guided catheter insertion technique with the principle of hydrodynamic delivery to achieve muscle-specific gene transfer in pigs. We demonstrate that gene transfer efficiency of the procedure is directly related to flow rate, injection pressure, and injection volume. The optimal gene delivery was achieved at a flow rate of 15 ml/second with injection pressure of 300 psi and injection volume equal to 1.5% of body weight. Under such a condition, hydrodynamic injection of saline containing pCMV-Luc (100 µg/ml) resulted in luciferase activity of 106 to 107 relative light units (RLU)/mg of proteins extracted from the targeted muscle 5 days after hydrodynamic gene delivery. Result from immunohistochemical analysis revealed 70–90% transfection efficiency of muscle groups in the hindlimb and persistent reporter gene expression for 2 months in transfected cells. With an exception of transient edema and elevation of creatine phosphokinase, no permanent tissue damage was observed. These results suggest that the image-guided, intravenous hydrodynamic delivery is an effective and safe method for gene delivery to skeletal muscle. PMID:19738603

  15. In Vivo Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 for Therapeutic Gene Editing: Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Lee, Yi-Wei; Scaletti, Federica; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-17

    The successful use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-based gene editing for therapeutics requires efficient in vivo delivery of the CRISPR components. There are, however, major challenges on the delivery front. In this Topical Review, we will highlight recent developments in CRISPR delivery, and we will present hurdles that still need to be overcome to achieve effective in vivo editing.

  16. Current Progress in Gene Delivery Technology Based on Chemical Methods and Nano-carriers

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lian; Zeng, Xin; Liu, Ming; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer methods are promising in the field of gene therapy. Current methods for gene transfer include three major groups: viral, physical and chemical methods. This review mainly summarizes development of several types of chemical methods for gene transfer in vitro and in vivo by means of nano-carriers like; calcium phosphates, lipids, and cationic polymers including chitosan, polyethylenimine, polyamidoamine dendrimers, and poly(lactide-co-glycolide). This review also briefly introduces applications of these chemical methods for gene delivery. PMID:24505233

  17. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  18. Factors affecting drug and gene delivery: effects of interaction with blood components.

    PubMed

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have been used extensively to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic activities of a wide variety of drugs and genes. In this article, we summarize the factors determining the tissue disposition of delivery systems: the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the delivery system and the anatomic and physiological characteristics of the tissues. There are several modes of drug and gene targeting, ranging from passive to active targeting, and each of these can be achieved by optimizing the design of the delivery system to suit a specific aim. After entering the systemic circulation, either by an intravascular injection or through absorption from an administration site, however, a delivery system encounters a variety of blood components, including blood cells and a range of serum proteins. These components are by no means inert as far as interaction with the delivery system is concerned, and they can sometimes markedly effect its tissue disposition. The interaction with blood components is known to occur with particulate delivery systems, such as liposomes, or with cationic charge-mediated delivery systems for genes. In addition to these rather nonspecific ones, interactions via the targeting ligand of the delivery system can occur. We recently found that mannosylated carriers interact with serum mannan binding protein, greatly altering their tissue disposition in a number of ways that depend on the properties of the carriers involved.

  19. GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors for enhanced inhibition of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Liu, Zhongbing; Bian, Tierong; Li, Juan; Huang, Wenjun; Jing, Pei; Liu, Li; Wang, Yunlong; Zhong, Zhirong

    2015-12-30

    Gastric cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and its 5-year survival rate remains depressed in spite of multiple treatment options. Targeting drug delivery to tumor vasculature may be a promising strategy for gastric cancer therapy, for it can block the nutrition source of tumor and inhibit the metastasis and invasion in a certain extent. In present study, we have prepared the drug-targeting delivery system of peptide GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors (GX1-Ad5-AL), in which the tumor suppressor gene of PTEN was integrated into DNA of Ad5 and the GX1 peptide could play targeting role to vascular of gastric cancer. The inhibition ability of GX1-Ad5-AL to human gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was evaluated by MTT assay. Further, the cell migration assay was carried out in transwell inserts and the cells uptaking of GX1-Ad5-AL was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The experimental results indicated that the average cell proliferation inhibition rates resulted from the drug delivery system of GX1-Ad5-AL in SGC-7901 and HUVEC were 68.36% and 64.13%, respectively which were higher than that resulted from GX1 or Ad5-AL. Meanwhile, results of cell migration experiment demonstrated that GX1-Ad5-AL could significantly suppress the migration of gastric cancer cell of SGC-7901. Moreover, both the imaging from confocal laser scanning microscopy and the quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that, GX1-Ad5-AL was more easily uptaken by SGC-7901 cells, as compared to Ad5-AL. Therefore, the formulation of GX1-Ad5-AL was effective for enhancing the inhibition effect and suppressing the migration of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

  20. Improved hepatic transduction, reduced systemic vector dissemination, and long-term transgene expression by delivering helper-dependent adenoviral vectors into the surgically isolated liver of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David A; Palmer, Donna J; Beaudet, Arthur L; Finegold, Milton J; Carey, K Dee; Cioffi, William G; Ng, Philip

    2006-04-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are attractive vectors for liver-directed gene therapy because they can mediate sustained, high-level transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potentially severe and lethal consequences. We hypothesize that the threshold to efficient hepatic transduction may be circumvented by delivering the vector into the surgically isolated liver via the portal vein. Total hepatic isolation was achieved by occluding hepatic inflow from the portal vein and hepatic artery and by occluding hepatic venous outflow at the inferior vena cava. We demonstrate in nonhuman primates that this approach resulted in significantly higher efficiency hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with systemic intravascular delivery. This method of delivery was associated with transient acute toxicity, the severity of which was variable. Importantly, stable, high levels of transgene expression were obtained for at least 665 days for one baboon and for at least 560 days for two baboons with no evidence of long-term toxicity.

  1. Doxycycline-Regulated 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line with Inducible, Stable Expression of Adenoviral E4orf1 Gene: A Cell Model to Study Insulin-Independent Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnapuram, Rashmi; Dhurandhar, Emily J.; Dubuisson, Olga; Hegde, Vijay; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired glycemic control and excessive adiposity are major risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes mellitus. In rodent models, Ad36, a human adenovirus, improves glycemic control, independent of dietary fat intake or adiposity. It is impractical to use Ad36 for therapeutic action. Instead, we identified that E4orf1 protein of Ad36, mediates its anti-hyperglycemic action independent of insulin signaling. To further evaluate the therapeutic potential of E4orf1 to improve glycemic control, we established a stable 3T3-L1 cell system in which E4orf1 expression can be regulated. The development and characterization of this cell line is described here. Full-length adenoviral-36 E4orf1 cDNA obtained by PCR was cloned into a tetracycline responsive element containing vector (pTRE-Tight-E4orf1). Upon screening dozens of pTRE-Tight-E4orf1 clones, we identified the one with the highest expression of E4orf1 in response to doxycycline treatment. Furthermore, using this inducible system we characterized the ability of E4orf1 to improve glucose disposal in a time dependent manner. This stable cell line offers a valuable resource to carefully study the novel signaling pathways E4orf1 uses to enhance cellular glucose disposal independent of insulin. PMID:23544159

  2. Poly(beta-amino esters): procedures for synthesis and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan J; Zugates, Gregory T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery systems are promising as they avoid many problems of viral gene therapy by having increased design flexibility, high safety, large DNA cargo capacity, and ease of manufacture. Here, we describe the use of polymeric vectors, in particular biodegradable poly(beta-amino esters) (PBAEs), for non-viral gene delivery. These polymers are able to self-assemble with DNA and form positively charged gene delivery nanoparticles. Methods for synthesis of these polymers, particle self-assembly, and transfection using these particles are delineated. A standard protocol is presented as well as a high-throughput screening technique that can be used to more quickly optimize transfection parameters for efficient delivery.

  3. Dendrimers as Carriers for siRNA Delivery and Gene Silencing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weizhe; He, Ziying

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was first literaturally reported in 1998 and has become rapidly a promising tool for therapeutic applications in gene therapy. In a typical RNAi process, small interfering RNAs (siRNA) are used to specifically downregulate the expression of the targeted gene, known as the term “gene silencing.” One key point for successful gene silencing is to employ a safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. In this context, dendrimers are emerging as potential nonviral vectors to deliver siRNA for RNAi purpose. Dendrimers have attracted intense interest since their emanating research in the 1980s and are extensively studied as efficient DNA delivery vectors in gene transfer applications, due to their unique features based on the well-defined and multivalent structures. Knowing that DNA and RNA possess a similar structure in terms of nucleic acid framework and the electronegative nature, one can also use the excellent DNA delivery properties of dendrimers to develop effective siRNA delivery systems. In this review, the development of dendrimer-based siRNA delivery vectors is summarized, focusing on the vector features (siRNA delivery efficiency, cytotoxicity, etc.) of different types of dendrimers and the related investigations on structure-activity relationship to promote safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. PMID:24288498

  4. Using multivalent adenoviral vectors for HIV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Li, Zan C; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Wu, Hongju; Matthews, Qiana L

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been used for a variety of vaccine applications including cancer and infectious diseases. Traditionally, Ad-based vaccines are designed to express antigens through transgene expression of a given antigen. For effective vaccine development it is often necessary to express or present multiple antigens to the immune system to elicit an optimal vaccine as observed preclinically with mosaic/polyvalent HIV vaccines or malaria vaccines. Due to the wide flexibility of Ad vectors they are an ideal platform for expressing large amounts of antigen and/or polyvalent mosaic antigens. Ad vectors that display antigens on their capsid surface can elicit a robust humoral immune response, the "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy. The adenoviral hexon protein has been utilized to display peptides in the majority of vaccine strategies involving capsid incorporation. Based on our abilities to manipulate hexon HVR2 and HVR5, we sought to manipulate HVR1 in the context of HIV antigen display for the first time ever. More importantly, peptide incorporation within HVR1 was utilized in combination with other HVRs, thus creating multivalent vectors. To date this is the first report where dual antigens are displayed within one Ad hexon particle. These vectors utilize HVR1 as an incorporation site for a seven amino acid region of the HIV glycoprotein 41, in combination with six Histidine incorporation within HVR2 or HVR5. Our study illustrates that these multivalent antigen vectors are viable and can present HIV antigen as well as His6 within one Ad virion particle. Furthermore, mouse immunizations with these vectors demonstrate that these vectors can elicit a HIV and His6 epitope-specific humoral immune response.

