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Sample records for adenoviral mediated gene

  1. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  2. Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Gliomas: Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Wilson, Thomas J.; Calinescu, Alexandra; Paran, Christopher; Kamran, Neha; Koschmann, Carl; Moreno-Ayala, Mariela A.; Assi, Hikmat; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; it carries a dismal prognosis. Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is being developed as a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM. Preclinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of adenovirus administration into the brain and tumor mass in rodents and into the non-human primates’ brain. Importantly Ads have been safely administered within the tumor resection cavity in humans. Areas Covered Background on GBM and Ad vectors; we describe gene therapy strategies for GBM and discuss the value of combination approaches. Finally we discuss the results of the human clinical trials for GBM that have used adenoviral vectors. Expert Opinion The transduction characteristics of Ad vectors, and their safety profile, added to their capacity to achieve high levels of transgene expression have made them powerful vectors for the treatment of GBM. Recent gene therapy successes in the treatment of retinal diseases and systemic brain metabolic diseases, encourages the development of gene therapy for malignant glioma. Exciting clinical trials are currently recruiting patients; although it is large randomized phase III controlled clinical trials that will provide the final decision on the success of gene therapy for the treatment of GBM. PMID:24773178

  3. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  4. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  5. Adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF-B enhances wound healing in type I and type II diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Katz, Anna B; Lim, Foong-Yen; Zoltick, Philip; Radu, Antoneta; Alaee, Datis; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2004-01-01

    We have shown that the genetically diabetic mouse (C57BLKS/J-m+/+Lepr(db)) has a wound healing and neovascularization deficit associated with an inability to recruit endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) to the wound. This may account for a fundamental mechanism in impaired diabetic wound healing. We hypothesized that the adenoviral mediated overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) would enhance wound healing, improve neovascularization, and recruit EPCs to the epithelial wound in three diabetic mouse models. Eight-mm full-thickness flank wounds were made in db/db, nonobese NOD/Ltj, streptozotocin, and C57BLKS/J mice. Wounds were treated with either 1 x 10(8) PFU Ad-PDGF-B or Ad LacZ or phosphate buffered saline solution. Wounds harvested at seven days were analyzed for epithelial gap, blood vessel density, granulation tissue area, and EPCs per high powered field. All three diabetic models have a significant wound healing and neovascularization defect compared to C57BLKS/J controls. Adenoviral-PDGF-B treatment significantly enhanced epithelial gap closure in db/db, streptozotocin, and nonobese NOD/Ltj mice as compared to diabetic phosphate buffered saline solution or Ad LacZ controls. A similar increase in the formation of granulation tissue and vessel density was also observed. All three models had reduced levels of GATA-2 positive EPCs in the wound bed that was corrected by the adenoviral mediated gene transfer of PDGF. EPC recruitment was positively correlated with neovascularization and wound healing. Three different diabetic models have a wound healing impairment and a decreased ability to recruit EPCs. The vulnerary effect of adenoviral mediated gene therapy with PDGF-B significantly enhanced wound healing and neovascularization in diabetic wounds. The PDGF-B mediated augmentation of EPC recruitment to the wound bed may be a fundamental mechanism of these results.

  6. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  7. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  8. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  9. Efficacy of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene in the treatment of lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    LI, KUN-LIN; KANG, JUN; ZHANG, PENG; LI, LI; WANG, YU-BO; CHEN, HENG-YI; HE, YONG

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion induced by lung cancer exerts a negative impact on quality of life and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of the recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene (rAd-p53) in the local treatment of lung cancer and its synergistic effect with chemotherapy. The present study retrospectively recruited 210 patients with lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion who had adopted a treatment strategy of platinum chemotherapy. Pleurodesis was performed via the injection of cisplatin or rAd-p53. Long-term follow-up was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effects of cisplatin and rAd-p53 administration on pleural effusion and other relevant clinical indicators. The short-term effect of pleurodesis was as follows: The efficacy rate of rAd-p53 therapy was significantly higher compared with cisplatin therapy (71.26 vs. 54.47%), and the efficacy of treatment with ≥2×1012 viral particles of rAd-p53 for pleurodesis was significantly greater than treatment with 40 mg cisplatin (P<0.05). Furthermore, efficacy analysis performed 6 and 12 months after pleurodesis indicated that the efficacy rate of rAd-p53 was significantly greater than that of cisplatin (P<0.05). A comparison of median progression-free survival (PFS) time identified a significant difference (P<0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (3.3 vs. 2.7 months); however, a comparison of median overall survival time identified no significant difference (P>0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (9.6 vs. 8.7 months). In addition, Cox regression analysis indicated that PFS was not affected by clinical indicators such as age, gender, prognostic staging and smoking status; however, PFS was affected by pathological subtype (adenocarcinoma or squamous carcinoma) in the rAd-p53 group. rAd-p53 administration for pleurodesis exerts long-term therapeutic effects on the local treatment of lung cancer. Thus, a combination of rAd-p53 and chemotherapy may exert a synergistic effect and

  10. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  11. High efficiency myogenic conversion of human fibroblasts by adenoviral vector-mediated MyoD gene transfer. An alternative strategy for ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, L; Salvatori, G; Coletta, M; Sonnino, C; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Gioglio, L; Murry, C E; Kelly, R; Ferrari, G; Molinaro, M; Crescenzi, M; Mavilio, F; Cossu, G

    1998-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on autologous transplantation of genetically modified myogenic cells, is seriously limited by the number of primary myogenic cells that can be isolated, expanded, transduced, and reimplanted into the patient's muscles. We explored the possibility of using the MyoD gene to induce myogenic conversion of nonmuscle, primary cells in a quantitatively relevant fashion. Primary human and murine fibroblasts from skin, muscle, or bone marrow were infected by an E1-deleted adenoviral vector carrying a retroviral long terminal repeat-promoted MyoD cDNA. Expression of MyoD caused irreversible withdrawal from the cell cycle and myogenic differentiation in the majority (from 60 to 90%) of cultured fibroblasts, as defined by activation of muscle-specific genes, fusion into contractile myotubes, and appearance of ultrastructurally normal sarcomagenesis in culture. 24 h after adenoviral exposure, MyoD-converted cultures were injected into regenerating muscle of immunodeficient (severe combined immunodeficiency/beige) mice, where they gave rise to beta-galactosidase positive, centrally nucleated fibers expressing human myosin heavy chains. Fibers originating from converted fibroblasts were indistinguishable from those obtained by injection of control cultures of lacZ-transduced satellite cells. MyoD-converted murine fibroblasts participated to muscle regeneration also in immunocompetent, syngeneic mice. Although antibodies from these mice bound to adenoviral infected cells in vitro, no inflammatory infiltrate was present in the graft site throughout the 3-wk study period. These data support the feasibility of an alternative approach to gene therapy of primary myopathies, based on implantation of large numbers of genetically modified primary fibroblasts massively converted to myogenesis by adenoviral delivery of MyoD ex vivo. PMID:9593768

  12. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  13. Adenoviral vector-mediated GDNF gene therapy in a rodent lesion model of late stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, P A; Araujo, D M; Hilt, D C; Sheng, J; Jiao, S

    1997-11-28

    A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene (Ad-GDNF) was used to express the neurotrophic factor GDNF in the unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated substantia nigra (SN) of adult rats ten weeks following the 6-OHDA injection. 6-OHDA lesions significantly increased apomorphine-induced (contralateral) rotations and reduced striatal and nigral dopamine (DA) levels by 99% and 70%, respectively. Ad-GDNF significantly (P < 0.01) decreased (by 30-40%) apomorphine-induced rotations in lesioned rats for up to two weeks following a single injection. Locomotor activity, assessed 7 days following the Ad-GDNF injection, was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased (by 300-400%). Two weeks after the Ad-GDNF injection, locomotor activity was still significantly increased compared to the Ad-beta-gal-injected 6-OHDA lesioned (control) group. Additionally, in Ad-GDNF-injected rats, there was a significant decrease (10-13%) in weight gain which persisted for approximately two weeks following the injection. Consistent with the behavioral changes, levels of DA and the metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were elevated (by 98% and 65%, respectively) in the SN, but not the striatum of Ad-GDNF-injected rats. Overall, a single Ad-GDNF injection had significant effects for 2-3 weeks following administration. These results suggest that virally delivered GDNF promotes the recovery of nigral dopaminergic tone (i.e.: increased DA and DOPAC levels) and improves behavioral performance (i.e.: decreased rotations, increased locomotion) in rodents with extensive nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Moreover, our results suggest that viral delivery of trophic factors may be used eventually to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  14. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  15. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  16. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  17. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  18. Overexpression of IL-1beta by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in the rat brain causes a prolonged hepatic chemokine response, axonal injury and the suppression of spontaneous behaviour.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sandra J; Deacon, Rob M J; Jiang, Yanyan; Ferrari, Carina; Pitossi, Fernando J; Anthony, Daniel C

    2007-08-01

    Acute brain injury induces early and transient hepatic expression of chemokines, which amplify the injury response and give rise to movement of leukocytes into the blood and subsequently the brain and liver. Here, we sought to determine whether an ongoing injury stimulus within the brain would continue to drive the hepatic chemokine response and how it impacts on behaviour and CNS integrity. We generated chronic IL-1beta expression in rat brain by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer, which resulted in chronic leukocyte recruitment, axonal injury and prolonged depression of spontaneous behaviour. IL-1beta could not be detected in circulating blood, but a chronic systemic response was established, including extended production of hepatic and circulating chemokines, leukocytosis, liver damage, weight loss, decreased serum albumin and marked liver leukocyte recruitment. Thus, hepatic chemokine synthesis is a feature of active chronic CNS disease and provides an accessible target for the suppression of CNS inflammation.

  19. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  20. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  1. Vascular gene transfer from metallic stent surfaces using adenoviral vectors tethered through hydrolysable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J; Alferiev, Ivan S

    2014-08-12

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  2. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  3. Long-term survival of cardiac allografts induced by cyclophosphamide combined with CTLA4Ig-gene transfer mediated by adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Ma, J B; Jin, Y Z; Feng, Y G; Hao, J; Gao, X; Xie, S S

    2006-11-01

    There is a need to achieve donor-specific tolerance in clinical organ transplantation, where potential benefits remain overshadowed by chronic rejection and the side-effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. It is known that the mature immune system in mice can be reprogrammed to accept a foreign graft as if it was "self". The AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer (SC) + cyclophosphamide (CP) treatment alone prolongs allograft survival but does not induce tolerance. However, in our study, the AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer combined with SC + CP treatment yielded significantly prolonged mean survival times (149.7 +/- 18.0 days), while those in the untreated or AdLacZ treated mice were rejected in normal fashion (5.3 +/- 0.5 and 5.2 +/- 0.4 days, respectively), and survival in the AdCTLA4Ig or SC + CP treated groups were 45.7 +/- 9.6 or 50.2 +/- 5.3 days, respectively. In conclusion, a protocol of AdCTLA4Ig + SC + CP improved the survival of DA-->LEW cardiac allografts.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  6. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  7. Vascular Gene Transfer from Metallic Stent Surfaces Using Adenoviral Vectors Tethered through Hydrolysable Cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P.; Adamo, Richard F.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  8. High Efficiency CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Editing in Primary Human T-cells Using Mutant Adenoviral E4orf6/E1b55k "Helper" Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, Kamila S; Grier, Alexandra E; Sahni, Jaya; Burleigh, Stephen M; Martin, Unja; Yang, Julia G; Popp, Nicholas A; Krutein, Michelle C; Khan, Iram F; Jacoby, Kyle; Jensen, Michael C; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2016-09-29

    Many future therapeutic applications of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 and related RNA-guided nucleases are likely to require their use to promote gene targeting, thus necessitating development of methods that provide for delivery of three components-Cas9, guide RNAs and recombination templates-to primary cells rendered proficient for homology-directed repair. Here, we demonstrate an electroporation/transduction codelivery method that utilizes mRNA to express both Cas9 and mutant adenoviral E4orf6 and E1b55k helper proteins in association with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing guide RNAs and recombination templates. By transiently enhancing target cell permissiveness to AAV transduction and gene editing efficiency, this novel approach promotes efficient gene disruption and/or gene targeting at multiple loci in primary human T-cells, illustrating its broad potential for application in translational gene editing.

  9. Intrapleural Adenoviral-mediated Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor Gene Transfer Suppresses the Progression of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Keshava, Shiva; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive thoracic cancer with a high mortality rate as it responds poorly to standard therapeutic interventions. Our recent studies showed that expression of endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) in MPM cells suppresses tumorigenicity. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanism by which EPCR suppresses MPM tumor growth and evaluate whether EPCR gene therapy could suppress the progression of MPM in a mouse model of MPM. Measurement of cytokines from the pleural lavage showed that mice implanted with MPM cells expressing EPCR had elevated levels of IFNγ and TNFα compared to mice implanted with MPM cells lacking EPCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that EPCR expression renders MPM cells highly susceptible to IFNγ + TNFα-induced apoptosis. Intrapleural injection of Ad.EPCR into mice with an established MPM originating from MPM cells lacking EPCR reduced the progression of tumor growth. Ad.EPCR treatment elicited recruitment of macrophages and NK cells into the tumor microenvironment and increased IFNγ and TNFα levels in the pleural space. Ad.EPCR treatment resulted in a marked increase in tumor cell apoptosis. In summary, our data show that EPCR expression in MPM cells promotes tumor cell apoptosis, and intrapleural EPCR gene therapy suppresses MPM progression. PMID:27833109

  10. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  11. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  12. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  13. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models.

  14. Efficacy of CD46-targeting chimeric Ad5/35 adenoviral gene therapy for colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se-Young; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Kwonseop; Lee, Keesook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hemmi, Silvio; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Min Soo; Jung, Chaeyong

    2016-01-01

    CD46 is a complement inhibitor membrane cofactor which also acts as a receptor for various microbes, including species B adenoviruses (Ads). While most Ad gene therapy vectors are derived from species C and infect cells through coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR expression is downregulated in many cancer cells, resulting inefficient Ad-based therapeutics. Despite a limited knowledge on the expression status of many cancer cells, an increasing number of cancer gene therapy studies include fiber-modified Ad vectors redirected to the more ubiquitously expressed CD46. Since our finding from tumor microarray indicate that CD46 was overexpressed in cancers of the prostate and colon, fiber chimeric Ad5/35 vectors that have infection tropism for CD46 were employed to demonstrate its efficacy in colorectal cancers (CRC). CD46-overexpressed cells showed a significantly higher response to Ad5/35-GFP and to Ad5/35-tk/GCV. While CRC cells express variable levels of CD46, CD46 expression was positively correlated with Ad5/35-mediated GFP fluorescence and accordingly its cell killing. Injection of Ad5/35-tk/GCV caused much greater tumor-suppression in mice bearing CD46-overexpressed cancer xenograft compared to mock group. Analysis of CRC samples revealed that patients with positive CD46 expression had a higher survival rate (p=0.031), carried tumors that were well-differentiated, but less invasive and metastatic, and with a low T stage (all p<0.05). Taken together, our study demonstrated that species B-based adenoviral gene therapy is a suitable approach for generally CD46-overexpressed CRC but would require careful consideration preceding CD46 analysis and categorizing CRC patients. PMID:27203670

  15. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  16. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation. PMID:27727248

  17. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  18. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  19. Clinical utility of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene therapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-xia; Zhang, Shu; He, Xiao-hua; Liu, Shi-yu; Ma, Chao; Zou, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised to be a highly effective antitumor treatment by introducing a tumor suppressor gene or the abrogation of an oncogene. Among the potential therapeutic transgenes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 serves as an attractive target. Restoration of wild-type p53 function in tumors can be achieved by introduction of an intact complementary deoxyribonucleic acid copy of the p53 gene using a suitable viral vector, in most cases an adenoviral vector (Adp53). Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that Adp53 triggers a dramatic tumor regression response in various cancers. These viruses are engineered to lack certain early proteins and are thus replication defective, including Gendicine, SCH-58500, and Advexin. Several types of tumor-specific p53-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus vectors (known as replication-competent CRAdp53 vectors) have been developed, such as ONYX 015, AdDelta24-p53, SG600-p53, OBP-702, and H101. Various clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the safety and efficiency of these adenoviral vectors. In this review we will talk about the biological mechanisms, clinical utility, and therapeutic potentials of the replication-deficient Adp53-based and replication-competent CRAdp53-based gene therapy. PMID:25364261

  20. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  1. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Cittadini, A; Monti, MG; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, PN; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the β-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) handling, oxygen consumption, and β-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca2+–force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6±0.2 versus 2.7±0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca2+ available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca2+–force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. β-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1 levels, and

  2. Comparison of high-capacity and first-generation adenoviral vector gene delivery to murine muscle in utero.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Wu, E; Zheng, H; Biermann, V; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2005-01-01

    In utero gene delivery could offer the advantage of treatment at an early stage for genetic disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in which the inevitable process of muscle degeneration is already initiated at birth. Furthermore, treatment of fetal muscle with adenoviral (Ad) vectors is attractive because of a high density of Ad receptors, easy vector accessibility due to immaturity of the basal lamina and the possibility of treating stem cells. Previously, we demonstrated the efficient transduction of fetal muscle by high-capacity Ad (HC-Ad) vectors. In this study, we compared HC-Ad and first-generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors for longevity of lacZ transgene expression, toxicity and induction of immunity after direct vector-mediated in utero gene delivery to fetal C57BL/6 mice muscle 16 days after conception (E-16). The total amount of beta-galactosidase (betagal) expressed from the HC-Ad vector remained stable for the 5 months of the study, although the concentration of betagal decreased due to muscle growth. Higher survival rates that reflect lower levels of toxicity were observed in those mice transduced with an HC-Ad vector as compared to an FG-Ad vector. The toxicity induced by FG-Ad vector gene delivery was dependent on mouse strain and vector dose. Animals treated with either HC-Ad and FG-Ad vectors developed non-neutralizing antibodies against Ad capsid and antibodies against betagal, but these antibodies did not cause loss of vector genomes from transduced muscle. In a mouse model of DMD, dystrophin gene transfer to muscle in utero using an HC-Ad vector restored the dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that long-term transgene expression can be achieved by HC-Ad vector-mediated gene delivery to fetal muscle, although strategies of vector integration may need to be considered to accommodate muscle growth.

  3. A Hybrid Adenoviral Vector System Achieves Efficient Long-Term Gene Expression in the Liver via piggyBac Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Feddersen, Charlotte R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Much research has gone into the development of hybrid gene delivery systems that combine the broad tropism and efficient transduction of adenoviral vectors with the ability to achieve stable expression of cargo genes. In addition to gene therapy applications, such a system has considerable advantages for studies of gene function in vivo, permitting fine-tuned genetic manipulation with higher throughput than can be achieved using standard transgenic and DNA targeting techniques. Existing strategies are limited, however, by low integration efficiencies, small cargo capacity, and/or a dependence on target cell division. The utility of this approach could be enhanced by a system that provides all of the following: (1) efficient delivery, (2) stable expression in a high percentage of target cells (whether mitotic or not), (3) large cargo capacity, (4) flexibility to use with a wide range of additional experimental conditions, and (5) simple experimental technique. Here we report the initial characterization of a hybrid system that meets these criteria by utilizing piggyBac (PB) transposition to achieve genomic integration from adenoviral vectors. We demonstrate stable expression of an adenovirus (Ad)-PB-delivered reporter gene in ∼20–40% of hepatocytes following standard tail vein injection. Its high efficiency and flexibility relative to existing hybrid adenoviral gene delivery approaches indicate a considerable potential utility of the Ad-PB system for therapeutic gene delivery and in vivo studies of gene function. PMID:25808258

  4. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  5. GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors for enhanced inhibition of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Liu, Zhongbing; Bian, Tierong; Li, Juan; Huang, Wenjun; Jing, Pei; Liu, Li; Wang, Yunlong; Zhong, Zhirong

    2015-12-30

    Gastric cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and its 5-year survival rate remains depressed in spite of multiple treatment options. Targeting drug delivery to tumor vasculature may be a promising strategy for gastric cancer therapy, for it can block the nutrition source of tumor and inhibit the metastasis and invasion in a certain extent. In present study, we have prepared the drug-targeting delivery system of peptide GX1-mediated anionic liposomes carrying adenoviral vectors (GX1-Ad5-AL), in which the tumor suppressor gene of PTEN was integrated into DNA of Ad5 and the GX1 peptide could play targeting role to vascular of gastric cancer. The inhibition ability of GX1-Ad5-AL to human gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was evaluated by MTT assay. Further, the cell migration assay was carried out in transwell inserts and the cells uptaking of GX1-Ad5-AL was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The experimental results indicated that the average cell proliferation inhibition rates resulted from the drug delivery system of GX1-Ad5-AL in SGC-7901 and HUVEC were 68.36% and 64.13%, respectively which were higher than that resulted from GX1 or Ad5-AL. Meanwhile, results of cell migration experiment demonstrated that GX1-Ad5-AL could significantly suppress the migration of gastric cancer cell of SGC-7901. Moreover, both the imaging from confocal laser scanning microscopy and the quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that, GX1-Ad5-AL was more easily uptaken by SGC-7901 cells, as compared to Ad5-AL. Therefore, the formulation of GX1-Ad5-AL was effective for enhancing the inhibition effect and suppressing the migration of gastric cancer vascular endothelial cells.

  6. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  7. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy.

  8. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  9. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  10. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  11. Adenoviral gene therapy of the Tay-Sachs disease in hexosaminidase A-deficient knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, J E; Mignon, A; Haase, G; Caillaud, C; McDonell, N; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1999-05-01

    The severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tays-Sachs disease, is caused by a beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency which prevents the formation of lysosomal heterodimeric alpha-beta enzyme, hexosaminidase A (HexA). No treatment is available for this fatal disease; however, gene therapy could represent a therapeutic approach. We previously have constructed and characterized, in vitro, adenoviral and retroviral vectors coding for alpha- and beta-subunits of the human beta-hexosaminidases. Here, we have determined the in vivo strategy which leads to the highest HexA activity in the maximum number of tissues in hexA -deficient knock-out mice. We demonstrated that intravenous co-administration of adenoviral vectors coding for both alpha- and beta-subunits, resulting in preferential liver transduction, was essential to obtain the most successful results. Only the supply of both subunits allowed for HexA overexpression leading to massive secretion of the enzyme in serum, and full or partial enzymatic activity restoration in all peripheral tissues tested. The enzymatic correction was likely to be due to direct cellular transduction by adenoviral vectors and/or uptake of secreted HexA by different organs. These results confirmed that the liver was the preferential target organ to deliver a large amount of secreted proteins. In addition, the need to overexpress both subunits of heterodimeric proteins in order to obtain a high level of secretion in animals defective in only one subunit is emphasized. The endogenous non-defective subunit is otherwise limiting.

  12. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  13. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  14. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  15. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  16. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  17. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  18. A novel single tetracycline-regulative adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax gene expression and cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Zhang, Lidong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Tongyu; Yin, Min; Xu, Kai; Ji, Lin; Roth, Jack A; Fang, Bingliang

    2002-07-18

    Using a binary adenoviral system, we recently showed that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter induces tumor-specific Bax gene expression. However, the strong cytotoxicity of Bax and other pro-apoptotic genes to packaging 293 cells has so far hindered construction of the desired single adenoviral vectors expressing toxic genes. We report here the construction of a single bicistronic adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax expression. The vector (Ad/gBax) utilizes the Tet-Off system and expresses a GFP/Bax fusion protein for easy detection. The hTERT promoter drives the expression of tTA, a transactivator capable of binding to TRE (tetracycline-responsive element) in the absence of tetracycline, which in turn induces expression of the GFP-Bax gene. The addition of tetracycline in 293 cells blocks the binding of tTA to TRE and substantially inhibits GFP-Bax expression and toxicity, thus allowing the packaging and production of Ad/gBax. Our data show that Ad/gBax could drive the high expression of GFP-Bax in tumor cells but not in normal cells and mouse tissues. Furthermore, the expression of GFP-Bax fusion protein elicited tumor-specific apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo at a level comparable to that induced by the binary system. Thus, Ad/gBax may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancers.

  19. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human Apo A-I for gene therapy in LDLR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Leggiero, E; Astone, D; Cerullo, V; Lombardo, B; Mazzaccara, C; Labruna, G; Sacchetti, L; Salvatore, F; Croyle, M; Pastore, L

    2013-12-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors have great potential for gene therapy applications; however, their administration induces acute toxicity that impairs safe clinical applications. We previously observed that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors strongly reduces the acute response in murine and primate models. To evaluate whether PEGylated HD-Ad vectors combine reduced toxicity with the correction of pathological phenotypes, we administered an HD-Ad vector expressing the human apolipoprotein A-I (hApoA-I) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice (a model for familial hypercholesterolemia) fed a high-cholesterol diet. Mice were treated with high doses of HD-Ad-expressing apo A-I or its PEGylated version. Twelve weeks later, LDL levels were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels higher in mice treated with either of the vectors than in untreated mice. After terminal killing, the areas of atherosclerotic plaques were much smaller in the vector-treated mice than in the control animals. Moreover, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was lower and consequently the toxicity profile better in mice treated with PEGylated vector than in mice treated with the unmodified vector. This finding indicates that the reduction in toxicity resulting from PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors does not impair the correction of pathological phenotypes. It also supports the clinical potential of these vectors for the correction of genetic diseases.

  20. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  1. Gene Therapy of Disseminated Breast Cancer Using Adenoviral Vectors Targeted Through Immunological Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    vectors encoding the firefly luciferase and 13-galactosidase reporter genes. In addition to these, an adenovirus vector encoding for the cytosine ... deaminase (CD) gene will be used to perform therapeutic studies. The CD enzyme converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a

  2. Highly efficient retinal gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Cao, Huibi; Wu, Jing; Duan, Rongqi; Hu, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the field of retinal gene therapy in the past several years. In particular, therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in three separate human clinical trials conducted to assess the ability of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) to treat of a type of Leber’s congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. However, despite the success of retinal gene therapy with AAV, challenges remain for delivering large therapeutic genes or genes requiring long DNA regulatory elements for controlling their expression. For example, Stargardt’s disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration, is caused by defects in ABCA4, a gene that is too large to be packaged in AAV. Therefore, we investigated the ability of helper dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad) to deliver genes to the retina as it has a much larger transgene capacity. Using an EGFP reporter, our results showed that HD-Ad can transduce the entire retinal epithelium of a mouse using a dose of only 1 × 105 infectious units and maintain transgene expression for at least 4 months. The results demonstrate that HD-Ad has the potential to be an effective vector for the gene therapy of the retina. PMID:26161435

  3. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  4. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-Il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. "adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein", "adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein" and "adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein". Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and effective gene

  5. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. “adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein”, “adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein” and “adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein”. Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and

  6. Retargeting of Gene Expression Using Endothelium Specific Hexon Modified Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Lu, Zhi Hong; Preuss, Meredith A.; Barnes, Justin A.; Stockard, Cecil R.; Grizzle, William E.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter were characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution. PMID:24210128

  7. Retargeting of gene expression using endothelium specific hexon modified adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, Sergey A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Hong Lu, Zhi; Preuss, Meredith A; Barnes, Justin A; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Curiel, David T

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors are well suited for gene therapy. However, tissue-selective transduction by systemically administered Ad5-based vectors is confounded by viral particle sequestration in the liver. Hexon-modified Ad5 expressing reporter gene under transcriptional control by the immediate/early cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the Roundabout 4 receptor (Robo4) enhancer/promoter was characterized by growth in cell culture, stability in vitro, gene transfer in the presence of human coagulation factor X, and biodistribution in mice. The obtained data demonstrate the utility of the Robo4 promoter in an Ad5 vector context. Substitution of the hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) of the Ad5 hexon with HVR7 from Ad serotype 3 resulted in decreased liver tropism and dramatically altered biodistribution of gene expression. The results of these studies suggest that the combination of liver detargeting using a genetic modification of hexon with an endothelium-specific transcriptional control element produces an additive effect in the improvement of Ad5 biodistribution.

  8. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Oka, K; Mullins, C E; Kushwaha, R S; Leen, A M; Chan, L

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/-) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high-cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery or by catheter-based intrahepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ⩽1.1 × 10(12) viral particles (vp) kg(-1) failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pre-treatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pre-treatment level on days 20-48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransferase remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upward on day 72 and returned to pre-treatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol-lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78 and 50% in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR

  9. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  10. Targeting adeno-associated virus and adenoviral gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Gang; Huang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Bu-Yun; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) heavily endangers human heath worldwide. HCC is one of most frequent cancers in China because patients with liver disease, such as chronic hepatitis, have the highest cancer susceptibility. Traditional therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy in advanced liver cancer, and novel strategies are urgently needed to improve the limited treatment options for HCC. This review summarizes the basic knowledge, current advances, and future challenges and prospects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and adenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy of HCC. This paper also reviews the clinical trials of gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, immunotherapy, toxicity and immunological barriers for AAV and adenoviruses, and proposes several alternative strategies to overcome the therapeutic barriers to using AAV and adenoviruses as vectors. PMID:26755879

  11. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases.

  12. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function.

  13. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  14. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Developing adenoviral vectors encoding therapeutic genes toxic to host cells: comparing binary and single-inducible vectors expressing truncated E2F-1.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Hao, Hongying; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, H Sam

    2010-02-20

    Adenoviral vectors are highly efficient at transferring genes into cells and are broadly used in cancer gene therapy. However, many therapeutic genes are toxic to vector host cells and thus inhibit vector production. The truncated form of E2F-1 (E2Ftr), which lacks the transactivation domain, can significantly induce cancer cell apoptosis, but is also toxic to HEK-293 cells and inhibits adenovirus replication. To overcome this, we have developed binary- and single-vector systems with a modified tetracycline-off inducible promoter to control E2Ftr expression. We compared several vectors and found that the structure of expression cassettes in vectors significantly affects E2Ftr expression. One construct expresses high levels of inducible E2Ftr and efficiently causes apoptotic cancer cell death by activation of caspase-3. The approach developed in this study may be applied in other viral vectors for encoding therapeutic genes that are toxic to their host cells and/or inhibit vector propagation.

  16. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  17. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  18. Autoregulated expression of p53 from an adenoviral vector confers superior tumor inhibition in a model of prostate carcinoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo Esaki; da Silva Soares, Rafael Bento; Costanzi-Strauss, Eugenia; Strauss, Bryan E

    2016-12-01

    Alternative treatments for cancer using gene therapy approaches have shown promising results and some have even reached the marketplace. Even so, additional improvements are needed, such as employing a strategically chosen promoter to drive expression of the transgene in the target cell. Previously, we described viral vectors where high-level transgene expression was achieved using a p53-responsive promoter. Here we present an adenoviral vector (AdPGp53) where p53 is employed to regulate its own expression and which outperforms a traditional vector when tested in a model of gene therapy for prostate cancer. The functionality of AdPGp53 and AdCMVp53 were compared in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. AdPGp53 conferred greatly enhanced levels of p53 protein and induction of the p53 target gene, p21, as well as superior cell killing by a mechanism consistent with apoptosis. DU145 cells were susceptible to induction of death with AdPGp53, yet PC3 cells were quite resistant. Though AdCMVp53 was shown to be reliable, extremely high-level expression of p53 offered by AdPGp53 was necessary for tumor suppressor activity in PC3 and DU145. In situ gene therapy experiments revealed tumor inhibition and increased overall survival in response to AdPGp53, but not AdCMVp53. Upon histologic examination, only AdPGp53 treatment was correlated with the detection of both p53 and TUNEL-positive cells. This study points to the importance of improved vector performance for gene therapy of prostate cancer.

  19. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Introgen's adenoviral p53 gene therapy [INGN 201, ADVEXIN] is in clinical development for the treatment of various cancers. The p53 tumour suppressor gene is deleted or mutated in many tumour cells and is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human tumours. INGN 201 has been shown to kill cancer cells directly. In August 2002, Introgen announced plans to file an application for INGN 201 with the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of head and neck cancer; the European filing will be submitted simultaneously with the previously scheduled (planned for 2004) submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) for ADVEXIN to the US FDA. On 20 February 2003, INGN 201 received orphan drug designation from the US FDA for head and neck cancer. INGN 201 is available for licensing although Introgen favours retaining partial or full rights to the therapy in the US. Introgen Therapeutics and its collaborative partner for the p53 programme, Aventis Gencell, have been developing p53 gene therapy products. The agreement was originally signed by Rhône-Poulenc Rorer's Gencell division, which became Aventis Gencell after Rhône-Poulenc Rorer merged with Hoechst Marion Roussel to form Aventis Pharma. According to the original agreement, Introgen was responsible for phase I and preclinical development in North America, while Aventis Gencell was responsible for clinical trials conducted in Europe and for clinical trials in North America beyond phase I. In April 2001, Aventis Gencell and Introgen restructured their existing collaboration agreement for p53 gene therapy products. Aventis Gencell indicated that p53 research had suffered from internal competition for resources and was pulling back from its development agreement with Introgen for p53 gene therapy products. Introgen will assume responsibility for worldwide development of all p53 programmes and will obtain exclusive worldwide commercial rights to p53-based gene therapy

  20. Differential Contribution of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep Protein Expression and Nucleic Acid Elements to Inhibition of Adenoviral Replication in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Heilbronn, Regine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) exhibits complex interactions with its helper adenovirus. Whereas AAV-2 is dependent on adenoviral functions for productive replication, it conversely inhibits adenoviral replication, both when its genome is present in trans after coinfection with both viruses and when it is present in cis, as in the production of recombinant adenovirus (rAd)/AAV-2 hybrid vectors. The notion that AAV-mediated inhibition of adenoviral replication is due predominantly to the expression of the AAV-2 Rep proteins was recently challenged by successful Rep78 expression in a rAd5 vector through recoding of the Rep open reading frame (ORF). We closely analyzed the relative contributions of AAV-2 nucleic acid elements and Rep protein expression to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in both of the above scenarios. When present in cis, a sequence element in the 3′ part of the rep gene, comprising only the AAV-2 p40 promoter and the AAV-2 intron sequence, which we termed the RIS-Ad, completely blocks adenoviral replication. p5/p19 promoter-driven Rep protein expression, on the other hand, only weakly inhibits rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation, and by inactivation of the RIS-Ad, it is feasible to generate first-generation rAd vectors expressing functional Rep proteins. The RIS-Ad plays no role in the inhibition of adenoviral replication in trans in a model closely mimicking AAV-2–Ad coinfection. In this case, expression of the Rep proteins is required, as well as the presence of an amplifiable inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-containing template. Thus, very different AAV-2 elements and mechanisms are involved in inhibition of adenoviral replication during rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation and after Ad-AAV coinfection. IMPORTANCE This is the first study to systematically compare the contributions of AAV-2 protein expression and AAV-2 nucleic acid elements to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in rAd/AAV-2 hybrid vector

  1. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  2. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  3. Cytotoxic effect of a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector with cytosine deaminase gene driven by L-plastin promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihwa; Kim, Sunja; Lee, Kyumhyang; Kim, Changmin; Chung, Injae

    2007-06-01

    Great expectations are set on gene therapy for the treatment of malignant hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in East Asia. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (AV) have been developed in which the L-plastin promoter (LP) regulates the expression of transgenes, in a tumor cell specific manner, resulting in an increase in the therapeutic index. The development of the AdLPCD vector, a replication-incompetent AV, containing a transcription unit of LP and E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD), was reported in our previous work. In the present study, the AdLPCD vector combined with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) administration was tested to see if it might have significant utility in the chemosensitization of L-plastin positive HCC. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Chang Liver, Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells) were investigated for the expression of LacZ after infecting the cells with the AdLPLacZ vector containing a 2.4 kb fragment of LP and the LacZ gene. Relatively high levels of LP activity were detected in HepG2, followed by Chang Liver cells; whereas, no promoter activity was found in Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells, as determined by AdLPLacZ infection followed by the beta-galactosidase assay. In addition, the results of RT-PCR assays for the detection of endogenous L-plastin mRNA in these cells lines correlated well with those of the beta-galactosidase activity after infection with AdLPLacZ. Based on these data, the cytotoxic effect of AdLPCD/5-FC was evaluated in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that the CD gene delivered by AV could sensitize HepG2 cells to the prodrug, 5-FC. However, the observed effects were insufficient to cause the death of most of cells. This suggests that the screening of patients for an AdLP/5-FC strategy based on AdLPLacZ data might not always guarantee a good therapeutic outcome.