  5. Biosensor-controlled gene therapy/drug delivery with nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Rose, William A.; Wang, Nan; Reece, Lisa M.; Lvov, Yuri; Leary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Nanomedicine involves cell-by-cell regenerative medicine, either repairing cells one at a time or triggering apoptotic pathways in cells that are not repairable. Multilayered nanoparticle systems are being constructed for the targeted delivery of gene therapy to single cells. Cleavable shells containing targeting, biosensing, and gene therapeutic molecules are being constructed to direct nanoparticles to desired intracellular targets. Therapeutic gene sequences are controlled by biosensor-activated control switches to provide the proper amount of gene therapy on a single cell basis. The central idea is to set up gene therapy "nanofactories" inside single living cells. Molecular biosensors linked to these genes control their expression. Gene delivery is started in response to a biosensor detected problem; gene delivery is halted when the cell response indicates that more gene therapy is not needed. Cell targeting of nanoparticles, both nanocrystals and nanocapsules, has been tested by a combination of fluorescent tracking dyes, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intracellular targeting has been tested by confocal microscopy. Successful gene delivery has been visualized by use of GFP reporter sequences. DNA tethering techniques were used to increase the level of expression of these genes. Integrated nanomedical systems are being designed, constructed, and tested in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in small animals. While still in its infancy, nanomedicine represents a paradigm shift in thinking-from destruction of injured cells by surgery, radiation, chemotherapy to cell-by-cell repair within an organ and destruction of non-repairable cells by natural apoptosis.

  6. A visible, targeted high-efficiency gene delivery and transfection strategy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To enhance myocardial angiogenic gene expression, a novel gene delivery strategy was tested. Direct intramyocardial injection of an angiogenic gene with microbubbles and insonation were applied in a dog animal model. Dogs received one of the four different treatments in conjunction with either the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene: gene with microbubbles (MB) and ultrasound (US); gene with US; gene with MB; or the gene alone. Results Distribution of MB and the gene in the myocardium was visualized during the experiment. Compared with the EGFP gene group, an average 14.7-fold enhancement in gene expression was achieved in the EGFP+MB/US group (P < 0.01). Compared with the HGF gene group, an average 10.7-fold enhancement in gene expression was achieved in the HGF+MB/US group (P < 0.01). In addition, capillary density increased from 20.8 ± 3.4/mm2 in the HGF gene group to 146.7 ± 31.4/mm2 in HGF+MB/US group (P < 0.01). Conclusions Thus, direct intramyocardial injection of an angiogenic gene in conjunction with microbubbles plus insonation synergistically enhances angiogenesis. This method offers an observable gene delivery procedure with enhanced expression efficiency of the delivered gene. PMID:21600027

  7. Electroporation-mediated Delivery of Genes in Rodent Models of Lung Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated gene delivery to the lung. Electroporation is a highly efficient and easily reproducible technique that allows circumvention of several of lung gene delivery challenges and safety issues present with other forms of lung gene therapy. PMID:24510825

  8. Electroporation-mediated delivery of genes in rodent models of lung contusion.

    PubMed

    Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated gene delivery to the lung. Electroporation is a highly efficient and easily reproducible technique that allows circumvention of several of lung gene delivery challenges and safety issues present with other forms of lung gene therapy.

  9. The retrograde delivery of adenovirus vector carrying the gene for brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects neurons and oligodendrocytes from apoptosis in the chronically compressed spinal cord of twy/twy mice.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Hirai, Takayuki; Yayama, Takafumi; Chen, Kebing; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Johnson, William Eustace; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2012-12-15

    The twy/twy mouse undergoes spontaneous chronic mechanical compression of the spinal cord; this in vivo model system was used to examine the effects of retrograde adenovirus (adenoviral vector [AdV])-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene delivery to spinal neural cells. To investigate the targeting and potential neuroprotective effect of retrograde AdV-mediated BDNF gene transfection in the chronically compressed spinal cord in terms of prevention of apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes. Several studies have investigated the neuroprotective effects of neurotrophins, including BDNF, in spinal cord injury. However, no report has described the effects of retrograde neurotrophic factor gene delivery in compressed spinal cords, including gene targeting and the potential to prevent neural cell apoptosis. AdV-BDNF or AdV-LacZ (as a control gene) was injected into the bilateral sternomastoid muscles of 18-week old twy/twy mice for retrograde gene delivery via the spinal accessory motor neurons. Heterozygous Institute of Cancer Research mice (+/twy), which do not undergo spontaneous spinal compression, were used as a control for the effects of such compression on gene delivery. The localization and cell specificity of β-galactosidase expression (produced by LacZ gene transfection) and BDNF expression in the spinal cord were examined by coimmunofluorescence staining for neural cell markers (NeuN, neurons; reactive immunology protein, oligodendrocytes; glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytes; OX-42, microglia) 4 weeks after gene injection. The possible neuroprotection afforded by retrograde AdV-BDNF gene delivery versus AdV-LacZ-transfected control mice was assessed by scoring the prevalence of apoptotic cells (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling-positive cells) and immunoreactivity to active caspases -3, -8, and -9, p75, neurofilament 200 kD (NF), and for the oligodendroglial progenitor marker, NG2. RESULTS

  10. Expression of biologically active atrial natriuretic factor following intrahepatic injection of a replication-defective adenoviral vector in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, V; Adam, M; Deprez, I; Ambriovic, A; Rosenberg, D; Crespeau, F; Saana, M; Pham, I; Eloit, M; Adnot, S; Pouchelon, J L

    1999-01-20

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasoactive hormone produced and released by atrial cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether adenovirus-mediated ANF gene delivery to dogs leads to a sustained increase in circulating ANF levels resulting in long-lasting biological effects. An adenoviral vector containing the canine ANF cDNA under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (AdRSV-ANF) was injected via the intrahepatic route to nonvaccinated 2-month-old dogs. In the first group of four dogs injected with AdRSV-ANF (10(10.2) TCID50), a short-lived increase in plasma ANF concentrations not associated with biological effects occurred 8-10 days after the injection, as compared with four control dogs injected with an adenovirus encoding a luciferase reporter gene (AdRSV-luc). In a second series of experiments, six dogs received AdRSV-ANF at a dose of 10(10) TCID50 and a replication-defective type 5 adenovirus harboring a modified VAI gene (Ad-VAr) at the same dose. Sustained increases in plasma ANF concentrations and urinary cGMP excretion starting on day 2 and persisting until day 20 were seen, as well as concomitant elevations in natriuresis and diuresis, a transient increase in cardiac output, and a delay in body weight gain, as compared with control dogs injected with AdRSV-luc/Ad-VAr. These results show that adenovirus-mediated ANF gene expression can lead to systemic biological effects in dogs, a finding of potential relevance for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and sodium-retaining disorders.

  11. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  12. A promising gene delivery system developed from PEGylated MoS2 nanosheets for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:25386104

  13. Development of Liposomal Bubbles with Perfluoropropane Gas as Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ryo; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi

    2007-05-01

    Liposomes have some advantages as drug, antigen and gene delivery carriers. Their size can be easily controlled and they can be modified to add a targeting function. Based on liposome technology, we developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) containing the ultrasound imaging gas, perfluoropropane. We assessed the feasibility of Bubble liposomes as carriers for gene delivery after cavitation induced by ultrasound. At first, we investigated their ability to deliver genes with Bubble liposomes and ultrasound to various types of cells such as mouse sarcoma cells, mouse melanoma cells, human T cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the Bubble liposomes could deliver plasmid DNA to many cell types without cytotoxicity. In addition, we found that Bubble liposomes could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into mouse femoral artery in vivo. The gene transduction with Bubble liposomes was more effectively than conventional lipofection. We conclude that Bubble liposomes are unique and efficient gene delivery carriers in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems.