  4. Enhanced adenoviral gene delivery to motor and dorsal root ganglion neurons following injection into demyelinated peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zheng, Yiyan; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Hu, Xiaoling; Yu, Panpan; Burke, Darlene A; Wang, Heming; Jun, Cai; Byers, Jonathan; Whittemore, Scott R; Shields, Christopher B

    2010-08-15

    Injection of viral vectors into peripheral nerves may transfer specific genes into their dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and motoneurons. However, myelin sheaths of peripheral axons block the entry of viral particles into nerves. We studied whether mild, transient peripheral nerve demyelination prior to intraneural viral vector injection would enhance gene transfer to target DRG neurons and motoneurons. The right sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 mice was focally demyelinated with 1% lysolecithin, and the left sciatic nerve was similarly injected with saline (control). Five days after demyelination, 0.5 microl of Ad5-GFP was injected into both sciatic nerves at the site of previous injection. The effectiveness of gene transfer was evaluated by counting GFP(+) neurons in the DRGs and ventral horns. After peripheral nerve demyelination, there was a fivefold increase in the number of infected DRG neurons and almost a 15-fold increase in the number of infected motoneurons compared with the control, nondemyelinated side. Focal demyelination reduced the myelin sheath barrier, allowing greater virus-axon contact. Increased CXADR expression on the demyelinated axons facilitated axoplasmic viral entry. No animals sustained any prolonged neurological deficits. Increased gene delivery into DRG neurons and motoneurons may provide effective treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pain, and spinal cord injury.

  5. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  6. Specific transcription of an adenoviral gene that possesses no TATA sequence homology in extracts of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Leong, K; Flint, S J

    1984-09-25

    Transcription of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) IVa2 gene, which contains no TATA-like sequence in the region immediately upstream of the IVa2 cap sites (Baker, C. C., and Ziff, E. B. (1981) J. Mol. Biol. 149, 189-221), has been examined in extracts of HeLa cells (Manley, J. L., Fire, A., Cano, A., Sharp, P. A., and Gefter, M.L. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 3855-3859). Run-off transcripts of the predicted length of those initiated at the IVa2 cap sites were synthesized from different Ad2 DNA templates, each of which also contained the major late transcriptional control region. Mapping of the 5' ends of the RNA made from one template by a nuclease protection assay established the fidelity of initiation of IVa2 transcription in vitro. The efficiency of IVa2 expression in whole HeLa extracts was influenced quite dramatically by monovalent and divalent metal ion concentrations and the concentration of extract protein present in the reaction mixture. Under certain conditions, IVa2 run-off transcripts were made almost as efficiently as those from the Ad2 major late transcriptional control region. However, conditions promoting optimal IVa2 transcription in vitro did not favor recognition of the major late transcriptional control region, and vice versa: the synthesis of IVa2 and major late run-off transcripts responded differently to all parameters tested.

  7. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  8. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are superior in vitro to first-generation vectors for endothelial cell-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua M; Tang, Chongren; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David A

    2010-12-01

    Arterial endothelial cells (EC) are attractive targets for gene therapy of atherosclerosis because they are accessible to hematogenous and catheter-based vector delivery and overlie atherosclerotic plaques. Vector-mediated expression-in EC-of proteins that mediate cholesterol transfer out of the artery wall and decrease inflammation could prevent and reverse atherosclerosis. However, clinical application of this strategy is limited by lack of a suitable gene-transfer vector. First-generation adenovirus (FGAd) is useful for EC gene transfer in proof-of-concept studies, but is unsuitable for atheroprotective human gene therapy because of limited duration of expression and proinflammatory effects. Moreover, others have reported detrimental effects of FGAd on critical aspects of EC physiology including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) either alone or expressing an atheroprotective gene [apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)] could circumvent these limitations. In contrast to control FGAd, HDAd did not alter any of several critical EC physiologic functions (including proliferation, migration, apoptosis, metabolic activity, and nitric oxide (NO) production) and did not stimulate proinflammatory pathways [including expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Expression of apoA-I by HDAd reduced EC VCAM-1 expression. HDAd is a promising vector and apoA-I is a promising gene for atheroprotective human gene therapy delivered via EC.

  9. Induction of Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Mouse Model following Gene Fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan Virus Gn and S0.7 in an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Li, Puyuan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV) glycoprotein (GP) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359–610 aa, HSP70C) to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1–274-S0.7). C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7) and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV. PMID:24505421

  10. Emerging adenoviral vectors for stable correction of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jager, Lorenz; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2007-08-01

    Recent drawbacks in treating patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders with retroviral vectors underline the importance of generating novel tools for stable transduction of mammalian cells. Substantial progress has been made over the recent years which may offer important steps towards stable and more importantly safer correction of genetic diseases. This article discusses recent advances for stable transduction of target cells based on adenoviral gene transfer. There is accumulating evidence that recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) based on various human serotypes with a broad cellular tropism and adenoviruses (Ads) from different species will play an important role in future gene therapy applications. In combination with recombinant AdVs for somatic integration these gene transfer vectors offer high transduction efficiencies with potentially safer integration patterns. Other approaches for persistent transgene expression include excision of stable episomes from the adenoviral vector genome, but also long-term persistence of the complete adenoviral vector genome as an episomal DNA molecule was demonstrated and exemplified by the treatment of various genetic diseases in small and large animal models. This review displays advantages but also limitations of these Ad based vector systems. This is the perfect time to pursue such approaches because alternative strategies for stable transduction of mammalian cells undergoing many cell divisions are urgently needed. Looking into the future, we believe that a combination of different components from different viral vectors in concert with non-viral vector systems will be successful in designing significantly optimized transfer vehicles for a broad range of different genetic diseases.

  11. Healing after death: antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Fueyo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We recently evaluated the capacity of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus to trigger an antitumor immune response in a syngeneic mouse glioma model. This virotherapy elicited immunity against both tumor-associated antigens and viral antigens. An immunogenic cell death accompanied by pathogen- or damage- associated patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) induced by the virus may be responsible for the adenoviral-mediated antitumor effect. PMID:25954598

  12. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids.

  13. Isoform-Specific Modulation of Inflammation Induced by Adenoviral Mediated Delivery of Platelet-Derived Growth Factors in the Adult Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in vertebrate development. To what extent PDGFs also exert beneficial homeostatic or reparative roles in adult organs, as opposed to adverse fibrogenic responses in pathology, are unclear. PDGF signaling plays critical roles during heart development, during which forced overexpression of PDGFs induces detrimental cardiac fibrosis; other studies have implicated PDGF signaling in post-infarct myocardial repair. Different PDGFs may exert different effects mediated through the two PDGF receptors (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) in different cell types. Here, we assessed responses induced by five known PDGF isoforms in the adult mouse heart in the context of adenovirus vector-mediated inflammation. Our results show that different PDGFs have different, in some cases even opposing, effects. Strikingly, whereas the major PDGFRα agonists (PDGF-A and -C) decreased the amount of scar tissue and increased the numbers of PDGFRα-positive fibroblasts, PDGFRβ agonists either induced large scars with extensive inflammation (PDGF-B) or dampened the adenovirus-induced inflammation and produced a small and dense scar (PDGF-D). These results provide evidence for PDGF isoform-specific inflammation-modulating functions that may have therapeutic implications. They also illustrate a surprising complexity in the PDGF-mediated pathophysiological responses. PMID:27513343

  14. Gene transfer mediated by alpha2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H; Huse, K; Birkenmeier, G; Otto, A; Scholz, G H

    1996-01-01

    alpha2-Macroglobulin covalently linked to poly(L)-lysine can be used as a vehicle for receptor-mediated gene transfer. This modified alpha2-macroglobulin maintains its ability to bind to the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor, and was shown to introduce a luciferase reporter gene plasmid into HepG2 human hepatoma cells in vitro. The alpha2-macroglobulin receptor is a very large and multifunctional cell surface receptor, whose rapid and efficient internalization rate makes it attractive for gene therapy, e.g. for hepatic gene targeting via injection into the portal vein. PMID:8871570

  15. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:23127366

  16. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  17. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julius W.; Kane, J. Robert; Young, Jacob S.; Chang, Alan L.; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as “GliomaFF.” We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy. PMID:26058317

  18. Recovery of radiation-induced dry eye and corneal damage by pretreatment with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of erythropoietin to the salivary glands in mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cotrim, Ana P; Zheng, Changyu; Riveros, Paola Perez; Baum, Bruce J; Chiorini, John A

    2013-04-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation (RTx) causes dry eye syndrome (DES), dry mouth, and as in other sicca syndromes, they are incurable. The aims of this work are as follows: (a) to evaluate a mouse model of DES induced by clinically relevant doses of radiation, and (b) to evaluate the protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo) in preventing DES. C3H female mice were subjected to five sessions of RTx, with or without pre-RTx retroductal administration of the AdLTR2EF1a-hEPO (AdEpo) vector in the salivary glands (SG), and compared with naïve controls at Day 10 (10d) (8 Gy fractions) and 56 days (56d) (6 Gy fractions) after RTx treatment. Mice were tested for changes in lacrimal glands (LG), tear secretion (phenol red thread), weight, hematocrit (Hct), and markers of inflammation, as well as microvessels and oxidative damage. Tear secretion was reduced in both RTx groups, compared to controls, by 10d. This was also seen at 56d in RTx but not AdEpo+RTx group. Hct was significantly higher in all AdEpo+RTx mice at 10d and 56d. Corneal epithelium was significantly thinner at 10d in the RTx group compared with AdEpo+RTx or the control mice. There was a significant reduction at 10d in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 in LG in the RTx group that was prevented in the AdEpo+RTx group. In conclusion, RTx is able to induce DES in mice. AdEpo administration protected corneal epithelia and resulted in some recovery of LG function, supporting the value of further studies using gene therapy for extraglandular diseases.

  19. [Deletion of IV a2 gene from adenoviral genome by lambda-Red recombinase system and packaging of the recombinant adenovirus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Fan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Liu, Xue-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Ruan, Li

    2011-05-01

    This investigation is to delete the most of the coding sequence (1104 bp) of the IV a2 gene in an adenovirus genome by a lambda-Red recombinase system-mediated PCR-targeting approach and rescue a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion. First, the template pAK of PCR targeting, containing kanamycin cassette, was constructed. Then, a linear fragment for PCR targeting, which had 39 bp homologous arms at both of its terminus, was amplified by PCR from the pAK. The pFG140 and the linear fragment were electroporated into E. coli BW25113/pIJ790 sequentially and the recombinant pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) was established by homologous recombination between the linear fragment and the pFG140 with aid of X-Red recombinase. The precise deletion of 1 104 bp fragment from IV a2 was confirmed by restriction endonucleases digestion and DNA sequencing. ORF of IV a2 was amplified by PCR from pFG140 and then cloned into the pAAV2neo vector. The recombinant adenovirus Ad5delta IV a2 (1104) was rescued by co-transfection of pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) and pAAV2neo-IV a2 into HEK293 cells. It was shown by Western Blot that IV a2 could not be detected in the Ad5deltaIV a2 (1104)- infected HEK293 cells. This study established a PCR-targeting strategy for manipulating adenovirus genome directly by a lambda-Red recombinase system, and a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion was obtained.

  20. Chapter five--The development of transcription-regulated adenoviral vectors with high cancer-selective imaging capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Sato, Makoto; Wu, Lily

    2012-01-01

    A clear benefit of molecular imaging is to enable noninvasive, repetitive monitoring of intrinsic signals within tumor cells as a means to identify the lesions as malignant or to assess the ability of treatment to perturb key pathways within the tumor cells. Due to the promising utility of molecular imaging in oncology, preclinical research to refine molecular imaging techniques in small animals is a blossoming field. We will first discuss the several imaging modalities such as fluorescent imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography that are now commonly used in small animal settings. The indirect imaging approach, which can be adapted to a wide range of imaging reporter genes, is a useful platform to develop molecular imaging. In particular, reporter gene-based imaging is well suited for transcriptional-targeted imaging that can be delivered by recombinant adenoviral vectors. In this review, we will summarize transcription-regulated strategies used in adenoviral-mediated molecular imaging to visualize metastasis and monitor oncolytic therapy in preclinical models.

  1. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-17

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  2. Aminoclay as a highly effective cationic vehicle for enhancing adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through nanobiohybrid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic complexation of adenovirus (Ad) with cationic lipids or polymers has been shown to be an effective means for overcoming the limitations of adenoviral vectors and enhancing gene-transfer efficacy. However, such complexation causes cytotoxicity, limiting the use of this strategy. The present study explored the potential of 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) as a cationic vehicle for improving Ad-mediated gene transfer without inducing cytotoxicity. Aminoclay complexation produced a dose-dependent increase in Ad-mediated transgene expression in both Ad infection-sensitive and -refractory cells, thereby greatly lowering the Ad dose required for transgene expression. Unlike the case for cationic lipids (Lipofectamine) or polymers (Polybrene), the enhancement effect of aminoclay was not accompanied by significant cytotoxicity regardless of cell lines and it was not observed for nonviral plasmid vectors. Physical characterization studies revealed that nanobiohybrid complexes formed between aminoclay and Ad particles through electrostatic interactions, creating aggregates of Ad particles whose surface was shielded with aminoclay nanosheet oligomers. It appears that aminoclay complexation changes the surface charge of Ad particles from a negative to a highly positive value and thus increases Ad binding to cellular membranes, thereby providing an additional cellular entry mechanism, namely caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Aminoclay-Ad nanobiohybrids may serve as a next-generation efficient, versatile and biocompatible gene-delivery carrier.

  3. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  4. Factors involved in the maturation of murine dendritic cells transduced with adenoviral vector variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Naoko; Koretomo, Ryosuke; Murakami, Sayaka |; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki |; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Fujita, Takuya |; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Naoki |

    2008-05-10

    Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is an attractive method for manipulating the immunostimulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immunotherapy. DCs treated with Ad have phenotype alterations (maturation) that facilitate T cell sensitization. We investigated the mechanisms of DC maturation with Ad transduction. Expression levels of a maturation marker (CD40) on DCs treated with conventional Ad, fiber-modified Ads (AdRGD, AdF35, AdF35{delta}RGD), or a different serotype Ad (Ad35) were correlated with their transduction efficacy. The {alpha}{sub v}-integrin directional Ad, AdRGD, exhibited the most potent ability to enhance both foreign gene expression and CD40 expression, and induced secretion of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and interferon-{alpha} in DCs. The presence of a foreign gene expression cassette in AdRGD was not necessary for DC maturation. Maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD was suppressed by destruction of the Ad genome, inhibition of endocytosis, or endosome acidification, whereas proteasome inhibition increased CD40 expression levels on DCs. Moreover, inhibition of {alpha}{sub v}-integrin signal transduction and blockade of cytokine secretion affected the maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD only slightly or not at all, respectively. Thus, our data provide evidence that Ad-induced DC maturation is due to Ad invasion of the DCs, followed by nuclear transport of the Ad genome, and not to the expression of foreign genes.

  5. Aptamer-mediated cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Qiao, Greg; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Yong; Wei, Ming Q; Qiao, Liang; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Zhu, Yimin; Zheng, Conglong; Pu, Chunwen; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer as a genetic disorder is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional anticancer options such as chemo- and/or radio-therapy have their own drawbacks and could not provide a cure in most cases at present. More effective therapeutic strategies with less side effects are urgently needed. Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single strand DNA or RNA molecules that can bind to their target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Such site-specific binding ability of aptamers facilitates the delivery and interaction of exogenous nucleic acids with diseased genes. Thus, aptamer-guided gene therapy has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy in addition to the classic treatment regimen. Aptamers can directly deliver anti-cancer nucleic acids, e.g. small interfering RNA, micro RNA, antimicroRNA and small hairpin RNA, to cancer cells or function as a targeting ligand to guide nanoparticles containing therapeutic nucleic acids. This review focuses on recent progress in aptamer-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other types of cancers, shedding light on the potential of this novel approach of targeted cancer gene therapy.

  6. Temozolomide does not impair gene therapy-mediated antitumor immunity in syngeneic brain tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Wibowo, Mia; Ahlzadeh, Gabrielle E; Puntel, Mariana; Ghiasi, Homayon; Kamran, Neha; Paran, Christopher; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain cancer in adults. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly prolongs the survival of GBM patients. However, the 3-year survival is still ~5%. Herein we combined intratumoral administration of an adenoviral vector expressing Flt3L (Ad-Flt3L) with systemic TMZ in order to assess its impact on therapeutic efficacy. Experimental Design Wild type or immunodeficient mice bearing intracranial GBM or metastatic melanoma were treated with an intratumoral injection of Ad-Flt3L alone or in combination with the conditionally cytotoxic enzyme thymidine kinase (Ad-TK), followed by systemic administration of ganciclovir and TMZ. We monitored survival and measured the tumor-infiltrating immune cells. Results While treatment with TMZ alone led to a small improvement in median survival, when used in combination with gene therapy-mediated immunotherapy it significantly increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice. The anti-tumor effect was further enhanced by concomitant intratumoral administration of Ad-TK, leading to 50–70% long-term survival in all tumor models. Although TMZ reduced the content of T cells in the tumor, this did not affect the therapeutic efficacy. The anti-tumor effect of Ad-Flt3L+Ad-TK+TMZ required an intact immune system, since the treatment failed when administered to KO mice that lacked lymphocytes or dendritic cells. Conclusions Our results challenge the notion that chemotherapy leads to a state of immune-suppression which impairs the ability of the immune system to mount an effective anti-tumor response. Our work indicates that TMZ does not inhibit antitumor immunity and supports its clinical implementation in combination with immune-mediated therapies. PMID:24501391

  7. Adenoviral transduction of enterocytes and M-cells using in vitro models based on Caco-2 cells: the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates both apical and basolateral transduction.

    PubMed

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Fleisher, David; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-06-07

    Understanding virus-cell interaction is a key to the design of successful gene delivery vectors. In the present study we investigated Ad5 transduction of enterocytes and M-cells utilizing differentiated Caco-2 cells and cocultures of Caco-2 cells with lymphocytes. Transduction inhibition studies showed that CAR is the major receptor mediating apical and basolateral virus entry in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Integrins and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans do not appear to play a significant role. Immunofluorescence localized CAR to sites of cell-cell contact, with staining mostly observed on the cell perimeter. Staining was observed even in nonpermeabilized monolayers, suggesting apical accessibility of the receptor. Cocultures with mouse Peyer's patch lymphocytes or Raji B human lymphocytes were more susceptible to transduction than Caco-2 cells, and the effects were dose-dependent. Similar to Caco-2 cells, CAR and not integrins mediated apical transduction. In conclusion, contrary to other epithelial cell lines, both apical and basolateral transduction of absorptive enterocytes and M-cells is mediated by binding to CAR. The coculture system can be used to study the interactions between M-cells and gene delivery vectors.

  8. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  9. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  10. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  11. Transduction of Brain Dopamine Neurons by Adenoviral Vectors Is Modulated by CAR Expression: Rationale for Tropism Modified Vectors in PD Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Travis B.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Glandon, Anya M.; Curiel, David T.; Standaert, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad) vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)–based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN) in wild type (wt) and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the development

  12. Plant transformation via pollen tube-mediated gene transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic transformation using foreign genes and the subsequent development of transgenic plants has been employed to develop enhanced elite germplasm. Although some skepticism exits regarding pollen tube-mediated gene transfer (PTT), reports demonstrating improved transformation efficiency with PTT ...

  13. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  14. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  15. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  16. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  17. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+) T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  18. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    The overall goal of our research is to develop an immunological approach for breast cancer gene therapy . The results of the first year study...described in our previous Annual Report, show that gene gun-mediated Th-12 gene therapy is effective against breast tumors in mouse models. During the second...effect of IL-l2 gene therapy against 4T1 tumor is not mediated by T cells, but rather involves NK cells. From several different immunomodulatory genes

  19. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    The results of this study show that particle-mediated IL-12 gene therapy was effective against mammary tumors in mouse models. IL-12 gene therapy of...combination with IL-12 gene therapy , IL-18 and ICE genes were found to be more effective in treatment of established TS/A mammary tumor than IL-12 alone. These...results suggest that particle-mediated IL-12 gene therapy , alone or in combination with other immunological approaches, may be effective for

  20. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells with adenoviral vectors: differences of infectability between lines and correlation of infectability with expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Brokhman, Irina; Pomp, Oz; Fishman, Lital; Tennenbaum, Tamar; Amit, Michal; Itzkovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    Adenovirus is an efficient vector for expression of transgenes in dividing and nondividing cells. However, very few studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have utilized adenoviral vectors. We examine here the ability of adenovirus to infect naive hESCs and the differentiated derivatives of multiple hESC lines. We found a striking variation in adenovirus infection rates between lines. The variability in infection rates was positively correlated with the expression of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, but not that of alpha(nu)-integrin. Adenoviral infection did not interfere with the expression of pluripotency markers, even after passaging. In addition, infection did not affect differentiation of hESC-derived neural precursors in vitro. We also found that green fluorescent protein expression mediated by adenovirus can be a useful marker for tracking hESC in xenografts. We conclude that adenovirus is a practical vector for genetic modification of naive hESC from most, but not all lines, but may be more generally useful for gene transfer into differentiated derivatives of hESC lines.

  1. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  2. Using a Commercial Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Viral-Mediated Gene Transfer In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Candace M.; Forsberg, Flemming; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A.; Minimo, Corrado; Claudio, Pier P.

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of site-specific gene delivery mediated by diagnostic ultrasound using genes encapsulated in commercially available ultrasound contrast agents in vitro and in vivo. Five different commercially available contrast agents were tested in vitro for their ability to enclose an adenoviral vector carrying GFP. Prostate cancer cells (DU 145) or non small cell lung cancer cells (H23) were plated in 80 culture wells and insonified at 207 or 535 kPa peak negative pressure for 1 min after administration of 0.1 ml of bubbles reconstituted with the viral vector. Experiments were repeated with the delivery vehicle incubated with complement to inactivate unenclosed Adeno-GFP and with controls. After 24 hours transduction efficiency was demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy. In vivo 15 nude mice with 21 melanoma tumors (DB-1) implanted received 0.1 ml injections of contrast. Mice were split into 3 control and 4 active groups and ultrasound was performed for 4 min at 4 MHz using an Aplio scanner (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Tumors, heart, lungs and liver were harvested 48 hours later. Specimens underwent regular and fluorescent microscopy and were stained using an antibody against GFP. In vitro all contrast agents produced more fluorescence at 207 kPa than at 535 kPa. However, only Imagent (IMCOR Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) was able to induce marked gene transduction with the inactivating agent. In vivo systemic delivery of Adeno-GFP carrying microbubbles following pre-treatment with the inactivating agent resulted in specific transduction of the tumor cells only with no uptake in heart, lungs or liver (unlike the controls). In conclusion, specific viral gene transduction has been obtained in vitro and in vivo through the use of ultrasound and Imagent microbubbles as delivery vehicles.

  3. Circumventing Antivector Immunity: Potential Use of Nonhuman Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Podgorski, Iva I.; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles. PMID:24499174

  4. Circumventing antivector immunity: potential use of nonhuman adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Podgorski, Iva I; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles.

  5. Correction of chromosomal mutation and random integration in embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Fumi; Balamotis, Michael A; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Aizawa, Emi; Diaz, Arturo; Hasty, Paul; Graham, Frank L; Caskey, C Thomas; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2005-09-20

    For gene therapy of inherited diseases, targeted integration/gene repair through homologous recombination (HR) between exogenous and chromosomal DNA would be an ideal strategy to avoid potentially serious problems of random integration such as cellular transformation and gene silencing. Efficient sequence-specific modification of chromosomes by HR would also advance both biological studies and therapeutic applications of a variety of stem cells. Toward these goals, we developed an improved strategy of adenoviral vector (AdV)-mediated HR and examined its ability to correct an insertional mutation in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) locus in male mouse ES cells. The efficiency of HR was compared between four types of AdVs that contained various lengths of homologies at the Hprt locus and with various multiplicities of infections. The frequency of HR with helper-dependent AdVs (HD AdVs) with an 18.6-kb homology reached 0.2% per transduced cell at a multiplicity of infection of 10 genomes per cell. Detection of random integration at DNA levels by PCR revealed extremely high efficiency of 5% per cell. We also isolated and characterized chromosomal sites where HD AdVs integrated in a random manner. In contrast to retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, which tend to integrate into genes, the integration sites of AdV was distributed randomly inside and outside genes. These findings suggest that HR mediated by HD AdVs is efficient and relatively safe and might be a new viable option for ex vivo gene therapy as well as a tool for chromosomal manipulation of a variety of stem cells.

  6. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  7. Recruitment of Histone Methyltransferase G9a Mediates Transcriptional Repression of Fgf21 Gene by E4BP4 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Buelow, Katie; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Brady, Hugh J. M.; Yin, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to fasting-refeeding cycles by reprogramming expression of metabolic genes. Fasting potently induces one of the key hepatic hormones, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), to promote lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis, whereas refeeding suppresses its expression. We previously reported that the basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (E4 binding protein 4) represses Fgf21 expression and disrupts its circadian oscillations in cultured hepatocytes. However, the epigenetic mechanism for E4BP4-dependent suppression of Fgf21 has not yet been addressed. Here we present evidence that histone methyltransferase G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent repression of Fgf21 during refeeding by promoting repressive histone modification. We find that Fgf21 expression is up-regulated in E4bp4 knock-out mouse liver. We demonstrate that the G9a-specific inhibitor BIX01294 abolishes suppression of the Fgf21 promoter activity by E4BP4, whereas overexpression of E4bp4 leads to increased levels of dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) around the Fgf21 promoter region. Furthermore, we also show that E4BP4 interacts with G9a, and knockdown of G9a blocks repression of Fgf21 promoter activity and expression in cells overexpressing E4bp4. A G9a mutant lacking catalytic activity, due to deletion of the SET domain, fails to inhibit the Fgf21 promoter activity. Importantly, acute hepatic knockdown by adenoviral shRNA targeting G9a abolishes Fgf21 repression by refeeding, concomitant with decreased levels of H3K9me2 around the Fgf21 promoter region. In summary, we show that G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent suppression of hepatic Fgf21 by enhancing histone methylation (H3K9me2) of the Fgf21 promoter. PMID:23283977

  8. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  9. Gene repair and transposon-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul D; Augustin, Lance B; Kren, Betsy T; Steer, Clifford J

    2002-01-01

    The main strategy of gene therapy has traditionally been focused on gene augmentation. This approach typically involves the introduction of an expression system designed to express a specific protein in the transfected cell. Both the basic and clinical sciences have generated enough information to suggest that gene therapy would eventually alter the fundamental practice of modern medicine. However, despite progress in the field, widespread clinical applications and success have not been achieved. The myriad deficiencies associated with gene augmentation have resulted in the development of alternative approaches to treat inherited and acquired genetic disorders. One, derived primarily from the pioneering work of homologous recombination, is gene repair. Simply stated, the process involves targeting the mutation in situ for gene correction and a return to normal gene function. Site-specific genetic repair has many advantages over augmentation although it too is associated with significant limitations. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of gene correction. In particular, we discuss technologies based on chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides, single-stranded and triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and small fragment homologous replacement. While each of these approaches is different, they all share a number of common characteristics, including the need for efficient delivery of nucleic acids to the nucleus. In addition, we review the potential application of a novel and exciting nonviral gene augmentation strategy--the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

  10. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    gene therapy . The results of the first year study, described in our previous Annual Report, show that gene gun-mediated IL-12 gene therapy is effective against breast tumors in mouse models. During the second year of this study we demonstrated that 4T1 tumor is weakly immunogenic, and it can induce a low level immune response. However, the anti-metastatic effect of IL-12 gene therapy against 4T1 tumor is not mediated by T cells, but rather involves NK cells. From several different immunomidulatory genes tested in combination with

  11. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  12. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  13. GENE THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF PITUITARY TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Silvia S.; Castro, Maria G.; Brown, Oscar A.; Goya, Rodolfo G.; Console, Gloria M.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology in humans. Current therapies include surgery, radiotherapy and pharmacological approaches. Although useful, none of them offers a permanent cure. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental adenomas with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. Although the efficiency and safety of current viral vectors must be optimized before clinical use, they remain as highly promising therapeutic tools. PMID:20186255

  14. Polycomb-Mediated Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Sung, Sibum

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are conserved chromatin regulators involved in the control of key developmental programs in eukaryotes. They collectively provide the transcriptional memory unique to each cell identity by maintaining transcriptional states of developmental genes. PcG proteins form multi-protein complexes, known as Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). PRC1 and PRC2 contribute to the stable gene silencing in part through catalyzing covalent histone modifications. Components of PRC1 and PRC2 are well conserved from plants to animals. PcG-mediated gene silencing has been extensively investigated in efforts to understand molecular mechanisms underlying developmental programs in eukaryotes. Here, we describe our current knowledge on PcG-mediated gene repression which dictates developmental programs by dynamic layers of regulatory activities, with an emphasis given to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25410906

  15. Using multivalent adenoviral vectors for HIV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Li, Zan C; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Wu, Hongju; Matthews, Qiana L

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been used for a variety of vaccine applications including cancer and infectious diseases. Traditionally, Ad-based vaccines are designed to express antigens through transgene expression of a given antigen. For effective vaccine development it is often necessary to express or present multiple antigens to the immune system to elicit an optimal vaccine as observed preclinically with mosaic/polyvalent HIV vaccines or malaria vaccines. Due to the wide flexibility of Ad vectors they are an ideal platform for expressing large amounts of antigen and/or polyvalent mosaic antigens. Ad vectors that display antigens on their capsid surface can elicit a robust humoral immune response, the "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy. The adenoviral hexon protein has been utilized to display peptides in the majority of vaccine strategies involving capsid incorporation. Based on our abilities to manipulate hexon HVR2 and HVR5, we sought to manipulate HVR1 in the context of HIV antigen display for the first time ever. More importantly, peptide incorporation within HVR1 was utilized in combination with other HVRs, thus creating multivalent vectors. To date this is the first report where dual antigens are displayed within one Ad hexon particle. These vectors utilize HVR1 as an incorporation site for a seven amino acid region of the HIV glycoprotein 41, in combination with six Histidine incorporation within HVR2 or HVR5. Our study illustrates that these multivalent antigen vectors are viable and can present HIV antigen as well as His6 within one Ad virion particle. Furthermore, mouse immunizations with these vectors demonstrate that these vectors can elicit a HIV and His6 epitope-specific humoral immune response.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Exogenous gene integration mediated by genome editing technologies in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hitoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito; Yanagi, Kanoko; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2017-03-08

    Genome editing technologies, such as transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/ CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) systems, can induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted genomic locus, leading to frameshift-mediated gene disruption in the process of DSB repair. Recently, the technology-induced DSBs followed by DSB repairs are applied to integrate exogenous genes into the targeted genomic locus in various model organisms. In addition to a conventional knock-in technology mediated by homology-directed repair (HDR), novel knock-in technologies using refined donor vectors have also been developed with the genome editing technologies based on other DSB repair mechanisms, including non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ). Therefore, the improved knock-in technologies would contribute to freely modify the genome of model organisms.

  18. Nonhomologous end joining-mediated gene replacement in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Weinthal, Dan Michael; Taylor, Roslyn Ann; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2013-05-01

    Stimulation of the homologous recombination DNA-repair pathway via the induction of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) has been deployed for gene replacement in plant cells. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated repair of DSBs, on the other hand, has been utilized for the induction of site-specific mutagenesis in plants. Since NHEJ is the dominant DSB repair pathway and can also lead to the capture of foreign DNA molecules, we suggest that it can also be deployed for gene replacement. An acceptor DNA molecule in which a green fluorescent protein (GFP) coding sequence (gfp) was flanked by ZFN recognition sequences was used to produce transgenic target plants. A donor DNA molecule in which a promoterless hygromycin B phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hpt) was flanked by ZFN recognition sequences was constructed. The donor DNA molecule and ZFN expression cassette were delivered into target plants. ZFN-mediated site-specific mutagenesis and complete removal of the GFP coding sequence resulted in the recovery of hygromycin-resistant plants that no longer expressed GFP and in which the hpt gene was unlinked to the acceptor DNA. More importantly, ZFN-mediated digestion of both donor and acceptor DNA molecules resulted in NHEJ-mediated replacement of the gfp with hpt and recovery of hygromycin-resistant plants that no longer expressed GFP and in which the hpt gene was physically linked to the acceptor DNA. Sequence and phenotypical analyses, and transmission of the replacement events to the next generation, confirmed the stability of the NHEJ-induced gene exchange, suggesting its use as a novel method for transgene replacement and gene stacking in plants.

  19. RNAi-mediated gene function analysis in skin.

    PubMed

    Beronja, Slobodan; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a method for RNAi-mediated gene function analysis in skin (Beronja et al., Nat Med 16:821-827, 2010). It employs ultrasound-guided in utero microinjections of lentivirus into the amniotic cavity of embryonic day 9 mice, which result in rapid, efficient, and stable transduction into mouse skin. Our technique greatly extends the available molecular and genetic toolbox for comprehensive functional examination of outstanding problems in epidermal biology. In its simplest form, as a single-gene function analysis via shRNA-mediated gene knockdown, our technique requires no animal mating and may need as little as only a few days between manipulation and phenotypic analysis.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers.

  1. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  2. A Regulatory Element Near the 3′ End of the Adeno-Associated Virus rep Gene Inhibits Adenovirus Replication in cis by Means of p40 Promoter-Associated Short Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Gonsior, Melanie; Stutika, Catrin; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has long been known to inhibit helper adenovirus (Ad) replication independently of AAV Rep protein expression. More recently, replication of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)/AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) hybrid vectors was shown to be inhibited in cis by a sequence near the 3′ end of AAV rep, termed the Rep inhibition sequence for adenoviral replication (RIS-Ad). RIS-Ad functions independently of Rep protein expression. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of adenoviral replication by RIS-Ad requires an active AAV p40 promoter and the 5′ half of the intron. In addition, Ad inhibition is critically dependent on the integrity of the p40 transcription start site (TSS) leading to short p40-associated transcripts. These do not give rise to effector molecules capable of inhibiting adenoviral replication in trans, like small polypeptides or microRNAs. Our data point to an inhibitory mechanism in which RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pauses directly downstream of the p40 promoter, leading to interference of the stalled Pol II transcription complex with the adenoviral replication machinery. Whereas inhibition by RIS-Ad is mediated exclusively in cis, it can be overcome by providing a replication-competent adenoviral genome in trans. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of RIS-Ad is not limited to AAV-2 but could also be shown for the corresponding regions of other AAV serotypes, including AAV-5. These findings have important implications for the future generation of Ad5/AAV hybrid vectors. IMPORTANCE Insertion of sequences from the 3′ part of the rep gene of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the genome of its helper adenovirus strongly reduces adenoviral genome replication. We could show that this inhibition is mediated exclusively in cis without the involvement of trans-acting regulatory RNAs or polypeptides but nevertheless requires an active AAV-2 p40 promoter and p40-associated short transcripts. Our results suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism that has so

  3. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs.

  4. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  5. Genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain.

    PubMed

    Bos, Paula D; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Nadal, Cristina; Shu, Weiping; Gomis, Roger R; Nguyen, Don X; Minn, Andy J; van de Vijver, Marc J; Gerald, William L; Foekens, John A; Massagué, Joan

    2009-06-18

    The molecular basis for breast cancer metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. Brain relapse typically occurs years after the removal of a breast tumour, suggesting that disseminated cancer cells must acquire specialized functions to take over this organ. Here we show that breast cancer metastasis to the brain involves mediators of extravasation through non-fenestrated capillaries, complemented by specific enhancers of blood-brain barrier crossing and brain colonization. We isolated cells that preferentially infiltrate the brain from patients with advanced disease. Gene expression analysis of these cells and of clinical samples, coupled with functional analysis, identified the cyclooxygenase COX2 (also known as PTGS2), the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand HBEGF, and the alpha2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GALNAC5 as mediators of cancer cell passage through the blood-brain barrier. EGFR ligands and COX2 were previously linked to breast cancer infiltration of the lungs, but not the bones or liver, suggesting a sharing of these mediators in cerebral and pulmonary metastases. In contrast, ST6GALNAC5 specifically mediates brain metastasis. Normally restricted to the brain, the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in breast cancer cells enhances their adhesion to brain endothelial cells and their passage through the blood-brain barrier. This co-option of a brain sialyltransferase highlights the role of cell-surface glycosylation in organ-specific metastatic interactions.

  6. RNA editing regulates transposon-mediated heterochromatic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Savva, Yiannis A; Jepson, James E C; Chang, Yao-Jen; Whitaker, Rachel; Jones, Brian C; St Laurent, Georges; Tackett, Michael R; Kapranov, Philipp; Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Helfand, Stephen L; Reenan, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation drives epigenetic mechanisms associated with silenced gene expression. Repressive heterochromatin is established through the RNA interference pathway, triggered by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that can be modified via RNA editing. However, the biological consequences of such modifications remain enigmatic. Here we show that RNA editing regulates heterochromatic gene silencing in Drosophila. We utilize the binding activity of an RNA-editing enzyme to visualize the in vivo production of a long dsRNA trigger mediated by Hoppel transposable elements. Using homologous recombination, we delete this trigger, dramatically altering heterochromatic gene silencing and chromatin architecture. Furthermore, we show that the trigger RNA is edited and that dADAR serves as a key regulator of chromatin state. Additionally, dADAR auto-editing generates a natural suppressor of gene silencing. Lastly, systemic differences in RNA editing activity generates interindividual variation in silencing state within a population. Our data reveal a global role for RNA editing in regulating gene expression.