  15. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  16. Destination Brain: the Past, Present, and Future of Therapeutic Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chaitanya R; Labhasetwar, Vinod; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2017-03-01

    Neurological diseases and disorders (NDDs) present a significant societal burden and currently available drug- and biological-based therapeutic strategies have proven inadequate to alleviate it. Gene therapy is a suitable alternative to treat NDDs compared to conventional systems since it can be tailored to specifically alter select gene expression, reverse disease phenotype and restore normal function. The scope of gene therapy has broadened over the years with the advent of RNA interference and genome editing technologies. Consequently, encouraging results from central nervous system (CNS)-targeted gene delivery studies have led to their transition from preclinical to clinical trials. As we shift to an exciting gene therapy era, a retrospective of available literature on CNS-associated gene delivery is in order. This review is timely in this regard, since it analyzes key challenges and major findings from the last two decades and evaluates future prospects of brain gene delivery. We emphasize major areas consisting of physiological and pharmacological challenges in gene therapy, function-based selection of a ideal cellular target(s), available therapy modalities, and diversity of viral vectors and nanoparticles as vehicle systems. Further, we present plausible answers to key questions such as strategies to circumvent low blood-brain barrier permeability and most suitable CNS cell types for targeting. We compare and contrast pros and cons of the tested viral vectors in the context of delivery systems used in past and current clinical trials. Gene vector design challenges are also evaluated in the context of cell-specific promoters. Key challenges and findings reported for recent gene therapy clinical trials, assessing viral vectors and nanoparticles are discussed from the perspective of bench to bedside gene therapy translation. We conclude this review by tying together gene delivery challenges, available vehicle systems and comprehensive analyses of

  17. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-01-06

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Curiel, David T.; Leppla, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  19. Portal vein delivery of viral vectors for gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Alexandra; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cooper, Mario; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Herzog, Roland W; Nichols, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a very complex organ with a large variety of functions, making it an attractive organ for gene replacement therapy. Many genetic disorders can be corrected by delivering gene products directly into the liver using viral vectors. In this chapter, we will describe gene delivery via portal vein administration in mice and dogs to correct the blood coagulation disorder hemophilia B. Although there are multiple delivery routes for both viral and non-viral vectors in animals, portal vein administration delivers vectors directly and efficiently into the liver. Complete correction of murine hemophilia B and multi-year near-correction of canine hemophilia B have been achieved following portal vein delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing factor IX from hepatocyte-specific promoters. Peripheral vein injection can lead to increased vector dissemination to off-target organ such as the lung and spleen. Below, we will describe portal vein injection delivery route via laparotomy.

  20. Oral Immunization of Rhesus Macaques with Adenoviral HIV Vaccines Using Enteric-coated Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, George T.; Nehete, Pramod N.; Passeri, Marco F.; Nehete, Bharti N.; Weaver, Eric A.; Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Schluns, Kimberly; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Targeted delivery of vaccine candidates to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract holds potential for mucosal immunization, particularly against mucosal pathogens like the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Among the different strategies for achieving targeted release in the GI tract, namely the small intestine, pH sensitive enteric coating polymers have been shown to protect solid oral dosage forms from the harsh digestive environment of the stomach and dissolve relatively rapidly in the small intestine by taking advantage of the luminal pH gradient. We developed an enteric polymethacrylate formulation for coating hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC) capsules containing lyophilized Adenoviral type 5 (Ad5) vectors expressing HIV-1 gag and a string of six highly-conserved HIV-1 envelope peptides representing broadly cross-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. Oral immunization of rhesus macaques with these capsules primed antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses and subsequent intranasal delivery of the envelope peptide cocktail using a mutant cholera toxin adjuvant boosted cellular immune responses including, antigen-specific intracellular IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory T cells in the intestine. These results suggest that the combination of oral adenoviral vector priming followed by intranasal protein/peptide boosting may be an effective mucosal HIV vaccination strategy for targeting viral antigens to the GI tract and priming systemic and mucosal immunity. PMID:18063450

  1. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  2. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  3. Microbubbles in Ultrasound-Triggered Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hernot, Sophie; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, in the form of gas-filled microbubbles, are becoming popular in perfusion monitoring; they are employed as molecular imaging agents. Microbubbles are manufactured from biocompatible materials, they can be injected intravenously, and some are approved for clinical use. Microbubbles can be destroyed by ultrasound irradiation. This destruction phenomenon can be applied to targeted drug delivery and enhancement of drug action. The ultrasonic field can be focused at the target tissues and organs; thus, selectivity of the treatment can be improved, reducing undesirable side effects. Microbubbles enhance ultrasound energy deposition in the tissues and serve as cavitation nuclei, increasing intracellular drug delivery. DNA delivery and successful tissue transfection is observed in the areas of the body where ultrasound is applied after intravascular administration of microbubbles and plasmid DNA. Accelerated blood clot dissolution in the areas of insonation by cooperative action of thrombolytic agents and microbubbles is demonstrated in several clinical trials. PMID:18486268

  4. Ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer of AQP1 to the irradiated minipig parotid gland restores fluid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zourelias, L; Wu, C; Edwards, PC; Trombetta, M; Passineau, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Xerostomia is a common side effect of ionizing radiation used to treat head and neck cancer. A groundbreaking Phase I human clinical trial utilizing Adenoviral gene transfer of Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) to a single salivary gland of individuals suffering from radiation-induced xerostomia has recently been reported. Unfortunately, the limitations of the Adenoviral vector system utilized in this pioneering trial preclude its advancement to a Phase II trial and we have thus undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer (UAGT) as an alternative means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy to the salivary gland by comparing head-to-head with the canonical Adenoviral vector in a swine model. Findings Swine irradiated unilaterally with a 10Gy electron beam targeted at the parotid gland suffered from significant, sustained hyposalivation that was bilateral, despite irradiation being confined to the targeted gland. Unilateral AQP1 gene therapy with UAGT resulted in bilateral restoration of stimulated salivary flow at 48 hours and one week post-treatment (1.62+/−0.48ml, 1.87+/−0.45ml) to pre-injury levels (1.34+/−0.14ml) in a manner comparable to Adenoviral delivery (2.32+/−0.6ml, 1.33+/−0.97ml). Conclusions UAGT can replace the Adenoviral vector as a means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy in the irradiated swine model and is a candidate for advancement to a Phase I human clinical trial. PMID:25871828

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  6. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid nanoparticle assemblies with applications in gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.

    2016-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are synthetic carriers of nucleic acids in gene delivery and gene silencing therapeutics. The introduction will describe the structures of distinct liquid crystalline phases of CL–nucleic acid complexes, which were revealed in earlier synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. When mixed with plasmid DNA, CLs containing lipids with distinct shapes spontaneously undergo topological transitions into self-assembled lamellar, inverse hexagonal, and hexagonal CL–DNA phases. CLs containing cubic phase lipids are observed to readily mix with short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules creating double gyroid CL–siRNA phases for gene silencing. Custom synthesis of multivalent lipids and a range of novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipids with attached targeting ligands and hydrolysable moieties have led to functionalized equilibrium nanoparticles (NPs) optimized for cell targeting, uptake or endosomal escape. Very recent experiments are described with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA NPs, including fluorescence microscopy colocalization with members of the Rab family of GTPases, which directly reveal interactions with cell membranes and NP pathways. In vitro optimization of CL–DNA and CL–siRNA NPs with relevant primary cancer cells is expected to impact nucleic acid therapeutics in vivo. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298431

  7. Gene delivery to the neurulating embryo during culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modulating expression of specific genes during embryogenesis will help elucidate their role in development. Transient overexpression of specific genes can be accomplished by adding additional copies, or else antisense transcripts can be used to block expression. Manipulation of g...

  8. Transplantation of novel vascular endothelial growth factor gene delivery system manipulated skeletal myoblasts promote myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Xia, Yu; Lai, Hao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Yang; Song, Dongli; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-10-03

    Skeletal myoblast (SkM) transplantation combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene delivery has been proposed as a promising therapy for cardiac repair. Nevertheless, the defective gene vectors and unregulable VEGF expression in vivo hinder its application. Therefore, the search for an economical, effective, controllable gene delivery system is quite necessary. In our study, hyperbranched polyamidoamine (h-PAMAM) dendrimer was synthesized as a novel gene delivery vector using a modified method. And hypoxia-regulated human VEGF-165 plasmids (pHRE-hVEGF165) were constructed for controllable VEGF gene expression. The efficiency and feasibility of h-PAMAM-HRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system manipulated SkM transplantation for cardiac repair were investigated in myocardial infarction models. The h-PAMAM encapsulated pHRE-hVEGF165 could resist nuclease digestion for over 120 min. In primary SkMs, h-PAMAM-pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system showed high transfection efficiency (43.47 ± 2.22%) and minor cytotoxicity (cell viability = 91.38 ± 0.48%). And the transfected SkMs could express hVEGF165 for 18 days under hypoxia in vitro. For myocardial infarction models, intramyocardial transplantation of the transfected SkMs could result in reduction of apoptotic myocardiocytes, improvement of grafted cell survival, decrease of infarct size and interstitial fibrosis, and increase of blood vessel density, which inhibited left ventricle remodeling and improved heart function at the late phase following infarction. These results indicate that h-PAMAM based pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery into SkMs is feasible and effective, and may serve as a novel and promising gene therapy strategy in ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymeric Carriers for Gene Delivery: Chitosan and Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Pack, Daniel Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potential medical solution that promises new treatments and may hold the cure for many different types of diseases and disorders of the human race. However, gene therapy is still a growing medical field and the technology is still in its infancy. The main challenge for gene therapy is to find safe and effective vectors that are able to deliver genes to the specific cells and get them to express inside the cells. Due to safety concerns, synthetic delivery systems, rather than viral vectors, are preferred for gene delivery and significant efforts have been focused on the development of this field. However, we are faced with problems like low gene transfer efficiency, cytotoxicity and lack of cell-targeting capability for these synthetic delivery systems. Over the years, we have seen a variety of new and effective polymers which have been designed and synthesized specifically for gene delivery. Moreover, various strategies that aimed at enhancing their physicochemical properties, improving transfection efficiency, reducing cytotoxicity as well as incorporating functional groups that offer better targetability and higher cellular uptake are established. Here, we look at two potential polymeric carriers, chitosan and poly(amidoamine) dendrimers, which have been widely reported for gene delivery. For chitosan, the interest arises from their availability, excellent non-cytotoxicity profile, biodegradability and ease of modification. For poly(amidoamine) dendrimers, the interest arises from their ease of synthesis with controlled structure and size, minimal cytotoxicity, biodegradability and high transfection efficiencies. The latest developments on these polymers for gene delivery will be the main focus of this article. PMID:20618156

  10. GFP expression by intracellular gene delivery of GFP-coding fragments using nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-12-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/gene-construct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as (1) the reading direction of the gene-fragments, (2) the quantity of gene-fragments attached on the surface of the QD-constructs, (3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of the QD/gene-constructs, and (4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene-fragments. Using this QD/gene-construct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs had disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes.