  7. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  8. Reversal of experimental colitis disease activity in mice following administration of an adenoviral IL-10 vector

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Makoto; Mathis, J Michael; Jennings, Merilyn H; Jordan, Paul; Wang, Yuping; Ando, Tomoaki; Joh, Takashi; Alexander, J Steven

    2005-01-01

    Genetic deficiency in the expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) is associated with the onset and progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The clinical significance of IL-10 expression is supported by studies showing that immune-augmentation of IL-10 prevents inflammation and mucosal damage in animal models of colitis and in human colitis. Interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating cytokine, has been shown to prevent some inflammation and injury in animal and clinical studies, but the efficacy of IL-10 treatment remains unsatisfactory. We found that intra-peritoneal administration of adenoviral IL-10 to mice significantly reversed colitis induced by administration of 3% DSS (dextran sulfate), a common model of colitis. Adenoviral IL-10 (Ad-IL10) transfected mice developed high levels of IL-10 (394 +/- 136 pg/ml) within the peritoneal cavity where the adenovirus was expressed. Importantly, when given on day 4 (after the induction of colitis w/DSS), Ad-IL10 significantly reduced disease activity and weight loss and completely prevented histopathologic injury to the colon at day 10. Mechanistically, compared to Ad-null and DSS treated mice, Ad-IL10 and DSS-treated mice were able to suppress the expression of MAdCAM-1, an endothelial adhesion molecule associated with IBD. Our results suggest that Ad-IL10 (adenoviral IL-10) gene therapy of the intestine or peritoneum may be useful in the clinical treatment of IBD, since we demonstrated that this vector can reverse the course of an existing gut inflammation and markers of inflammation. PMID:16259632

  9. Adenoviral vector tethering to metal surfaces via hydrolyzable cross-linkers for the modulation of vector release and transduction.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Chorny, Michael; Connolly, Jeanne M; Adamo, Richard F; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The use of arterial stents and other medical implants as a delivery platform for surface immobilized gene vectors allows for safe and efficient localized expression of therapeutic transgenes. In this study we investigate the use of hydrolyzable cross-linkers with distinct kinetics of hydrolysis for delivery of gene vectors from polyallylamine bisphosphonate-modified metal surfaces. Three cross-linkers with the estimated t1/2 of ester bonds hydrolysis of 5, 12 and 50 days demonstrated a cumulative 20%, 39% and 45% vector release, respectively, after 30 days exposure to physiological buffer at 37 °C. Transgene expression in endothelial and smooth muscles cells transduced with substrate immobilized adenovirus resulted in significantly different expression profiles for each individual cross-linker. Furthermore, immobilization of adenoviral vectors effectively extended their transduction effectiveness beyond the initial phase of release. Transgene expression driven by adenovirus-tethered stents in rat carotid arteries demonstrated that a faster rate of cross-linker hydrolysis resulted in higher expression levels at day 1, which declined by day 8 after stent implantation, while inversely, slower hydrolysis was associated with increased arterial expression at day 8 in comparison with day 1. In conclusion, adjustable release of transduction-competent adenoviral vectors from metallic surfaces can be achieved, both in vitro and in vivo, through surface immobilization of adenoviral vectors using hydrolyzable cross-linkers with structure-specific release kinetics.

  10. Photochemical internalization-mediated nonviral gene transfection: polyamine core-shell nanoparticles as gene carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Genesis; Wang, Frederick; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Kwon, Young Jik; Cho, Soo Kyung; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The overall objective of the research was to investigate the utility of photochemical internalization (PCI) for the enhanced nonviral transfection of genes into glioma cells. The PCI-mediated introduction of the tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) or the cytosine deaminase (CD) pro-drug activating gene into U87 or U251 glioma cell monolayers and multicell tumor spheroids were evaluated. In the study reported here, polyamine-DNA gene polyplexes were encapsulated in a nanoparticle (NP) with an acid degradable polyketal outer shell. These NP synthetically mimic the roles of viral capsid and envelope, which transport and release the gene, respectively. The effects of PCI-mediated suppressor and suicide genes transfection efficiency employing either "naked" polyplex cores alone or as NP-shelled cores were compared. PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS2a and λ=670-nm laser irradiance. The results clearly demonstrated that the PCI can enhance the delivery of both the PTEN or CD genes in human glioma cell monolayers and multicell tumor spheroids. The transfection efficiency, as measured by cell survival and inhibition of spheroid growth, was found to be significantly greater at suboptimal light and DNA levels for shelled NPs compared with polyamine-DNA polyplexes alone.

  11. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  12. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  13. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; Aprelikova, Olga; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sotiriou, Christos; Liu, Edison T; Ropers, H Hilger; Yee, Cindy J; Boyd, Jeff; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-01-01

    Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling). Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P < 0.005 as a cutoff. Forty of 178 total X-chromosome transcripts were differentially expressed between the BRCA1-associated tumors and sporadic cancers with a BRCA2-like molecular profile. Thirty of these 40 genes showed higher mean expression in the BRCA1-associated samples including all 11 transcripts that mapped to Xp11. In contrast, four of 178 total X chromosome transcripts showed significant differential expression between BRCA1-associated and sporadic tumors with a BRCA1-like molecular profile. All four mapped to Xp11 and showed higher mean expression in BRCA1-associated tumors. Re-expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell resulted in the repression of 21 transcripts. Eleven of the 21 (54.5%) transcripts mapped to Xp11. However, there was no significant overlap between these Xp11 genes and those found to be differentially expressed between BRCA1-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer samples. These results demonstrate that BRCA1 mediates the repression of several X chromosome genes, many of which map to the Xp11 locus. PMID:15383145

  14. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  15. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  16. Development of an adenoviral vector with robust expression driven by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a new adenoviral vector where transgene expression is driven by p53. We first developed a synthetic promoter, referred to as PGTx{beta}, containing a p53-responsive element, a minimal promoter and the first intron of the rabbit {beta}-globin gene. Initial assays using plasmid-based vectors indicated that expression was tightly controlled by p53 and was 5-fold stronger than the constitutive CMV immediate early promoter/enhancer. The adenoviral vector, AdPG, was also shown to offer p53-responsive expression in prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP (wt p53), DU-145 (temperature sensitive mutant of p53) and PC3 (p53-null, but engineered to express temperature-sensitive p53 mutants). AdPG served as a sensor of p53 activity in LNCaP cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Since p53 can be induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this new vector could be further developed for use in combination with conventional therapies to bring about cooperation between the genetic and pharmacologic treatment modalities.

  17. An efficient and scalable process for helper-dependent adenoviral vector production using polyethylenimine-adenofection.

    PubMed

    Dormond, E; Meneses-Acosta, A; Jacob, D; Durocher, Y; Gilbert, R; Perrier, M; Kamen, A

    2009-02-15

    Safety requirements for adenoviral gene therapy protocols have led to the development of the third generation of vectors commonly called helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). HDVs have demonstrated a high therapeutic potential; however, the poor efficiency and reliability of the actual production process hampers further large-scale clinical evaluation of this new vector. The current HDV production methods involve a preliminary rescue step through transfection of adherent cell cultures by an HDV plasmid followed by a helper adenovirus (HV) infection. Amplification by serial co-infection of complementary cells allows an increase in the HDV titer. Using a HEK293 FLP/frt cell system in suspension culture, an alternative protocol to the current transfection/infection procedure was evaluated. In this work, the adenofection uses the HDV plasmid linked to the HV with the help of polyethylenimine (PEI) and has shown to outperform standard protocols by producing higher HDV yield. The influence of complex composition on the HDV production was examined by a statistical design. The optimized adenofection and amplification conditions were successively performed to generate HDV at the 3 L bioreactor scale. Following only two serial co-infection passages, up to 1.44 x 10(8) HDV infectious units/mL of culture were generated, which corresponded to 26% of the total particles produced. This production strategy, realized in cell suspension culture, reduced process duration and therefore the probability of vector recombination by introducing a cost-effective transfection protocol, ensuring production of high-quality vector stock.

  18. Kidney-specific transposon-mediated gene transfer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Lauren E; Cheng, Jizhong; Welch, Richard C; Williams, Felisha M; Luo, Wentian; Gewin, Leslie S; Wilson, Matthew H

    2017-03-20

    Methods enabling kidney-specific gene transfer in adult mice are needed to develop new therapies for kidney disease. We attempted kidney-specific gene transfer following hydrodynamic tail vein injection using the kidney-specific podocin and gamma-glutamyl transferase promoters, but found expression primarily in the liver. In order to achieve kidney-specific transgene expression, we tested direct hydrodynamic injection of a DNA solution into the renal pelvis and found that luciferase expression was strong in the kidney and absent from extra-renal tissues. We observed heterogeneous, low-level transfection of the collecting duct, proximal tubule, distal tubule, interstitial cells, and rarely glomerular cells following injection. To assess renal injury, we performed the renal pelvis injections on uninephrectomised mice and found that their blood urea nitrogen was elevated at two days post-transfer but resolved within two weeks. Although luciferase expression quickly decreased following renal pelvis injection, the use of the piggyBac transposon system improved long-term expression. Immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide stabilised luciferase expression, suggesting immune clearance of the transfected cells occurs in immunocompetent animals. Injection of a transposon expressing erythropoietin raised the haematocrit, indicating that the developed injection technique can elicit a biologic effect in vivo. Hydrodynamic renal pelvis injection enables transposon mediated-kidney specific gene transfer in adult mice.

  19. Kidney-specific transposon-mediated gene transfer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Lauren E.; Cheng, Jizhong; Welch, Richard C.; Williams, Felisha M.; Luo, Wentian; Gewin, Leslie S.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2017-01-01

    Methods enabling kidney-specific gene transfer in adult mice are needed to develop new therapies for kidney disease. We attempted kidney-specific gene transfer following hydrodynamic tail vein injection using the kidney-specific podocin and gamma-glutamyl transferase promoters, but found expression primarily in the liver. In order to achieve kidney-specific transgene expression, we tested direct hydrodynamic injection of a DNA solution into the renal pelvis and found that luciferase expression was strong in the kidney and absent from extra-renal tissues. We observed heterogeneous, low-level transfection of the collecting duct, proximal tubule, distal tubule, interstitial cells, and rarely glomerular cells following injection. To assess renal injury, we performed the renal pelvis injections on uninephrectomised mice and found that their blood urea nitrogen was elevated at two days post-transfer but resolved within two weeks. Although luciferase expression quickly decreased following renal pelvis injection, the use of the piggyBac transposon system improved long-term expression. Immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide stabilised luciferase expression, suggesting immune clearance of the transfected cells occurs in immunocompetent animals. Injection of a transposon expressing erythropoietin raised the haematocrit, indicating that the developed injection technique can elicit a biologic effect in vivo. Hydrodynamic renal pelvis injection enables transposon mediated-kidney specific gene transfer in adult mice. PMID:28317878

  20. Ipr1 gene mediates innate immunity to tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Rojas, Mauricio; Shebzukhov, Yuriy V.; Zhou, Hongwei; Kobzik, Lester; Higgins, Darren; Daly, Mark; Bloom, Barry R.; Kramnik, Igor

    2005-01-01

    An estimated 8 million people are infected each year with the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and over 2 million die annually1. Yet only about 10% of those infected develop tuberculosis. Genetic variation within host populations is known to play a significant role in humans and animals 2,3, but the nature of genetic control of host resistance to tuberculosis remains poorly understood. Previously we mapped a new genetic locus on mouse chromosome 1, designated sst1 (for supersusceptibility to tuberculosis1)4. Here we demonstrate in sst1 congenic mouse strains that this locus mediates innate immunity, and identify a candidate gene, Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1 (Ipr1), within the sst1 locus. The Ipr1 gene is upregulated in the sst1 resistant macrophages upon activation and infection, but is not expressed in the sst1 susceptible macrophages. Expression of the Ipr1 transgene in the sst1 susceptible macrophages limits multiplication not only of MTB but also Listeria monocytogenes and switches a cell death pathway of the infected macrophages from necrosis to apoptosis. Our data suggest that the Ipr1 gene product may play a novel role in integrating signals generated by intracellular pathogens with mechanisms controlling innate immunity, cell death and pathogenesis. PMID:15815631

  1. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Schlesinger, Jacob J; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-04-10

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcgammaRI, but not its associated gamma-chain, and was not supported by other FcgammaR family members (FcgammaRIIA, FcgammaRIIB, and FcgammaRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1). In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcgammaRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer.

  2. Development of a Nanotechnology Platform for Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    metastatic and characterized to be CAR¯/HER2¯. This means that they are not a good candidate for adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin anti-HER2...and can potentially be used in the treatment of the patients that do not respond to adenoviral gene therapy or Herceptin immunotherapy.     5

  3. Studies of DEAE-dextran-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y W; Yang, J C

    1997-02-01

    DEAE-dextran-mediated gene transfer was studied for the introduction of pSV2neo DNA into Fisher-rat 3T3 (FR3T3) cells. Zeta (zeta) potentials of the DEAE-dextran-DNA complexes and FR3T3 cells were found to be dependent on the concentration of DEAE-dextran in the medium. The maximum transfection efficiency occurred at a DEAE-dextran/DNA ratio of 50:1 or thereabouts. The interaction between DNA and cells is determined by the adsorption process. The results obtained, along with the correlation between the kinetic adsorption behaviour of 3H-labelled DNA and the transfection efficiency, indicated that adsorption of DEAE-dextran-DNA complexes to the negatively charged cell surfaces, due to electrostatic and dispersion attraction, plays the decisive role in determining the DNA transfection efficiencies.

  4. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-01-01

    Transferring genetic molecules into the peripheral sensory nervous system to manipulate nociceptive pathophysiology is a powerful approach for experimental modulation of sensory signaling and potentially for translation into therapy for chronic pain. This can be efficiently achieved by the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in conjunction with nociceptor-specific regulatory transgene cassettes. Among different routes of delivery, direct injection into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the most efficient AAV-mediated gene transfer selectively into the peripheral sensory nervous system. Here, we briefly discuss the advantages and applications of intraganglionic microinjection, and then provide a detailed approach for DRG injection, including a list of the necessary materials and description of a method for performing DRG microinjection experiments. We also discuss our experience with several adeno-associated virus (AAV) options for in vivo transgene expression in DRG neurons.

  5. AAV-Mediated Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is directly or indirectly involved in many essential processes and is affected by numerous inherited diseases. Therefore, many inherited diseases could be effectively treated by targeting the liver using gene transfer approaches. The challenges associated with liver-directed gene therapy are efficient targeting of hepatocytes, stability of the vector genome, and persistent high level expression. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer vectors. The first AAV gene transfer vector developed for in vivo use was based on the AAV2 serotype. AAV2 has a broad tropism and transduces many cell types, including hepatocytes, relatively efficiently in vivo. The capsid protein confers the serological profile and at least 12 primate AAV serotypes have already been characterized. Importantly, pseudotyping a recombinant AAV vector with different capsid proteins can dramatically alter the tropism. Both AAV8 and AAV9 have higher affinities for hepatocytes when compared to AAV2. In particular, AAV8 can transduce 3–4 fold more hepatocytes and deliver 3–4 fold more genomes per transduced cell when compared to AAV2. Depending on the dose, AAV8 can transduce up to 90–95% of hepatocytes in the mouse liver following intraportal vein injection. Interestingly, comparable levels of transduction can be achieved following intravenous injection. Direct intraparenchymal injection of an AAV vector also mediates relatively high level long term expression. Additional specificity can be conferred by using liver-specific promoters in conjunction with AAV8 capsid proteins. In addition to treating primary hepatocyte defects, immune reactions to transgene products can be minimized by circumventing the fixed tissue macrophages of the liver, Kupffer cells, and limiting expression to hepatocytes. The ability to target hepatocytes by virtue of the AAV serotype and the use of liver-specific promoters allows investigators to test novel therapeutic

  6. Control of pollen-mediated gene flow in transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsheng; Norris-Caneda, Kim H; Rottmann, William H; Gulledge, Jon E; Chang, Shujun; Kwan, Brian Yow-Hui; Thomas, Anita M; Mandel, Lydia C; Kothera, Ronald T; Victor, Aditi D; Pearson, Leslie; Hinchee, Maud A W

    2012-08-01

    Pollen elimination provides an effective containment method to reduce direct gene flow from transgenic trees to their wild relatives. Until now, only limited success has been achieved in controlling pollen production in trees. A pine (Pinus radiata) male cone-specific promoter, PrMC2, was used to drive modified barnase coding sequences (barnaseH102E, barnaseK27A, and barnaseE73G) in order to determine their effectiveness in pollen ablation. The expression cassette PrMC2-barnaseH102E was found to efficiently ablate pollen in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), pine, and Eucalyptus (spp.). Large-scale and multiple-year field tests demonstrated that complete prevention of pollen production was achieved in greater than 95% of independently transformed lines of pine and Eucalyptus (spp.) that contained the PrMC2-barnaseH102E expression cassette. A complete pollen control phenotype was achieved in transgenic lines and expressed stably over multiple years, multiple test locations, and when the PrMC2-barnaseH102E cassette was flanked by different genes. The PrMC2-barnaseH102E transgenic pine and Eucalyptus (spp.) trees grew similarly to control trees in all observed attributes except the pollenless phenotype. The ability to achieve the complete control of pollen production in field-grown trees is likely the result of a unique combination of three factors: the male cone/anther specificity of the PrMC2 promoter, the reduced RNase activity of barnaseH102E, and unique features associated with a polyploid tapetum. The field performance of the PrMC2-barnaseH102E in representative angiosperm and gymnosperm trees indicates that this gene can be used to mitigate pollen-mediated gene flow associated with large-scale deployment of transgenic trees.

  7. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  8. Adeno-associated virus-mediated cancer gene therapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingfeng; Luo, Yuxuan; Sun, Jihong; Zhou, Yurong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-28

    Gene therapy is one of the frontiers of modern medicine. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is becoming a promising approach to treat a variety of diseases and cancers. AAV-mediated cancer gene therapies have rapidly advanced due to their superiority to other gene-carrying vectors, such as the lack of pathogenicity, the ability to transfect both dividing and non-dividing cells, low host immune response, and long-term expression. This article reviews and provides up to date knowledge on AAV-mediated cancer gene therapy.

  9. Functional genomic analysis of cotton genes with agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Shan, Libo

    2013-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is one of the most agronomically important crops worldwide for its unique textile fiber production and serving as food and feed stock. Molecular breeding and genetic engineering of useful genes into cotton have emerged as advanced approaches to improve cotton yield, fiber quality, and resistance to various stresses. However, the understanding of gene functions and regulations in cotton is largely hindered by the limited molecular and biochemical tools. Here, we describe the method of an Agrobacterium infiltration-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay to transiently silence endogenous genes in cotton at 2-week-old seedling stage. The genes of interest could be readily silenced with a consistently high efficiency. To monitor gene silencing efficiency, we have cloned cotton GrCla1 from G. raimondii, a homolog gene of Arabidopsis Cloroplastos alterados 1 (AtCla1) involved in chloroplast development, and inserted into a tobacco rattle virus (TRV) binary vector pYL156. Silencing of GrCla1 results in albino phenotype on the newly emerging leaves, serving as a visual marker for silencing efficiency. To further explore the possibility of using VIGS assay to reveal the essential genes mediating disease resistance to Verticillium dahliae, a fungal pathogen causing severe Verticillium wilt in cotton, we developed a seedling infection assay to inoculate cotton seedlings when the genes of interest are silenced by VIGS. The method we describe here could be further explored for functional genomic analysis of cotton genes involved in development and various biotic and abiotic stresses.

  10. Pathogen-Induced Proapoptotic Phenotype and High CD95 (Fas) Expression Accompany a Suboptimal CD8+ T-Cell Response: Reversal by Adenoviral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Bruña–Romero, Oscar; Araújo, Adriano F.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Ersching, Jonatan; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Marcela F.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2012-01-01

    MHC class Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination. PMID:22615561

  11. The birth of new genes by RNA- and DNA-mediated duplication during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin; Ryvkin, Paul; Hemphill, Edward; Mandoiu, Ion; Nelson, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Gene duplication has long been recognized as a major force in genome evolution and has recently been recognized as an important source of individual variation. For many years, the origin of functional gene duplicates was assumed to be whole or partial genome duplication events, but recently retrotransposition has also been shown to contribute new functional protein coding genes and siRNA's. In this study, we utilize pseudogenes to recreate more complete gene family histories, and compare the rates of RNA and DNA-mediated duplication and new functional gene formation in five mammalian genomes. We find that RNA-mediated duplication occurs at a much higher and more variable rate than DNA-mediated duplication, and gives rise to many more duplicated sequences over time. We show that, while the chance of RNA-mediated duplicates becoming functional is much lower than that of their DNA-mediated counterparts, the higher rate of retrotransposition leads to nearly equal contributions of new genes by each mechanism. We also find that functional RNA-mediated duplicates are closer to neighboring genes than non-functional RNA-mediated copies, consistent with co-option of regulatory elements at the site of insertion. Overall, new genes derived from DNA and RNA-mediated duplication mechanisms are under similar levels of purifying selective pressure, but have broadly different functions. RNA-mediated duplication gives rise to a diversity of genes but is dominated by the highly expressed genes of RNA metabolic pathways. DNA-mediated duplication can copy regulatory material along with the protein coding region of the gene and often gives rise to classes of genes whose function are dependent on complex regulatory information. This mechanistic difference may in part explain why we find that mammalian protein families tend to evolve by either one mechanism or the other, but rarely by both. Supplementary Material has been provided (see online Supplementary Material at www.liebertonline.com ).

  12. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  13. Enhanced Peptide of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Adenoviral Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    greater than that observed in tumors injected with control adenovirus (1.4 - 1..6% ID/g). Another adenovirus encoding for both SSTR2 and cytosine deaminase ...for treating prostate cancer xenografts which involves the use of an adenoviral vector encoding for both SSTR2 and the cytosine deaminase (CD) enzyme...SSTR2 and bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) was performed in a manner similar to that previously described. The AdEasy system was used to generate the

  14. Improved hepatic transduction, reduced systemic vector dissemination, and long-term transgene expression by delivering helper-dependent adenoviral vectors into the surgically isolated liver of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David A; Palmer, Donna J; Beaudet, Arthur L; Finegold, Milton J; Carey, K Dee; Cioffi, William G; Ng, Philip

    2006-04-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are attractive vectors for liver-directed gene therapy because they can mediate sustained, high-level transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potentially severe and lethal consequences. We hypothesize that the threshold to efficient hepatic transduction may be circumvented by delivering the vector into the surgically isolated liver via the portal vein. Total hepatic isolation was achieved by occluding hepatic inflow from the portal vein and hepatic artery and by occluding hepatic venous outflow at the inferior vena cava. We demonstrate in nonhuman primates that this approach resulted in significantly higher efficiency hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with systemic intravascular delivery. This method of delivery was associated with transient acute toxicity, the severity of which was variable. Importantly, stable, high levels of transgene expression were obtained for at least 665 days for one baboon and for at least 560 days for two baboons with no evidence of long-term toxicity.

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide as inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2003-01-01

    Sensory neuropeptides have been proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic cough. Next to prominent neuropeptides such as tachykinins or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been suggested to participate in airway physiology and pathophysiology. CGRP is a 37 amino-acid peptide which is expressed by nerve fibers projecting to the airways and by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. The most prominent effects of CGRP in the airways are vasodilatation and in a few instances bronchoconstriction. A further pulmonary effect of CGRP is the induction of eosinophil migration and the stimulation of beta-integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to fibronectin at the site of inflammation. By contrast, CGRP inhibits macrophage secretion and the capacity of macrophages to activate T-cells, indicating a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Due to the complex pulmonary effects of CGRP with bronchoconstriction and vasodilatation and diverse immunomodulatory actions, potential anti-asthma drugs based on this peptide have not been established so far. However, targeting the effects of CGRP may be of value for future strategies in nerve modulation.

  16. Bacteriophage WO Can Mediate Horizontal Gene Transfer in Endosymbiotic Wolbachia Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan H.; Sun, Bao F.; Xiong, Tuan L.; Wang, Yan K.; Murfin, Kristen E.; Xiao, Jin H.; Huang, Da W.

    2016-01-01

    Phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common in free-living bacteria, and many transferred genes can play a significant role in their new bacterial hosts. However, there are few reports concerning phage-mediated HGT in endosymbionts (obligate intracellular bacteria within animal or plant hosts), such as Wolbachia. The Wolbachia-infecting temperate phage WO can actively shift among Wolbachia genomes and has the potential to mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains. In the present study, we extend previous findings by validating that the phage WO can mediate transfer of non-phage genes. To do so, we utilized bioinformatic, phylogenetic, and molecular analyses based on all sequenced Wolbachia and phage WO genomes. Our results show that the phage WO can mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains, regardless of whether the transferred genes originate from Wolbachia or other unrelated bacteria. PMID:27965627

  17. Vascular administration of adenoviral vector soaked in absorbable gelatin sponge particles (GSP) prolongs the transgene expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeong-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Rha, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seung-Eun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jeong-Man; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2005-02-01

    Transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization using emulsions composed of anticancer agents and gelatin sponges (GS) has been an efficient and safe palliative treatment for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We employed catheter-mediated left hepatic arterial embolization (CHAE) to increase transduction efficiency of adenoviral vector in canine hepatocytes. The emulsion was prepared by mixing pieces of GSP and adenoviral vectors expressing recombinant beta-galactosidase (Ad.LacZ) or human hepatocyte growth factor (Ad.hHGF). After the left hepatic artery was catheterized under angiography, CHAE with Ad.LacZ or Ad.hHGF was performed. Livers were removed and stained for LacZ activity on day 7. The expression pattern of LacZ staining was either scarce or patchy around the central hilum of the hepatic artery, or was homogeneously distributed in whole lobes, depending on whether large or small pieces of GSP were used. Hematological and serum biochemical changes during CHAE exhibited only a few effects. The chronological measurement of serum HGF concentration showed that the duration of transgene expression was greater after CHAE with Ad.hHGF. A similar pattern of transgene expression was observed in a rat model after hepatic arterial embolization with differential doses of Ad.hHGF soaked in GSP. These results suggest that hepatic arterial embolization by transcatheter mediated infusion with a mixture of adenovirus-GSP could be used for human HCC.

  18. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  19. An adenovirus with enhanced infectivity mediates molecular chemotherapy of ovarian cancer cells and allows imaging of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, A; Belousova, N; Zinn, K R; Liu, B; Wang, M; Chaudhuri, T R; Rogers, B E; Buchsbaum, D J; Siegal, G P; Barnes, M N; Gomez-Navarro, J; Curiel, D T; Alvarez, R D

    2001-09-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) is a useful vector for cancer gene therapy due to its unparalleled gene transfer efficiency to dividing and quiescent cells. Primary cancer cells, however, often have highly variable or low levels of the requisite coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Also, assessment of gene transfer and vector persistence has been logistically difficult in human clinical trials. We describe here two novel bicistronic adenoviral (Ad) vectors, AdTKSSTR and RGDTKSSTR, which contain the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (TK) for molecular chemotherapy and bystander effect. In addition, the viruses contain the human somatostatin receptor subtype-2 gene (SSTR2), the expression of which can be noninvasively imaged. We enhanced the infectivity of RGDTKSSTR by genetically incorporating the RGD-4C motif into the HI-loop of the fiber. This allows the virus to circumvent CAR deficiency by binding to alpha(v)beta(3) and alpha(v)beta(5) integrins, which are highly expressed on most ovarian cancers. The expanded tropism of RGDTKSSTR results in increased infectivity of purified primary ovarian cancer cells and allows enhanced gene transfer in the presence of malignant ascites containing anti-Ad antibodies. RGDTKSSTR may be a useful agent for treating ovarian cancer in clinical trials.

  20. Adenoviral Gene Therapy Vectors Targeted to Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    collectively called retinitis pigmentosa . Al- though there currently is no treatment or cure for these diseases, the past few years have seen important...Dryja, T. P., and Li, T. (1995). Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa . Hum. Mol. 1358. Genet. 4: 1739-174. 50. Friedlander, M., and Blobel, G...refractory to Ad5 transduction such as EBV-infected B cells and retinal photoreceptors. Using this technique, we are now evaluating the ability of

  1. Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rpp4 (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi 4) confers resistance to P. pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). By combining expression profiling and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), we are developing a genetic framework for Rpp4-mediated resistance. We measured gene expression i...

  2. Survival after prolonged pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for adenoviral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Allibhai, Taslim F; Spinella, Philip C; Meyer, Michael T; Hall, Brian H; Kofos, Daniel; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2008-08-01

    Adenoviral pneumonia can cause significant pulmonary morbidity leading to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rescue. Reported survival of adenoviral pneumonia requiring ECMO has been poor, and prolonged time on ECMO is associated with increased mortality. We present 2 pediatric cases of adenoviral pneumonia in patients who survived after greater than 30 days on ECMO and review the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry to describe the collective experience of children with viral pneumonia requiring prolonged ECMO. Although survival has improved over the past decade for pediatric adenoviral pneumonia, the ELSO database previously has had no surviving children reported with a primary diagnosis of adenovirus after more than 4 weeks on ECMO. Our experience suggests that there may be use for prolonged ECMO support in children despite severe adenoviral pneumonia.

  3. Adenoviral transfer of mda-7 leads to BAX up-regulation and apoptosis in mesothelioma cells, and is abrogated by over-expression of BCL-XL.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaobo X.; Mohuiddin, Imran; Chada, Sunil; Mhashilkar, Abner M.; Ozvaran, Mustafa K.; McConkey, David J.; Miller, Steven D.; Daniel, Jonathon C.; Smythe, W. Roy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is unresponsive to conventional therapies. Forced expression of the novel tumor suppressor mda-7 gene in other cell types has resulted in decreased growth and apoptosis. We evaluated cell growth, apoptosis and tumor suppressor characteristics following forced expression of this gene in mesothelioma cell lines. METHODS: MDA-7 expression in human MPM cells at baseline, following pharmacologic differentiation and viral mda-7 transduction (Ad-mda7) were evaluated with Western blot. Cell viability was evaluated with a colorimetric (XTT) assay, and apoptosis with subG1 FACS and Hoescht. Caspase-3 expression was evaluated by functional assay. These parameters were also evaluated in a stable bcl-xl hyper-expressing MPM cell line. Bax mRNA levels were evaluated with real-time PCR. RESULTS: No baseline or differentiated MPM MDA7 expression was found, but was noted following Ad-mda7 exposure. More than 50% of MPM cells were killed at 5 days following Ad-mda7 exposure (p < 0.001). Apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 cleavage and increased BAX expression at both the protein (translational) and mRNA (transcriptional) level. These findings were reduced in a bcl-xl hyper-expressing cell line (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Although mda-7 does not appear to be a MPM suppressor gene, adenoviral-mediated expression in cell lines induces apoptotic cellular death related to BAX upregulation and caspase cleavage. This is supported by abrogation of effect in a bcl-xl hyper-expressing cell line. PMID:12606823

  4. Culture and adenoviral infection of sinoatrial node myocytes from adult mice

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Joshua R.; Sharpe, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker myocytes in the sinoatrial node of the heart initiate each heartbeat by firing spontaneous action potentials. However, the molecular processes that underlie pacemaking are incompletely understood, in part because of our limited ability to manipulate protein expression within the native cellular context of sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs). Here we describe a new method for the culture of fully differentiated SAMs from adult mice, and we demonstrate that robust expression of introduced proteins can be achieved within 24–48 h in vitro via adenoviral gene transfer. Comparison of morphological and electrophysiological characteristics of 48 h-cultured versus acutely isolated SAMs revealed only minor changes in vitro. Specifically, we found that cells tended to flatten in culture but retained an overall normal morphology, with no significant changes in cellular dimensions or membrane capacitance. Cultured cells beat spontaneously and, in patch-clamp recordings, the spontaneous action potential firing rate did not differ between cultured and acutely isolated cells, despite modest changes in a subset of action potential waveform parameters. The biophysical properties of two membrane currents that are critical for pacemaker activity in SAMs, the “funny current” (If) and voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (ICa), were also indistinguishable between cultured and acutely isolated cells. This new method for culture and adenoviral infection of fully-differentiated SAMs from the adult mouse heart expands the range of experimental techniques that can be applied to study the molecular physiology of cardiac pacemaking because it will enable studies in which protein expression levels can be modified or genetically encoded reporter molecules expressed within SAMs. PMID:26001410

  5. CTCF-mediated Chromatin Loop for the Posterior Hoxc Gene Expression in MEF Cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyehyun; Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Chang-Pyo; Seo, Seong-Hye; Roh, Tae-Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-06-01

    Modulation of chromatin structure has been proposed as a molecular mechanism underlying the spatiotemporal collinear expression of Hox genes during development. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-mediated chromatin organization is now recognized as a crucial epigenetic mechanism for transcriptional regulation. Thus, we examined whether CTCF-mediated chromosomal conformation is involved in Hoxc gene expression by comparing wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells expressing anterior Hoxc genes with Akt1 null MEFs expressing anterior as well as posterior Hoxc genes. We found that CTCF binding between Hoxc11 and -c12 is important for CTCF-mediated chromosomal loop formation and concomitant posterior Hoxc gene expression. Hypomethylation at this site increased CTCF binding and recapitulated the chromosomal conformation and posterior Hoxc gene expression patterns observed in Akt1 null MEFs. From this work we found that CTCF at the C12|11 does not function as a barrier/boundary, instead let the posterior Hoxc genes switch their interaction from inactive centromeric to active telomeric genomic niche, and concomitant posterior Hoxc gene expression. Although it is not clear whether CTCF affects Hoxc gene expression solely through its looping activity, CTCF-mediated chromatin structural modulation could be an another tier of Hox gene regulation during development. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):436-444, 2016.

  6. Antigen expression determines adenoviral vaccine potency independent of IFN and STING signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Zak, Daniel E.; Costa, Andreia; Yamamoto, Ayako; Kastenmuller, Kathrin; Hill, Brenna J.; Lynn, Geoffrey M.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gall, Jason G.D.; Roederer, Mario; Aderem, Alan; Seder, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are lead vaccine candidates for protection against a variety of pathogens, including Ebola, HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, due to their ability to potently induce T cell immunity in humans. However, the ability to induce protective cellular immunity varies among rAds. Here, we assessed the mechanisms that control the potency of CD8 T cell responses in murine models following vaccination with human-, chimpanzee-, and simian-derived rAds encoding SIV-Gag antigen (Ag). After rAd vaccination, we quantified Ag expression and performed expression profiling of innate immune response genes in the draining lymph node. Human-derived rAd5 and chimpanzee-derived chAd3 were the most potent rAds and induced high and persistent Ag expression with low innate gene activation, while less potent rAds induced less Ag expression and robustly induced innate immunity genes that were primarily associated with IFN signaling. Abrogation of type I IFN or stimulator of IFN genes (STING) signaling increased Ag expression and accelerated CD8 T cell response kinetics but did not alter memory responses or protection. These findings reveal that the magnitude of rAd-induced memory CD8 T cell immune responses correlates with Ag expression but is independent of IFN and STING and provide criteria for optimizing protective CD8 T cell immunity with rAd vaccines. PMID:25642773

  7. Adenoviral vectors modified by heparin-polyethyleneimine nanogels enhance targeting to the lung and show therapeutic potential for pulmonary metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Mu, Yandong; Li, XiaoPeng; Gou, MaLing; Zhang, HaiLong; Luo, ShunTao; Men, Ke; Mao, YongQiu; Qian, ZhiYong; Yang, Li

    2011-12-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is a well-known cationic polymer that has previously been shown to have significant potential to deliver genes in vitro and in vivo. However, PEI is non-degradable and exhibits a high cytotoxicity as its molecular weight increases. The clinical application for systemic administration of adenoviral (Ad) vectors is limited, as these vectors do not efficiently penetrate solid tumor masses due to a common deficiency of Coxsackie Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) on the tumor surface. In this study, we conjugated low molecular weight PEI (Mn = 1,800) to heparin (Mn = 4,000-6,000) to create a new type of cationic degradable nanogel (HPEI) that was then used to modify Ad vectors. The resulting HPEI-Ad complexes were used to infect CT26 and HeLa cells in vitro. Additionally, the HPEI-Ad complexes were administrated in vivo via intravenous injection, and tissue distribution was assessed using luciferase assays; the therapeutic potential of HPEI-Ad complexes for pulmonary metastasis mediated by CT26 cells was also investigated. In vitro, HPEI-Ad complexes enhanced the transfection efficiency in CT26 cells, reaching 36.3% compared with 0.1% of the native adenovirus. In vivo, HPEI-Ad complexes exhibited greater affinity for lung tissue than the native adenovirus and effectively inhibited the growth of pulmonary metastases mediated by CT26 cells. Our results indicate that Ad vectors modified by HPEI nanogels to form HPEI-Ad complexes enhanced transfection efficiency in CT26 cells that lacked CAR, targeted to the lung and demostrated a potential therapy for pulmonary metastasis.