  11. Efficient intranuclear gene delivery by CdSe aqueous quantum dots electrostatically-coated with polyethyleneimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Giang H. T.; Y Shih, Wan; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanoparticles with photoluminescence properties that do not photobleach. Due to these advantages, using QDs for non-viral gene delivery has the additional benefit of being able to track the delivery of the genes in real time as it happens. We investigate the efficacy of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CdSe aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) electrostatically complexed with branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) both as a non-viral gene delivery vector and as a fluorescent probe for tracking the delivery of genes into nuclei. The MPA-capped CdSe AQDs that were completely synthesized in water were the model AQDs. A nominal MPA:Cd:Se = 4:3:1 was chosen for optimal photoluminescence and zeta potential. The gene delivery study was carried out in vitro using a human colon cancer cell line, HT29 (ATCC). The model gene was a plasmid DNA (pDNA) that can express red fluorescent protein (RFP). Positively charged branched PEI was employed to provide a proton buffer to the AQDs to allow for endosomal escape. It is shown that by using a PEI-AQD complex with a PEI/AQD molar ratio of 300 and a nominal pDNA/PEI-AQD ratio of 6, we can achieve 75 ± 2.6% RFP expression efficiency with cell vitality remaining at 78 ± 4% of the control.

  12. Design and Fabrication of N-Alkyl-Polyethylenimine-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanoclusters for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Zhiyong; Lee, Seulki; Ai, Hua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, inorganic magnetic nanoparticles, especially iron oxide nanoparticles (IOs), have emerged as great vehicles for biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In order to rationally design IO-based gene delivery nanovectors, surface modification is essential and determines the loading and release of the gene of interest. Here we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery vehicles based on low molecular weight N-alkyl polyethylenimine-stabilized IOs. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in this chapter. PMID:22568910

  13. Caveolin-1 inhibits epidermal growth factor-stimulated lamellipod extension and cell migration in metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MTLn3). Transformation suppressor effects of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery of caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Razani, B; Altschuler, Y; Bouzahzah, B; Mostov, K E; Pestell, R G; Lisanti, M P

    2000-07-07

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes that may function as a transformation suppressor. For example, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (D7S522; 7q31.1) that is deleted in human cancers, including mammary carcinomas. However, little is known about the role of caveolins in regulating cell movement, a critical parameter in determining metastatic potential. Here, we examine the role of caveolin-1 in cell movement. For this purpose, we employed an established cellular model, MTLn3, a metastatic rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In this system, epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation induces rapid lamellipod extension and cell migration. Interestingly, we find that MTLn3 cells fail to express detectable levels of endogenous caveolin-1. To restore caveolin-1 expression in MTLn3 cells efficiently, we employed an inducible adenoviral gene delivery system to achieve tightly controlled expression of caveolin-1. We show here that caveolin-1 expression in MTLn3 cells inhibits EGF-stimulated lamellipod extension and cell migration and blocks their anchorage-independent growth. Under these conditions, EGF-induced activation of the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is also blunted. Our results suggest that caveolin-1 expression in motile MTLn3 cells induces a non-motile phenotype.

  14. Mucus Penetrating Nanoparticles: Biophysical Tool and Method of Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Schneider, Craig; Suk, Jung Soo; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug and gene delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections, cystic fibrosis, chronic rhinosinusitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma to name a few. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. This article discusses the recent development of the “mucus-penetrating particle” or “MPP” nanotechnology, and how it has been used to both enhance understanding of the nanoscale barrier properties of human mucus secretions, and to achieve more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal tissues following topical administration. Drug loaded MPPs possess non-adhesive coatings that allow them to rapidly penetrate mucus layers through openings in the mucus mesh at rates nearly as fast as they would penetrate pure water. Critically, MPPs allow enhanced drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues without diminishing the protective function of mucus. Recent progress in the development of MPPs as a biophysical tool to probe the length-scale dependent rheological properties of mucosal secretions and as a method for drug and gene delivery is highlighted. PMID:22988559

  15. Targeting Adenoviral Vectors by Using the Extracellular Domain of the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor: Improved Potency via Trimerization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Smith,*, Theodore; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Mulgrew, Kathy; Kaloss, Michele; Kylefjord, Helen; Ryan, Patricia C.; Kaleko, Michael; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2002-01-01

    Adenovirus binds to mammalian cells via interaction of fiber with the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Redirecting adenoviral vectors to enter target cells via new receptors has the advantage of increasing the efficiency of gene delivery and reducing nonspecific transduction of untargeted tissues. In an attempt to reach this goal, we have produced bifunctional molecules with soluble CAR (sCAR), which is the extracellular domain of CAR fused to peptide-targeting ligands. Two peptide-targeting ligands have been evaluated: a cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD) and the receptor-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE). Human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) are poorly transduced by adenovirus due to a lack of CAR on the surface. Addition of the sCAR-cRGD or sCAR-ApoE targeting protein to adenovirus redirected binding to the appropriate receptor on HDF. However, a large excess of the monomeric protein was needed for maximal transduction, indicating a suboptimal interaction. To improve interaction of sCAR with the fiber knob, an isoleucine GCN4 trimerization domain was introduced, and trimerization was verified by cross-linking analysis. Trimerized sCAR proteins were significantly better at interacting with fiber and inhibiting binding to HeLa cells. Trimeric sCAR proteins containing cRGD and ApoE were more efficient at transducing HDF in vitro than the monomeric proteins. In addition, the trimerized sCAR protein without targeting ligands efficiently blocked liver gene transfer in normal C57BL/6 mice. However, addition of either ligand failed to retarget the liver in vivo. One explanation may be the large complex size, which serves to decrease the bioavailability of the trimeric sCAR-adenovirus complexes. In summary, we have demonstrated that trimerization of sCAR proteins can significantly improve the potency of this targeting approach in altering vector tropism in vitro and allow the efficient blocking of liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:11799184

  16. Role of nanotechnology and gene delivery systems in TRAIL-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, George E; Tawadros, Fady; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Tabassum, Sobia; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Arafat, Waleed

    2016-01-01

    Since its identification as a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family, TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) has emerged as a new avenue in apoptosis-inducing cancer therapies. Its ability to circumvent the chemoresistance of conventional therapeutics and to interact with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways, amplified its potential as a cancer apoptotic agent. Many recombinant preparations of this death ligand and monoclonal antibodies targeting its death receptors have been tested in monotherapy and combinational clinical trials. Gene therapy is a new approach for cancer treatment which implies viral or non-viral functional transgene induction of apoptosis in cancer cells or repair of the underlying genetic abnormality on a molecular level. The role of this approach in overcoming the traditional barriers of radiation and chemotherapeutics systemic toxicity, risk of recurrence, and metastasis made it a promising platform for cancer treatment. The recent first Food Drug Administration (FDA) approved oncolytic herpes virus for melanoma treatment brings forth the potency of the cancer gene therapy approach in the future. Many gene delivery systems have been studied for intratumoural TRAIL gene delivery alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents to produce synergistic cancer cytotoxicity. However, there still remain many obstacles to be conquered for this different gene delivery systems. Nanomedicine on the other hand offers a new frontier for clinical trials and biomedical research. The FDA approved nanodrugs motivates horizon exploration for other nanoscale designed particles’ implications in gene delivery. In this review we aim to highlight the molecular role of TRAIL in apoptosis and interaction with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways. Finally, we also aim to discuss the different roles of gene delivery systems, mesenchymal cells, and nanotechnology designs in TRAIL gene delivery. PMID:27594905

  17. Differential Contribution of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep Protein Expression and Nucleic Acid Elements to Inhibition of Adenoviral Replication in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Heilbronn, Regine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) exhibits complex interactions with its helper adenovirus. Whereas AAV-2 is dependent on adenoviral functions for productive replication, it conversely inhibits adenoviral replication, both when its genome is present in trans after coinfection with both viruses and when it is present in cis, as in the production of recombinant adenovirus (rAd)/AAV-2 hybrid vectors. The notion that AAV-mediated inhibition of adenoviral replication is due predominantly to the expression of the AAV-2 Rep proteins was recently challenged by successful Rep78 expression in a rAd5 vector through recoding of the Rep open reading frame (ORF). We closely analyzed the relative contributions of AAV-2 nucleic acid elements and Rep protein expression to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in both of the above scenarios. When present in cis, a sequence element in the 3′ part of the rep gene, comprising only the AAV-2 p40 promoter and the AAV-2 intron sequence, which we termed the RIS-Ad, completely blocks adenoviral replication. p5/p19 promoter-driven Rep protein expression, on the other hand, only weakly inhibits rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation, and by inactivation of the RIS-Ad, it is feasible to generate first-generation rAd vectors expressing functional Rep proteins. The RIS-Ad plays no role in the inhibition of adenoviral replication in trans in a model closely mimicking AAV-2–Ad coinfection. In this case, expression of the Rep proteins is required, as well as the presence of an amplifiable inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-containing template. Thus, very different AAV-2 elements and mechanisms are involved in inhibition of adenoviral replication during rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation and after Ad-AAV coinfection. IMPORTANCE This is the first study to systematically compare the contributions of AAV-2 protein expression and AAV-2 nucleic acid elements to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in rAd/AAV-2 hybrid vector

  18. Placental expression of imprinted genes varies with sampling site and mode of delivery

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, A.B.; Tunster, S.J.; Savory, N.; Holmes, A.; Beasley, J.; Parveen, S.A.R.; Penketh, R.J.A.; John, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes, which are monoallelically expressed by virtue of an epigenetic process initiated in the germline, are known to play key roles in regulating fetal growth and placental development. Numerous studies are investigating the expression of these imprinted genes in the human placenta in relation to common complications of pregnancy such as fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. This study aimed to determine whether placental sampling protocols or other factors such as fetal sex, gestational age and mode of delivery may influence the expression of imprinted genes predicted to regulate placental signalling. Methods Term placentas were collected from Caucasian women delivering at University Hospital of Wales or Royal Gwent Hospital within two hours of delivery. Expression of the imprinted genes PHLDA2, CDKN1C, PEG3 and PEG10 was assayed by quantitative real time PCR. Intraplacental gene expression was analysed (N = 5). Placental gene expression was compared between male (N = 11) and female (N = 11) infants, early term (N = 8) and late term (N = 10) deliveries and between labouring (N = 13) and non-labouring (N = 21) participants. Results The paternally expressed imprinted genes PEG3 and PEG10 were resilient to differences in sampling site, fetal sex, term gestational age and mode of delivery. The maternally expressed imprinted gene CDKN1C was elevated over 2-fold (p < 0.001) in placenta from labouring deliveries compared with elective caesarean sections. In addition, the maternally expressed imprinted gene PHLDA2 was elevated by 1.8 fold (p = 0.01) in samples taken at the distal edge of the placenta compared to the cord insertion site. Conclusion These findings support the reinterpretation of existing data sets on these genes in relation to complications of pregnancy and further reinforce the importance of optimising and unifying placental collection protocols for future studies. PMID:26162698

  19. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials. In the present review, the characteristics of the ‘ideal’ viral vector are discussed and the major types of viral vectors used in vascular gene transfer are reviewed. Basic knowledge of the use of viral vectors for direct in vivo gene transfer (adenoviral-based vectors, etc) and for ex vivo gene transfer (retroviral-based vectors) is provided. New developments in the field of viral vectorology, such as pseudotyping of retroviral vectors and targeting of other viral vectors to a specific cell type, will enhance the more rapid transition of vascular gene therapy from the experimental arena to the clinical setting. PMID:19649233

  20. Ultrasound for drug and gene delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-06-30

    Noninvasive, transient, and local image-guided blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) has been demonstrated with focused ultrasound exposure in animal models. Most studies have combined low pressure amplitude and low time average acoustic power burst sonications with intravascular injection of pre-formed micro-bubbles to produce BBBD without damage to the neurons. The BBB has been shown to be healed within a few hours after the exposure. The combination of focused ultrasound beams with MR image guidance allows precise anatomical targeting as demonstrated by the delivery of several marker molecules in different animal models. This method may in the future have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Most notably, the delivery of the chemotherapy agents (liposomal Doxorubicin and Herceptin) has been shown in a rat model.

  1. Self-assembled pentablock copolymers for selective and sustained gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingqi

    2011-05-15

    The poly(diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM) - Pluronic F127 - PDEAEM pentablock copolymer (PB) gene delivery vector system has been found to possess an inherent selectivity in transfecting cancer cells over non-cancer cells in vitro, without attaching any targeting ligands. In order to understand the mechanism of this selective transfection, three possible intracellular barriers to transfection were investigated in both cancer and non-cancer cells. We concluded that escape from the endocytic pathway served as the primary intracellular barrier for PB-mediated transfection. Most likely, PB vectors were entrapped and rendered non-functional in acidic lysosomes of non-cancer cells, but survived in less acidic lysosomes of cancer cells. The work highlights the importance of identifying intracellular barriers for different gene delivery systems and provides a new paradigm for designing targeting vectors based on intracellular differences between cell types, rather than through the use of targeting ligands. The PB vector was further developed to simultaneously deliver anticancer drugs and genes, which showed a synergistic effect demonstrated by significantly enhanced gene expression in vitro. Due to the thermosensitive gelation behavior, the PB vector packaging both drug and gene was also investigated for its in vitro sustained release properties by using polyethylene glycol diacrylate as a barrier gel to mimic the tumor matrix in vivo. Overall, this work resulted in the development of a gene delivery vector for sustained and selective gene delivery to tumor cells for cancer therapy.

  2. Multifunctional nanocarrier based on clay nanotubes for efficient intracellular siRNA delivery and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Yinfeng; Huang, Chusen; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiahui; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2014-04-01

    RNA interference-mediated gene silencing relating to disease has recently emerged as a powerful method in gene therapy. Despite the promises, effective transport of siRNA with minimal side effects remains a challenge. Halloysites are cheap and naturally available aluminosilicate clay nanotubes with high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. In this study, a novel multifunctional nanocarrier based on functionalized halloysite nanotubes (f-HNTs) has been developed via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembling approach for loading and intracellular delivery of therapeutic antisurvivin siRNA and simultaneously tracking their intracellular transport, in which PEI-modified HNTs are used as gene vector, antisurvivin siRNA as gene therapeutic agent, and mercaptoacetic acid-capped CdSe quantum dots as fluorescent labeling probes. The successful assembly of the f-HNTs-siRNA complexes was systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectrophotometry, Zeta potential measurement, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy, biological TEM, and flow cytometry studies revealed that the complexes enabled the efficient intracellular delivery of siRNA for cell-specific gene silencing. MTT assays exhibited that the complexes can enhance antitumor activity. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that f-HNTs-mediated siRNA delivery effectively knocked down gene expression of survivin and thereby decreased the levels of target proteins of PANC-1 cells. Therefore, this study suggested that the synthesized f-HNTs were a new effective drug delivery system for potential application in cancer gene therapy.

  3. Cell-specific targeting strategies for electroporation-mediated gene delivery in cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Dean, David A

    2013-10-01

    The use of electroporation to facilitate gene transfer is an extremely powerful and useful method for both in vitro and in vivo applications. One of its great strengths is that it induces functional destabilization and permeabilization of cell membranes throughout a tissue leading to widespread gene transfer to multiple cells and cell types within the electric field. While this is a strength, it can also be a limitation in terms of cell-specific gene delivery. The ability to restrict gene delivery and expression to particular cell types is of paramount importance for many types of gene therapy, since ectopic expression of a transgene could lead to deleterious host inflammatory responses or dysregulation of normal cellular functions. At present, there are relatively few ways to obtain cell-specific targeting of nonviral vectors, molecular probes, small molecules, and imaging agents. We have developed a novel means of restricting gene delivery to desired cell types based on the ability to control the transport of plasmids into the nuclei of desired cell types. In this article, we discuss the mechanisms of this approach and several applications in living animals to demonstrate the benefits of the combination of electroporation and selective nuclear import of plasmids for cell-specific gene delivery.

  4. A novel cationic liposome formulation for efficient gene delivery via a pulmonary route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Donghua; Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Chunxi; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Na

    2011-06-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy for lung cancer is not only dependent on efficient gene carriers but also on a suitable delivery route. A pulmonary delivery route can directly deliver gene vectors to the lung which is more efficient than a systemic delivery route. For gene carriers, cationic liposomes have recently emerged as leading non-viral vectors in worldwide gene therapy clinical trials. However, cytotoxic effects or apoptosis are often observed which is mostly dependent on the cationic lipid used. Therefore, an efficient and safe cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), previously synthesized by our group was first used to prepare cationic liposomes. Physicochemical and biological properties of LHLN-liposomes were investigated. LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes showed positive surface charge, spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and strong DNA binding capability. Compared with Lipofectamine2000, the new cationic liposome formulation using LHLN exhibited not only lower cytotoxicity (P < 0.05) but also similar transfection efficiency in A549 and HepG2 lung cancer cells for in vitro tests. When administered by intratracheal instillation into rat lungs for in vivo evaluation, LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes exhibited higher pulmonary gene transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine2000/DNA complexes (P < 0.05). These results suggested that LHLN-liposomes may have great potential for efficient pulmonary gene delivery.

  5. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform. PMID:25213606

  6. Development of a tailorable and tunable mechanism for cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blocker, Kory M.

    Due to the spatial and temporal control as well as the cell-type specificity necessary to extend gene delivery to therapeutic applications, there exists a need to create systems capable of gene transfer that are well-understood and easily manipulated. Furthermore, the creation of such materials will enable further exploration of the correlation between biochemical cues and the resulting cellular responses. In response to this as yet unmet need, a method to promote cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery was developed for this dissertation. Through the use of non-viral gene delivery, flexibility of the vehicle design was incorporated into the system. Using PNA technology, pDNA was able to be specifically tethered to a self-assembled monolayer via an enzymatically-labile peptide tether. This construct was shown to promote cell-responsive delivery while retaining flexibility over the chemical and physical properties of the vehicle and substrate. By alteration of some design parameters including tether number, pDNA surface coverage, and complexation agent, temporal control over the release profile was demonstrated. Furthermore, the ability to extend the applicability of the system was detailed by transitioning to a poly-D-lysine coated substrate upon which the pDNA is immobilized. This dissertation details proof-of-principle work in the formation of a controlled release gene delivery mechanism that may be used to promote understanding of cellular responses to biochemical signaling as well as be extended to use in tissue engineering applications.