  8. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks.

  9. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants.

  10. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  11. The human desmin promoter drives robust gene expression for skeletal muscle stem cell-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jonuschies, Jacqueline; Antoniou, Michael; Waddington, Simon; Boldrin, Luisa; Muntoni, Francesco; Thrasher, Adrian; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) represent suitable candidates to mediate gene therapy for muscular dystrophies as they infect dividing and non-dividing cells and integrate their genetic material into the host genome, thereby theoretically mediating longterm expression. We evaluated the ability of LVs where a GFP reporter gene was under the control of five different promoters, to transduce and mediate expression in myogenic and non-myogenic cells in vitro and in skeletal muscle fibres and stem (satellite) cells in vivo. We further analysed lentivirally-transduced satellite cell-derived myoblasts following their transplantation into dystrophic, immunodeficient mouse muscles. The spleen focus-forming virus promoter mediated the highest gene expression in all cell types; the CBX3-HNRPA2B1 ubiquitously-acting chromatin opening element (UCOE) promoter was also active in all cells, whereas the human desmin promoter in isolation or fused with UCOE had lower activity in non-muscle cells. Surprisingly, the human skeletal muscle actin promoter was also active in immune cells. The human desmin promoter mediated robust, persistent reporter gene expression in myogenic cells in vitro, and satellite cells and muscle fibres in vivo. The human desmin promoter combined with UCOE did not significantly increase transgene expression. Therefore, our data indicate that the desmin promoter is suitable for the development of therapeutic purposes.

  12. Retroviral gene insertion in breast milk mediated lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Joana; Okonta, Henry; Bagalb, Hussein; Lee, Soon Jin; Fink, Brian; Changanamkandat, Rajesh; Duggan, Joan

    2008-07-20

    We have demonstrated breast milk transmitted MoMuLV-ts1 retrovirus infection and subsequent lymphoma development in offspring of uninfected mothers suckled by infected surrogate mothers. Additionally, we have shown that the lymphoma development occurs as a result of viral gene integration into host genome. A total of 146 pups from Balb/C mice were divided into 5 groups; one control and 4 experimental. All offspring suckled from surrogate infected or control mothers, except one group of infected pups left with their biological mothers. Thirteen of 91 infected pups developed lymphoma. Inverse-PCR, DNA cloning, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study the virus integration sites (VIS) and alterations in gene expression. VIS were randomly distributed throughout the genome. The majority of insertion sites were found in chromosomes 10, 12 and 13. A total of 209 proviral genomic insertion sites were located with 52 intragenic and 157 intergenic sites. We have identified 29 target genes. Four genes including Tacc3, Aurka, Gfi1 and Ahi1 showed the maximum upregulation of mRNA expression. These four genes can be considered as candidate genes based on their association with cancer. Upregulation of these genes may be involved in this type of lymphoma development. This model provides an important opportunity to gain insight into the relationship of viral gene insertion into host genome and development of lymphoma via natural transmission route such as breast milk.

  13. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel; Montanez, Cecilia; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2010-05-28

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  14. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown and in vivo diuresis assay in adult female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Aguirre, Sarah E; Hansen, Immo A

    2012-07-14

    This video protocol demonstrates an effective technique to knockdown a particular gene in an insect and conduct a novel bioassay to measure excretion rate. This method can be used to obtain a better understanding of the process of diuresis in insects and is especially useful in the study of diuresis in blood-feeding arthropods that are able to take up huge amounts of liquid in a single blood meal. This RNAi-mediated gene knockdown combined with an in vivo diuresis assay was developed by the Hansen lab to study the effects of RNAi-mediated knockdown of aquaporin genes on Aedes aegypti mosquito diuresis. The protocol is setup in two parts: the first demonstration illustrates how to construct a simple mosquito injection device and how to prepare and inject dsRNA into the thorax of mosquitoes for RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. The second demonstration illustrates how to determine excretion rates in mosquitoes using an in vivo bioassay.

  15. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA) mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Lauren D; Young, Elizabeth C; Ritchie, Kimberly B; Paul, John H

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs) of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain) were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's) in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA-mediated HGT in the

  16. Have you heard? Viral-mediated gene therapy restores hearing.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donna M; Raphael, Yehoash

    2012-07-26

    Genetic loss of VGLUT3 in cochlear inner hair cells results in profound deafness. In this issue of Neuron, Akil et al. (2012) show that AAV-mediated introduction of wild-type VGLUT3 in the genetically deaf mouse cochlea results in significantly improved hearing.

  17. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  18. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  19. Gene looping facilitates TFIIH kinase-mediated termination of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Scott; Ansari, Athar

    2015-01-01

    TFIIH is a general transcription factor with kinase and helicase activities. The kinase activity resides in the Kin28 subunit of TFIIH. The role of Kin28 kinase in the early steps of transcription is well established. Here we report a novel role of Kin28 in the termination of transcription. We show that RNAPII reads through a termination signal upon kinase inhibition. Furthermore, the recruitment of termination factors towards the 3′ end of a gene was compromised in the kinase mutant, thus confirming the termination defect. A concomitant decrease in crosslinking of termination factors near the 5′ end of genes was also observed in the kinase-defective mutant. Simultaneous presence of termination factors towards both the ends of a gene is indicative of gene looping; while the loss of termination factor occupancy from the distal ends suggest the abolition of a looped gene conformation. Accordingly, CCC analysis revealed that the looped architecture of genes was severely compromised in the Kin28 kinase mutant. In a looping defective sua7-1 mutant, even the enzymatically active Kin28 kinase could not rescue the termination defect. These results strongly suggest a crucial role of Kin28 kinase-dependent gene looping in the termination of transcription in budding yeast. PMID:26286112

  20. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Kaisa-Emilia; Airenne, Kari; Ylä-Herttulala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism. PMID:25912715

  1. ipt Gene transformation in petunia by an Agrobacterium mediated method.

    PubMed

    Bai, L J; Ye, C J; Lu, J Y; Yang, D E; Xue, H; Pan, Y; Cao, P X; Wang, B; Liu, M

    2009-01-01

    To prevent leaf senescence of petunia, the cytokinin biosynthetic gene isopentenyl transferase (ipt) was placed under the control of 35S promoter and introduced into petunia. PCR analysis showed an expected 0.5 Kb fragment of ipt gene in transgenic petunia. RT-PCR analysis indicated the expression of ipt gene in the transgenic lines. Leaves from transgenic plants remained green and healthy in normal culture condition, while the non-transformed plants turned to yellow. Transgenic plants showed a reduction in height and smaller leaf sizes. In transgenic lines, the internodes were shorter, and the roots grew slower than the non-transformed plants.

  2. [Classification and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in China--A review].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Xu, Hai

    2016-02-04

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs, developing from the treatment of urinary tract infection in early time and now from the treatment of intestinal infection and respiratory infection, have been widely used in clinical, animal husbandry and aquaculture. Bacteria gradually become resistant to them and resistance mechanism is more and more complicated. Quinolone resistance mechanism is mainly divided into chromosome mediated resistance and plasmid mediated resistance, the latter plays an important role in spreading of antibiotic resistance. In 1998, plasmid mediated quinolone resistance mechanism was reported for the first time, namely the qnr gene mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism. qnr genes can spread rapidly in different bacteria, which causes the infection difficult to control, makes the nosocomial infection popular in a wide range. In addition, qnr genes are usually associated with β-lactamase resistance gene. They exist in complex integron and integrate with the other varieties of resistance genes, which narrows the space of clinical medicine choose or drug combinations use to treat related bacterial infection and brings us a serious challenge. In this review, we provide a detailed overview for the historical discovery, classification, the resistance mechanisms of qnr genes, and the prevalence of those genes in China.

  3. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  4. Ocular Localization and Transduction by Adenoviral Vectors Are Serotype-Dependent and Can Be Modified by Inclusion of RGD Fiber Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Kazuhiro; Mori, Keisuke; Shoji, Takuhei; Omata, Hidekazu; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Brough, Douglas E.; Wei, Lisa L.; Yoneya, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate localization and transgene expression from adenoviral vector of serotypes 5, 35, and 28, ± an RGD motif in the fiber following intravitreal or subretinal administration. Methods Ocular transduction by adenoviral vector serotypes ± RGD was studied in the eyes of mice receiving an intravitreous or subretinal injection. Each serotype expressed a CMV-GFP expression cassette and histological sections of eyes were examined. Transgene expression levels were examined using luciferase (Luc) regulated by the CMV promoter. Results GFP localization studies revealed that serotypes 5 and 28 given intravitreously transduced corneal endothelial, trabecular, and iris cells. Intravitreous delivery of the unmodified Ad35 serotype transduced only trabecular meshwork cells, but, the modification of the RGD motif into the fiber of the Ad35 viral vector base expanded transduction to corneal endothelial and iris cells. Incorporation of the RGD motif into the fiber knob with deletion of RGD from the penton base did not affect the transduction ability of the Ad5 vector base. Subretinal studies showed that RGD in the Ad5 knob shifted transduction from RPE cells to photoreceptor cells. Using a CMV-Luc expression cassette, intravitreous delivery of all the tested vectors, such as Ad5-, Ad35- and Ad28- resulted in an initial rapid induction of luciferase activity that thereafter declined. Subretinal administration of vectors showed a marked difference in transgene activity. Ad35-Luc gene expression peaked at 7 days and remained elevated for 6 months. Ad28-Luc expression was high after 1 day and remained sustained for one month. Conclusions Different adenoviral vector serotypes ± modifications transduce different cells within the eye. Transgene expression can be brief or extended and is serotype and delivery route dependent. Thus, adenoviral vectors provide a versatile platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents for ocular diseases. PMID:25232844

  5. Gene Deletion in Barley Mediated by LTR-retrotransposon BARE

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Yang, Fei; Schulman, Alan H.; Zhu, Jinghuan; Jia, Yong; Wang, Junmei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Jia, Qiaojun; Hua, Wei; Yang, Jianming; Li, Chengdao

    2017-01-01

    A poly-row branched spike (prbs) barley mutant was obtained from soaking a two-rowed barley inflorescence in a solution of maize genomic DNA. Positional cloning and sequencing demonstrated that the prbs mutant resulted from a 28 kb deletion including the inflorescence architecture gene HvRA2. Sequence annotation revealed that the HvRA2 gene is flanked by two LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons (BARE) sharing 89% sequence identity. A recombination between the integrase (IN) gene regions of the two BARE copies resulted in the formation of an intact BARE and loss of HvRA2. No maize DNA was detected in the recombination region although the flanking sequences of HvRA2 gene showed over 73% of sequence identity with repetitive sequences on 10 maize chromosomes. It is still unknown whether the interaction of retrotransposons between barley and maize has resulted in the recombination observed in the present study. PMID:28252053

  6. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy Against Viral Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-12

    economy. Vaccine development is an important strategy to thwart the threat of these viral biothreat agents. There is an urgent need to improve...Alberta, Tl A 8K6. Canada E-mail: josh. wu@drdc-rddc.gc.ca .• 78 JoshQ.H. Wu existing vaccines against these agents and to develop new ones. Gene...of vaccines against viral biothreat agents. Genes encoding protective antigens of viral biothreat agents can be carried by these viral vectors and

  7. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  8. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy.

  9. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  10. Gene therapy-mediated delivery of targeted cytotoxins for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Yagiz, Kader; Liu, Chunyan; Muhammad, A K M G; Puntel, Mariana; Foulad, David; Zadmehr, Ali; Ahlzadeh, Gabrielle E; Kroeger, Kurt M; Tesarfreund, Matthew; Lee, Sharon; Debinski, Waldemar; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive N; Rodriguez, Ron; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-11-16

    Restricting the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents by targeting receptors exclusively expressed on tumor cells is critical when treating infiltrative brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBMs express an IL-13 receptor (IL13Rα2) that differs from the physiological IL4R/IL13R receptor. We developed a regulatable adenoviral vector (Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE) encoding a mutated human IL-13 fused to Pseudomonas exotoxin (mhIL-13-PE) that specifically binds to IL13Rα2 to provide sustained expression, effective anti-GBM cytotoxicity, and minimal neurotoxicity. The therapeutic Ad also encodes mutated human IL-4 that binds to the physiological IL4R/IL13R without interacting with IL13Rα2, thus inhibiting potential binding of mhIL-13-PE to normal brain cells. Using intracranial GBM xenografts and syngeneic mouse models, we tested the Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE and two protein formulations, hIL-13-PE used in clinical trials (Cintredekin Besudotox) and a second-generation mhIL-13-PE. Cintredekin Besudotox doubled median survival without eliciting long-term survival and caused severe neurotoxicity; mhIL-13-PE led to ∼40% long-term survival, eliciting severe neurological toxicity at the high dose tested. In contrast, Ad-mediated delivery of mhIL-13-PE led to tumor regression and long-term survival in over 70% of the animals, without causing apparent neurotoxicity. Although Cintredekin Besudotox was originally developed to target GBM, when tested in a phase III trial it failed to achieve clinical endpoints and revealed neurotoxicity. Limitations of Cintredekin Besudotox include its short half-life, which demanded frequent or continued administration, and binding to IL4R/IL13R, present in normal brain cells. These shortcomings were overcome by our therapeutic Ad, thus representing a significant advance in the development of targeted therapeutics for GBM.

  11. Phasevarions mediate random switching of gene expression in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Dowideit, Stefanie J; Edwards, Jennifer L; Falsetta, Megan L; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Harrison, Odile B; Fox, Kate L; Seib, Kate L; Maguire, Tina L; Wang, Andrew H-J; Maiden, Martin C; Grimmond, Sean M; Apicella, Michael A; Jennings, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion"), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M) systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes--modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18) and modB (modB1, 2). These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5'-AGAAA-3'. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11), differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates that

  12. Novel mechanism of JNK pathway activation by adenoviral E1A.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Vasily S; Brichkina, Anna I; Morrison, Helen; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A; Herrlich, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The adenoviral oncoprotein E1A influences cellular regulation by interacting with a number of cellular proteins. In collaboration with complementary oncogenes, E1A fully transforms primary cells. As part of this action, E1A inhibits transcription of c-Jun:Fos target genes while promoting that of c-Jun:ATF2-dependent genes including jun. Both c-Jun and ATF2 are hyperphosphorylated in response to E1A. In the current study, E1A was fused with the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor (E1A-ER) to monitor the immediate effect of E1A activation. With this approach we now show that E1A activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream kinases MKK4 and MKK7, as well as the small GTPase Rac1. Activation of the JNK pathway requires the N-terminal domain of E1A, and, importantly, is independent of transcription. In addition, it requires the presence of ERM proteins. Downregulation of signaling components upstream of JNK inhibits E1A-dependent JNK/c-Jun activation. Taking these findings together, we show that E1A activates the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway upstream of Rac1 in a transcription-independent manner, demonstrating a novel mechanism of E1A action.

  13. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  14. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  15. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  16. Phasevarions Mediate Random Switching of Gene Expression in Pathogenic Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Dowideit, Stefanie J.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Falsetta, Megan L.; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Harrison, Odile B.; Fox, Kate L.; Seib, Kate L.; Maguire, Tina L.; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Maiden, Martin C.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Apicella, Michael A.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a “phasevarion”), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M) systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes—modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18) and modB (modB1, 2). These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5′-AGAAA-3′. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11), differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates that

  17. Lentiviral-mediated gene correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Donald S; McIntyre, Chantelle; Thomas, Belinda; Koldej, Rachel; Ranieri, Enzo; Roberts, Ainslie; Clements, Peter R; Dunning, Kylie; Byers, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is the most common of the mucopolysaccharidoses. The disease is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme sulphamidase and results in the storage of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparan sulphate. MPS IIIA is characterised by widespread storage and urinary excretion of heparan sulphate, and a progressive and eventually profound neurological course. Gene therapy is one of the few avenues of treatment that hold promise of a sustainable treatment for this disorder. Methods The murine sulphamidase gene cDNA was cloned into a lentiviral vector and high-titre virus produced. Human MPS IIIA fibroblast cultures were transduced with the sulphamidase vector and analysed using molecular, enzymatic and metabolic assays. High-titre virus was intravenously injected into six 5-week old MPS IIIA mice. Three of these mice were pre-treated with hyperosmotic mannitol. The weight of animals was monitored and GAG content in urine samples was analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Transduction of cultured MPS IIIA fibroblasts with the sulphamidase gene corrected both the enzymatic and metabolic defects. Sulphamidase secreted by gene-corrected cells was able to cross correct untransduced MPS IIIA cells. Urinary GAG was found to be greatly reduced in samples from mice receiving the vector compared to untreated MPS IIIA controls. In addition, the weight of treated mice became progressively normalised over the 6-months post-treatment. Conclusion Lentiviral vectors appear promising vehicles for the development of gene therapy for MPS IIIA. PMID:17227588

  18. Gene therapy techniques for the delivery of endothelial nitric oxide synthase to the lung for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deng, W; Bivalacqua, T J; Champion, H C; Hellstrom, W J; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious, often fatal disease characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary vascular bed, increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and right heart failure. The increased vascular resistance in the pulmonary circulation is due to structural changes and increased vasoconstrictor tone. Although current therapies have prolonged survival, the long-term outcome is not favorable. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and is important in regulating vascular resistance and in vascular remodeling in the lung. NO deficiency due to endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PH. Therefore, local eNOS gene delivery to the lung is a promising approach for the treatment of PH. Adenoviral-mediated in vivo gene therapy and adult stem cell-based ex vivo gene therapy are two attractive current gene therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In this chapter we describe the use of two gene transfer techniques, i.e., adenoviral gene transfer of eNOS and eNOS gene-modified rat marrow stromal cells, for eNOS gene delivery to the lung of laboratory animals for the treatment of PH.

  19. Efficient Gene Silencing Mediated by Tobacco Rattle Virus in an Emerging Model Plant Physalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the ‘Chinese lantern’). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and

  20. Efficient gene silencing mediated by tobacco rattle virus in an emerging model plant physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the 'Chinese lantern'). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and development

  1. slo K+ channel gene regulation mediates rapid drug tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Al-Hasan, Yazan M.; Larios, Leo E.; Bohm, Rudolf A.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2004-12-01

    Changes in neural activity caused by exposure to drugs may trigger homeostatic mechanisms that attempt to restore normal neural excitability. In Drosophila, a single sedation with the anesthetic benzyl alcohol changes the expression of the slo K+ channel gene and induces rapid drug tolerance. We demonstrate linkage between these two phenomena by using a mutation and a transgene. A mutation that eliminates slo expression prevents tolerance, whereas expression from an inducible slo transgene mimics tolerance in naïve animals. The behavioral response to benzyl alcohol can be separated into an initial phase of hyperkinesis and a subsequent phase of sedation. The hyperkinetic phase causes a drop in slo gene expression and makes animals more sensitive to benzyl alcohol. It is the sedative phase that stimulates slo gene expression and induces tolerance. We demonstrate that the expression level of slo is a predictor of drug sensitivity. drug abuse | potassium channel | transcription regulation

  2. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  3. Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele Foos, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Burnham Institute La Jolla, California 92037 REPORT DATE: February 2005 TYPE...NUMBERS Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate DAMD17-02-1-0019 Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness 6. AUTHOR(S) Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele...REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Foos G, Hauser CA (2004) The role of Ets transcription factors in mediating cellular transformation. In: Handbook of Experimental

  4. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smethells, John R; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector injection was examined in rats on measures of anxiety, body weight, cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. To examine anxiety, periadolescent rats were tested in an elevated-plus maze. Weight gain was then examined under four rodent diets. Ten months after CocH-injection, adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine intravenously and, subsequently, cocaine-induced locomotion was tested. Viral gene transfer produced sustained plasma levels of CocH for over 13 months of testing. CocH-treated rats did not differ from controls in measures of anxiety, and only showed a transient reduction in weight gain during the first 3 weeks postinjection. However, CocH-treated rats were insensitive to cocaine. At 10 months postinjection, none of the CocH-treated rats initiated cocaine self-administration, unlike 90% of the control rats. At 13 months postinjection, CocH-treated rats showed no cocaine-induced locomotion, whereas control rats showed a dose-dependent enhancement of locomotion. CocH vector produced a long-term blockade of the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine in rats, emphasizing its role as a promising therapeutic intervention in cocaine abuse.

  5. Liver X receptor α mediates hepatic triglyceride accumulation through upregulation of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Bradlee L.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saarinen, Alicia M.; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Kershaw, Erin E.; Zechner, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are transcription factors essential for cholesterol homeostasis and lipogenesis. LXRα has been implicated in regulating hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation upon both influx of adipose-derived fatty acids (FAs) during fasting and stimulation of de novo FA synthesis by chemical agonism of LXR. However, whether or not a convergent mechanism is employed to drive deposition of FAs from these 2 different sources in TGs is undetermined. Here, we report that the G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2), a selective inhibitor of intracellular TG hydrolysis/lipolysis, is a direct target gene of LXRα. Transcriptional activation is conferred by LXRα binding to a direct repeat 4 (DR4) motif in the G0S2 promoter. While LXRα–/– mice exhibited decreased hepatic G0S2 expression, adenoviral expression of G0S2 was sufficient to restore fasting-induced TG storage and glycogen depletion in the liver of these mice. In response to LXR agonist T0901317, G0S2 ablation prevented hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia without affecting the beneficial effects on HDL. Thus, the LXRα-G0S2 axis plays a distinct role in regulating hepatic TG during both fasting and pharmacological activation of LXR. PMID:28239648

  6. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  7. LONG DISTANCE POLLEN-MEDIATED GENE FLOW FROM CREEPING BENTGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers from USEPA WED have measured gene flow from experimental fields of Roundup? herbicide resistant genetically modified (GM) creeping bentgrass a grass used primarily on golf courses, to compatible non-crop relatives. Using a sampling design based on the estimated time ...

  8. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing. Images PMID:1851991

  9. RNAi pathway genes are resistant to small RNA mediated gene silencing in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pompey, Justine M; Morf, Laura; Singh, Upinder

    2014-01-01

    The RNA interference pathway in the protist Entamoeba histolytica plays important roles in permanent gene silencing as well as in the regulation of virulence determinants. Recently, a novel RNA interference (RNAi)-based silencing technique was developed in this parasite that uses a gene endogenously silenced by small RNAs as a "trigger" to induce silencing of other genes that are fused to it. Fusion to a trigger gene induces the production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs, resulting in robust and permanent silencing of the cognate gene. This approach has silenced multiple genes including those involved in virulence and transcriptional regulation. We now demonstrate that all tested genes of the amebic RNAi pathway are unable to be silenced using the trigger approach, including Argonaute genes (Ago2-1, Ago2-2, and Ago2-3), RNaseIII, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). In all situations (except for RdRP), fusion to a trigger successfully induces production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs to the cognate gene. These small RNAs are capable of silencing a target gene in trans, indicating that they are functional; despite this, however, they cannot silence the RNAi pathway genes. Interestingly, when a trigger is fused to RdRP, small RNA induction to RdRP does not occur, a unique phenotype hinting that either RdRP is highly resistant to being a target of small RNAs or that small RNA generation may be controlled by RdRP. The inability of the small RNA pathway to silence RNAi genes in E. histolytica, despite the generation of functional small RNAs to these loci suggest that epigenetic factors may protect certain genomic loci and thus determine susceptibility to small RNA mediated silencing.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-05-15

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing.

  11. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Lactase gene expression is spatiotemporally regulated during mammalian gut development. We hypothesize that distinct DNA control regions specify appropriate spatial and temporal patterning of lactase gene expression. In order to define regions of the lactase promoter involved in mediating intestine-specific and spatiotemporal restricted expression, transgenic mice harboring 100 bp, 1.3- and 2.0- kb fragments of the 5' flanking region of the rat lactase gene cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter were characterized. The 100-bp lactase promoter-reporter transgenic mouse line expressed maximal luciferase activity in the intestine with a posterior shift in spatial restriction and ectopic expression in the stomach and lung. The temporal pattern of expression mediated by the 1.3-kb promoter?reporter transgene increases with postnatal maturation in contrast with the postnatal decline mediated by the 2.0-kb promoter-reporter transgene and the endogenous lactase gene. The differential transgene expression patterns mediated by the lactase promoter fragments suggests that intestine-specific spatial and temporal control elements reside in distinct regions of the DNA sequences upstream of the lactase gene transcription start-site.

  12. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  13. Imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in human glioma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kaestle, Christine; Winkeler, Alexandra; Richter, Raphaela; Sauer, Heinrich; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fraefel, Cornel; Wartenberg, Maria; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-06-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP). After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector-mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of < 150 μm. Guided vector injection into the spheroids showed transduction efficiencies ranging between < 10 and > 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application-injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  14. Sleeping Beauty-Mediated Drug Resistance Gene Transfer in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Olson, Erik R.; McIvor, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system can insert sequences into mammalian chromosomes, supporting long-term expression of both reporter and therapeutic genes. Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an ideal therapeutic gene transfer target as they are used in therapy for a variety of hematologic and metabolic conditions. As successful SB-mediated gene transfer into human CD34+ HPCs has been reported by several laboratories, we sought to extend these studies to the introduction of a therapeutic gene conferring resistance to methotrexate (MTX), potentially providing a chemoprotective effect after engraftment. SB-mediated transposition of hematopoietic progenitors, using a transposon encoding an L22Y variant dihydrofolate reductase fused to green fluorescent protein, conferred resistance to methotrexate and dipyridamole, a nucleoside transport inhibitor that tightens MTX selection conditions, as assessed by in vitro hematopoietic colony formation. Transposition of individual transgenes was confirmed by sequence analysis of transposon–chromosome junctions recovered by linear amplification-mediated PCR. These studies demonstrate the potential of SB-mediated transposition of HPCs for expression of drug resistance genes for selective and chemoprotective applications. PMID:26176276

  15. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-02

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases.

  16. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-06-30

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations.

  17. Cytokine gene-mediated immunotherapy: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jinushi, Masahisa; Tahara, Hideaki

    2009-08-01

    Recent understanding of the molecular events crucial in overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments and generating effective antitumor immunity provides us with the wreath opportunity to manipulate genes that have a key role in antitumor immune responses. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) are two indispensable cytokines for activating dendritic cells and boosting the strong immune responses against cancer. In this review, we describe the antitumor mechanisms and clinical application of gene-modified tumor cells and dendritic cells to secrete GM-CSF or IL-12, respectively, in various preclinical and clinical settings. The principles operative in these vaccination strategies may prove applicable to other immunotherapy strategies, especially in combination with other therapeutic modalities, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  18. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  19. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-01-01

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations. PMID:18474406

  20. Thixotropic solutions enhance viral-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Michael P; Luner, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zabner, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient in part because its receptor is absent on the apical surface of the airways. Targeting adenovirus to other receptors, increasing the viral concentration, and even prolonging the incubation time with adenovirus vectors can partially overcome the lack of receptors and facilitate gene transfer. Unfortunately, mucociliary clearance would prevent prolonged incubation time in vivo. Thixotropic solutions (TS) are gels that upon a vigorous shearing force reversibly become liquid. We hypothesized that formulating recombinant adenoviruses in TS would decrease virus clearance and thus enhance gene transfer to the airway epithelia. We found that clearance of virus-sized fluorescent beads by human airway epithelia in vitro and by monkey trachea in vivo were markedly decreased when the beads were formulated in TS compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Adenovirus formulated in TS significantly increased adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of a reporter gene in human airway epithelia in vitro and in murine airway epithelia in vivo. Furthermore, an adenovirus encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene (AdCFTR) formulated in TS was more efficient in correcting the chloride transport defect in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia than AdCFTR formulated in PBS. These data indicate a novel strategy to augment the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer vectors and could be of value in gene transfer to cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vivo.

  1. Laminin mediates tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta- casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain. PMID:7730398

  2. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  3. Activity-Regulated Genes as Mediators of Neural Circuit Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jennifer H.; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Many electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms are common to the seemingly diverse types of activity-dependent functional adaptation that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. They fine-tune brain circuits by strengthening or weakening synaptic connections or by altering synapse numbers. Their effects are further modulated by posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, that control activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. PMID:21601615

  4. Genes That Mediate Arsenic and Heavy Metal Detoxification in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, David A.; Gong, Ji-Ming; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2003-03-26

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of arsenic tolerance in plants, we developed a genetic screen to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered tolerance to arsenic. We report here on the isolation of ars1, a novel mutant with significantly increased tolerance to arsenate. ars1 accumulates similar levels of arsenic as wild type plants, but ars1 tolerance does not appear to be phytochelatin or glutathione dependent. ars1 plants do have a higher rate of phosphate uptake than wild type plants and plants grown with an excess of phosphate show increased tolerance to arsenate. Traditional models of arsenate tolerance in plants are based on the suppression of phosphate uptake pathways and, consequently, the reduced uptake of arsenate. Our data suggest that arsenate tolerance in ars1 is due to a new mechanism mediated by increased phosphate uptake in ars1. Results exploring increased metal tolerance through engineered phytochelatin expression will also be discussed.

  5. Gene Expression of Proresolving Lipid Mediator Pathways Is Associated With Clinical Outcomes in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sarah K.; Butler, Kathryn L.; Hayden, Douglas; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Serhan, Charles N.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Specialized proresolving lipid mediators have emerged as powerful modulators of inflammation and activators of resolution. Animal models show significant benefits of specialized proresolving lipid mediators on survival and wound healing after major burn trauma. To date, no studies have investigated specialized proresolving lipid mediators and their relation to other lipid mediator pathways in humans after trauma. Here we determine if patients with poor outcomes after trauma have dysregulated lipid mediator pathways. Design We studied blood leukocyte expression of 18 genes critical to the synthesis, signaling, and metabolism of specialized proresolving lipid mediators and proinflammatory lipid mediators, and we correlated these expression patterns with clinical outcomes in trauma patients from the Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury study. Setting Seven U.S. medical trauma centers. Subjects Ninety-six patients enrolled in the Inflammation and Host Response to Injury study, after blunt trauma and unambiguously classified as having uncomplicated or complicated recoveries. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Within each patient, the 18 genes of interest were used to calculate scores for distinct families of lipid mediators, including resolvins, lipoxins, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes, as well as leukotriene to resolvin score ratios. Scores were built using a simple weighting scheme, taking into consideration both dependent and independent activities of enzymes and receptors responsible for lipid mediator biosynthesis and function. Individually, ALOX12, PTGS2, PTGES, PTGDS, ALOX5AP, LTA4H, FPR2, PTGER2, LTB4R, HPGD, PTGR1, and CYP4F3 were expressed differentially over 28 days posttrauma between patients with uncomplicated and complicated recoveries (p < 0.05). When all genes were combined into scores, patients with uncomplicated recoveries had differential and higher resolvin

  6. ISEcp1-mediated transposition of qnrB-like gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cattoir, Vincent; Nordmann, Patrice; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Espinal, Paula; Poirel, Laurent

    2008-08-01

    A novel QnrB-like plasmid-mediated resistance determinant, QnrB19, was identified from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate from Colombia. Its gene was associated with an ISEcp1-like insertion element that did not act as a promoter for its expression. Using an in vitro model of transposition, we showed that the ISEcp1-like element was able to mobilize the qnrB19 gene.

  7. ISEcp1-Mediated Transposition of qnrB-Like Gene in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Cattoir, Vincent; Nordmann, Patrice; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Espinal, Paula; Poirel, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    A novel QnrB-like plasmid-mediated resistance determinant, QnrB19, was identified from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate from Colombia. Its gene was associated with an ISEcp1-like insertion element that did not act as a promoter for its expression. Using an in vitro model of transposition, we showed that the ISEcp1-like element was able to mobilize the qnrB19 gene. PMID:18519717

  8. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  9. Conserved transcriptional responses to cyanobacterial stressors are mediated by alternate regulation of paralogous genes in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Pfrender, Michael E; Lopez, Jacqueline A; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-04-01

    Despite a significant increase in genomic data, our knowledge of gene functions and their transcriptional responses to environmental stimuli remains limited. Here, we use the model keystone species Daphnia pulex to study environmental responses of genes in the context of their gene family history to better understand the relationship between genome structure and gene function in response to environmental stimuli. Daphnia were exposed to five different treatments, each consisting of a diet supplemented with one of five cyanobacterial species, and a control treatment consisting of a diet of only green algae. Differential gene expression profiles of Daphnia exposed to each of these five cyanobacterial species showed that genes with known functions are more likely to be shared by different expression profiles, whereas genes specific to the lineage of Daphnia are more likely to be unique to a given expression profile. Furthermore, while only a small number of nonlineage-specific genes were conserved across treatment type, there was a high degree of overlap in expression profiles at the functional level. The conservation of functional responses across the different cyanobacterial treatments can be attributed to the treatment-specific expression of different paralogous genes within the same gene family. Comparison with available gene expression data in the literature suggests differences in nutritional composition in diets with cyanobacterial species compared to diets of green algae as a primary driver for cyanobacterial effects on Daphnia. We conclude that conserved functional responses in Daphnia across different cyanobacterial treatments are mediated through alternate regulation of paralogous gene families.

  10. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E).

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer K; Havird, Justin C; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E; genes influenced by environmental factors) to investigate X. fastidiosa relationships and differentiate isolates with low genetic variability. Potential environmentally mediated genes, including host colonization and survival genes related to infection establishment, were identified a priori. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions to the rate of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) was calculated to select genes that may be under increased positive selection compared to previously studied housekeeping genes. Nine genes were sequenced from 54 X. fastidiosa isolates infecting different host plants across the United States. Results of maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian phylogenetic (BP) analyses are in agreement with known X. fastidiosa subspecies clades but show novel within-subspecies differentiation, including geographic differentiation, and provide additional information regarding host-based isolate variation and specificity. dN/dS ratios of environmentally mediated genes, though <1 due to high sequence similarity, are significantly greater than housekeeping gene dN/dS ratios and correlate with increased sequence variability. MLSA-E can more precisely resolve relationships between closely related bacterial strains with low genetic variability, such as X. fastidiosa isolates. Discovering the genetic relationships between X. fastidiosa isolates will provide new insights into the epidemiology of populations of X. fastidiosa, allowing

  11. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA+ cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a

  12. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA (+) cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a novel

  13. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  14. Tnfaip8 is an essential gene for the regulation of glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Woodward, M J; de Boer, J; Heidorn, S; Hubank, M; Kioussis, D; Williams, O; Brady, H J M

    2010-02-01

    Glucocorticoids have significant immunoregulatory actions on thymocytes and T cells and act by binding and activating cytosolic glucocorticoid receptors, which translocate to the nucleus and control gene expression through binding to specific response elements in target genes. Glucocorticoids promote cell death by activating an apoptotic program that requires transcriptional regulation. We set out to identify genes that are crucial to the process of glucocorticoid-mediated thymocyte apoptosis. Freshly isolated murine primary thymocytes were treated with dexamethasone, mRNA isolated and used to screen DNA microarrays. A set of candidate genes with upregulated expression was identified and selected members assayed in reconstituted fetal thymic organ culture (FTOC). Fetal liver-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) were infected with retroviruses expressing individual genes then used to repopulate depleted fetal thymic lobes. Reconstituted FTOCs expressing the gene Tnfaip8 were treated with dexamethasone and shown to be greatly sensitized to dexamethasone. Retrovirus-mediated RNA interference was applied to knock down Tnfaip8 expression in HPCs and these were used to reconstitute FTOCs. We observed that downregulating the expression of Tnfaip8 alone was sufficient to effectively protect thymocytes against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. We propose that Tnfaip8 is crucial in regulating glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis of thymocytes.

  15. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  16. Gene insertion and long-term expression in lung mediated by the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    PubMed

    Belur, Lalitha R; Frandsen, Joel L; Dupuy, Adam J; Ingbar, David H; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Scott McIvor, R

    2003-09-01

    Gene transfer to the lung could provide important new treatments for chronic and acquired lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, emphysema, and cancer. DNA-mediated gene transfer to the lung has been previously demonstrated, but anticipated effectiveness has been limited by low gene transfer efficiencies and by transient expression of the transgene. Here, we combine plasmid-based gene transfer with the integrating capacity of the nonviral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vector system to mediate gene insertion and long-term gene expression in mouse lung. We observed transgene expression after 24 h in lungs of all animals injected with the luciferase transposon (pT/L), but expression for up to 3 months required codelivery of a plasmid encoding the Sleeping Beauty transposase. We also observed long-term expression in pT/L-injected animals transgenic for SB transposase. Transgene expression was localized to the alveolar region of the lung, with transfection including mainly type II pneumocytes. We used a linker-mediated PCR technique to recover transposon flanking sequences, demonstrating transposition of pT/L into mouse chromosomal DNA of the lung.

  17. Construction and characterization of adenoviral vectors for the delivery of TALENs into human cells.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are designed to cut the genomic DNA at specific chromosomal positions. The resulting DNA double strand break activates cellular repair pathways that can be harnessed for targeted genome modifications. TALENs thus constitute a powerful tool to interrogate the function of DNA sequences within complex genomes. Moreover, their high DNA cleavage activity combined with a low cytotoxicity make them excellent candidates for applications in human gene therapy. Full exploitation of these large and repeat-bearing nucleases in human cell types will benefit largely from using the adenoviral vector (AdV) technology. The genetic stability and the episomal nature of AdV genomes in conjunction with the availability of a large number of AdV serotypes able to transduce various human cell types make it possible to achieve high-level and transient expression of TALENs in numerous target cells, regardless of their mitotic state. Here, we describe a set of protocols detailing the rescue, propagation and purification of TALEN-encoding AdVs. Moreover, we describe procedures for the characterization and quantification of recombinant viral DNA present in the resulting AdV preparations. The protocols are preceded by information about their underlying principles and applied in the context of second-generation capsid-modified AdVs expressing TALENs targeted to the AAVS1 "safe harbor" locus on human chromosome 19.

  18. Synthetic Fatty Acids Prevent Plasmid-Mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Getino, María; Sanabria-Ríos, David J.; Fernández-López, Raúl; Campos-Gómez, Javier; Sánchez-López, José M.; Fernández, Antonio; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial conjugation constitutes a major horizontal gene transfer mechanism for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. Antibiotic resistance spread could be halted or diminished by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. In this work, synthetic 2-alkynoic fatty acids were identified as a novel class of conjugation inhibitors. Their chemical properties were investigated by using the prototype 2-hexadecynoic acid and its derivatives. Essential features of effective inhibitors were the carboxylic group, an optimal long aliphatic chain of 16 carbon atoms, and one unsaturation. Chemical modification of these groups led to inactive or less-active derivatives. Conjugation inhibitors were found to act on the donor cell, affecting a wide number of pathogenic bacterial hosts, including Escherichia, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter spp. Conjugation inhibitors were active in inhibiting transfer of IncF, IncW, and IncH plasmids, moderately active against IncI, IncL/M, and IncX plasmids, and inactive against IncP and IncN plasmids. Importantly, the use of 2-hexadecynoic acid avoided the spread of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient population, demonstrating the feasibility of abolishing the dissemination of antimicrobial resistances by blocking bacterial conjugation. PMID:26330514

  19. Toxin-mediated gene regulatory mechanism in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The dangerous human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus relies heavily on toxins to cause disease, but toxin production can put a strong burden on the bacteria’s energy balance. Thus, controlling the synthesis of proteins solely needed in times of toxin production represents a way for the bacteria to avoid wasting energy. One hypothetical manner to accomplish this sort of regulation is by gene regulatory functions of the toxins themselves. There have been several reports about gene regulation by toxins in S. aureus, but these were never verified on the molecular level. In our study published in MBio [Joo et al., 7(5). pii: e01579-16], we show that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), important peptide toxins of S. aureus, release a repressor from the promoter of the operon encoding the toxin export system, thereby enabling toxin secretion. This study describes the first molecular regulatory mechanism exerted by an S. aureus toxin, setting a paradigmatic example of how S. aureus toxins may influence cell functions to adjust them to times of toxin production.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2011-02-01

    The potato gene RB, cloned from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to better characterize this partial resistance phenotype, we have compared host resistance responses mediated by RB with those mediated by the S. demissum-derived R gene R9, which confers immunity to P. infestans carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrR9. We found that both RB and R9 genes were capable of eliciting a hypersensitive cell death response (HR). However, in RB plants, the pathogen escaped HR lesions and continued to grow beyond the inoculation sites. We also found that callose deposition was negatively correlated with resistance levels in tested plants. Transcription patterns of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 basic, PR-2 acidic, and PR-5 indicated that P. infestans inoculation induced transcription of these defense-related genes regardless of the host genotype; however, transcription was reduced in both the susceptible and partially resistant plants later in the infection process but remained elevated in the immune host. Most interestingly, transcription of the HR-associated gene Hin1 was suppressed in both Katahdin and RB-transgenic Katahdin but not in R9 4 days after inoculation. Together, this suggests that suppression of certain defense-related genes may allow P. infestans to spread beyond the site of infection in the partially resistant host despite elicitation of hypersensitive cell death.

  1. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  2. ESTROGENIC STATUS MODULATES DMBA-MEDIATED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION: MICROARRAY-BASED ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic status in women influences the metabolism and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The objective of this study was to examine the influence of estradiol (E2) on 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mediated changes on gene expressio...

  3. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  4. The Nuclear Pore-Associated TREX-2 Complex Employs Mediator to Regulate Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maren; Hellerschmied, Doris; Schubert, Tobias; Amlacher, Stefan; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Reja, Rohit; Pugh, B. Franklin; Clausen, Tim; Köhler, Alwin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) influence gene expression besides their established function in nuclear transport. The TREX-2 complex localizes to the NPC basket and affects gene-NPC interactions, transcription, and mRNA export. How TREX-2 regulates the gene expression machinery is unknown. Here, we show that TREX-2 interacts with the Mediator complex, an essential regulator of RNA Polymerase (Pol) II. Structural and biochemical studies identify a conserved region on TREX-2, which directly binds the Mediator Med31/Med7N submodule. TREX-2 regulates assembly of Mediator with the Cdk8 kinase and is required for recruitment and site-specific phosphorylation of Pol II. Transcriptome and phenotypic profiling confirm that TREX-2 and Med31 are functionally interdependent at specific genes. TREX-2 additionally uses its Mediator-interacting surface to regulate mRNA export suggesting a mechanism for coupling transcription initiation and early steps of mRNA processing. Our data provide mechanistic insight into how an NPC-associated adaptor complex accesses the core transcription machinery. PMID:26317468

  5. Estrogenic status modulates aryl hydrocarbon receptor - mediated hepatic gene expression and carcinogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic status is thought to influence the cancer risk in women and has been reported to affect toxicity of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in animals. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of estradiol (E2) on hepatic gene expression changes mediated by 7,...

  6. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  7. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar 'Morex'. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar 'Morex' or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes.

  8. Molecular Recognition Enables Nanosubstrate-Mediated Delivery of Gene-Encapsulated Nanoparticles with High Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Substrate-mediated gene delivery is a promising method due to its unique ability to preconcentrate exogenous genes onto designated substrates. However, many challenges remain to enable continuous and multiround delivery of the gene using the same substrates without depositing payloads and immobilizing cells in each round of delivery. Herein we introduce a gene delivery system, nanosubstrate-mediated delivery (NSMD) platform, based on two functional components with nanoscale features, including (1) DNA⊂SNPs, supramolecular nanoparticle (SNP) vectors for gene encapsulation, and (2) Ad-SiNWS, adamantane (Ad)-grafted silicon nanowire substrates. The multivalent molecular recognition between the Ad motifs on Ad-SiNWS and the β-cyclodextrin (CD) motifs on DNA⊂SNPs leads to dynamic assembly and local enrichment of DNA⊂SNPs from the surrounding medium onto Ad-SiNWS. Subsequently, once cells settled on the substrate, DNA⊂SNPs enriched on Ad-SiNWS were introduced through the cell membranes by intimate contact with individual nanowires on Ad-SiNWS, resulting in a highly efficient delivery of exogenous genes. Most importantly, sequential delivery of multiple batches of exogenous genes on the same batch cells settled on Ad-SiNWS was realized by sequential additions of the corresponding DNA⊂SNPs with equivalent efficiency. Moreover, using the NSMD platform in vivo, cells recruited on subcutaneously transplanted Ad-SiNWS were also efficiently transfected with exogenous genes loaded into SNPs, validating the in vivo feasibility of this system. We believe that this nanosubstrate-mediated delivery platform will provide a superior system for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery and can be further used for the encapsulation and delivery of other biomolecules. PMID:24708312

  9. Immunology of AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Keirnan; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy largely owing to suitable disease targets, anatomic accessibility, and well-studied immunologic privilege. These advantages have fostered research culminating in several clinical trials and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the vector of choice for many ocular therapies. Pre-clinical and clinical investigations have assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of naturally occurring and engineered AAV serotypes as well as their delivered transgenes and these data have been correlated to potential clinical sequelae. Encouragingly, AAV appears safe and effective with clinical follow-up surpassing 5 years in some studies. As disease targets continue to expand for AAV in the eye, thorough and deliberate assessment of immunologic safety is critical. With careful study, the development of these technologies should concurrently inform the biology of the ocular immune response. PMID:24009613

  10. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway.

  11. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  12. Gene Expression Profiles of Chlamydophila pneumoniae during the Developmental Cycle and Iron Depletion–Mediated Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Mäurer, André P; Mehlitz, Adrian; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Meyer, Thomas F

    2007-01-01

    The obligate intracellular, gram-negative bacterium Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Cpn) has impact as a human pathogen. Little is known about changes in the Cpn transcriptome during its biphasic developmental cycle (the acute infection) and persistence. The latter stage has been linked to chronic diseases. To analyze Cpn CWL029 gene expression, we designed a pathogen-specific oligo microarray and optimized the extraction method for pathogen RNA. Throughout the acute infection, ratio expression profiles for each gene were generated using 48 h post infection as a reference. Based on these profiles, significantly expressed genes were separated into 12 expression clusters using self-organizing map clustering and manual sorting into the “early”, “mid”, “late”, and “tardy” cluster classes. The latter two were differentiated because the “tardy” class showed steadily increasing expression at the end of the cycle. The transcriptome of the Cpn elementary body (EB) and published EB proteomics data were compared to the cluster profile of the acute infection. We found an intriguing association between “late” genes and genes coding for EB proteins, whereas “tardy” genes were mainly associated with genes coding for EB mRNA. It has been published that iron depletion leads to Cpn persistence. We compared the gene expression profiles during iron depletion–mediated persistence with the expression clusters of the acute infection. This led to the finding that establishment of iron depletion–mediated persistence is more likely a mid-cycle arrest in development rather than a completely distinct gene expression pattern. Here, we describe the Cpn transcriptome during the acute infection, differentiating “late” genes, which correlate to EB proteins, and “tardy” genes, which lead to EB mRNA. Expression profiles during iron mediated–persistence led us to propose the hypothesis that the transcriptomic “clock” is arrested during acute mid-cycle. PMID

  13. AAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal disorders in large animal models.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lhériteau, Elsa; Lhéariteau, Elsa; Moullier, Phillip; Rolling, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inherited and noninherited blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they elicit minimal immune responses and mediated long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types. Extensive preclinical evaluation of new strategies in large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. Because of differences in the retinal structures among species and unique structures such as the macula and fovea in the primate retina, nonhuman primates are widely used as preclinical animal models. But the observation of inherited retinal degenerations in dogs, which share a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with humans, has led to the characterization of several canine models for retinal diseases, one of which has already responded successfully to AAV-mediated gene therapy. This article presents a review and detailed discussion of the various large animal models available for the study of AAV-mediated gene-based therapies in the retina.

  14. Recurrent Domestication by Lepidoptera of Genes from Their Parasites Mediated by Bracoviruses.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Laila; Boulain, Helene; Gauthier, Jeremy; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Musset, Karine; Jakubowska, Agata K; Aury, Jean-Marc; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Huguet, Elisabeth; Herrero, Salvador; Drezen, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Bracoviruses are symbiotic viruses associated with tens of thousands of species of parasitic wasps that develop within the body of lepidopteran hosts and that collectively parasitize caterpillars of virtually every lepidopteran species. Viral particles are produced in the wasp ovaries and injected into host larvae with the wasp eggs. Once in the host body, the viral DNA circles enclosed in the particles integrate into lepidopteran host cell DNA. Here we show that bracovirus DNA sequences have been inserted repeatedly into lepidopteran genomes, indicating this viral DNA can also enter germline cells. The original mode of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) unveiled here is based on the integrative properties of an endogenous virus that has evolved as a gene transfer agent within parasitic wasp genomes for ≈100 million years. Among the bracovirus genes thus transferred, a phylogenetic analysis indicated that those encoding C-type-lectins most likely originated from the wasp gene set, showing that a bracovirus-mediated gene flux exists between the 2 insect orders Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Furthermore, the acquisition of bracovirus sequences that can be expressed by Lepidoptera has resulted in the domestication of several genes that could result in adaptive advantages for the host. Indeed, functional analyses suggest that two of the acquired genes could have a protective role against a common pathogen in the field, baculovirus. From these results, we hypothesize that bracovirus-mediated HGT has played an important role in the evolutionary arms race between Lepidoptera and their pathogens.

  15. Recurrent Domestication by Lepidoptera of Genes from Their Parasites Mediated by Bracoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gasmi, Laila; Boulain, Helene; Gauthier, Jeremy; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Musset, Karine; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Aury, Jean-Marc; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Huguet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bracoviruses are symbiotic viruses associated with tens of thousands of species of parasitic wasps that develop within the body of lepidopteran hosts and that collectively parasitize caterpillars of virtually every lepidopteran species. Viral particles are produced in the wasp ovaries and injected into host larvae with the wasp eggs. Once in the host body, the viral DNA circles enclosed in the particles integrate into lepidopteran host cell DNA. Here we show that bracovirus DNA sequences have been inserted repeatedly into lepidopteran genomes, indicating this viral DNA can also enter germline cells. The original mode of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) unveiled here is based on the integrative properties of an endogenous virus that has evolved as a gene transfer agent within parasitic wasp genomes for ≈100 million years. Among the bracovirus genes thus transferred, a phylogenetic analysis indicated that those encoding C-type-lectins most likely originated from the wasp gene set, showing that a bracovirus-mediated gene flux exists between the 2 insect orders Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Furthermore, the acquisition of bracovirus sequences that can be expressed by Lepidoptera has resulted in the domestication of several genes that could result in adaptive advantages for the host. Indeed, functional analyses suggest that two of the acquired genes could have a protective role against a common pathogen in the field, baculovirus. From these results, we hypothesize that bracovirus-mediated HGT has played an important role in the evolutionary arms race between Lepidoptera and their pathogens. PMID:26379286

  16. Understanding microRNA-mediated gene regulatory networks through mathematical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has added a new player to the regulation of gene expression. With the increasing number of molecular species involved in gene regulatory networks, it is hard to obtain an intuitive understanding of network dynamics. Mathematical modelling can help dissecting the role of miRNAs in gene regulatory networks, and we shall here review the most recent developments that utilise different mathematical modelling approaches to provide quantitative insights into the function of miRNAs in the regulation of gene expression. Key miRNA regulation features that have been elucidated via modelling include: (i) the role of miRNA-mediated feedback and feedforward loops in fine-tuning of gene expression; (ii) the miRNA–target interaction properties determining the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated gene repression; and (iii) the competition for shared miRNAs leading to the cross-regulation of genes. However, there is still lack of mechanistic understanding of many other properties of miRNA regulation like unconventional miRNA–target interactions, miRNA regulation at different sub-cellular locations and functional miRNA variant, which will need future modelling efforts to deal with. This review provides an overview of recent developments and challenges in this field. PMID:27317695

  17. A novel immunocompetent murine model for replicating oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Hedjran, F; Larson, C; Perez, G L; Reid, T

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses are under investigation as a promising novel strategy for cancer immunotherapeutics. Unfortunately, there is no immunocompetent mouse cancer model to test oncolytic adenovirus because murine cancer cells are generally unable to produce infectious viral progeny from human adenoviruses. We find that the murine K-ras-induced lung adenocarcinoma cell line ADS-12 supports adenoviral infection and generates infectious viral progeny. ADS-12 cells express the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor and infected ADS-12 cells express the viral protein E1A. We find that our previously described oncolytic virus, adenovirus TAV-255 (AdTAV-255), kills ADS-12 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We investigated ADS-12 cells as an in-vivo model system for replicating oncolytic adenoviruses. Subcutaneous injection of ADS-12 cells into immunocompetent 129 mice led to tumor formation in all injected mice. Intratumoral injection of AdTAV-255 in established tumors causes a significant reduction in tumor growth. This model system represents the first fully immunocompetent mouse model for cancer treatment with replicating oncolytic adenoviruses, and therefore will be useful to study the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenoviruses in general and particularly immunostimulatory viruses designed to evoke an antitumor immune response. PMID:25525035

  18. Advances and Future Challenges in Adenoviral Vector Pharmacology and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Reeti; Chen, Christopher Y; Weaver, Eric A; Barry, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus is a robust vector for therapeutic applications, but its use is limited by our understanding of its complex in vivo pharmacology. In this review we describe the necessity of identifying its natural, widespread, and multifaceted interactions with the host since this information will be crucial for efficiently redirecting virus into target cells. In the rational design of vectors, the notion of overcoming a sequence of viral “sinks” must be combined with re-targeting to target populations with capsid as well as shielding the vectors from pre-existing or toxic immune responses. It must also be noted that most known adenoviral pharmacology is deduced from the most commonly used serotypes, Ad5 and Ad2. However, these serotypes may not represent all adenoviruses, and may not even represent the most useful vectors for all purposes. Chimeras between Ad serotypes may become useful in engineering vectors that can selectively evade substantial viral traps, such as Kupffer cells, while retaining the robust qualities of Ad5. Similarly, vectorizing other Ad serotypes may become useful in avoiding immunity against Ad5 altogether. Taken together, this research on basic adenovirus biology will be necessary in developing vectors that interact more strategically with the host for the most optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:21453281

  19. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  20. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ferguson, John; Ng, Sok Meng; Hui, Ken; Goh, Gerald; Lin, Aiping; Esplugues, Enric; Flavell, Richard A; Abraham, Clara; Zhao, Hongyu; Cho, Judy H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20) compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2), where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  1. Fsh controls gene expression in fish both independently of and through steroid mediation.

    PubMed

    Sambroni, Elisabeth; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms and the mediators relaying Fsh action on testicular functions are poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in fish both gonadotropins (Fsh and Lh) are able to efficiently stimulate steroidogenesis, likely through a direct interaction with their cognate receptors present on the Leydig cells. In this context, it is crucial to understand if Fsh effects are mediated through the production of steroids. To address this issue we performed transcriptome studies after in vitro incubations of rainbow trout testis explants in the presence of Fsh alone or in combination with trilostane, an inhibitor of Δ4- steroidogenesis. Trilostane significantly reduced or suppressed the response of many genes to Fsh (like wisp1, testis gapdhs, cldn11, inha, vt1 or dmrt1) showing that, in fish, important aspects of Fsh action follow indirect pathways and require the production of Δ4-steroids. What is more, most of the genes regulated by Fsh through steroid mediation were similarly regulated by Lh (and/or androgens). In contrast, the response to Fsh of other genes was not suppressed in the presence of trilostane. These latter included genes encoding for anti-mullerian hormone, midkine a (pleiotrophin related), angiopoietine-related protein, cyclins E1 and G1, hepatocyte growth factor activator, insulin-like growth factor 1b/3. A majority of those genes were preferentially regulated by Fsh, when compared to Lh, suggesting that specific regulatory effects of Fsh did not depend on steroid production. Finally, antagonistic effects between Fsh and steroids were found, in particular for genes encoding key factors of steroidogenesis (star, hsd3b1, cyp11b2-2) or for genes of the Igf system (igf1b/3). Our study provides the first clear evidence that, in fish, Fsh exerts Δ4-steroid-independent regulatory functions on many genes which are highly relevant for the onset of spermatogenesis.

  2. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruka; Yoshida, Keita; Hozumi, Akiko; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2014-09-01

    Knockout of genes with CRISPR/Cas9 is a newly emerged approach to investigate functions of genes in various organisms. We demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 can mutate endogenous genes of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, a splendid model for elucidating molecular mechanisms for constructing the chordate body plan. Short guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 mRNA, when they are expressed in Ciona embryos by means of microinjection or electroporation of their expression vectors, introduced mutations in the target genes. The specificity of target choice by sgRNA is relatively high compared to the reports from some other organisms, and a single nucleotide mutation at the sgRNA dramatically reduced mutation efficiency at the on-target site. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis will be a powerful method to study gene functions in Ciona along with another genome editing approach using TALE nucleases.

  4. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  5. SAFB1 Mediates Repression of Immune Regulators and Apoptotic Genes in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hammerich-Hille, Stephanie; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Tsimelzon, Anna; Creighton, Chad J.; Jiang, Shiming; Polo, Jose M.; Melnick, Ari; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2010-01-01

    The scaffold attachment factors SAFB1 and SAFB2 are paralogs, which are involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, differentiation, and stress response. They have been shown to function as estrogen receptor corepressors, and there is evidence for a role in breast tumorigenesis. To identify their endogenous target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we utilized a combined approach of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and gene expression array studies. By performing ChIP-on-chip on microarrays containing 24,000 promoters, we identified 541 SAFB1/SAFB2-binding sites in promoters of known genes, with significant enrichment on chromosomes 1 and 6. Gene expression analysis revealed that the majority of target genes were induced in the absence of SAFB1 or SAFB2 and less were repressed. Interestingly, there was no significant overlap between the genes identified by ChIP-on-chip and gene expression array analysis, suggesting regulation through regions outside the proximal promoters. In contrast to SAFB2, which shared most of its target genes with SAFB1, SAFB1 had many unique target genes, most of them involved in the regulation of the immune system. A subsequent analysis of the estrogen treatment group revealed that 12% of estrogen-regulated genes were dependent on SAFB1, with the majority being estrogen-repressed genes. These were primarily genes involved in apoptosis, such as BBC3, NEDD9, and OPG. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of SAFB1/SAFB2 as corepressors and also uncovers a previously unknown role for SAFB1 in the regulation of immune genes and in estrogen-mediated repression of genes. PMID:19901029

  6. Amino acids in Tobamovirus coat protein controlling pepper L(1a) gene-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Ikumi; Shimomoto, Yoshifumi; Sawada, Hiromasa; Tomita, Reiko; Sekine, Ken-Taro; Kiba, Akinori; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Kappei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2012-10-01

    In pepper plants (genus Capsicum), the resistance against Tobamovirus spp. is conferred by L gene alleles. The recently identified L variant L(1a) can recognize coat proteins (CPs) of Tobacco mild green mosaic virus Japanese strain (TMGMV-J) and Paprika mild mottle virus Japanese strain (PaMMV-J), but not of Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), as the elicitor to induce resistance at 24 °C. Interestingly, L(1a) gene-mediated resistance against TMGMV-J, but not PaMMV-J, is retained at 30 °C. This observation led us to speculate that L(1a) can discriminate between CPs of TMGMV-J and PaMMV-J. In this study, we aimed to determine the region(s) in CP by which L(1a) distinguishes TMGMV-J from PaMMV-J. By using chimeric CPs consisting of TMGMV-J and PaMMV-J, we found that the chimeric TMGMV-J CP, whose residues in the β-sheet domain were replaced by those of PaMMV-J, lost its ability to induce L(1a) gene-mediated resistance at 30 °C. In contrast, the chimeric PaMMV-J CP with the β-sheet domain replaced by TMGMV-J CP was able to induce L(1a) gene-mediated resistance at 30 °C. Furthermore, viral particles were not detected in the leaves inoculated with either chimeric virus. These observations indicated that the amino acids within the β-sheet domain were involved in both the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance and virion formation. Further analyses using chimeric CPs of TMGMV-J and PMMoV indicated that amino acids within the β-sheet domain alone were not sufficient for the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance by TMGMV-J CP. These results suggest that multiple regions in Tobamovirus CP are implicated in the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance.

  7. Isolation and characterization of anti-adenoviral secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-28

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure. PMID:24477283

  9. Adenoviral protein V promotes a process of viral assembly through nucleophosmin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, Hideyo; Dobbins, George C.; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Curiel, David T.

    2012-10-25

    Adenoviral infection induces nucleoplasmic redistribution of a nucleolar nucleophosmin 1/NPM1/B23.1. NPM1 is preferentially localized in the nucleoli of normal cells, whereas it is also present at the nuclear matrix in cancer cells. However, the biological roles of NPM1 during infection are unknown. Here, by analyzing a pV-deletion mutant, Ad5-dV/TSB, we demonstrate that pV promotes the NPM1 translocation from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm in normal cells, and the NPM1 translocation is correlated with adenoviral replication. Lack of pV causes a dramatic reduction of adenoviral replication in normal cells, but not cancer cells, and Ad5-dV/TSB was defective in viral assembly in normal cells. NPM1 knockdown inhibits adenoviral replication, suggesting an involvement of NPM1 in adenoviral biology. Further, we show that NPM1 interacts with empty adenovirus particles which are an intermediate during virion maturation by immunoelectron microscopy. Collectively, these data implicate that pV participates in a process of viral assembly through NPM1.

  10. Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ikeda, Shingo; Lopez-Burks, Martha E; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Schilling, Thomas F

    2014-09-01

    Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb), knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.

  11. LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression is repressed by SIRT1 in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Elayyan, Jinan; Lee, Eun-Jin; Gabay, Odile; Smith, Christopher A; Qiq, Omar; Reich, Eli; Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves; Kimber, Susan J; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona

    2017-04-07

    Reduced SIRT1 activity and levels during osteoarthritis (OA), promotes gradual loss of cartilage. Loss of cartilage matrix is accompanied by an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13, partially because of enhanced LEF1 transcriptional activity. In this study, we assessed the role of SIRT1 in LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression in human OA chondrocytes. Results showed that MMP13 protein levels and enzymatic activity decreased significantly during SIRT1 overexpression or activation by resveratrol. Conversely, MMP13 gene expression was reduced in chondrocytes transfected with SIRT1 siRNA or treated with nicotinamide (NAM), a sirtuin inhibitor. Chondrocytes challenged with IL-1β, a cytokine involved in OA pathogenesis, enhanced LEF1 protein levels, and gene expression, resulting in increased MMP13 gene expression; however, overexpression of SIRT1 during IL-1β challenge impeded LEF1 levels and MMP13 gene expression. Previous reports showed that LEF1 binds to the MMP13 promoter and transactivates its expression, but we observed that SIRT1 repressed LEF1 protein and mRNA expression, ultimately reducing LEF1 transcriptional activity, as judged by luciferase assay. Finally, mouse articular cartilage from Sirt1(-/-) presented increased LEF1 and MMP13 protein levels, similar to human OA cartilage. Thus, demonstrating for the first time that SIRT1 represses MMP13 in human OA chondrocytes, which appears to be mediated, at least in part, through repression of the transcription factor LEF1, a known modulator of MMP13 gene expression.-Elayyan, J. Lee, E.-J., Gabay, O., Smith, C. A., Qiq, O., Reich, E., Mobasheri, A., Henrotin, Y., Kimber, S. J., Dvir-Ginzberg, M. LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression is repressed by SIRT1 in human chondrocytes.

  12. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  13. Expression of Foreign Genes Demonstrates the Effectiveness of Pollen-Mediated Transformation in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liyan; Cui, Guimei; Wang, Yixue; Hao, Yaoshan; Du, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Changbiao; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wu, Shu-Biao; Sun, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Plant genetic transformation has arguably been the core of plant improvement in recent decades. Efforts have been made to develop in planta transformation systems due to the limitations present in the tissue-culture-based methods. Herein, we report an improved in planta transformation system, and provide the evidence of reporter gene expression in pollen tube, embryos and stable transgenicity of the plants following pollen-mediated plant transformation with optimized sonication treatment of pollen. The results showed that the aeration at 4°C treatment of pollen grains in sucrose prior to sonication significantly improved the pollen viability leading to improved kernel set and transformation efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that the removal of operculum covering pollen pore by ultrasonication might be one of the reasons for the pollen grains to become competent for transformation. Evidences have shown that the eGfp gene was expressed in the pollen tube and embryos, and the Cry1Ac gene was detected in the subsequent T1 and T2 progenies, suggesting the successful transfer of the foreign genes to the recipient plants. The Southern blot analysis of Cry1Ac gene in T2 progenies and PCR-identified Apr gene segregation in T2 seedlings confirmed the stable inheritance of the transgene. The outcome illustrated that the pollen-mediated genetic transformation system can be widely applied in the plant improvement programs with apparent advantages over tissue-culture-based transformation methods. PMID:28377783

  14. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8) does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade. PMID:27279976

  15. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  16. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-17

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human's health in the 21(st) century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6')-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought.

  17. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  18. Triptolide T10 enhances AAV-mediated gene transfer in mice striatum.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinmiao; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-02

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated gene transfer has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). Triptolide T10 is a monomeric compound isolated from tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (Thunder God vine), a traditional Chinese herb for anti-inflammatory medications. In the present study, we co-administered T10 with recombinant AAV2 in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and in the striatum of C57BL/6 mice, and then evaluated the AAV-mediated gene expression levels. The results have shown that T10 significantly augmented the expression of AAV-mediated gene in a dose-dependent fashion without detectable cytotoxicity. As growing evidence indicated that inflammation contributed to the progression of PD, and the anti-inflammatory effect of T10 was shown in our previous studies, our data of T10 to enhance AAV transduction suggest that T10 might be potentially used as a facilitating reagent for the AAV gene therapy applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) Mediated siRNA Gene Silencing in the Schistosoma mansoni Snail Host, Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Miller, Andre; Liu, Yijia; Scaria, Puthupparampil; Woodle, Martin; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn

    2011-01-01

    An in vivo, non-invasive technique for gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, has been developed using cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) mediated delivery of long double-stranded (ds) and small interfering (si) RNA. Cellular delivery was evaluated and optimized by using a ‘mock’ fluorescent siRNA. Subsequently, we used the method to suppress expression of Cathepsin B (CathB) with either the corresponding siRNA or dsRNA of this transcript. In addition, the knockdown of peroxiredoxin (Prx) at both RNA and protein levels was achieved with the PEI-mediated soaking method. B. glabrata is an important snail host for the transmission of the parasitic digenean platyhelminth, Schistosoma mansoni that causes schistosomiasis in the neotropics. Progress is being made to realize the genome sequence of the snail and to uncover gene expression profiles and cellular pathways that enable the snail to either prevent or sustain an infection. Using PEI complexes, a convenient soaking method has been developed, enabling functional gene knockdown studies with either dsRNA or siRNA. The protocol developed offers a first whole organism method for host-parasite gene function studies needed to identify key mechanisms required for parasite development in the snail host, which ultimately are needed as points for disrupting this parasite mediated disease. PMID:21765961

  20. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, Pawel K.; Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D.; Mitra, Anaya; Radomska, Katarzyna J.; Gosnell, Blake A.; Solvang, Maria N.; Levine, Allen S.; Schioeth, Helgi B.

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. {yields} The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. {yields} Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. {yields} Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  1. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium. PMID:25520733

  2. A Novel Gene Gun-Mediated IL-12 Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    immunogenic 4T1 tumor, primary tumor growth was not affected by IL-12 gene therapy , although lung metastasis was significantly reduced. The anti...metastatically effect in the 4T1 model appears to be T cell independent, and we are investigating its mechanism. These results suggest that a similar gene therapy protocol may be useful in human breast cancer treatment.

  3. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tusar T.; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box–like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  4. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  5. Oligonucleotide-mediated gene repair at DNA level: the potential applications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Mei; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in gene sequence can cause many genetic disorders, and researchers have attempted to develop treatments or cures at the DNA level for these diseases. Several strategies including triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotide (RDO), and short single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) have been used to correct the dysfunctional genes in situ in the chromosome. Experimental data from cells and animal models suggest that all these strategies can repair the mutations in situ at DNA level. More effective structures of oligonucleotide, efficient delivery systems, and gene correction efficiency should be improved. Development of these strategies holds great potentials for treatments of genetic defects and other disorders.

  6. Transgene-mediated co-suppression of DNA topoisomerase-1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Cha, Dong Seok; Mamillapalli, Srivalli Swathi; Kwon, Young Chul; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of multi-transgenic copies can result in reduced expression of the transgene and can induce silence of endogenous gene; this process is called as co-suppression. Using a transgene-mediated co-suppression technique, we demonstrated the biological function of DNA topoisomerase-1 (top-1) in C. elegans development. Introduction of full-length top-1 transgene sufficiently induced the co-suppression of endogenous top-1 gene, causing embryonic lethality and abnormal germline development. We also found that the co-suppression of top-1 gene affected morphogenesis, lifespan and larval growth that were not observed in top-1 (RNAi) animals. Strikingly, co-suppression effects were significantly reduced by the elimination of top-1 introns, suggesting that efficient co-suppression may require intron(s) in C. elegans. Sequence analysis revealed that the introns 1 and 2 of top-1 gene possess consensus binding sites for several transcription factors, including MAB-3, LIN-14, TTX-3/CEH-10, CEH-1, and CEH-22. Among them, we examined a genetic link between ceh-22 and top-1. The ceh-22 is partially required for the specification of distal tip cells (DTC), which functions as a stem cell niche in the C. elegans gonad. Intriguingly, top-1 (RNAi) significantly enhanced DTC loss in ceh-22 mutant gonads, indicating that top-1 may play an important role in CEH-22-mediated DTC fate specification. Therefore, our findings suggest that transgene-mediated co-suppression facilitates the silencing of the specific genes and the study of gene function in vivo.

  7. Gene cloning and characterization of Streptococcus intermedius fimbriae involved in saliva-mediated aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Taihei; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Sugimoto, Yasushi; Soutome, Sakiko; Oho, Takahiko

    2009-12-01

    Streptococcus intermedius, an oral commensal and a cause of systemic pyogenic disease, expresses fimbriae. To identify the gene(s) encoding these fimbriae, we used a serum raised against purified fimbriae to screen libaries of recombinant lambda phages. The cloned gene cluster encoding S. intermedius fimbriae, (saliva-mediated aggregation and adherence-associated fimbriae), contained 4 ORFs, i.e. a putative ribonulease (Saf1), a putative adhesin (Saf2), the main pilus subunit (Saf3) and a sortase C (SrtC). Escherichia coli strains harboring recombinant phages and plasmids carrying the saf3 gene produced a 55kDa protein recognized by the antifimbriae serum. Saf3 contains an N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal cell-wall-anchoring motif LPXTG. Among strains of the Streptococcus anginosus group, only serotype g and untypable strains were found to contain the saf3 gene, to possess the fimbrial antigen and to exhibit saliva-mediated aggregation. Knockout mutants made by insertion of an erythromycin resistance gene into saf3 did not produce fimbrial structures or fimbrial antigens and did not participate in saliva-mediated aggregation. The adherent activity of mutants toward plastic wells coated with salivary agglutinin was about 65% that of the parental strain, and the reaction depended on calcium. There was no significant difference in adherence to hydroxyapatite beads pretreated with salivary agglutinin between the parental and mutant strains. These results demonstrated that Saf3 is associated with aggregation, and suggested that other molecule(s) are associated with adherence of S. intermedius.

  8. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase.

  9. CXCL12 methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sijia; Wang, Yihan; Chen, Meijun; Sun, Lulu; Han, Jun; Elena, V Kazakova; Qiao, Hong

    2017-03-08

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer, and its incidence rate is rapidly growing. It is necessary to understand the pathogenesis of PTC to develop effective diagnosis methods. Promoter methylation has been recognized to contribute to the alterations in gene expression observed in tumorigenesis. Our RNA-seq data identified 1191 differentially expressed mRNAs and 147 differentially expressed lncRNAs in PTC. Next, promoter methylation of these genes was detected by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) technology and comprehensively analyzed to identify differential methylation. In total, 14 genes (13 mRNAs and 1 lncRNA), in which methylation was intimately involved in regulating gene expression, were proposed as novel diagnostic biomarkers. To gain insights into the relationships among these 14 genes, a core co-function network was constructed based on co-expression, co-function and co-methylation data. Notably, CXCL12 was identified as an essential gene in the network that was closely connected with the other genes. These data suggested that CXCL12 down-regulation in PTC may be caused by promoter hypermethylation. Our study was the first to perform an RRBS analysis for PTC and suggested that CXCL12 may contribute to PTC development by methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated sequential editing of genes critical for ookinete motility in Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Gao, Han; Yang, Zhenke; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhenkui; Wang, Xu; Xiao, Bo; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Cui, Huiting; Yuan, Jing

    2017-03-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully adapted for gene editing in malaria parasites including Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii. However, the reported methods were limited to editing one gene at a time. In practice, it is often desired to modify multiple genetic loci in a parasite genome. Here we describe a CRISPR/Cas9 mediated genome editing method that allows successive modification of more than one gene in the genome of P. yoelii using an improved single-vector system (pYCm) we developed previously. Drug resistant genes encoding human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) and a yeast bifunctional protein (yFCU), with cytosine deaminase (CD) and uridyl phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) activities in the plasmid, allowed sequential positive (pyrimethamine, Pyr) and negative (5-fluorocytosine, 5FC) selections and generation of transgenic parasites free of the episomal plasmid after genetic modification. Using this system, we were able to efficiently tag a gene of interest (Pyp28) and subsequently disrupted two genes (Pyctrp and Pycdpk3) that are individually critical for ookinete motility. Disruption of the genes either eliminated (Pyctrp) or greatly reduced (Pycdpk3) ookinete forward motility in matrigel in vitro and completely blocked oocyst development in mosquito midgut. The method will greatly facilitate studies of parasite gene function, development, and disease pathogenesis.