  7. Gene transfer to hemophilia A mice via oral delivery of FVIII-chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Katherine; Sarkar, Rita; Raut, Sanj; Leong, Kam W

    2008-12-18

    Effective oral delivery of a non-viral gene carrier would represent a novel and attractive strategy for therapeutic gene transfer. To evaluate the potential of this approach, we studied the oral gene delivery efficacy of DNA polyplexes composed of chitosan and Factor VIII DNA. Transgene DNA was detected in both local and systemic tissues following oral administration of the chitosan nanoparticles to hemophilia A mice. Functional factor VIII protein was detected in plasma by chromogenic and thrombin generation assays, reaching a peak level of 2-4% FVIII at day 22 after delivery. In addition, a bleeding challenge one month after DNA administration resulted in phenotypic correction in 13/20 mice given 250-600 microg of FVIII DNA in chitosan nanoparticles, compared to 1/13 mice given naked FVIII DNA and 0/6 untreated mice. While further optimization would be required to render this type of delivery system practical for hemophilia A gene therapy, the findings suggest the feasibility of oral, non-viral delivery for gene medicine applications.

  8. Efficient gene delivery to pancreatic islets with ultrasonic microbubble destruction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyuan; Ding, Jia-Huan; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Yang, Bing-Zhi; Shohet, Ralph V.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Hohmeier, Hans E.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2006-05-01

    This study describes a method of gene delivery to pancreatic islets of adult, living animals by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). The technique involves incorporation of plasmids into the phospholipid shell of gas-filled microbubbles, which are then infused into rats and destroyed within the pancreatic microcirculation with ultrasound. Specific delivery of genes to islet beta cells by UTMD was achieved by using a plasmid containing a rat insulin 1 promoter (RIP), and reporter gene expression was regulated appropriately by glucose in animals that received a RIP-luciferase plasmid. To demonstrate biological efficacy, we used UTMD to deliver RIP-human insulin and RIP-hexokinase I plasmids to islets of adult rats. Delivery of the former plasmid resulted in clear increases in circulating human C-peptide and decreased blood glucose levels, whereas delivery of the latter plasmid resulted in a clear increase in hexokinase I protein expression in islets, increased insulin levels in blood, and decreased circulating glucose levels. We conclude that UTMD allows relatively noninvasive delivery of genes to pancreatic islets with an efficiency sufficient to modulate beta cell function in adult animals. diabetes | gene therapy | ultrasound

  9. Effect of strontium ions substitution on gene delivery related properties of calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, A; Fathi, M H; Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, H

    2010-09-01

    Gene therapy has been considered a strategy for delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to a specific site. Calcium phosphates are one gene delivery vector group of interest. However, low transfection efficiency has limited the use of calcium phosphate in gene delivery applications. Present work aims at studying the fabrication of strontium substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles with improved gene delivery related properties. Strontium substituted calcium phosphate was prepared using a simple sol gel method. X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, specific surface area analysis, zeta potential measurement and ion release evaluation were used to characterize the samples. This characterization showed strontium and carbonate co-substituted calcium phosphate which resulted in nano size particles with low crystallinity, high specific surface area, positive surface charge, and a high dissolution rate. These improved properties could increase the DNA concentration on the vector as well as the endosomal escape of the complex that leads to higher transfection efficiency of this novel gene delivery vector.

  10. Intestinal delivery of non-viral gene therapeutics: physiological barriers and preclinical models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin J; Bourre, Ludovic; Melgar, Silvia; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2011-03-01

    The future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics is dependent on achieving successful delivery. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in delivery via the gastrointestinal tract. Gene therapy via this route has many advantages, including non-invasive access and the versatility to treat local diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, as well as systemic diseases, such as haemophilia. However, the intestine presents several distinct barriers and, therefore, the design of robust non-viral delivery systems is key to future success. Several non-viral delivery strategies have provided evidence of activity in vivo. To facilitate the design of more efficient and safe gene medicines, more physiologically relevant models, at both the in vitro and in vivo levels, are essential.

  11. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed.

  12. The effects of a multifunctional oligomer and its incorporation strategies on the gene delivery efficiency of poly(L-lysine).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dezhong; Li, Congxin; Hu, Yuling; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Jiatong; Zhang, Zhengpu; Guo, Tianying

    2012-05-14

    A novel multifunctional oligomer is synthesized and incorporated to enhance the gene delivery efficiency of PLL via non-electrostatic assembly and covalent grafting strategies. The improvement of the gene delivery efficiency is dependent on the gene carrying complex properties, and the properties are dependent on the oligomer incorporation strategy.

  13. A chemistry/physics pathway with nanofibrous scaffolds for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fen; Tang, Zhaohui; He, Weidong; Chu, Benjamin

    2010-10-21

    This perspective is to introduce a new pathway for non-viral gene delivery by taking advantage of nanofibrous scaffolds as gene storage devices, gene carriers and homing devices. During gene delivery to the target, the DNA has to be protected in order to pass through a set of barriers before reaching the nucleus. The DNA can form a complex with polycations, and numerous publications exist on how to stabilize the DNA fragments by natural and synthetic materials. Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds can be used to store the DNA, especially in the form of a more stabilized polyplex, and then to deliver the DNA (polyplex) to cells that are attached to the scaffold. While each essential step has been tested experimentally, the overall yet untested process, especially for in vivo experiments, may lead to a promising specific approach for gene/drug storage and delivery. The pathway described herein is based mainly on our understanding of the physics and chemistry of gene storage and delivery processes, in contrast to using pure biological concepts. Novel biodegradable, biocompatible nanofibrous materials with imbedded DNA (e.g., in the polyplex form) can then be designed to fabricate an intelligent scaffold for gene delivery. To achieve the above goal, the first step is to stabilize the DNA so that it can be incorporated into nanofibrous scaffolds. In this respect, we shall discuss the different methods of DNA/gene condensation and complex formation, and then explain the strategy used to incorporate DNA into electrospun nanofibers. Solvent-induced DNA condensation and then encapsulation were achieved. However, the released naked DNA was not sufficiently protected for gene transfection in cells. The objective of the current perspective is to suggest that, instead of the solvent-induced DNA condensation, one can combine the recently developed polyplex formation by using branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI). More importantly, free bPEI can be incorporated into the nanofibers

  14. Cerebellomedullary Cistern Delivery for AAV-Based Gene Therapy: A Technical Note for Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Samaranch, Lluis; Bringas, John; Pivirotto, Philip; Sebastian, Waldy San; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2016-01-01

    Accessing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the craniocervical junction through the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane via cerebellomedullary injection (also known as cisternal puncture or cisterna magna injection) has become a standard procedure in preclinical studies. Such delivery provides broader coverage to the central and peripheral nervous system unlike local parenchymal delivery alone. As a clinical application, this approach offers a more reliable method for neurological gene replacement delivery in infants, where skull-mounted devices are not indicated. Here we describe a consistent, precise, and safe method for CSF injection with minimal equipment and technical skills. PMID:26757202

  15. Cerebellomedullary Cistern Delivery for AAV-Based Gene Therapy: A Technical Note for Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, Lluis; Bringas, John; Pivirotto, Philip; Sebastian, Waldy San; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2016-02-01

    Accessing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the craniocervical junction through the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane via cerebellomedullary injection (also known as cisternal puncture or cisterna magna injection) has become a standard procedure in preclinical studies. Such delivery provides broader coverage to the central and peripheral nervous system unlike local parenchymal delivery alone. As a clinical application, this approach offers a more reliable method for neurological gene replacement delivery in infants, where skull-mounted devices are not indicated. Here we describe a consistent, precise, and safe method for CSF injection with minimal equipment and technical skills.

  16. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  17. Gene Delivery to the Retina: From Mouse to Man

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jean; Chung, Daniel C.; Maguire, Albert

    2013-01-01

    With the recent progress in identifying disease-causing genes in humans and in animal models, there are more and more opportunities for using retinal gene transfer to learn more about retinal physiology and also to develop therapies for blinding disorders. Success in preclinical studies for one form of inherited blindness have led to testing in human clinical trials. This paves the way to consider a number of other retinal diseases as ultimate gene therapy targets in human studies. The information presented here is designed to assist scientists and clinicians to use gene transfer to probe the biology of the retina and/or to move appropriate gene-based treatment studies from the bench to the clinic. PMID:22365778

  18. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  19. Engineering biodegradable and multifunctional peptide-based polymers for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of in vivo gene transfer establishes the need for multifunctional delivery vectors capable of meeting these challenges. An additional consideration for clinical translation of synthetic delivery formulations is reproducibility and scale-up of materials. In this review, we summarize our work over the last five years in developing a modular approach for synthesizing peptide-based polymers. In these materials, bioactive peptides that address various barriers to gene delivery are copolymerized with a hydrophilic backbone of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) using reversible-addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. We demonstrate that this synthetic approach results in well-defined, narrowly-disperse polymers with controllable composition and molecular weight. To date, we have investigated the effectiveness of various bioactive peptides for DNA condensation, endosomal escape, cell targeting, and degradability on gene transfer, as well as the impact of multivalency and polymer architecture on peptide bioactivity. PMID:24156736

  20. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  1. Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin for targeted gene delivery of VEGF165-Ang-1 with PEI.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caili; Lv, Linlin; Liu, Yu; Yu, Yanni; You, Renchuan; Yang, Jicheng; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-06-01