  11. CXCL12 methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijia; Wang, Yihan; Chen, Meijun; Sun, Lulu; Han, Jun; Elena, V. Kazakova; Qiao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer, and its incidence rate is rapidly growing. It is necessary to understand the pathogenesis of PTC to develop effective diagnosis methods. Promoter methylation has been recognized to contribute to the alterations in gene expression observed in tumorigenesis. Our RNA-seq data identified 1191 differentially expressed mRNAs and 147 differentially expressed lncRNAs in PTC. Next, promoter methylation of these genes was detected by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) technology and comprehensively analyzed to identify differential methylation. In total, 14 genes (13 mRNAs and 1 lncRNA), in which methylation was intimately involved in regulating gene expression, were proposed as novel diagnostic biomarkers. To gain insights into the relationships among these 14 genes, a core co-function network was constructed based on co-expression, co-function and co-methylation data. Notably, CXCL12 was identified as an essential gene in the network that was closely connected with the other genes. These data suggested that CXCL12 down-regulation in PTC may be caused by promoter hypermethylation. Our study was the first to perform an RRBS analysis for PTC and suggested that CXCL12 may contribute to PTC development by methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:28272462

  12. Euglossine bees mediate only limited long-distance gene flow in a tropical vine.

    PubMed

    Opedal, Øystein H; Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Albertsen, Elena; Armbruster, W Scott; Pérez-Barrales, Rocío; Stenøien, Hans K; Pélabon, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Euglossine bees (Apidae: Euglossini) have long been hypothesized to act as long-distance pollinators of many low-density tropical plants. We tested this hypothesis by the analysis of gene flow and genetic structure within and among populations of the euglossine bee-pollinated vine Dalechampia scandens. Using microsatellite markers, we assessed historical gene flow by the quantification of regional-scale genetic structure and isolation by distance among 18 populations, and contemporary gene flow by the estimation of recent migration rates among populations. To assess bee-mediated pollen dispersal on a smaller scale, we conducted paternity analyses within a focal population, and quantified within-population spatial genetic structure in four populations. Gene flow was limited to certain nearby populations within continuous forest blocks, whereas drift appeared to dominate on larger scales. Limited long-distance gene flow was supported by within-population patterns; gene flow was biased towards nearby plants, and significant small-scale spatial genetic structure was detected within populations. These findings suggest that, although female euglossine bees might be effective at moving pollen within populations, and perhaps within forest blocks, their contribution to gene flow on the regional scale seems too limited to counteract genetic drift in patchily distributed tropical plants. Among-population gene flow might have been reduced following habitat fragmentation.

  13. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  14. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development.

  15. Self-recognition in social amoebae is mediated by allelic pairs of tiger genes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shigenori; Benabentos, Rocio; Ho, Hsing-I; Kuspa, Adam; Shaulsky, Gad

    2011-07-22

    Free-living cells of the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can aggregate and develop into multicellular fruiting bodies in which many die altruistically as they become stalk cells that support the surviving spores. Dictyostelium cells exhibit kin discrimination--a potential defense against cheaters, which sporulate without contributing to the stalk. Kin discrimination depends on strain relatedness, and the polymorphic genes tgrB1 and tgrC1 are potential components of that mechanism. Here, we demonstrate a direct role for these genes in kin discrimination. We show that a matching pair of tgrB1 and tgrC1 alleles is necessary and sufficient for attractive self-recognition, which is mediated by differential cell-cell adhesion. We propose that TgrB1 and TgrC1 proteins mediate this adhesion through direct binding. This system is a genetically tractable ancient model of eukaryotic self-recognition.

  16. [Genetic transformation of OSISAP1 gene to onion (Allium cepa L.) mediated by amicroprojectile bombardment].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Jiang; Cui, Cheng-Ri

    2007-06-01

    Microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation method has been developed for onion (Allium cepa L.) using embryogenic calli, induced from stem discs, as target tissue. Zinc-finger protein gene OSISAP1 (Oryza sative subspecies indica stress-associated protein gene) was introduced into the open-pollinated onion cultivar (subs.) 'HG400B'. Bombardment parameters were optimized as: the pressure is 1,100 psi, the distance is 6 cm, two times, the ratio of mass between plasmid DNA and golden particles is 1:320. An efficient microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation system of onion (Allium cepa L.) callus has been established. The binary vector used carried the nptII gene for kanamycin resistance and the GUS reporter gene. Transgenic cultures were screened for their ability to express the GUS reporter gene and to grow in the presence of kanamycin (150 mg/L). Transient expression of GUS reporter gene was observed through histochemical staining of embryogenic callus transformed by microprojectile bombardment. The putative transgenic plants were analysed at the molecular level using PCR, southern hybridization, and RT-PCR. The results confirmed that the OSISAP1 gene was integrated as one copy into the genome of onion and expression. Transgenic plants were produced efficiently with a transformation frequency of about 10%. Test of salinity-alkali stress showed that sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate at 200 mmol/L effectively killed non-transgenic plants within 1 week of irrigation, while the transgenic plants were completely unaffected by salinity of 400 mmol/L. So transformation with the OSISAP1 gene raised the salinity-alkali-tolerance of the transgenic plants to a high level.

  17. Regulatory Factor X (RFX)-mediated transcriptional rewiring of ciliary genes in animals.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Brian P; Burghoorn, Jan; Swoboda, Peter

    2010-07-20

    Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) and were retained by most organisms spanning all extant eukaryotic lineages, including organisms in the Unikonta (Amoebozoa, fungi, choanoflagellates, and animals), Archaeplastida, Excavata, Chromalveolata, and Rhizaria. In certain animals, including humans, ciliary gene regulation is mediated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors (TFs). RFX TFs bind X-box promoter motifs and thereby positively regulate >50 ciliary genes. Though RFX-mediated ciliary gene regulation has been studied in several bilaterian animals, little is known about the evolutionary conservation of ciliary gene regulation. Here, we explore the evolutionary relationships between RFX TFs and cilia. By sampling the genome sequences of >120 eukaryotic organisms, we show that RFX TFs are exclusively found in unikont organisms (whether ciliated or not), but are completely absent from the genome sequences of all nonunikont organisms (again, whether ciliated or not). Sampling the promoter sequences of 12 highly conserved ciliary genes from 23 diverse unikont and nonunikont organisms further revealed that phylogenetic footprints of X-box promoter motif sequences are found exclusively in ciliary genes of certain animals. Thus, there is no correlation between cilia/ciliary genes and the presence or absence of RFX TFs and X-box promoter motifs in nonanimal unikont and in nonunikont organisms. These data suggest that RFX TFs originated early in the unikont lineage, distinctly after cilia evolved. The evolutionary model that best explains these observations indicates that the transcriptional rewiring of many ciliary genes by RFX TFs occurred early in the animal lineage.

  18. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  19. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  20. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes.

  1. AAV8-mediated hepatic gene transfer in infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Tarantal, Alice F; Wilson, James M

    2011-11-01

    Many genetic metabolic diseases manifest in infancy, therefore, it is important to develop effective treatments that could be implemented at this time. Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) gene transfer has been studied in neonatal mouse, cat, and dog models and shown some efficacy with a single hepatic injection at birth. AAV8-mediated liver gene transfer has also generated sustained therapeutic effects in feline and canine models of lysosomal storage disorders. In these models, delaying the age of vector treatment increased gene transfer stability. The growth rate of infant nonhuman primates is more similar to the growth trajectory of humans, thus infant monkeys provide an excellent model to study AAV gene transfer efficiency, stability, and safety. In this study, we report for the first time that AAV8-mediated hepatic gene transfer in infant monkeys is safe and efficient but less stable when compared to adolescent animals. Infant monkeys administered AAV8 intravenously at 1 week postnatal age achieved up to 98% transduction of hepatocytes within 7 days of injection; however, there was significant dilution of genomes and loss of transgene expression 35 days postadministration. Delaying the injection to 1 month postnatal age did not improve stability of transduction but decreased the antibody response to AAV8 capsid.

  2. Efficient BLG-Cre mediated gene deletion in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Selbert, S; Bentley, D J; Melton, D W; Rannie, D; Lourenço, P; Watson, C J; Clarke, A R

    1998-09-01

    Using the phage P1-derived Cre/loxP recombination system, we have developed a strategy for efficient mammary tissue specific inactivation of floxed genes. Transgenic mice were generated which express Cre DNA-recombinase under the control of the mammary gland specific promoter of the ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene. To test the specificity of Cre mediated recombination, we crossed these mice to animals harbouring a floxed DNA ligase I allele. We show that the BLG-Cre construct specifies mammary specific gene deletion, and furthermore that it is temporally regulated, predominantly occurring during lactation. We fully characterised the extent of gene deletion in one line (line 74). In this strain the virgin gland is characterised by low levels (7%) of Cre mediated deletion, whereas 70-80% of cells within the lactating mammary gland have undergone recombination. Immunohistochemistry and indirect in situ PCR were used respectively to demonstrate that both Cre protein and Cre activity were evenly distributed throughout the population of secretory epithelial cells. The level of background recombination in non-mammary tissues was found to be < or = 1.1%, irrespective of mammary gland developmental status. Crossing the transgenic BLG-Cre strain described here to mice harbouring other floxed alleles will facilitate the functional analysis of those genes during differentiation and development of the mammary gland.

  3. Updated Multiplex PCR for Detection of All Six Plasmid-Mediated qnr Gene Families.

    PubMed

    Kraychete, Gabriela Bergiante; Botelho, Larissa Alvarenga Batista; Campana, Eloiza Helena; Picão, Renata Cristina; Bonelli, Raquel Regina

    2016-12-01

    Plasmid-mediated qnr genes have been reported in bacteria worldwide and are widely associated with other relevant determinants of resistance in multiresistance plasmids. Here, we provide an update on a previously described multiplex PCR in order to detect all six qnr families (including qnrA, qnrS, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, and qnrVC) described until now. The proposed method makes possible the screening of these genes, reducing cost and time, and it may demonstrate an underestimated prevalence of the latest variants described.

  4. A ubiquitin-specific protease possesses a decisive role for adenovirus replication and oncogene-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Wilhelm; Koyuncu, Emre; Singh, Sonia; Arbelo-Roman, Christina; Hartl, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Speiseder, Thomas; Meier, Chris; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Adenoviral replication depends on viral as well as cellular proteins. However, little is known about cellular proteins promoting adenoviral replication. In our screens to identify such proteins, we discovered a cellular component of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway interacting with the central regulator of adenoviral replication. Our binding assays mapped a specific interaction between the N-terminal domains of both viral E1B-55K and USP7, a deubiquitinating enzyme. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of USP7 severely reduced E1B-55K protein levels, but more importantly negatively affected adenoviral replication. We also succeeded in resynthesizing an inhibitor of USP7, which like the knockdown background reduced adenoviral replication. Further assays revealed that not only adenoviral growth, but also adenoviral oncogene-driven cellular transformation relies on the functions of USP7. Our data provide insights into an intricate mechanistic pathway usurped by an adenovirus to promote its replication and oncogenic functions, and at the same time open up possibilities for new antiviral strategies.

  5. A Ubiquitin-specific Protease Possesses a Decisive Role for Adenovirus Replication and Oncogene-mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Arbelo-Roman, Christina; Hartl, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Speiseder, Thomas; Meier, Chris; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral replication depends on viral as well as cellular proteins. However, little is known about cellular proteins promoting adenoviral replication. In our screens to identify such proteins, we discovered a cellular component of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway interacting with the central regulator of adenoviral replication. Our binding assays mapped a specific interaction between the N-terminal domains of both viral E1B-55K and USP7, a deubiquitinating enzyme. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of USP7 severely reduced E1B-55K protein levels, but more importantly negatively affected adenoviral replication. We also succeeded in resynthesizing an inhibitor of USP7, which like the knockdown background reduced adenoviral replication. Further assays revealed that not only adenoviral growth, but also adenoviral oncogene-driven cellular transformation relies on the functions of USP7. Our data provide insights into an intricate mechanistic pathway usurped by an adenovirus to promote its replication and oncogenic functions, and at the same time open up possibilities for new antiviral strategies. PMID:23555268

  6. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  7. Potential of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goya, R G.; Sarkar, D.K.; Brown, O.A.; Hereñú, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology, comprising up to 15% of primary intracranial tumors. Current therapies for pituitary tumors include surgery and radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological approaches for some types. Although all of these approaches have shown a significant degree of success, they are not devoid of unwanted side effects, and in most cases do not offer a permanent cure. Gene therapy—the transfer of genetic material for therapeutic purposes—has undergone an explosive development in the last few years. Within this context, the development of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of pituitary tumors emerges as a promising area of research. We begin by presenting a brief account of the genesis of prolactinomas, with particular emphasis on how estradiol induces prolactinomas in animals. In so doing, we discuss the role of each of the recently discovered growth inhibitory and growth stimulatory substances and their interactions in estrogen action. We also evaluate the cell-cell communication that may govern these growth factor interactions and subsequently promote the growth and survival of prolactinomas. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental prolactinomas or somatomammotropic tumors with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for the herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters, like the human prolactin or human growth hormone promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. In a different type of approach, an adenoviral vector, encoding the human retinoblastoma suppressor oncogene, has been successfully used to rescue the phenotype of spontaneous pituitary

  8. RNAi-mediated double gene knockdown and gustatory perception measurement in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Baker, Nicholas; Amdam, Gro V

    2013-07-25

    This video demonstrates novel techniques of RNA interference (RNAi) which downregulate two genes simultaneously in honey bees using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injections. It also presents a protocol of proboscis extension response (PER) assay for measuring gustatory perception. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown is an effective technique downregulating target gene expression. This technique is usually used for single gene manipulation, but it has limitations to detect interactions and joint effects between genes. In the first part of this video, we present two strategies to simultaneously knock down two genes (called double gene knockdown). We show both strategies are able to effectively suppress two genes, vitellogenin (vg) and ultraspiracle (usp), which are in a regulatory feedback loop. This double gene knockdown approach can be used to dissect interrelationships between genes and can be readily applied in different insect species. The second part of this video is a demonstration of proboscis extension response (PER) assay in honey bees after the treatment of double gene knockdown. The PER assay is a standard test for measuring gustatory perception in honey bees, which is a key predictor for how fast a honey bee's behavioral maturation is. Greater gustatory perception of nest bees indicates increased behavioral development which is often associated with an earlier age at onset of foraging and foraging specialization in pollen. In addition, PER assay can be applied to identify metabolic states of satiation or hunger in honey bees. Finally, PER assay combined with pairing different odor stimuli for conditioning the bees is also widely used for learning and memory studies in honey bees.

  9. Tissue-specific gene silencing mediated by a naturally occurring chalcone synthase gene cluster in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Jigyasa H; Clough, Steven J; Chan, Wan-Ching; Vodkin, Lila O

    2004-04-01

    Chalcone synthase, a key regulatory enzyme in the flavonoid pathway, constitutes an eight-member gene family in Glycine max (soybean). Three of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family members are arranged as inverted repeats in a 10-kb region, corresponding to the I locus (inhibitor). Spontaneous mutations of a dominant allele (I or i(i)) to a recessive allele (i) have been shown to delete promoter sequences, paradoxically increasing total CHS transcript levels and resulting in black seed coats. However, it is not known which of the gene family members contribute toward pigmentation and how this locus affects CHS expression in other tissues. We investigated the unusual nature of the I locus using four pairs of isogenic lines differing with respect to alleles of the I locus. RNA gel blots using a generic open reading frame CHS probe detected similar CHS transcript levels in stems, roots, leaves, young pods, and cotyledons of the yellow and black isolines but not in the seed coats, which is consistent with the dominant I and i(i) alleles mediating CHS gene silencing in a tissue-specific manner. Using real-time RT-PCR, a variable pattern of expression of CHS genes in different tissues was demonstrated. However, increase in pigmentation in the black seed coats was associated with release of the silencing effect specifically on CHS7/CHS8, which occurred at all stages of seed coat development. These expression changes were linked to structural changes taking place at the I locus, shown to encompass a much wider region of at least 27 kb, comprising two identical 10.91-kb stretches of CHS gene duplications. The suppressive effect of this 27-kb I locus in a specific tissue of the G. max plant represents a unique endogenous gene silencing mechanism.

  10. Tissue-Specific Gene Silencing Mediated by a Naturally Occurring Chalcone Synthase Gene Cluster in Glycine maxW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Jigyasa H.; Clough, Steven J.; Chan, Wan-Ching; Vodkin, Lila O.

    2004-01-01

    Chalcone synthase, a key regulatory enzyme in the flavonoid pathway, constitutes an eight-member gene family in Glycine max (soybean). Three of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family members are arranged as inverted repeats in a 10-kb region, corresponding to the I locus (inhibitor). Spontaneous mutations of a dominant allele (I or ii) to a recessive allele (i) have been shown to delete promoter sequences, paradoxically increasing total CHS transcript levels and resulting in black seed coats. However, it is not known which of the gene family members contribute toward pigmentation and how this locus affects CHS expression in other tissues. We investigated the unusual nature of the I locus using four pairs of isogenic lines differing with respect to alleles of the I locus. RNA gel blots using a generic open reading frame CHS probe detected similar CHS transcript levels in stems, roots, leaves, young pods, and cotyledons of the yellow and black isolines but not in the seed coats, which is consistent with the dominant I and ii alleles mediating CHS gene silencing in a tissue-specific manner. Using real-time RT-PCR, a variable pattern of expression of CHS genes in different tissues was demonstrated. However, increase in pigmentation in the black seed coats was associated with release of the silencing effect specifically on CHS7/CHS8, which occurred at all stages of seed coat development. These expression changes were linked to structural changes taking place at the I locus, shown to encompass a much wider region of at least 27 kb, comprising two identical 10.91-kb stretches of CHS gene duplications. The suppressive effect of this 27-kb I locus in a specific tissue of the G. max plant represents a unique endogenous gene silencing mechanism. PMID:15064367

  11. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki; Fujiwara, Hironori; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  12. Gene induction and repression during terminal erythropoiesis are mediated by distinct epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Piu; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Cheng, Albert W; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Richard A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-10-20

    It is unclear how epigenetic changes regulate the induction of erythroid-specific genes during terminal erythropoiesis. Here we use global mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq) and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CHIP-seq) to investigate the changes that occur in mRNA levels, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy, and multiple posttranslational histone modifications when erythroid progenitors differentiate into late erythroblasts. Among genes induced during this developmental transition, there was an increase in the occupancy of Pol II, the activation marks H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9Ac, and H4K16Ac, and the elongation methylation mark H3K79me2. In contrast, genes that were repressed during differentiation showed relative decreases in H3K79me2 levels yet had levels of Pol II binding and active histone marks similar to those in erythroid progenitors. We also found that relative changes in histone modification levels, in particular, H3K79me2 and H4K16ac, were most predictive of gene expression patterns. Our results suggest that in terminal erythropoiesis both promoter and elongation-associated marks contribute to the induction of erythroid genes, whereas gene repression is marked by changes in histone modifications mediating Pol II elongation. Our data map the epigenetic landscape of terminal erythropoiesis and suggest that control of transcription elongation regulates gene expression during terminal erythroid differentiation.

  13. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Jochen; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Kneitz, Susanne; Weber, Dana; Fuchs, Joerg; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes regulate gene

  14. The Paf1 complex represses small RNA-mediated epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Valentin; Stadler, Michael Beda; Batki, Julia; Bühler, Marc

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the ability of exogenously introduced double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to silence expression of homologous sequences. Silencing is initiated when the enzyme Dicer processes the dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Small RNA molecules are incorporated into Argonaute protein-containing effector complexes, which they guide to complementary targets to mediate different types of gene silencing, specifically post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and chromatin-dependent gene silencing1. Although endogenous small RNAs play critical roles in chromatin-mediated processes across kingdoms, efforts to initiate chromatin modifications in trans by using siRNAs have been inherently difficult to achieve in all eukaryotic cells. Using fission yeast, we show that RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation is negatively controlled by the highly conserved RNA polymerase-associated factor 1 complex (Paf1C). Temporary expression of a synthetic hairpin RNA in Paf1C mutants triggers stable heterochromatin formation at homologous loci, effectively silencing genes in trans. This repressed state is propagated across generations by continual production of secondary siRNAs, independently of the synthetic hairpin RNA. Our data support a model where Paf1C prevents targeting of nascent transcripts by the siRNA-containing RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex and thereby epigenetic gene silencing, by promoting efficient transcription termination and rapid release of the RNA from the site of transcription. We show that although compromised transcription termination is sufficient to initiate the formation of bi-stable heterochromatin by trans-acting siRNAs, impairment of both transcription termination and nascent transcript release is imperative to confer stability to the repressed state. Our work uncovers a novel mechanism for small RNA- mediated epigenome regulation and highlights fundamental roles for Paf1C and the RNAi machinery in building

  15. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  16. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces phage-mediated gene transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Allen, Heather K.; Brunelle, Brian W.; Lee, In Soo; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Stanton, Thaddeus B.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the US during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness genes in the

  17. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  18. The coat protein gene of tobamovirus P 0 pathotype is a determinant for activation of temperature-insensitive L 1a-gene-mediated resistance in Capsicum plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Katsutoshi; Sawada, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Kouhei; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Eri; Ito, Takao; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Tsuda, Shinya; Suzuki, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Kappei; Kiba, Akinori; Okuno, Tetsuro; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2008-01-01

    Tobamovirus resistance in Capsicum plants, which is mediated by L genes (L(1), L(2), L(3) or L(4)), is known to be temperature sensitive. However, the L(1a ) gene, a newly identified tobamovirus resistance gene that is mapped to the L locus, confers temperature-insensitive resistance against the tobamovirus P(0) pathotype. To identify the viral elicitor that activates the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance, several chimeric viral genomes were constructed between tobacco mosaic virus-L (P(0) pathotype), paprika mild mottle virus-J (P(1 )pathotype) and pepper mild mottle virus-J (P(1,2) pathotype). Infection patterns of these chimeric viruses in L(1a )-harboring plants revealed that the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance was activated by the CP of a particular pathotype of tobamovirus, like other L-gene-mediated resistances, but the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance differs from those conferred by other L genes in terms of temperature sensitivity.

  19. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko

    2011-06-01

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  20. 3' Untranslated regions mediate transcriptional interference between convergent genes both locally and ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luwen; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Lin; Fang, Ou; Leach, Lindsey J; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2014-01-01

    Paired sense and antisense (S/AS) genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3'-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3'-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans) and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the transcriptional collision

  1. High frequency vector-mediated transformation and gene replacement in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed Central

    Gaertig, J; Gu, L; Hai, B; Gorovsky, M A

    1994-01-01

    Recently, we developed a mass DNA-mediated transformation technique for the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila that introduces transforming DNA by electroporation into conjugating cells. Other studies demonstrated that a neomycin resistance gene flanked by Tetrahymena H4-I gene regulatory sequences transformed Tetrahymena by homologous recombination within the H4-I locus when microinjected into the macronucleus. We describe the use of conjugant electrotransformation (CET) for gene replacement and for the development of new independently replicating vectors and a gene cassette that can be used as a selectable marker in gene knockout experiments. Using CET, the neomycin resistance gene flanked by H4-I sequences transformed Tetrahymena, resulting in the replacement of the H4-I gene or integrative recombination of the H4-I/neo/H4-I gene (but not vector sequences) in the 5' or 3' flanking region of the H4-I locus. Gene replacement was obtained with non-digested plasmid DNA but releasing the insert increased the frequency of replacement events about 6-fold. The efficiency of transformation by the H4-I/neo/H4-I selectable marker was unchanged when a single copy of the Tetrahymena rDNA replication origin was included on the transforming plasmid. However, the efficiency of transformation using CET increased greatly when a tandem repeat of the replication origin fragment was used. This high frequency of transformation enabled mapping of the region required for H4-I promoter function to within 333 bp upstream of the initiator ATG. Similarly approximately 300 bp of sequence downstream of the translation terminator TGA of the beta-tubulin 2 (BTU2) gene could substitute for the 3' region of the H4-I gene. This hybrid H4-I/neo/BTU2 gene did not transform Tetrahymena when subcloned on a plasmid lacking an origin of replication, but did transform at high frequency on a two origin plasmid. Thus, the H4-I/neo/BTU2 cassette is a selectable marker that can be used for gene

  2. A highly conserved SOX6 double binding site mediates SOX6 gene downregulation in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Cantu', Claudio; Grande, Vito; Alborelli, Ilaria; Cassinelli, Letizia; Cantu’, Ileana; Colzani, Maria Teresa; Ierardi, Rossella; Ronzoni, Luisa; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Ferrari, Giuliana; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Ronchi, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The Sox6 transcription factor plays critical roles in various cell types, including erythroid cells. Sox6-deficient mice are anemic due to impaired red cell maturation and show inappropriate globin gene expression in definitive erythrocytes. To identify new Sox6 target genes in erythroid cells, we used the known repressive double Sox6 consensus within the εy-globin promoter to perform a bioinformatic genome-wide search for similar, evolutionarily conserved motifs located within genes whose expression changes during erythropoiesis. We found a highly conserved Sox6 consensus within the Sox6 human gene promoter itself. This sequence is bound by Sox6 in vitro and in vivo, and mediates transcriptional repression in transient transfections in human erythroleukemic K562 cells and in primary erythroblasts. The binding of a lentiviral transduced Sox6FLAG protein to the endogenous Sox6 promoter is accompanied, in erythroid cells, by strong downregulation of the endogenous Sox6 transcript and by decreased in vivo chromatin accessibility of this region to the PstI restriction enzyme. These observations suggest that the negative Sox6 autoregulation, mediated by the double Sox6 binding site within its own promoter, may be relevant to control the Sox6 transcriptional downregulation that we observe in human erythroid cultures and in mouse bone marrow cells in late erythroid maturation. PMID:20852263

  3. STAT4-mediated transcriptional repression of the IL5 gene in human memory Th2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-van Horn, Sarah R; Estrada, Leonardo D; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Farrar, J David

    2016-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) plays a critical role in suppressing viral replication by driving the transcription of hundreds of interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs). While many ISGs are transcriptionally activated by the ISGF3 complex, the significance of other signaling intermediates in IFN-α/β-mediated gene regulation remains elusive, particularly in rare cases of gene silencing. In human Th2 cells, IFN-α/β signaling suppressed IL5 and IL13 mRNA expression during recall responses to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This suppression occurred through a rapid reduction in the rate of nascent transcription, independent of de novo expression of ISGs. Further, IFN-α/β-mediated STAT4 activation was required for repressing the human IL5 gene, and disrupting STAT4 dimerization reversed this effect. This is the first demonstration of STAT4 acting as a transcriptional repressor in response to IFN-α/β signaling and highlights the unique activity of this cytokine to acutely block the expression of an inflammatory cytokine in human T cells.

  4. A long noncoding RNA induced by TLRs mediates both activation and repression of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan; Atianand, Maninjay; Aiello, Daniel; Ricci, Emiliano; Gandhi, Pallavi; Hall, Lisa L.; Byron, Meg; Monks, Brian; Henry-Bezy, Meabh; O’Neill, Luke A.J; Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Moore, Melissa J.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    An inducible program of inflammatory gene expression is central to anti-microbial defenses. Signal-dependent activation of transcription factors, transcriptional co-regulators and chromatin modifying factors collaborate to control this response. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA that acts as a key regulator of this inflammatory response. Germline-encoded receptors such as the Toll-like receptors induce the expression of numerous lncRNAs. One of these, lincRNA-Cox2 mediates both the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes. Transcriptional repression of target genes is dependent on interactions of lincRNA-Cox2 with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and A2/B1. Collectively, these studies unveil a central role of lincRNA-Cox2 as a broad acting regulatory component of the circuit that controls the inflammatory response. PMID:23907535

  5. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-05-26

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA-RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits.

  6. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E.; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA–RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits. PMID:25916845

  7. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk.

  8. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  9. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Clinical Enterobacteria from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Ezequiel; Lucero, Celeste; Romero, Genara; Quiroga, María Paula; Rapoport, Melina; Guerriero, Leonor; Andres, Patricia; Rodriguez, Cecilia; Galas, Marcelo; Centrón, Daniela; Corso, Alejandra; Petroni, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    This first nationwide study was conducted to analyze the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in phenotypically unselected (consecutive) clinical enterobacteria. We studied 1,058 isolates that had been consecutively collected in 66 hospitals of the WHONET-Argentina Resistance Surveillance Network. Overall, 26% of isolates were nonsusceptible to at least one of the three quinolones tested (nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin). The overall prevalence of PMQR genes was 8.1% (4.6% for aac(6')-Ib-cr; 3.9% for qnr genes; and 0.4% for oqxA and oqxB, which were not previously reported in enterobacteria other than Klebsiella spp. from Argentina). The PMQR prevalence was highly variable among the enterobacterial species or when the different genes were considered. The prevalent PMQR genes were located in class 1 integrons [qnrB2, qnrB10, and aac(6')-Ib-cr]; in the ColE1-type plasmid pPAB19-1 or Tn2012-like transposons (qnrB19); and in Tn6238 or bracketed by IS26 and blaOXA-1 [aac(6')-Ib-cr]. The mutations associated with quinolone resistance that were located in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR mutations) of gyrA, parC, and gyrB were also investigated. The occurrence of QRDR mutations was significantly associated with the presence of PMQR genes: At least one QRDR mutation was present in 82% of the PMQR-harboring isolates but in only 23% of those without PMQR genes (p < 0.0001, Fisher's Test). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the prevalence of PMQR genes in consecutive clinical enterobacteria where all the genes currently known have been screened.

  10. Gene Therapy for Type I Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The type I glycogen storage diseases (GSD-I) are a group of related diseases caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) system, a key enzyme complex that is essential for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis between meals. The complex consists of a glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) that translocates glucose-6-phosphate from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a G6Pase-α catalytic unit that hydrolyses the glucose-6-phosphate into glucose and phosphate. A deficiency in G6Pase-α causes GSD type Ia (GSD-Ia) and a deficiency in G6PT causes GSD type Ib (GSD-Ib). Both GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, while GSD-Ib patients also suffer symptoms of neutropenia and myeloid dysfunctions. G6Pase-α and G6PT are both hydrophobic endoplasmic reticulum-associated transmembrane proteins that can not expressed in soluble active forms. Therefore protein replacement therapy of GSD-I is not an option. Animal models of GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib that mimic the human disorders are available. Both adenovirus- and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapies have been evaluated for GSD-Ia in these model systems. While adenoviral therapy produces only short term corrections and only impacts liver expression of the gene, AAV-mediated therapy delivers the transgene to both the liver and kidney, achieving longer term correction of the GSD-Ia disorder, although there are substantial differences in efficacy depending on the AAV serotype used. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib in the animal model is still in its infancy, although an adenoviral construct has improved the metabolic profile and myeloid function. Taken together further refinements in gene therapy may hold long term benefits for the treatment of type I GSD disorders. PMID:17430128

  11. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, B.; Kumar, N. Vinod; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases. PMID:27051186

  12. Broad dissemination of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in sediments of two urban coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Cummings, David E; Archer, Karisa F; Arriola, David J; Baker, Pieter A; Faucett, K Grace; Laroya, Jonathan B; Pfeil, Kelly L; Ryan, Cody R; Ryan, Kelsey R U; Zuill, Douglas E

    2011-01-15

    Contamination of soil and water with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may create reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes that have the potential to negatively impact future public health through horizontal gene transfer. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were detected by PCR amplification of metagenomic DNA from surface sediments of the Tijuana River Estuary, a sewage-impacted coastal wetland along the U.S.-Mexico border; sediments of Famosa Slough, a nearby urban wetland that is largely unaffected by sewage, contained only qnrB, qnrS, and qepA. The number of PCR-positive sites and replicates increased in both wetlands after rainfall. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed a significant increase (p < 0.0005) in qnrA abundance (copies per gram sediment or per 16S rDNA copy) in Tijuana River Estuary sediments immediately following rainfall, but no significant change was measured at Famosa Slough (p > 0.1). Nucleotide sequences of cloned qnrA amplicons were all affiliated with qnrA genes found on plasmids of clinical isolates with one exception that was most similar to the chromosomal qnrA gene found in Shewanella algae. Our results suggest that urban wetlands may become reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, particularly where wastewater is improperly managed.

  13. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust immunity by virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; McMahon, Michael B; Luster, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungus that causes rust disease on soybean, has potential to impart significant yield loss and disrupt food security and animal feed production. Rpp1 is a soybean gene that confers immunity to soybean rust, and it is important to understand how it regulates the soybean defense system and to use this knowledge to protect commercial crops. It was previously discovered that some soybean proteins resembling transcription factors accumulate in the nucleus of Rpp1 soybeans. To determine if they contribute to immunity, Bean pod mottle virus was used to attenuate or silence the expression of their genes. Rpp1 plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing exhibited reduced amounts of RNA for 5 of the tested genes, and the plants developed rust-like symptoms after subsequent inoculation with fungal spores. Symptoms were associated with the accumulation of rust fungal RNA and protein. Silenced plants also had reduced amounts of RNA for the soybean Myb84 transcription factor and soybean isoflavone O-methyltransferase, both of which are important to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and lignin formation, crucial components of rust resistance. These results help resolve some of the genes that contribute to Rpp1-mediated immunity and improve upon the knowledge of the soybean defense system. It is possible that these genes could be manipulated to enhance rust resistance in otherwise susceptible soybean cultivars.

  14. Genome-Wide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Able to Bypass p16-Mediated Senescence in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jae; Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Shakhbazov, Konstanin; Ranall, Max V; Fox, Carly; Lambie, Duncan; Stevenson, Alexander J; Yaswen, Paul; Gonda, Thomas J; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Malignant melanomas often arise from nevi, which result from initial oncogene-induced hyperproliferation of melanocytes that are maintained in a CDKN2A/p16-mediated senescent state. Thus, genes that can bypass this senescence barrier are likely to contribute to melanoma development. We have performed a gain-of-function screen of 17,030 lentivirally expressed human open reading frames (ORFs) in a melanoma cell line containing an inducible p16 construct to identify such genes. Genes known to bypass p16-induced senescence arrest, including the human papilloma virus 18 E7 gene ( HPV18E7), and genes such as the p16-binding CDK6 with expected functions, as well as panel of novel genes, were identified, including high-mobility group box (HMGB) proteins. A number of these were further validated in two other models of p16-induced senescence. Tissue immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher levels of CDK6 in primary melanomas compared with normal skin and nevi. Reduction of CDK6 levels drove melanoma cells expressing functional p16 into senescence, demonstrating its contribution to bypass senescence.