    Vascularization is a crucial challenge in tissue engineering. One solution for this problem is to implant scaffolds that contain functional genes that promote vascularization by providing angiogenic growth factors via a gene delivery carrier. Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) is a gene delivery carrier with high transfection efficiency but with cytotoxicity. To solve this problem, we utilized Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (ASF), which has favorable cytocompatibility and biodegradability, RGD sequences and a negative charge, in conjunction with PEI, as the delivery vector for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 165-angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) dual gene simultaneous expression plasmid, creating an ASF/PEI/pDNA complex. The results suggested that the zeta potential of the ASF/PEI/pDNA complex was significantly lower than that of the PEI/pDNA complex. Decreased nitrogen and increased oxygen on the surface of the complex demonstrated that the ASF had successfully combined with the surface of the PEI/pDNA. Furthermore, the complexes resisted digestion by nucleic acid enzymes and degradation by serum. L929 cells were cultured and transfected in vitro and improved cytotoxicity was found when the cells were transfected with ASF/PEI/pDNA compared with PEI/pDNA. In addition, the transfection efficiency and VEGF secretion increased. In general, this study provides a novel method for decreasing the cytotoxicity of PEI gene delivery vectors and increasing transfection efficiency of angiogenesis-related genes.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable HPMA-Oligolysine Copolymers for Improved Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Rob S.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive peptides, including DNA-binding, endosomal release and cell targeting peptides, have been integrated into synthetic gene carriers to improve delivery efficiencies by enabling the vectors to overcome barriers to gene delivery. Our overall goal is to develop multifunctional, peptide-based polymers that incorporate motifs to condense DNA and facilitate sequential trafficking steps. One approach is to polymerize vinyl-terminated peptides by radical polymerization. In this work, cationic oligolysine peptides were designed to contain vinyl termini with internal reducible linkers. These peptides were copolymerized with HPMA to form biodegradable, DNA-condensing copolymers for gene delivery. The polymerization conditions were optimized by varying the initiator to monomer ratios, macromonomer to comonomer ratios, and reactant concentrations. The synthesized copolymers were shown to possess several important properties required for in vivo gene delivery applications, including (i) efficient DNA binding and condensation, (ii) the ability to stabilize particles against salt-induced aggregation, (iii) the ability to resist extracellular polyplex unpackaging, (iv) biocompatibility and the potential to be degraded into nontoxic components after cellular uptake, and (v) efficient delivery of plasmid to cultured cells. PMID:19968270

  4. Structure-function investigations of DNA condensing agents with application to gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Heather Marie

    Lipid-based systems are notoriously poor for gene delivery, and their use has been primarily empirical. In order to improve these systems, it is imperative to obtain a greater understanding of molecular interactions between DNA and positively charged molecules. A variety of cationic molecules have been studied with DNA, in an attempt to correlate structural properties of these assemblies (using x-ray diffraction) with their efficiency as DNA carriers for gene delivery (using a luciferase assay). Several systems have been studied, some of which use the same charged amine moieties presented in three distinct morphologies: the multivalent salts spermine and spermidine, dendrimers, and dendrimeric lipids. The dendrimers somewhat approximate the properties of histories, cylindrical proteins that condense intracellular DNA. Structural studies of histone and DNA have also been conducted in order to better understand these interactions and their possible relevance to the gene delivery pathway. In addition, empirical evidence suggests that for successful in vivo gene delivery, cholesterol should be used as a helper lipid. The delivery efficiency and structural behavior of cholesterol and other sterol molecules have been studied in ternary lipid mixtures.

  5. Inverted Quasi-Spherical Droplets on Polydopamine-TiO2 Substrates for Enhancing Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Mihyun; Cho, Mira; Kim, Il-Sun; Park, Kook In; Lee, Haeshin; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2017-08-15

    Devising efficient gene delivery systems is crucial to enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of gene-cell therapy approaches. Herein, inverted quasi-spherical (iQS) droplet systems, which enhance gene delivery efficiencies by reducing the path lengths of gene vectors, mediating motions of vectors at early stages, and raising the contact frequencies of vectors with cells, are developed by adopting the principle of 3D hanging-drop cell culture. Micrometer-sized polydopamine (pDA) holes are created on superhydrophobic titanium isopropoxide (TiO2 )-coated substrates by physical scraping; droplets are loaded on the pDA holes, and inversion of the substrate generates iQS droplets with large contact angles. Both human neural stem cells (hNSCs) and adeno-associated viral vectors are simultaneously incorporated into the iQS droplets to assess gene delivery efficiencies. The steep angles of iQS droplets and enhanced cell/vector contact frequencies facilitate the viral association with hNSCs and enhancing cell-cell interactions, thereby significantly promoting gene delivery efficiencies. Even with reduced viral quantities/exposure times and cell numbers, the iQS droplet systems elicit sufficient gene expression (i.e., interleukin-10). The ability of the iQS droplet systems to maximize beneficial gene delivery effects with minimal materials (e.g., medium, cells, and vectors) should enable their extensive use as a platform for preparing genetically stimulated cellular therapeutics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  7. Reduction of nontarget infection and systemic toxicity by targeted delivery of conditionally replicating viruses transported in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, J L; Spaeth, E L; Fueyo, J; Gomez-Manzano, C; Studeny, M; Andreeff, M; Marini, F C

    2010-04-01

    The fiber-modified adenoviral vector Delta-24-RGD (D24RGD) offers vast therapeutic potential. Direct injection of D24RGD has been used to successfully target ovarian tumors in mice. However, systemic toxicity, especially in the liver, profoundly limits the efficacy of direct viral vector delivery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the ability to function as a vector for targeted gene therapy because of their preferential engraftment into solid tumors and participation in tumor stroma formation. We show that MSC-guided delivery of D24RGD is specific and efficient and reduces the overall systemic toxicity in mice to negligible levels compared with D24RGD alone. In our model, we found efficient targeted delivery of MSC-D24RGD to both breast and ovarian cell lines. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining for adenoviral hexon protein confirmed negligible levels of systemic toxicity in mice that were administered MSC-D24RGD compared with those that were administered D24RGD. These data suggest that delivery of D24RGD through MSC not only increases the targeted delivery efficiency, but also reduces the systemic exposure of the virus, thereby reducing overall systemic toxicity to the host and ultimately enhancing its value as an anti-tumor therapeutic candidate.

  8. Reduction of nontarget infection and systemic toxicity by targeted delivery of conditionally replicating viruses transported in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Spaeth, Erika; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Studeny, Matus; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The fiber-modified adenoviral vector Delta-24-RGD (D24RGD) offers vast therapeutic potential. Direct injection of D24RGD has been used to successfully target ovarian tumors in mice. However, systemic toxicity, especially in the liver, is a profoundly limits the efficacy of direct viral vector delivery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the ability to function as a vector for targeted gene therapy because of their preferential engraftment into solid tumors and participation in tumor stroma formation. We show that MSC-guided delivery of D24RGD is specific and efficient and reduces the overall systemic toxicity in mice to negligible levels compared with D24RGD alone. In our model, we found efficient targeted delivery of MSC-D24RGD to both breast and ovarian cell lines. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining for adenoviral hexon protein confirmed negligible levels of systemic toxicity in mice given MSC-D24RGD compared with those given D24RGD. These data suggest that delivery of D24RGD via MSC not only increases the targeted delivery efficiency but also reduces the systemic exposure of the virus, thereby reducing overall systemic toxicity to the host and ultimately enhancing its value as an anti-tumor therapeutic candidate. PMID:19876078

  9. Sonoporation increases therapeutic efficacy of inducible and constitutive BMP2/7 in vivo gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Georg A; Hofmann, Anna T; Slezak, Paul; Schuetzenberger, Sebastian; Kaipel, Martin; Schwartz, Ernst; Neef, Anne; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Nau, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; McHale, Anthony P; Redl, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    An ideal novel treatment for bone defects should provide regeneration without autologous or allogenous grafting, exogenous cells, growth factors, or biomaterials while ensuring spatial and temporal control as well as safety. Therefore, a novel osteoinductive nonviral in vivo gene therapy approach using sonoporation was investigated in ectopic and orthotopic models. Constitutive or regulated, doxycycline-inducible, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 coexpression plasmids were repeatedly applied for 5 days. Ectopic and orthotopic gene transfer efficacy was monitored by coapplication of a luciferase plasmid and bioluminescence imaging. Orthotopic plasmid DNA distribution was investigated using a novel plasmid-labeling method. Luciferase imaging demonstrated an increased trend (61% vs. 100%) of gene transfer efficacy, and micro-computed tomography evaluation showed significantly enhanced frequency of ectopic bone formation for sonoporation compared with passive gene delivery (46% vs. 100%) dependent on applied ultrasound power. Bone formation by the inducible system (83%) was stringently controlled by doxycycline in vivo, and no ectopic bone formation was observed without induction or with passive gene transfer without sonoporation. Orthotopic evaluation in a rat femur segmental defect model demonstrated an increased trend of gene transfer efficacy using sonoporation. Investigation of DNA distribution demonstrated extensive binding of plasmid DNA to bone tissue. Sonoporated animals displayed a potentially increased union rate (33%) without extensive callus formation or heterotopic ossification. We conclude that sonoporation of BMP2/7 coexpression plasmids is a feasible, minimally invasive method for osteoinduction and that improvement of bone regeneration by sonoporative gene delivery is superior to passive gene delivery.

  10. Transient gene expression in epidermal cells of plant leaves by biolistic DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoko; Magori, Shimpei; Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Transient gene expression is a useful approach for studying the functions of gene products. In the case of plants, Agrobacterium infiltration is a method of choice for transient introduction of genes for many species. However, this technique does not work efficiently in some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, the infection of Agrobacterium is known to induce dynamic changes in gene expression patterns in the host plants, possibly affecting the function and localization of the proteins to be tested. These problems can be circumvented by biolistic delivery of the genes of interest. Here, we present an optimized protocol for biolistic delivery of plasmid DNA into epidermal cells of plant leaves, which can be easily performed using the Bio-Rad Helios gene gun system. This protocol allows efficient and reproducible transient expression of diverse genes in Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum, and is suitable for studies of the biological function and subcellular localization of the gene products directly in planta. The protocol also can be easily adapted to other species by optimizing the delivery gas pressure.