  15. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay modulate expression of important regulatory genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Simpson, Craig G.; Syed, Naeem H.; Lewandowska, Dominika; Marquez, Yamile; Kusenda, Branislav; Marshall, Jacqueline; Fuller, John; Cardle, Linda; McNicol, Jim; Dinh, Huy Q.; Barta, Andrea; Brown, John W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) coupled to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional mechanism for regulating gene expression. We have used a high-resolution AS RT–PCR panel to identify endogenous AS isoforms which increase in abundance when NMD is impaired in the Arabidopsis NMD factor mutants, upf1-5 and upf3-1. Of 270 AS genes (950 transcripts) on the panel, 102 transcripts from 97 genes (32%) were identified as NMD targets. Extrapolating from these data around 13% of intron-containing genes in the Arabidopsis genome are potentially regulated by AS/NMD. This cohort of naturally occurring NMD-sensitive AS transcripts also allowed the analysis of the signals for NMD in plants. We show the importance of AS in introns in 5′ or 3′UTRs in modulating NMD-sensitivity of mRNA transcripts. In particular, we identified upstream open reading frames overlapping the main start codon as a new trigger for NMD in plants and determined that NMD is induced if 3′-UTRs were >350 nt. Unexpectedly, although many intron retention transcripts possess NMD features, they are not sensitive to NMD. Finally, we have shown that AS/NMD regulates the abundance of transcripts of many genes important for plant development and adaptation including transcription factors, RNA processing factors and stress response genes. PMID:22127866

  16. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  17. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour vasculature and

  18. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  19. Adenoviral vectors encoding CRISPR/Cas9 multiplexes rescue dystrophin synthesis in unselected populations of DMD muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M.; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A. F. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disrupting the reading frame of the ~2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene cause a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Genome editing based on paired RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) from CRISPR/Cas9 systems has been proposed for permanently repairing faulty DMD loci. However, such multiplexing strategies require the development and testing of delivery systems capable of introducing the various gene editing tools into target cells. Here, we investigated the suitability of adenoviral vectors (AdVs) for multiplexed DMD editing by packaging in single vector particles expression units encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease and sequence-specific gRNA pairs. These RGN components were customized to trigger short- and long-range intragenic DMD excisions encompassing reading frame-disrupting exons in patient-derived muscle progenitor cells. By allowing synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the various RGN components, we demonstrate that dual RGN-encoding AdVs can correct over 10% of target DMD alleles, readily leading to the detection of Becker-like dystrophin proteins in unselected muscle cell populations. Moreover, we report that AdV-based gene editing can be tailored for removing mutations located within the over 500-kb major DMD mutational hotspot. Hence, this single DMD editing strategy can in principle tackle a broad spectrum of mutations present in more than 60% of patients with DMD. PMID:27845387

  20. Adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene selectively kills gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene (CD/TK) for selective killing of gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cells SCG7901 and normal gastric epithelial cell lines were infected by adenoviruses Ad-survivin/GFP and Ad-survivin/CD/TK. GFP expression and CD-TK were detected by fluorescence microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. After treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs ganciclovir (GCV) and/or 5-FC, the cell growth status was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle changes were detected using flow cytometry. In nude mice bearing human gastric cancer, the recombinant adenovirus vector was injected directly into the tumor followed by an intraperitoneal injection of GCV and/or 5-FC. The subsequent tumor growth was then observed. The GFP gene driven by survivin could be expressed within the gastric cancer line SCG7901, but not in normal gastric epithelial cells. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of the CD/TK gene product in the infected SCG7901 cells, but not in the infected normal gastric epithelial cells. The infected gastric cancer SCG7901, but not the gastric cells, was highly sensitive to the pro-drugs. The CD/TK fusion gene system showed significantly greater efficiency than either of the single suicide genes in killing the target cells (P<0.01). Treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs resulted in increased cell percentage in G0-Gl phase and decreased percentage in S phase. In nude mice bearing SCG7901 cells, treatment with the double suicide gene system significantly inhibited tumor growth, showing much stronger effects than either of the single suicide genes (P<0.01). The adenovirus-mediated CD/TK double suicide gene driven by survivin promoter combined with GCV an 5-FC treatment could be an effective therapy against experimental gastric cancer with much greater efficacy than the single suicide gene CD/TK combined

  1. A Novel TetR-Regulating Peptide Turns off rtTA-Mediated Activation of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Berens, Christian; Klotzsche, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Conditional regulation of gene expression is a powerful and indispensable method for analyzing gene function. The “Tet-On” system is a tool widely used for that purpose. Here, the transregulator rtTA mediates expression of a gene of interest after addition of the small molecule effector doxycycline. Although very effective in rapidly turning on gene expression, the system is hampered by the long half-life of doxycycline which makes shutting down gene expression rapidly very difficult to achieve. We isolated an rtTA-binding peptide by in vivo selection that acts as a doxycycline antagonist and leads to rapid and efficient shut down of rtTA-mediated reporter gene expression in a human cell line. This peptide represents the basis for novel effector molecules which complement the “Tet-system” by enabling the investigator to rapidly turn gene expression not just on at will, but now also off. PMID:24810590

  2. Exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA silences genes linked to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Siegel, T Nicolai; Martins, Rafael M; Wang, Fei; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Lubin; Hon, Chung-Chau; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Turner, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Claes, Aurelie; Guizetti, Julien; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Scherf, Artur

    2014-09-18

    Antigenic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum multicopy var gene family enables parasite evasion of immune destruction by host antibodies. Expression of a particular var subgroup, termed upsA, is linked to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain and to the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria. The mechanism determining upsA activation remains unknown. Here we show that an entirely new type of gene silencing mechanism involving an exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA controls the silencing of genes linked to severe malaria. We identify a novel chromatin-associated exoribonuclease, termed PfRNase II, that controls the silencing of upsA var genes by marking their transcription start site and intron-promoter regions leading to short-lived cryptic RNA. Parasites carrying a deficient PfRNase II gene produce full-length upsA var transcripts and intron-derived antisense long non-coding RNA. The presence of stable upsA var transcripts overcomes monoallelic expression, resulting in the simultaneous expression of both upsA and upsC type PfEMP1 proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. In addition, we observe an inverse relationship between transcript levels of PfRNase II and upsA-type var genes in parasites from severe malaria patients, implying a crucial role of PfRNase II in severe malaria. Our results uncover a previously unknown type of post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in malaria parasites with repercussions for other organisms. Additionally, the identification of RNase II as a parasite protein controlling the expression of virulence genes involved in pathogenesis in patients with severe malaria may provide new strategies for reducing malaria mortality.

  3. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 Gene Delivery Ameliorates Post-Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Ravi; Nilles, Kathleen; Gibson, Gregory; Burkhead, Benjamin; Mathier, Michael; McNamara, Dennis; McTiernan, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Adenoviral-mediated (AdV-T2) overexpression of TIMP-2 would blunt ventricular remodeling and improve survival in a murine model of chronic ischemic injury. Methods Male mice (n=124) aged 10–14 weeks underwent either 1) left coronary artery ligation to induce myocardial infarction (MI group, n=36), 2) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of AdV-T2 immediately post-MI (MI+T2 group, n=30), 3) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of a control adenovirus (MI+Ct, n=38), or 4) received no intervention (controls, n=20). On post-MI day 7, surviving mice (n=79) underwent echocardiographic, immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis. Results In infarcted animals, the MI+T2 group demonstrated improved survival (p< 0.02), better preservation of developed pressure and ventricular diameter (p<0.04), and the lowest expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (P<0.04) compared with MI and MI+Ct groups.. All infarcted hearts displayed significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration (p<0.04 versus control, MI, or MI+T2), with infiltration highest in the MI+Ct group and lowest in the MI+T2 group (p<0.04). Conclusions Adenoviral mediated myocardial delivery of the TIMP-2 gene improves post-MI survival and limits adverse remodeling in a murine model of myocardial infarction. PMID:21348952

  4. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  5. The Functions of Mediator in Candida albicans Support a Role in Shaping Species-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jelicic, Branka; Lo, Tricia L.; Beaurepaire, Cecile; Bantun, Farkad; Quenault, Tara; Boag, Peter R.; Ramm, Georg; Callaghan, Judy; Beilharz, Traude H.; Nantel, André; Peleg, Anton Y.; Traven, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The Mediator complex is an essential co-regulator of RNA polymerase II that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. Here we present the first study of Mediator in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We focused on the Middle domain subunit Med31, the Head domain subunit Med20, and Srb9/Med13 from the Kinase domain. The C. albicans Mediator shares some roles with model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, such as functions in the response to certain stresses and the role of Med31 in the expression of genes regulated by the activator Ace2. The C. albicans Mediator also has additional roles in the transcription of genes associated with virulence, for example genes related to morphogenesis and gene families enriched in pathogens, such as the ALS adhesins. Consistently, Med31, Med20, and Srb9/Med13 contribute to key virulence attributes of C. albicans, filamentation, and biofilm formation; and ALS1 is a biologically relevant target of Med31 for development of biofilms. Furthermore, Med31 affects virulence of C. albicans in the worm infection model. We present evidence that the roles of Med31 and Srb9/Med13 in the expression of the genes encoding cell wall adhesins are different between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans: they are repressors of the FLO genes in S. cerevisiae and are activators of the ALS genes in C. albicans. This suggests that Mediator subunits regulate adhesion in a distinct manner between these two distantly related fungal species. PMID:22496666

  6. Cell cycle regulatory effects of retinoic Acid and forskolin are mediated by the cyclin C gene.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Katri M; Malinen, Marjo; Ropponen, Antti; Väisänen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-10-23

    As a partner of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 3, Cyclin C controls cellular proliferation and, together with CDK8, represses gene transcription. In this study, we showed that the highly expressed Cyclin C gene is a direct target of the nuclear hormone all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in HEK293 human embryonal kidney cells. The RA receptor (RAR) gamma associates with a Cyclin C promoter region containing two RAR binding sites. The Cyclin C gene also directly responds to the cAMP activator Forskolin via the transcription factor CREB1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1), for which we identified four binding sites within the first 2250 bp of its promoter. RARgamma and CREB1 show functional convergence via the corepressor NCoR1, which controls in particular the Forskolin response of Cyclin C. The histone deacetylases 1, 5, 6, 7 and 11 are involved in the basal expression of Cyclin C, but in HEK293 and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells the antiproliferative effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) are not mediated by Cyclin C. However, cell cycle progressing effects of all-trans RA and Forskolin are dependent on Cyclin C expression levels. This suggests that the primary regulation of Cyclin C by all-trans RA and Forskolin mediates some of the cell cycle control actions of these compounds.

  7. Prospects for Lentiviral Vector Mediated Prostaglandin F Synthase Gene Delivery in Monkey Eyes In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Suk; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Filla, Mark S.; Slauson, Sarah R.; Kolb, Aaron W.; Peters, Donna M.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Gabelt, B’Ann True; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most effective outflow drugs approved for clinical use are prostaglandin F2α analogues, but these require daily topical self-dosing and have various intraocular, ocular surface and extraocular side effects. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) gene, resulting in long-term reduction of IOP, may eliminate off-target tissue effects and the need for daily topical PGF2α self-administration. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the PGFS gene to the anterior segment has been achieved in cats and non-human primates. Although these results are encouraging, our studies have identified a number of challenges that need to be overcome for prostaglandin gene therapy to be translated into the clinic. Using examples from our work in non-human primates, where we were able to achieve a significant reduction in IOP (2 mm Hg) for 5 months after delivery of the cDNA for bovine PGF synthase, we identify and discuss these issues and consider several possible solutions. PMID:24559478

  8. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, Naoya; Ando, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yasushi; Fujimuro, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Honjo, Ken; Shimoda, Masami; Toda, Hirofumi; Sawamura-Yamamoto, Takako; Makuch, Lauren A; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishizuka, Koko; Cascella, Nicola G.; Kamiya, Atsushi; Ishida, Norio; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Hai, Tsonwin; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Sawa, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that co-localizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a co-repressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription. PMID:18762802

  9. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, N; Ando, T; Maruyama, Y; Fujimuro, M; Mochizuki, H; Honjo, K; Shimoda, M; Toda, H; Sawamura-Yamamoto, T; Makuch, L A; Hayashi, A; Ishizuka, K; Cascella, N G; Kamiya, A; Ishida, N; Tomoda, T; Hai, T; Furukubo-Tokunaga, K; Sawa, A

    2008-12-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that colocalizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a corepressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  10. Efficient TALEN-mediated gene targeting of chicken primordial germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lorna; Carlson, Daniel F.; Nandi, Sunil; Sherman, Adrian; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we use TALE nucleases (TALENs) to target a reporter construct to the DDX4 (vasa) locus in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs). Vasa is a key germ cell determinant in many animal species and is posited to control avian germ cell formation. We show that TALENs mediate homology-directed repair of the DDX4 locus on the Z sex chromosome at high (8.1%) efficiencies. Large genetic deletions of 30 kb encompassing the entire DDX4 locus were also created using a single TALEN pair. The targeted PGCs were germline competent and were used to produce DDX4 null offspring. In DDX4 knockout chickens, PGCs are initially formed but are lost during meiosis in the developing ovary, leading to adult female sterility. TALEN-mediated gene targeting in avian PGCs is therefore an efficient process. PMID:28174243

  11. RNA-Mediated Silencing in Algae: Biological Roles and Tools for Analysis of Gene Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Heriberto; Ma, Xinrong; Msanne, Joseph; Repas, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Algae are a large group of aquatic, typically photosynthetic, eukaryotes that include species from very diverse phylogenetic lineages, from those similar to land plants to those related to protist parasites. The recent sequencing of several algal genomes has provided insights into the great complexity of these organisms. Genomic information has also emphasized our lack of knowledge of the functions of many predicted genes, as well as the gene regulatory mechanisms in algae. Core components of the machinery for RNA-mediated silencing show widespread distribution among algal lineages, but they also seem to have been lost entirely from several species with relatively small nuclear genomes. Complex sets of endogenous small RNAs, including candidate microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, have now been identified by high-throughput sequencing in green, red, and brown algae. However, the natural roles of RNA-mediated silencing in algal biology remain poorly understood. Limited evidence suggests that small RNAs may function, in different algae, in defense mechanisms against transposon mobilization, in responses to nutrient deprivation and, possibly, in the regulation of recently evolved developmental processes. From a practical perspective, RNA interference (RNAi) is becoming a promising tool for assessing gene function by sequence-specific knockdown. Transient gene silencing, triggered with exogenously synthesized nucleic acids, and/or stable gene repression, involving genome-integrated transgenes, have been achieved in green algae, diatoms, yellow-green algae, and euglenoids. The development of RNAi technology in conjunction with system level “omics” approaches may provide the tools needed to advance our understanding of algal physiological and metabolic processes. PMID:21803865

  12. Agrobacterium Mediated Transient Gene Silencing (AMTS) in Stevia rebaudiana: Insights into Steviol Glycoside Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway has emerged as bifurcation from ent-kaurenoic acid, substrate of methyl erythritol phosphate pathway that also leads to gibberellin biosynthesis. However, the genetic regulation of steviol glycoside biosynthesis has not been studied. So, in present study RNA interference (RNAi) based Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS) approach was followed. SrKA13H and three SrUGTs (SrUGT85C2, SrUGT74G1 and SrUGT76G1) genes encoding ent-kaurenoic acid-13 hydroxylase and three UDP glycosyltransferases of steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were silenced in Stevia rebaudiana to understand its molecular mechanism and association with gibberellins. Methodology/Principal Findings RNAi mediated AMTS of SrKA13H and three SrUGTs has significantly reduced the expression of targeted endogenous genes as well as total steviol glycoside accumulation. While gibberellins (GA3) content was significantly enhanced on AMTS of SrUGT85C2 and SrKA13H. Silencing of SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 was found to block the metabolite flux of steviol glycoside pathway and shifted it towards GA3 biosynthesis. Further, molecular docking of three SrUGT proteins has documented highest affinity of SrUGT76G1 for the substrates of alternate pathways synthesizing steviol glycosides. This could be a plausible reason for maximum reduction in steviol glycoside content on silencing of SrUGT76G1 than other genes. Conclusions SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 were identified as regulatory genes influencing carbon flux between steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthesis. This study has also documented the existence of alternate steviol glycoside biosynthesis route. PMID:24023961

  13. Silver nanoparticles mediated altered gene expression of melanin biosynthesis genes in Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Singh, H B

    2015-03-01

    Melanin production in many fungal phytopathogens has been investigated to play direct or indirect role in pathogenesis. However, in Bipolaris sorokiniana, the spot blotch pathogen of wheat, much less is known about the role melanin play in pathogenesis. As an extension of our previous report, the present study aims to investigate the plausible association between melanin production and virulence factor in B. sorokiniana. In the previous study, we carried out analysis on the antifungal efficacy of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against B. sorokiniana. The present investigation revealed the gene expression analysis of melanin biosynthesis genes viz. polyketide synthase (PKS1) and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) under the influence of AgNPs. The 0.05mg/ml concentration of AgNPs yielded noticeable inhibition of B. sorokiniana growth, while 0.1mg/ml concentration of AgNPs accounted for complete inhibition of pathogen growth. In addition, the semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis exhibited reduced expression of PKS1 and SCD1 under the influence of AgNPs treatment. Furthermore, the qRT-PCR demonstrated 6.47 and 1.808 fold significant decrease in the expression pattern of PKS1 and SCD1, respectively, in B. sorokiniana treated with AgNPs. The present study provides probable understanding of molecular events underlying the antifungal role of AgNPs against B. sorokiniana.

  14. Understanding the role of ETS-mediated gene regulation in complex biological processes.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Victoria J; LaRue, Amanda C; Turner, David P; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    Ets factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, which when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well-documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. The anti- and prometastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression. One of the goals of molecular biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Such an understanding of the molecular basis of cancer will provide new possibilities for: (1) earlier detection, as well as better diagnosis and staging of disease; (2) detection of minimal residual disease recurrences and evaluation of response to therapy; (3) prevention; and (4) novel treatment strategies. Increased understanding of ETS-regulated biological pathways will directly impact these areas.

  15. Anchoring of Heterochromatin to the Nuclear Lamina Reinforces Dosage Compensation-Mediated Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Brouhard, Elizabeth A.; Jiang, Jianhao; Sifuentes, Margarita H.

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromosome structure and nuclear architecture can have profound effects on gene regulation. We analyzed how compartmentalizing the genome by tethering heterochromatic regions to the nuclear lamina affects dosage compensation in the nematode C. elegans. In this organism, the dosage compensation complex (DCC) binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to repress transcription two-fold, thus balancing gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. X chromosome structure is disrupted by mutations in DCC subunits. Using X chromosome paint fluorescence microscopy, we found that X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are also disrupted when the mechanisms that anchor heterochromatin to the nuclear lamina are defective. Strikingly, the heterochromatic left end of the X chromosome is less affected than the gene-rich middle region, which lacks heterochromatic anchors. These changes in X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are accompanied by small, but significant levels of derepression of X-linked genes as measured by RNA-seq, without any observable defects in DCC localization and DCC-mediated changes in histone modifications. We propose a model in which heterochromatic tethers on the left arm of the X cooperate with the DCC to compact and peripherally relocate the X chromosomes, contributing to gene repression. PMID:27690361

  16. Overcoming doxorubicin resistance of cancer cells by Cas9-mediated gene disruption

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jong Seong; Byun, Juyoung; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Cas9 system was employed to down-regulate mdr1 gene for overcoming multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Disruption of the MDR1 gene was achieved by delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA plasmid or the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complex using a conventional gene transfection agent and protein transduction domain (PTD). Doxorubicin showed considerable cytotoxicity to the drug-resistant breast cancer cells pre-treated with the RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN) systems, whereas virtually non-toxic to the untreated cells. The potency of drug was enhanced in the cells treated with the protein-RNA complex as well as in those treated with plasmids, suggesting that mutation of the mdr1 gene by intracellular delivery of Cas9-sgRNA complex using proper protein delivery platforms could recover the drug susceptibility. Therefore, Cas9-mediated disruption of the drug resistance-related gene can be considered as a promising way to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:26961701

  17. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes in Populus.

    PubMed

    Tingting, Liu; Di, Fan; Lingyu, Ran; Yuanzhong, Jiang; Rui, Liu; Keming, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The typeⅡCRISPR/Cas9 system (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /CRISPR-associated 9) has been widely used in bacteria, yeast, animals and plants as a targeted genome editing technique. In previous work, we have successfully knocked out the endogenous phytoene dehydrogenase (PDS) gene in Populus tomentosa Carr. using this system. To study the effect of target design on the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in Populus, we analyzed the efficiency of mutagenesis using different single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that target PDS DNA sequence. We found that mismatches between the sgRNA and the target DNA resulted in decreased efficiency of mutagenesis and even failed mutagenesis. Moreover, complementarity between the 3' end nucleotide of sgRNA and target DNA is especially crucial for efficient mutagenesis. Further sequencing analysis showed that two PDS homologs in Populus, PtPDS1 and PtPDS2, could be knocked out simultaneously using this system with 86.4% and 50% efficiency, respectively. These results indicated the possibility of introducing mutations in two or more endogenous genes efficiently and obtaining multi-mutant strains of Populus using this system. We have indeed generated several knockout mutants of transcription factors and structural genes in Populus, which establishes a foundation for future studies of gene function and genetic improvement of Populus.

  18. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fuse, Yuji; Tamaoki, Junya; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Muratani, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7) and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a) were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates. PMID:28116036

  19. Development of a tailorable and tunable mechanism for cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blocker, Kory M.

    Due to the spatial and temporal control as well as the cell-type specificity necessary to extend gene delivery to therapeutic applications, there exists a need to create systems capable of gene transfer that are well-understood and easily manipulated. Furthermore, the creation of such materials will enable further exploration of the correlation between biochemical cues and the resulting cellular responses. In response to this as yet unmet need, a method to promote cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery was developed for this dissertation. Through the use of non-viral gene delivery, flexibility of the vehicle design was incorporated into the system. Using PNA technology, pDNA was able to be specifically tethered to a self-assembled monolayer via an enzymatically-labile peptide tether. This construct was shown to promote cell-responsive delivery while retaining flexibility over the chemical and physical properties of the vehicle and substrate. By alteration of some design parameters including tether number, pDNA surface coverage, and complexation agent, temporal control over the release profile was demonstrated. Furthermore, the ability to extend the applicability of the system was detailed by transitioning to a poly-D-lysine coated substrate upon which the pDNA is immobilized. This dissertation details proof-of-principle work in the formation of a controlled release gene delivery mechanism that may be used to promote understanding of cellular responses to biochemical signaling as well as be extended to use in tissue engineering applications.

  20. siRNA mediated gene silencing in Fusarium sp. HKF15 for overproduction of bikaverin.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Radhika; Purohit, Hemant J

    2014-04-01

    Fusarium sp. HKF15 is an isolate from effluent treatment plant which produces bikaverin. Bikaverin is a polyketide having antitumor and antibiotic potential. Acetyl coenzyme A is a common precursor for bikaverin as well as carotenoids and gibberellins. A polyketide synthase gene bik1 is responsible for bikaverin production whereas, hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmgR) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (fpps) are carotenoid and gibberellin pathway genes. Aim of this study was assessing siRNA mediated gene silencing for bikaverin overproduction with down-regulation of carotenoid and gibberellin pathway. HKF15 protoplasts derived from glucose grown culture were treated with 200pmolml(-1)hmgR and fpps siRNAs separately. Along with down-regulation of target genes, there was 2.4-fold increase in bik1 gene expression. The silencing was effective till 48h with a 41% increase in bikaverin production. The study proposes a strategy for manipulation of physiology towards desired secondary metabolite overproduction.

  1. [Establishment of loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for rapid detection of NDM-1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyi; Wu, Na; Zhu, Baoli; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Yuzhuo

    2011-08-01

    We established a rapid detection method of New Delhi Metallo-beta-Lactamase Gene (NDM-1) based on Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP). With the application of LAMP, we designed four sets of LAMP premiers, using NDM-1 gene as the target sequence, and selected the set of optimal primers. Meanwhile, we established optimal reaction systems and conditions to carry out the sensitivity and specificity experiments. The experiment results showed that the whole detection process took only one hour and could be observed visually. In the experiment of sensitivity, NDM-1 gene had a detection limit of 6 copies in each reaction. In the experiment of specificity, we detected NDM-1 gene in 4 pathogen strains (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae), and the total DNA from intestinal microbes and the total DNA from soil microbes. We had not detected the amplification reactions. The detection method established could rapidly detect NDM-1 gene and visualize the experiment result. The method is easy to operate and has high sensitivity and specificity and thus has great application value in basic research laboratories, emergent detection and spot detection.

  2. Correction of murine Rag1 deficiency by self-inactivating lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, K; Rodijk, M; Ng, Y-Y; Baert, M R M; Lagresle-Peyrou, C; Schambach, A; Zhang, F; Hoeben, R C; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Lankester, A C; Bredius, R G M; Driessen, G J A; Thrasher, A J; Baum, C; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; van Dongen, J J M; Staal, F J T

    2011-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) patients with an inactivating mutation in recombination activation gene 1 (RAG1) lack B and T cells due to the inability to rearrange immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. Gene therapy is a valid treatment option for RAG-SCID patients, especially for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow donor, but developing such therapy has proven challenging. As a preclinical model for RAG-SCID, we used Rag1-/- mice and lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) vectors harboring different internal elements to deliver native or codon-optimized human RAG1 sequences. Treatment resulted in the appearance of B and T cells in peripheral blood and developing B and T cells were detected in central lymphoid organs. Serum Ig levels and Ig and TCR Vβ gene segment usage was comparable to wild-type (WT) controls, indicating that RAG-mediated rearrangement took place. Remarkably, relatively low frequencies of B cells produced WT levels of serum immunoglobulins. Upon stimulation of the TCR, corrected spleen cells proliferated and produced cytokines. In vivo challenge resulted in production of antigen-specific antibodies. No leukemia development as consequence of insertional mutagenesis was observed. The functional reconstitution of the B- as well as the T-cell compartment provides proof-of-principle for therapeutic RAG1 gene transfer in Rag1-/- mice using lentiviral SIN vectors.

  3. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  4. Inhibition of choroidal neovascularization by lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jie; Mo, Bin; Liu, Lu; Yue, Yan-Kun; Yue, Chang-Li; Liu, Wu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of lentivirus-mediated pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) gene transfer performed in treatment of rats with established choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and investigates the mechanism by which PEDF inhibits CNV in rats. METHODS Brown Norway (BN) rats (n=204) were induced by exposure to a laser, and then randomly assigned to 3 groups: no treatment; treatments with intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or lentivirus-control GFP (free fluorescent protein). Following induction and treatment, the CNV tissue was assessed for form, size and vessel leakage by fluorescein fundus angiography (FFA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), histopathology, and examination of choroidal flat mounts. VEGF, Flk-1, and PEDF expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS A stable laser-induced rat model of CNV was successfully established, and used to demonstrate lentivirus-mediated PEDG gene transfer by intravitreal injection. Expression of green fluorescence labelled PEDF was observed in the retina up to 28d after injection. An intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-GFP at 7d led to a significant reduction in the size, thickness and area of CNV showed by FFA, OCT and choroidal flat mounts. PEDF was up-regulated while VEGF and Flk-1 were down-regulated in the lentivirus-PEDF-GFP group. The differences in VEGF and Flk-1 expression in the control and lentivirus-PEDF groups at 7, 14, 21 and 28d after laser induction were all statistically significant. CONCLUSION Lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer is effective for use in treatment of laser-induced CNV, and PEDF exerts its therapeutic effects by inhibiting expression of VEGF and Flk-1. PMID:27588264

  5. Parentage versus two-generation analyses for estimating pollen-mediated gene flow in plant populations.

    PubMed

    Burczyk, Jaroslaw; Koralewski, Tomasz E

    2005-07-01

    Assessment of contemporary pollen-mediated gene flow in plants is important for various aspects of plant population biology, genetic conservation and breeding. Here, through simulations we compare the two alternative approaches for measuring pollen-mediated gene flow: (i) the NEIGHBORHOOD model--a representative of parentage analyses, and (ii) the recently developed TWOGENER analysis of pollen pool structure. We investigate their properties in estimating the effective number of pollen parents (N(ep)) and the mean pollen dispersal distance (delta). We demonstrate that both methods provide very congruent estimates of N(ep) and delta, when the methods' assumptions considering the shape of pollen dispersal curve and the mating system follow those used in data simulations, although the NEIGHBORHOOD model exhibits generally lower variances of the estimates. The violations of the assumptions, especially increased selfing or long-distance pollen dispersal, affect the two methods to a different degree; however, they are still capable to provide comparable estimates of N(ep). The NEIGHBORHOOD model inherently allows to estimate both self-fertilization and outcrossing due to the long-distance pollen dispersal; however, the TWOGENER method is particularly sensitive to inflated selfing levels, which in turn may confound and suppress the effects of distant pollen movement. As a solution we demonstrate that in case of TWOGENER it is possible to extract the fraction of intraclass correlation that results from outcrossing only, which seems to be very relevant for measuring pollen-mediated gene flow. The two approaches differ in estimation precision and experimental efforts but they seem to be complementary depending on the main research focus and type of a population studied.

  6. Airway gene expression of IL-1 pathway mediators predicts exacerbation risk in obstructive airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Katherine J; Fu, Juan-juan; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2017-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma and COPD are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and are responsible for significant health care costs. This study further investigates interleukin (IL)-1 pathway activation and its relationship with exacerbations of asthma and COPD. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 95 participants with stable asthma (n=35) or COPD (n=60) were recruited and exacerbations recorded over the following 12 months. Gene expressions of IL-1 pathway biomarkers, including the IL-1 receptors (IL1R1, IL1R2, and IL1RN), and signaling molecules (IRAK2, IRAK3, and PELI1), were measured in sputum using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Mediators were compared between the frequent (≥2 exacerbations in the 12 months) and infrequent exacerbators, and the predictive relationships investigated using receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC) values. Results Of the 95 participants, 89 completed the exacerbation follow-up, where 30 participants (n=22 COPD, n=8 asthma) had two or more exacerbations. At the baseline visit, expressions of IRAK2, IRAK3, PELI1, and IL1R1 were elevated in participants with frequent exacerbations of both asthma and COPD combined and separately. In the combined population, sputum gene expression of IRAK3 (AUC=75.4%; P<0.001) was the best predictor of future frequent exacerbations, followed by IL1R1 (AUC=72.8%; P<0.001), PELI1 (AUC=71.2%; P<0.001), and IRAK2 (AUC=68.6; P=0.004). High IL-1 pathway gene expression was associated with frequent prior year exacerbations and correlated with the number and severity of exacerbations. Conclusion The upregulation of IL-1 pathway mediators is associated with frequent exacerbations of obstructive airway disease. Further studies should investigate these mediators as both potential diagnostic biomarkers predicting at-risk patients and novel treatment targets. PMID:28223794

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Vascular Gene Transfection by Cavitation of Endothelial-Targeted Cationic Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Aris; Belcik, Todd; Qi, Yue; Morgan, Terry K.; Champaneri, Shivam A.; Taylor, Sarah; Davidson, Brian P.; Zhao, Yan; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kuliszewski, Michael A.; Leong-Poi, Howard; Ammi, Azzdine; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery can be amplified by acoustic disruption of microbubble carriers that undergo cavitation. We hypothesized that endothelial targeting of microbubbles bearing cDNA is feasible and, through optimizing proximity to the vessel wall, increases the efficacy of gene transfection. BACKGROUND Contrast ultrasound-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for site-specific gene therapy, although there are concerns with the reproducibility of this technique and the safety when using high-power ultrasound. METHODS Cationic lipid-shelled decafluorobutane microbubbles bearing a targeting moiety were prepared and compared with nontargeted microbubbles. Microbubble targeting efficiency to endothelial adhesion molecules (P-selectin or intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1) was tested using in vitro flow chamber studies, intravital microscopy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)–stimulated murine cremaster muscle, and targeted contrast ultrasound imaging of P-selectin in a model of murine limb ischemia. Ultrasound-mediated transfection of luciferase reporter plasmid charge coupled to microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb muscle was assessed by in vivo optical imaging. RESULTS Charge coupling of cDNA to the microbubble surface was not influenced by the presence of targeting ligand, and did not alter the cavitation properties of cationic microbubbles. In flow chamber studies, surface conjugation of cDNA did not affect attachment of targeted microbubbles at microvascular shear stresses (0.6 and 1.5 dyne/cm2). Attachment in vivo was also not affected by cDNA according to intravital microscopy observations of venular adhesion of ICAM-1–targeted microbubbles and by ultrasound molecular imaging of P-selectin–targeted microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb in mice. Transfection at the site of high acoustic pressures (1.0 and 1.8 MPa) was similar for control and P-selectin–targeted microbubbles but was associated with

  8. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  9. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of potato using PLRV-rep and PVY CP genes and assessment of replicase mediated resistance against natural infection of PLRV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replicase-and coat protein gene-mediated resistances against potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and potato virus Y (PVY), respectively, demonstrated to be an effective way of protecting potato against two major virus problems (PLRV & PVY) world-wide. Potato cultivar Desiree was transformed using Agrobacte...

  10. Alu-mediated large deletion of the CDSN gene as a cause of peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Wada, T; Matsuda, Y; Muraoka, M; Toma, T; Takehara, K; Fujimoto, M; Yachie, A

    2014-10-01

    Peeling skin disease (PSD) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder caused by mutations in CDSN and is characterized by superficial peeling of the upper epidermis. Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a major component of corneodesmosomes that plays an important role in maintaining epidermis integrity. Herein, we report a patient with PSD caused by a novel homozygous large deletion in the 6p21.3 region encompassing the CDSN gene, which abrogates CDSN expression. Several genes including C6orf15, PSORS1C1, PSORS1C2, CCHCR1, and TCF19 were also deleted, however, the patient showed only clinical features typical of PSD. The deletion size was 59.1 kb. Analysis of the sequence surrounding the breakpoint showed that both telomeric and centromeric breakpoints existed within Alu-S sequences that were oriented in opposite directions. These results suggest an Alu-mediated recombination event as the mechanism underlying the deletion in our patient.

  11. Invertebrate eggs can fly: Evidence of waterfowl-mediated gene flow in aquatic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figuerola, J.; Green, A.J.; Michot, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Waterfowl often have been assumed to disperse freshwater aquatic organisms between isolated wetlands, but no one has analyzed the impact of this transport on the population structure of aquatic organisms. For three cladocerans (Daphnia ambigua, Daphnia laevis, and Sida crystallina) and one bryozoan (Cristatella mucedo), we estimated the genetic distances between populations across North America using sequences of several mitochondrial DNA genes and genotypic frequencies at allozyme and microsatellite loci. Waterfowl movements across North America (estimated from band recovery data) explained a significant proportion of the gene flow occurring between populations across the continent for three of the four species, even after controlling for geographic distances between localities. The fourth species, S. crystallina, has propagules less likely to survive desiccation or ingestion by birds. Differences in the capacity to exploit bird-mediated transport are likely to have important consequences for the ecology of aquatic communities and the spread of invasive species.

  12. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H.; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J.; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds. PMID:27099923

  13. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds.

  14. Intron-Mediated Enhancement: A Tool for Heterologous Gene Expression in Plants?

    PubMed Central

    Laxa, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Many plant promoters were characterized and used for transgene expression in plants. Even though these promoters drive high levels of transgene expression in plants, the expression patterns are rarely constitutive but restricted to some tissues and developmental stages. In terms of crop improvement not only the enhancement of expression per se but, in particular, tissue-specific and spatial expression of genes plays an important role. Introns were used to boost expression in transgenic plants in the field of crop improvement for a long time. However, the mechanism behind this so called intron-mediated enhancement (IME) is still largely unknown. This review highlights the complexity of IME on the levels of its regulation and modes of action and gives an overview on IME methodology, examples in fundamental research and models of proposed mechanisms. In addition, the application of IME in heterologous gene expression is discussed. PMID:28111580

  15. Thyroid hormone-responsive genes mediate otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K; Schreiber, A M

    2011-01-01

    Flatfish begin life as up-right swimming, bilaterally symmetrical larvae that metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles that swim with a highly lateralized posture. We have previously shown that TH induces abrupt growth and mineralization of one component of the vestibular system, the otoliths, during early larval development and metamorphosis. Here we report that four of five vestibular-specific genes that we tested (alpha-tectorin, otogelin, otolith matrix protein, and otopetrins 1 and 2 that are known to be associated with otolith development in other vertebrates are up-regulated 1.5- to 7-fold in larval flatfish during spontaneous metamorphosis and/or following 72 h of TH treatment. These findings suggest that otolith growth and development are mediated by diverse TH-responsive genes during flatfish metamorphosis.

  16. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease.

  17. Transformation of soybean Gy3 gene into Artemisaarenaria mediated by corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Lu-meng; Na, Ri; Xue, Dan; Xu, Yongze; Liu, Teng

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the protein content of desert plant, a method of genetic transformation mediated by corona discharge was established. Artemisia seeds were processed in corona electric field for 120 min at 12 kV, and then soaked in 0.1 SSC media that contained Soybean Gy3 gene DNA to incubate for 12 h at 26 °C. Finally the seeds were inoculated on the differentiation medium. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) detection showed that the Soybean Gy3 gene had been successfully introduced into genomic DNA of the regenerated plants of Artemisaarenaria. The study provided a new way for corona discharge in plant genetic modification.

  18. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  19. Involvement of an intracellular vesicular transport process in naked-sgRNA-mediated TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Kawano, Mitsuoki; Sato, Mari; Nashimoto, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is an RNA-mediated gene expression control technology with therapeutic potential. Recently, our group demonstrated that a heptamer, mh1 (Bcl‑2), targeting human Bcl-2 mRNA, can be taken up by cells without the use of any transfection reagents and can induce the apoptosis of leukemia cells. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of naked small guide (sg)RNA uptake by cultured cells. Therefore, in the present study the effects of various inhibitors on the induction of apoptosis by naked sgRNA treatment were investigated in order to identify the uptake pathway required for sgRNA function in cultured cells. Addition of the endocytosis inhibitors chlorpromazine, nystatin or methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin together with naked effective sgRNA was unable to diminish the apoptosis‑inducing effects of naked sgRNA or the reduction in target mRNA, suggesting that functional uptake of sgRNA by cells is clathrin‑, caveolae‑ and raft‑independent. Next, chloroquine, an inhibitor of lysosome acidification, and brefeldin A, an inhibitor that blocks protein transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum were administered. In the presence of these compounds, the apoptosis‑inducing effects of naked sgRNA were reduced. These results suggest that a vesicular transport process is involved in sgRNA‑mediated TRUE gene silencing. A greater understanding of how naked sgRNAs enter cells and how they reach their target RNAs may aid in the design of more specifically‑targeted and potent sgRNA drugs.