  11. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  12. Structure-activity relationship of dendrimers engineered with twenty common amino acids in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Hu, Ke; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-01-01

    Systematic explorations on the structure-activity relationship of surface-engineered dendrimers are essential to design high efficient and safe gene vectors. The chemical diversity of residues in naturally occurring amino acids allows us to generate a library of dendrimers with various surface properties. Here, we synthesized a total number of 40 dendrimers engineered with the twenty common amino acids and investigated their performances in gene delivery. The results show that gene transfection efficacy of the synthesized materials depends on both the type of amino acid and the conjugation ratio. Dendrimers engineered with cationic and hydrophobic amino acids possess relatively higher transfection efficacies. Engineering dendrimers with cationic amino acids such as arginine and lysine facilitates polyplex formation and cellular uptake, with histidine improves endosomal escape of the polyplexes, and with hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine modulates the balance between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity on dendrimer surface, which is beneficial for efficient cellular internalization. Dendrimers engineered with anionic or hydrophilic amino acids show limited transfection efficacy due to poor DNA binding capacity and/or limited cellular uptake. In the aspect of cytotoxicity, dendrimers engineered with arginine, lysine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan show much higher cytotoxicity than other engineered dendrimers. These results are helpful for us to tailor the surface chemistry of dendrimers for efficient gene delivery. Cationic polymers such as dendrimers were widely used as gene vectors but are limited by relatively low delivery efficacy and high toxicity. To achieve efficient and low toxic gene delivery, the polymers were modified with various ligands. However, these ligand-modified polymers in gene delivery are reported by independent researchers using different polymer scaffolds and cell lines. It is hard to provide structure

  13. Sui generis: gene therapy and delivery systems for the treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kane, J Robert; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-03-01

    Gene therapy offers a multidimensional set of approaches intended to treat and cure glioblastoma (GBM), in combination with the existing standard-of-care treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy), by capitalizing on the ability to deliver genes directly to the site of neoplasia to yield antitumoral effects. Four types of gene therapy are currently being investigated for their potential use in treating GBM: (i) suicide gene therapy, which induces the localized generation of cytotoxic compounds; (ii) immunomodulatory gene therapy, which induces or augments an enhanced antitumoral immune response; (iii) tumor-suppressor gene therapy, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells; and (iv) oncolytic virotherapy, which causes the lysis of tumor cells. The delivery of genes to the tumor site is made possible by means of viral and nonviral vectors for direct delivery of therapeutic gene(s), tumor-tropic cell carriers expressing therapeutic gene(s), and "intelligent" carriers designed to increase delivery, specificity, and tumoral toxicity against GBM. These vehicles are used to carry genetic material to the site of pathology, with the expectation that they can provide specific tropism to the desired site while limiting interaction with noncancerous tissue. Encouraging preclinical results using gene therapies for GBM have led to a series of human clinical trials. Although there is limited evidence of a therapeutic benefit to date, a number of clinical trials have convincingly established that different types of gene therapies delivered by various methods appear to be safe. Due to the flexibility of specialized carriers and genetic material, the technology for generating new and more effective therapies already exists.

  14. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs.

  15. Upgrading HepG2 cells with adenoviral vectors that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes: application for drug hepatotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, M José; Tolosa, Laia; Donato, M Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Drug attrition rates due to hepatotoxicity are an important safety issue considered in drug development. The HepG2 hepatoma cell line is currently being used for drug-induced hepatotoxicity evaluations, but its expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes is poor compared with hepatocytes. Different approaches have been proposed to upgrade HepG2 cells for more reliable drug-induced liver injury predictions. Areas covered: We describe the advantages and limitations of HepG2 cells transduced with adenoviral vectors that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes for safety risk assessments of bioactivable compounds. Adenoviral transduction facilitates efficient and controlled delivery of multiple drug-metabolizing activities to HepG2 cells at comparable levels to primary human hepatocytes by generating an 'artificial hepatocyte'. Furthermore, adenoviral transduction enables the design of tailored cells expressing particular metabolic capacities. Expert opinion: Upgraded HepG2 cells that recreate known inter-individual variations in hepatic CYP and conjugating activities due to both genetic (e.g., polymorphisms) or environmental (e.g., induction, inhibition) factors seems a suitable model to identify bioactivable drug and conduct hepatotoxicity risk assessments. This strategy should enable the generation of customized cells by reproducing human pheno- and genotypic CYP variability to represent a valuable human hepatic cell model to develop new safer drugs and to improve existing predictive toxicity assays.

  16. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for gene therapy: a "ménage à trois" among nucleic acids, materials, and the biological environment. Stimuli-responsive gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele

    2013-03-01

    Gene delivery is the science of transferring genetic material into cells by means of a vector to alter cellular function or structure at a molecular level. In this context, a number of nucleic acid-based drugs have been proposed and experimented so far and, as they act on distinct steps along the gene transcription-translation pathway, specific delivery strategies are required to elicit the desired outcome. Cationic lipids and polymers, collectively known as non-viral delivery systems, have thus made their breakthrough in basic and medical research. Albeit they are promising alternatives to viral vectors, their therapeutic application is still rather limited as high transfection efficiencies are normally associated to adverse cytotoxic side effects. In this scenario, drawing inspiration from processes naturally occurring in vivo, major strides forward have been made in the development of more effective materials for gene delivery applications. Specifically, smart vectors sensitive to a variety of physiological stimuli such as cell enzymes, redox status, and pH are substantially changing the landscape of gene delivery by helping to overcome some of the systemic and intracellular barriers that viral vectors naturally evade. Herein, after summarizing the state-of-the-art information regarding the use of nucleic acids as drugs, we review the main bottlenecks still limiting the overall effectiveness of non-viral gene delivery systems. Finally, we provide a critical outline of emerging stimuli-responsive strategies and discuss challenges still existing on the road toward conceiving more efficient and safer multifunctional vectors.

  17. Receptor-mediated, tumor-targeted gene delivery using folate-terminated polyrotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Wang, He; Wang, Chengxi; Li, Yueshan; Lu, Wenfeng; Chen, Shuifang; Luo, Jiandong; Jiang, Yongnan; Chen, Jianhai

    2012-05-07

    Safe and effective gene delivery is essential to the success of gene therapy. We synthesized and characterized a novel nonviral gene delivery system in which folate (FA) molecules were functioned as blockers on cationic polyrotaxanes (PR) composed of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)(600)-grafted α-cyclodextrin rings linearized on polyethylene glycol to form FA-terminated PR-PEI(600) (FPP). The FA terminal caps of FPP target cell surfaces abundant in FA receptor (FR), a common feature of tumor cells. The structure of FPP was characterized by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The delivery particle was composed of chemically bonded PEG (4000), α-cyclodextrins (CD), and PEI (600 Da) at a molar ratio of 1:17:86.7, and the particle size and zeta potential of FPP/pDNA polyplexes were measured using dynamic light scattering. FPP/pDNA exhibited a lower cytotoxicity, strong specificity to FR, and high efficiency of delivering DNA to target cells in vitro and in vivo with the reporter genes. Furthermore, the FPP/DNA complex showed an enhanced antitumor effect in the nude mice compared with other delivery systems, such as PEI-25K. Together, these results suggest that FPP may be useful for gene therapy.

  18. Advanced drug and gene delivery systems based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-09-28

    Biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers are one of the most promising systems for targeted and controlled drug and gene delivery. They have shown several unique advantages such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and degradation in vivo into nontoxic products after completing their tasks. The current biodegradable drug and gene delivery systems exhibit, however, typically low in vivo therapeutic efficacy, due to issues of low loading capacity, inadequate in vivo stability, premature cargo release, poor uptake by target cells, and slow release of therapeutics inside tumor cells. To overcome these problems, a variety of advanced drug and gene delivery systems has recently been designed and developed based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers. Notably, polycarbonates and copolymers with diverse functionalities such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, amine, alkene, alkyne, halogen, azido, acryloyl, vinyl sulfone, pyridyldisulfide, and saccharide, could be readily obtained by controlled ring-opening polymerization. In this paper, we give an overview on design concepts and recent developments of functional polycarbonate-based nanocarriers including stimuli-sensitive, photo-crosslinkable, or active targeting polymeric micelles, polymersomes and polyplexes for enhanced drug and gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. These multifunctional biodegradable nanosystems might be eventually developed for safe and efficient cancer chemotherapy and gene therapy.

  19. Gastrointestinal gene delivery by cyclodextrins--in vitro quantification of extracellular barriers.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin J; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Byrne, Colin; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2013-11-18

    Local gene delivery represents a promising therapeutic approach for diseases of the intestine. However, the gastrointestinal tract poses significant challenges to successful gene delivery. Cyclodextrins (CDs) have been extensively investigated as non-viral vectors. Here, we assessed the suitability of an amphiphilic cationic CD for intestinal gene transfer, with particular focus on extracellular barriers. Stability and transfection efficiency of CD·DNA complexes were assessed post incubation in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, bile salts and mucin, or with intestinal enzymes to represent extracellular barriers to intestinal gene delivery. Stability was determined by gel electrophoresis and transfection was measured by luciferase expression in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Transfection efficiency of CD·DNA complexes was enhanced after incubation in bile salts but was reduced after incubation in gastric and intestinal fluids and mucin. CD·DNA complexes were stable after incubation with pancreatic enzymes and with a model lower intestinal enzyme. Furthermore, the CD protected pDNA from degradation by DNase. In summary, physiologically relevant in vitro models were established and used to quantify the barriers posed by the intestinal extracellular environment to gene delivery. This systematic assessment identified the advantages and limitations of the CD vector and facilitated the proposal of formulation strategies to overcome these barriers.

  20. Effective gene delivery to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes through nucleofection.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Lugo, Lisandro; Díaz-Olmos, Yirys; Sáenz-García, José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities have raised to study the