  20. Improved efficacy and reduced toxicity by ultrasound-guided intrahepatic injections of helper-dependent adenoviral vector in Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Nunzia; Nusco, Edoardo; Piccolo, Pasquale; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Vaníkova, Jana; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna J; Vitek, Libor; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I is caused by mutations of the uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene resulting in life-threatening increase of serum bilirubin. Life-long correction of hyperbilirubinemia was previously shown with intravenous injection of high doses of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing UGT1A1 in the Gunn rat, the animal model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome. However, such high vector doses can activate an acute and potentially lethal inflammatory response with elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6). To overcome this obstacle, we investigated safety and efficacy of direct injections of low HDAd doses delivered directly into the liver parenchyma of Gunn rats. Direct hepatic injections performed by either laparotomy or ultrasound-guided percutaneous injections were compared with the same doses given by intravenous injections. A greater reduction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased conjugated bilirubin in bile were achieved with 1 × 10(11) vp/kg by direct liver injections compared with intravenous injections. In sharp contrast to intravenous injections, direct hepatic injections neither raised serum IL-6 nor resulted in thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of HDAd vectors into liver parenchyma resulted in improved hepatocyte transduction and reduced toxicity compared with systemic injections and is clinically attractive for liver-directed gene therapy of Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

  1. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination.

  2. CRISPR-ERA: a comprehensive design tool for CRISPR-mediated gene editing, repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglei; Wei, Zheng; Dominguez, Antonia; Li, Yanda; Wang, Xiaowo; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The CRISPR/Cas9 system was recently developed as a powerful and flexible technology for targeted genome engineering, including genome editing (altering the genetic sequence) and gene regulation (without altering the genetic sequence). These applications require the design of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that are efficient and specific. However, this remains challenging, as it requires the consideration of many criteria. Several sgRNA design tools have been developed for gene editing, but currently there is no tool for the design of sgRNAs for gene regulation. With accumulating experimental data on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing and regulation, we implement a comprehensive computational tool based on a set of sgRNA design rules summarized from these published reports. We report a genome-wide sgRNA design tool and provide an online website for predicting sgRNAs that are efficient and specific. We name the tool CRISPR-ERA, for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-mediated editing, repression, and activation (ERA). Availability and implementation: http://CRISPR-ERA.stanford.edu. Contact: stanley.qi@stanford.edu or xwwang@tsinghua.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26209430

  3. BDNF gene delivery mediated by neuron-targeted nanoparticles is neuroprotective in peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cátia D F; Gonçalves, Nádia P; Gomes, Carla P; Saraiva, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P

    2017-03-01

    Neuron-targeted gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat peripheral neuropathies. Here we propose the use of polymeric nanoparticles based on thiolated trimethyl chitosan (TMCSH) to mediate targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons upon a peripheral and minimally invasive intramuscular administration. Nanoparticles were grafted with the non-toxic carboxylic fragment of the tetanus neurotoxin (HC) to allow neuron targeting and were explored to deliver a plasmid DNA encoding for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a peripheral nerve injury model. The TMCSH-HC/BDNF nanoparticle treatment promoted the release and significant expression of BDNF in neural tissues, which resulted in an enhanced functional recovery after injury as compared to control treatments (vehicle and non-targeted nanoparticles), associated with an improvement in key pro-regenerative events, namely, the increased expression of neurofilament and growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the injured nerves. Moreover, the targeted nanoparticle treatment was correlated with a significantly higher density of myelinated axons in the distal stump of injured nerves, as well as with preservation of unmyelinated axon density as compared with controls and a protective role in injury-denervated muscles, preventing them from denervation. These results highlight the potential of TMCSH-HC nanoparticles as non-viral gene carriers to deliver therapeutic genes into the peripheral neurons and thus, pave the way for their use as an effective therapeutic intervention for peripheral neuropathies.

  4. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Ji; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Yeeun; Yi, Myung-hee; Kim, Juri; Park, Soon-Jung; Yong, Tai-Soon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, thereby regulating essential cellular processes. In this study, we aimed to outline modes of chromatin-mediated gene regulation in T. vaginalis. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) alters global transcriptional responses and induces hyperacetylation of histones and hypermethylation of H3K4. Analysis of the genome of T. vaginalis revealed that a number of enzymes regulate histone modification, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms are important to controlling gene expression in this organism. Additionally, we describe the genome-wide localization of two histone H3 modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27Ac), which we found to be positively associated with active gene expression in both steady and dynamic transcriptional states. These results provide the first direct evidence that histone modifications play an essential role in transcriptional regulation of T. vaginalis, and may help guide future epigenetic research into therapeutic intervention strategies against this parasite. PMID:28345651

  5. Stabilizing in vitro ultrasound-mediated gene transfection by regulating cavitation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chia-Wen; Desjouy, Cyril; Chen, Shing-Ru; Lee, Jyun-Lin; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that acoustic cavitation can facilitate the inward transport of genetic materials across cell membranes (sonoporation). However, partially due to the unstationary behavior of the initiation and leveling of cavitation, the sonoporation effect is usually unstable, especially in low intensity conditions. A system which is able to regulate the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop is implemented and its effect on in vitro gene transfection is tested. The regulated system provided better time stability and reproducibility of the cavitation levels than the unregulated conditions. Cultured hepatoma cells (BNL) mixed with 10 μg luciferase plasmids are exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound with or without cavitation regulation, and the gene transfection efficiency and cell viability are subsequently assessed. Experimental results show that for all exposure intensities (low, medium, and high), stable and intensity dependent, although not higher, gene expression could be achieved in the regulated cavitation system than the unregulated conditions. The cavitation regulation system provides a better control of cavitation and its bioeffect which are crucial important for clinical applications of ultrasound-mediated gene transfection.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces HDAC1-Mediated Suppression of IL-12B Gene Expression in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Aneesh; Antony, Cecil; Jose, Leny; Mundayoor, Sathish; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy; Kumar, R Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of host gene expression is one of the many strategies employed by intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to survive inside the macrophages and cause disease. The underlying molecular mechanism behind the downregulation of host defense gene expression is largely unknown. In this study we explored the role of histone deacetylation in macrophages in response to infection by virulent MTB H37Rv in manipulating host gene expression. We show a significant increase in the levels of HDAC1 with a concomitant and marked reduction in the levels of histone H3-acetylation in macrophages containing live, but not killed, virulent MTB. Additionally, we show that HDAC1 is recruited to the promoter of IL-12B in macrophages infected with live, virulent MTB, and the subsequent hypoacetylation of histone H3 suppresses the expression of this gene which plays a key role in initiating Th1 responses. By inhibiting immunologically relevant kinases, and by knockdown of crucial transcriptional regulators, we demonstrate that protein kinase-A (PKA), CREB, and c-Jun play an important role in regulating HDAC1 level in live MTB-infected macrophages. By chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis, we prove that HDAC1 expression is positively regulated by the recruitment of c-Jun to its promoter. Knockdown of HDAC1 in macrophages significantly reduced the survival of intracellular MTB. These observations indicate a novel HDAC1-mediated epigenetic modification induced by live, virulent MTB to subvert the immune system to survive and replicate in the host.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variants can mediate methylation status of inflammation, angiogenesis and signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Atilano, Shari R.; Malik, Deepika; Chwa, Marilyn; Cáceres-Del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA can be classified into haplogroups representing different geographic and/or racial origins of populations. The H haplogroup is protective against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), while the J haplogroup is high risk for AMD. In the present study, we performed comparison analyses of human retinal cell cybrids, which possess identical nuclei, but mtDNA from subjects with either the H or J haplogroups, and demonstrate differences in total global methylation, and expression patterns for two genes related to acetylation and five genes related to methylation. Analyses revealed that untreated-H and -J cybrids have different expression levels for nuclear genes (CFH, EFEMP1, VEGFA and NFkB2). However, expression levels for these genes become equivalent after treatment with a methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, sequencing of the entire mtDNA suggests that differences in epigenetic status found in cybrids are likely due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the haplogroup profiles rather than rare variants or private SNPs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA variants can mediate methylation profiles and transcription for inflammation, angiogenesis and various signaling pathways, which are important in several common diseases. PMID:25964427

  8. Expression of the familial Mediterranean fever gene is regulated by nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Grandemange, Sylvie; Soler, Stephan; Touitou, Isabelle

    2009-12-15

    Mutations in the MEditerranean FeVer (MEFV) gene are responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessively inherited auto-inflammatory disease. Cases of dominant inheritance and phenotype-genotype heterogeneity have been reported; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not currently understood. The FMF protein named pyrin or marenostrin (P/M) is thought to be involved in regulating innate immunity but its function remains subject to controversy. Recent studies postulate that a defect in MEFV expression regulation may play a role in FMF physiopathology. Our group, along with others, has identified several alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts in leukocytes. Since alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathways are usually coupled in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, we hypothesized that NMD could contribute to the regulation of the MEFV gene. To address this issue, we examined the effect of indirect and direct inhibition of NMD on expression of the MEFV transcripts in THP1, monocyte and neutrophil cells. We showed that MEFV is the first auto-inflammatory gene regulated by NMD in both a cell- and transcript-specific manner. These results and preliminary western-blot analyses suggest the possible translation of alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts into several P/M variants according to cell type and inflammatory state. Our results introduce the novel hypothesis that variation of NMD efficiency could play an important role in FMF physiopathology as a potent phenotypic modifier.

  9. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  10. Pollen-Mediated Movement of Herbicide Resistance Genes in Lolium rigidum

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, María-Concepción; Chueca, María-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of herbicide resistance genes by pollen is a major concern in cross-pollinated species such as annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). A two-year study was conducted in the greenhouse, under favorable conditions for pollination, to generate information on potential maximum cross-pollination. This maximum cross-pollination rate was 56.1%. A three-year field trial was also conducted to study the cross-pollination rates in terms of distance and orientation to an herbicide-resistant pollen source. Under field conditions, cross-pollination rates varied from 5.5% to 11.6% in plants adjacent to the pollen source and decreased with increasing distances (1.5 to 8.9% at 15 m distance and up to 4.1% at 25 m in the downwind direction). Environmental conditions influenced the cross-pollination both under greenhouse and field conditions. Data were fit to an exponential decay model to predict gene flow at increasing distances. This model predicted an average gene flow of 7.1% when the pollen donor and recipient plants were at 0 m distance from each other. Pollen-mediated gene flow declined by 50% at 16.7 m from the pollen source, yet under downwind conditions gene flow of 5.2% was predicted at 25 m, the farthest distance studied. Knowledge of cross-pollination rates will be useful for assessing the spread of herbicide resistance genes in L. rigidum and in developing appropriate strategies for its mitigation. PMID:27336441

  11. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  12. SRC-2-mediated coactivation of anti-tumorigenic target genes suppresses MYC-induced liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Comerford, Sarah A.; York, Brian; O’Donnell, Kathryn A.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. A Sleeping Beauty-mediated transposon mutagenesis screen previously identified mutations that cooperate with MYC to accelerate liver tumorigenesis. This revealed a tumor suppressor role for Steroid Receptor Coactivator 2/Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 2 (Src-2/Ncoa2) in liver cancer. In contrast, SRC-2 promotes survival and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, suggesting a tissue-specific and context-dependent role for SRC-2 in tumorigenesis. To determine if genetic loss of SRC-2 is sufficient to accelerate MYC-mediated liver tumorigenesis, we bred Src-2-/- mice with a MYC-induced liver tumor model and observed a significant increase in liver tumor burden. RNA sequencing of liver tumors and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a set of direct target genes that are bound by SRC-2 and exhibit downregulated expression in Src-2-/- liver tumors. We demonstrate that activation of SHP (Small Heterodimer Partner), DKK4 (Dickkopf-4), and CADM4 (Cell Adhesion Molecule 4) by SRC-2 suppresses tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. These studies suggest that SRC-2 may exhibit oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on the target genes and nuclear receptors that are expressed in distinct tissues and illuminate the mechanisms of tumor suppression by SRC-2 in liver. PMID:28273073

  13. Genome-wide signatures of male-mediated migration shaping the Indian gene pool.

    PubMed

    ArunKumar, GaneshPrasad; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Duty, Jeff; Rollo, Debra; Syama, Adhikarla; Arun, Varatharajan Santhakumari; Kavitha, Valampuri John; Triska, Petr; Greenspan, Bennett; Wells, R Spencer; Pitchappan, Ramasamy

    2015-09-01

    Multiple questions relating to contributions of cultural and demographical factors in the process of human geographical dispersal remain largely unanswered. India, a land of early human settlement and the resulting diversity is a good place to look for some of the answers. In this study, we explored the genetic structure of India using a diverse panel of 78 males genotyped using the GenoChip. Their genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity was examined in the context of various covariates that influence Indian gene pool. Admixture analysis of genome-wide SNP data showed high proportion of the Southwest Asian component in all of the Indian samples. Hierarchical clustering based on admixture proportions revealed seven distinct clusters correlating to geographical and linguistic affiliations. Convex hull overlay of Y-chromosomal haplogroups on the genome-wide SNP principal component analysis brought out distinct non-overlapping polygons of F*-M89, H*-M69, L1-M27, O2a-M95 and O3a3c1-M117, suggesting a male-mediated migration and expansion of the Indian gene pool. Lack of similar correlation with mitochondrial DNA clades indicated a shared genetic ancestry of females. We suggest that ancient male-mediated migratory events and settlement in various regional niches led to the present day scenario and peopling of India.

  14. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Katter, Katharina; Geurts, Aron M.; Hoffmann, Orsolya; Mátés, Lajos; Landa, Vladimir; Hiripi, László; Moreno, Carol; Lazar, Jozef; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Popova, Elena; Jerchow, Boris; Becker, Katja; Devaraj, Anantharam; Walter, Ingrid; Grzybowksi, Michael; Corbett, Molly; Filho, Artur Rangel; Hodges, Matthew R.; Bader, Michael; Ivics, Zoltán; Jacob, Howard J.; Pravenec, Michal; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Germline transgenesis is an important procedure for functional investigation of biological pathways, as well as for animal biotechnology. We have established a simple, nonviral protocol in three important biomedical model organisms frequently used in physiological studies. The protocol is based on the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system, SB100X, which reproducibly promoted generation of transgenic founders at frequencies of 50–64, 14–72, and 15% in mice, rats, and rabbits, respectively. The SB100X-mediated transgene integrations are less prone to genetic mosaicism and gene silencing as compared to either the classical pronuclear injection or to lentivirus-mediated transgenesis. The method was successfully applied to a variety of transgenes and animal models, and can be used to generate founders with single-copy integrations. The transposon vector also allows the generation of transgenic lines with tissue-specific expression patterns specified by promoter elements of choice, exemplified by a rat reporter strain useful for tracking serotonergic neurons. As a proof of principle, we rescued an inborn genetic defect in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat by SB100X transgenesis. A side-by-side comparison of the SB100X- and piggyBac-based protocols revealed that the two systems are complementary, offering new opportunities in genome manipulation.—Katter, K., Geurts, A. M., Hoffmann, O., Mátés, L., Landa,V., Hiripi, L., Moreno, C., Lazar, J., Bashir, S., Zidek, V., Popova, E., Jerchow, B., Becker, K., Devaraj, A., Walter, I., Grzybowksi, M., Corbett, M., Rangel Filho, A., Hodges, M. R., Bader, M., Ivics, Z., Jacob, H. J., Pravenec, M., Bősze, Z., Rülicke, T., Izsvák, Z. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits. PMID:23195032

  15. Repression of retrovirus-mediated transgene expression by interferons: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, S; Carroll, J M; Taichman, L B

    1997-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer is commonly used in gene therapy protocols and has the potential to provide long-term expression of the transgene. Although expression of a retrovirus-delivered transgene is satisfactory in cultured cells, it has been difficult to achieve consistent and high-level expression in vivo. In this investigation, we explored the possibility of modulating transgene expression by host-derived cytokines. Normal human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts were transduced with recombinant retroviruses expressing a reporter gene (lacZ). Treatment of transduced cells with a proinflammatory cytokine, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), significantly reduced lacZ expression to less than 25% of that of nontreated cells. The inhibition was concentration dependent (peak at 5 ng/ml) and time dependent (maximal at 16 h for transcript and 24 h for protein); expression remained repressed in the continued presence of IFN-gamma but returned to normal levels 24 h after IFN-gamma withdrawal. The decrease in beta-galactosidase activity appeared to result from decrease in steady-state lacZ mRNA levels. Inhibitors of transcription and translation blocked IFN-gamma-induced repression, suggesting involvement of newly synthesized protein intermediates. Similar results were obtained by treatment of transduced cells with IFN-alpha but not with other proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2 (IL-1), IL-4, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Although the level of lacZ mRNA was reduced by >70% following IFN treatment, the rate of lacZ transcription was not significantly different from that for nontreated cells. These results suggest that IFN-mediated regulation of transgene expression is at a posttranscriptional level. Interestingly, IFN-gamma also suppressed transgene expression driven by a cellular promoter (involucrin) inserted in an internal position in the retroviral vector. The presence of the overlapping 3' untranslated

  16. Poly(ethylenimine)-mediated gene delivery affects endothelial cell function and viability.

    PubMed

    Godbey, W T; Wu, K K; Mikos, A G

    2001-03-01

    Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) was used to transfect the endothelial cell line EA.hy 926, and the secreted levels of three gene products, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), and von Willebrand Factor (vWF), were assessed via ELISA. We found that the levels of these gene products in cell supernatants increased by factors up to 16.3 (tPA), 8.3 (PAI-1), or 6.7 (vWF) times the levels recorded for untreated cells, and roughly correlated with the percentage of cells that expressed the reporter plasmid. Transfections carried out using promotorless constructs of the same reporter plasmid also yielded increases in tPA, PAI-1, and vWF to similar extents. Additionally, data regarding cell viability were gathered and found to inversely relate to both the effectiveness of the PEI used for transfection and the secreted levels of the three mentioned products. There appeared to be two distinct types of cell death, resulting from the use of either free PEI (which acts within 2 h) or PEI/DNA complexes (which cause death 7-9 h after transfection). Cells were also transfected by poly(L-lysine) and liposomal carriers, and increases in secreted tPA similar to those seen with PEI-mediated transfection were observed for positively transfected cells. The results of these investigations indicate that non-viral gene delivery can induce a state of endothelial cell dysfunction, and that PEI-mediated transfection can lead to two distinct types of cell death.

  17. Efficient CRISPR-mediated gene targeting and transgene replacement in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Anna F; Schinko, Johannes B; Averof, Michalis

    2015-08-15

    Gene-editing techniques are revolutionizing the way we conduct genetics in many organisms. The CRISPR/Cas nuclease has emerged as a highly versatile, efficient and affordable tool for targeting chosen sites in the genome. Beyond its applications in established model organisms, CRISPR technology provides a platform for genetic intervention in a wide range of species, limited only by our ability to deliver it to cells and to select mutations efficiently. Here, we test the CRISPR technology in an emerging insect model and pest, the beetle Tribolium castaneum. We use simple assays to test CRISPR/Cas activity, we demonstrate efficient expression of guide RNAs and Cas9 from Tribolium U6 and hsp68 promoters and we test the efficiency of knockout and knock-in approaches in Tribolium. We find that 55-80% of injected individuals carry mutations (indels) generated by non-homologous end joining, including mosaic bi-allelic knockouts; 71-100% carry such mutations in their germ line and transmit them to the next generation. We show that CRISPR-mediated gene knockout of the Tribolium E-cadherin gene causes defects in dorsal closure, which is consistent with RNAi-induced phenotypes. Homology-directed knock-in of marker transgenes was observed in 14% of injected individuals and transmitted to the next generation by 6% of injected individuals. Previous work in Tribolium mapped a large number of transgene insertions associated with developmental phenotypes and enhancer traps. We present an efficient method for re-purposing these insertions, via CRISPR-mediated replacement of these transgenes by new constructs.

  18. A nonviral pHEMA+chitosan nanosphere-mediated high-efficiency gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Erdal; Tiwari, Pooja M; Waffo, Alain B; Miller, Michael E; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2013-01-01

    The transport of DNA into eukaryotic cells is minimal because of the cell membrane barrier, and this limits the application of DNA vaccines, gene silencing, and gene therapy. Several available transfection reagents and techniques have been used to circumvent this problem. Alternatively, nonviral nanoscale vectors have been shown to bypass the eukaryotic cell membrane. In the present work, we developed a unique nanomaterial, pHEMA+chitosan nanospheres (PCNSs), which consisted of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanospheres surrounded by a chitosan cationic shell, and we used this for encapsulation of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-F gene construct (a model for a DNA vaccine). The new nanomaterial was capable of transfecting various eukaryotic cell lines without the use of a commercial transfection reagent. Using transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and immunofluorescence, we clearly demonstrated that the positively charged PCNSs were able to bind to the negatively charged cell membrane and were taken up by endocytosis, in Cos-7 cells. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we also evaluated the efficiency of transfection achieved with PCNSs and without the use of a liposomal-based transfection mediator, in Cos-7, HEp-2, and Vero cells. To assess the transfection efficiency of the PCNSs in vivo, these novel nanomaterials containing RSV-F gene were injected intramuscularly into BALB/c mice, resulting in high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we report, for the first time, the application of the PCNSs as a nanovehicle for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  19. A nonviral pHEMA+chitosan nanosphere-mediated high-efficiency gene delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Erdal; Tiwari, Pooja M; Waffo, Alain B; Miller, Michael E; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2013-01-01

    The transport of DNA into eukaryotic cells is minimal because of the cell membrane barrier, and this limits the application of DNA vaccines, gene silencing, and gene therapy. Several available transfection reagents and techniques have been used to circumvent this problem. Alternatively, nonviral nanoscale vectors have been shown to bypass the eukaryotic cell membrane. In the present work, we developed a unique nanomaterial, pHEMA+chitosan nanospheres (PCNSs), which consisted of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanospheres surrounded by a chitosan cationic shell, and we used this for encapsulation of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-F gene construct (a model for a DNA vaccine). The new nanomaterial was capable of transfecting various eukaryotic cell lines without the use of a commercial transfection reagent. Using transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and immunofluorescence, we clearly demonstrated that the positively charged PCNSs were able to bind to the negatively charged cell membrane and were taken up by endocytosis, in Cos-7 cells. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we also evaluated the efficiency of transfection achieved with PCNSs and without the use of a liposomal-based transfection mediator, in Cos-7, HEp-2, and Vero cells. To assess the transfection efficiency of the PCNSs in vivo, these novel nanomaterials containing RSV-F gene were injected intramuscularly into BALB/c mice, resulting in high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we report, for the first time, the application of the PCNSs as a nanovehicle for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23610520

  20. SWI/SNF enzymes promote SOX10- mediated activation of myelin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Himangi G; Mehta, Gaurav; Zhang, Xiaolu; Datar, Ila; Mehrotra, Aanchal; Yeung, Kam C; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-01-01

    SOX10 is a Sry-related high mobility (HMG)-box transcriptional regulator that promotes differentiation of neural crest precursors into Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, and melanocytes. Myelin, formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, is essential for propagation of nerve impulses. SWI/SNF complexes are ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that are critical for cellular differentiation. It was recently demonstrated that the BRG1 subunit of SWI/SNF complexes activates SOX10 expression and also interacts with SOX10 to activate expression of OCT6 and KROX20, two transcriptional regulators of Schwann cell differentiation. To determine the requirement for SWI/SNF enzymes in the regulation of genes that encode components of myelin, which are downstream of these transcriptional regulators, we introduced SOX10 into fibroblasts that inducibly express dominant negative versions of the SWI/SNF ATPases, BRM or BRG1. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 have mutations in the ATP binding site and inhibit gene activation events that require SWI/SNF function. Ectopic expression of SOX10 in cells derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to the activation of the endogenous Schwann cell specific gene, myelin protein zero (MPZ) and the gene that encodes myelin basic protein (MBP). Thus, SOX10 reprogrammed these cells into myelin gene expressing cells. Ectopic expression of KROX20 was not sufficient for activation of these myelin genes. However, KROX20 together with SOX10 synergistically activated MPZ and MBP expression. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 abrogated SOX10 mediated activation of MPZ and MBP and synergistic activation of these genes by SOX10 and KROX20. SOX10 was required to recruit BRG1 to the MPZ locus. Similarly, in immortalized Schwann cells, BRG1 recruitment to SOX10 binding sites at the MPZ locus was dependent on SOX10 and expression of dominant negative BRG1 inhibited expression of MPZ and MBP in these cells. Thus, SWI/SNF enzymes cooperate with SOX10 to

  1. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Navdeep; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-05-01

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000nM) for 4h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  2. Identification of virulence genes in the corn pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Steffen; Ludwig, Nancy; Floss, Daniela S; Sugui, Janyce A; Koszucka, Anna M; Voll, Lars M; Sonnewald, Uwe; Deising, Holger B

    2011-01-01

    A previously developed Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) protocol for the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola led to high rates of tandem integration of the whole Ti-plasmid, and was therefore considered to be unsuitable for the identification of pathogenicity and virulence genes by insertional mutagenesis in this pathogen. We used a modified ATMT protocol with acetosyringone present only during the co-cultivation of C. graminicola and A. tumefaciens. Analysis of 105 single-spore isolates randomly chosen from a collection of approximately 2000 transformants, indicated that almost 70% of the transformants had single T-DNA integrations. Of 500 independent transformants tested, 10 exhibited attenuated virulence in infection assays on whole plants. Microscopic analyses primarily revealed defects at different pre-penetration stages of infection-related morphogenesis. Three transformants were characterized in detail. The identification of the T-DNA integration sites was performed by amplification of genomic DNA ends after endonuclease digestion and polynucleotide tailing. In one transformant, the T-DNA had integrated into the 5'-flank of a gene with similarity to allantoicase genes of other Ascomycota. In the second and third transformants, the T-DNA had integrated into an open reading frame (ORF) and into the 5'-flank of an ORF. In both cases, the ORFs have unknown function.

  3. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  4. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  5. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  6. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  7. TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu‐Hsing; Kowalko, Johanna E.; DiTommaso, Tia; Nyambi, Mandi; Montoro, Daniel T.; Essner, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Loss‐of‐function genetics provides strong evidence for a gene's function in a wild‐type context. In many model systems, this approach has been invaluable for discovering the function of genes in diverse biological processes. Axolotls are urodele amphibians (salamanders) with astonishing regenerative abilities, capable of regenerating entire limbs, portions of the tail (including spinal cord), heart, and brain into adulthood. With their relatively short generation time among salamanders, they offer an outstanding opportunity to interrogate natural mechanisms for appendage and organ regeneration provided that the tools are developed to address these long‐standing questions. Here we demonstrate targeted modification of the thrombospondin‐1 (tsp‐1) locus using transcription‐activator‐like effector nucleases (TALENs) and identify a role of tsp‐1 in recruitment of myeloid cells during limb regeneration. We find that while tsp‐1‐edited mosaic animals still regenerate limbs, they exhibit a reduced subepidermal collagen layer in limbs and an increased number of myeloid cells within blastemas. This work presents a protocol for generating and genotyping mosaic axolotls with TALEN‐mediated gene edits. PMID:27499866

  8. Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Regulation of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 Mediates Pluripotency Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Ryan T; Xu, Xueping; Yi, Fei; Merrill, Bradley J; Cooney, Austin J

    2010-01-01

    Delineating the signaling pathways that underlie ESC pluripotency is paramount for development of ESC applications in both the research and clinical settings. In culture pluripotency is maintained by leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) stimulation of two separate signaling axes: Stat3/Klf4/Sox2 and PI3K/Tbx3/Nanog, which converge in the regulation of Oct4 expression. However, LIF signaling is not required in vivo for self-renewal, thus alternate signaling axes likely mediate these pathways. Additional factors that promote pluripotency gene expression have been identified, including the direct regulation of Oct4 by liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) and β-catenin regulation of Nanog. Here, we present genetic, molecular, and pharmacological studies identifying a signaling axis in which β-catenin promotes pluripotency gene expression in an Lrh-1-dependent manner. Furthermore, Lrh-1 was identified as a novel β-catenin target gene, and Lrh-1 regulation is required for maintaining proper levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Tbx3. Elucidation of this pathway provides an alternate mechanism by which the primary pluripotency axis may be regulated in vivo and may pave the way for small molecule applications to manipulate pluripotency or improve the efficiency of somatic cell reprogramming. Stem Cells 2010;28:1794–1804 PMID:20734354

  9. Flipase-mediated cassette exchange in Sf9 insect cells for stable gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Prather, Kristala L J; Coroadinha, Ana S; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2012-11-01

    Site-specific DNA integration allows predictable heterologous gene expression and circumvents extensive clone screening. Herein, the establishment of a Flipase (Flp)-mediated cassette exchange system in Sf9 insect cells for targeted gene integration is described. A tagging cassette harboring a reporter dsRed gene was randomly introduced into the cell genome after screening different transfection protocols. Single-copy integration clones were then co-transfected with both Flp-containing plasmid and an EGFP-containing targeting cassette. Successful cassette exchange was suggested by emergence of G418-resistant green colonies and confirmed by PCR analysis, showing the absence of the tagging cassette and single integration of the targeting cassette in the same locus. Upon cassette exchange, uniform EGFP expression between clones derived from the same integration site was obtained. Moreover, the resulting cell clones exhibited the expression properties of the parental cell line. EGFP production titers over 40 mg/L were of the same order of magnitude as those achieved through baculovirus infection. This Sf9 master cell line constitutes a versatile and re-usable platform to produce multiple recombinant proteins for fundamental and applied research.

  10. Metazoan Nuclear Pores Provide a Scaffold for Poised Genes and Mediate Induced Enhancer-Promoter Contacts.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Debo, Brian; Aleman, Jennifer R; Talamas, Jessica A; Lan, Yemin; Nguyen, Nha H; Won, Kyoung J; Capelson, Maya

    2017-04-06

    Nuclear pore complex components (Nups) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, yet what regulatory steps are controlled by metazoan Nups remains unclear. We identified the presence of multiple Nups at promoters, enhancers, and insulators in the Drosophila genome. In line with this binding, we uncovered a functional role for Nup98 in mediating enhancer-promoter looping at ecdysone-inducible genes. These genes were found to be stably associated with nuclear pores before and after activation. Although changing levels of Nup98 disrupted enhancer-promoter contacts, it did not affect ongoing transcription but instead compromised subsequent transcriptional activation or transcriptional memory. In support of the enhancer-looping role, we found Nup98 to gain and retain physical interactions with architectural proteins upon stimulation with ecdysone. Together, our data identify Nups as a class of architectural proteins for enhancers and supports a model in which animal genomes use the nuclear pore as an organizing scaffold for inducible poised genes.

  11. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  12. Oligonucleotide-mediated gene modification and its promise for animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Laible, Götz; Wagner, Stefan; Alderson, Jon

    2006-01-17

    One of the great aspirations in modern biology is the ability to utilise the expanding knowledge of the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity through the purposeful tailoring of the mammalian genome. A number of technologies are emerging which have the capacity to modify genes in their chromosomal context. Not surprisingly, the major thrust in this area has come from the evaluation of gene therapy applications to correct mutations implicated in human genetic diseases. The recent development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides access to these technologies for the purposeful modification of livestock animals. The enormous phenotypic variety existent in contemporary livestock animals has in many cases been linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) and their underlying point mutations, often referred to as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Thus, the ability for the targeted genetic modification of livestock animals constitutes an attractive opportunity for future agricultural applications. In this review, we will summarize attempts and approaches for oligonucleotide-mediated gene modification (OGM) strategies for the site-specific modification of the genome, with an emphasis on chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotides (RDOs) and single-stranded oligonucletides (ssODNs). The potential of this approach for the directed genetic improvement of livestock animals is illustrated through examples, outlining the effects of point mutations on important traits, including meat and milk production, reproductive performance, disease resistance and superior models of human diseases. Current technological hurdles and potential strategies that might remove these barriers in the future are discussed.

  13. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of NDM-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Du, Yijun; Zhu, Xiaoling; Bai, Hua; Luo, Yanbo; Liu, Yuqing

    2012-08-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of the emerging resistance gene New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1), with its specificity and sensitivity having been evaluated. Six primers, including a pair of outer primers, a pair of inner primers, and a pair of loop primers, were specially designed for recognizing eight distinct sequences on the target NDM-1 gene. The amplification reaction was performed within only 40 min under isothermal conditions at 65°C in a regular water bath. The LAMP assay showed good specificity and higher sensitivity than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with a detection limit of 1 pg genomic DNA per tube of one NDM-1-positive reference strain. The detection result for the 345 clinical samples showed 100% consistence with the result by the PCR method, and three contaminated samples could be detected correctly by LAMP assays, while they could not be detected by PCR. The LAMP method reported here demonstrated a potential and valuable means for detection of the NDM-1 gene: easy, rapid, visual, specific, accurate, and sensitive, especially useful for on-the-spot investigation.

  14. Multiple mechanisms mediate glucose repression of the yeast GAL1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lamphier, M S; Ptashne, M

    1992-01-01

    Several mechanisms contribute to the glucose repression of the GAL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that one mechanism involves the transcriptional down-regulation of the GAL4 gene and a second requires the GAL80 gene. We also examine the contribution of cis-acting negative elements in the GAL1 promoter to glucose repression. In an otherwise wild-type strain disruption of any one of these three mechanisms alleviates repression of GAL1 only 2- to 4-fold. However, in the absence of the other two mechanisms the transcriptional down-regulation of GAL4 is sufficient to repress GAL1 expression 40- to 60-fold and the GAL80-dependent mechanism is sufficient to repress GAL1 expression 20- to 30-fold. These first two mechanisms constitute a functionally redundant system of repression and both must be disrupted in order to abolish glucose repression of GAL1. In contrast, negative elements in the GAL1 promoter are effective in repressing GAL1 expression 2- to 4-fold in glucose medium only when at least one of the other two mechanisms of repression is present. Thus, glucose repression of GAL1 is mediated primarily by the first two mechanisms, whereas the third mechanism supplements repression severalfold. PMID:1631075

  15. Compact and highly active next-generation libraries for CRISPR-mediated gene repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Adamson, Britt; Pak, Ryan A; Chen, Yuwen; Fields, Alexander P; Park, Chong Yon; Corn, Jacob E; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that nucleosomes directly block access of CRISPR/Cas9 to DNA (Horlbeck et al., 2016). Here, we build on this observation with a comprehensive algorithm that incorporates chromatin, position, and sequence features to accurately predict highly effective single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeting nuclease-dead Cas9-mediated transcriptional repression (CRISPRi) and activation (CRISPRa). We use this algorithm to design next-generation genome-scale CRISPRi and CRISPRa libraries targeting human and mouse genomes. A CRISPRi screen for essential genes in K562 cells demonstrates that the large majority of sgRNAs are highly active. We also find CRISPRi does not exhibit any detectable non-specific toxicity recently observed with CRISPR nuclease approaches. Precision-recall analysis shows that we detect over 90% of essential genes with minimal false positives using a compact 5 sgRNA/gene library. Our results establish CRISPRi and CRISPRa as premier tools for loss- or gain-of-function studies and provide a general strategy for identifying Cas9 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19760.001 PMID:27661255

  16. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase regulates retinoic acid receptor-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Le May, Nicolas; Iltis, Izarn; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Zhovmer, Alexander; Biard, Denis; Egly, Jean-Marc; Schreiber, Valérie; Coin, Frédéric

    2012-12-14

    Poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a catabolic enzyme that cleaves ADP-ribose polymers synthesized by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases. Here, transcriptome profiling and differentiation assay revealed a requirement of PARG for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-mediated transcription. Mechanistically, PARG accumulates early at promoters of RAR-responsive genes upon retinoic acid treatment to promote the formation of an appropriate chromatin environment suitable for transcription. Silencing of PARG or knockout of its enzymatic activity maintains the H3K9me2 mark at the promoter of the RAR-dependent genes, leading to the absence of preinitiation complex formation. In the absence of PARG, we found that the H3K9 demethylase KDM4D/JMJD2D became PARsylated. Mutation of two glutamic acids located in the Jumonji N domain of KDM4D inhibited PARsylation. PARG becomes dispensable for ligand-dependent transcription when either a PARP inhibitor or a non-PARsylable KDM4D/JMJD2D mutant is used. Our results define PARG as a coactivator regulating chromatin remodeling during RA-dependent gene expression.

  17. Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity in an Infant with Adenoviral Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Con, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC) has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC) is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases. PMID:25874149

  18. A comparison of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and protoplast-mediated transformation with CRISPR-Cas9 and bipartite gene targeting substrates, as effective gene targeting tools for Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Weyda, István; Yang, Lei; Vang, Jesper; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, versatile genetic tools have been developed and applied to a number of filamentous fungi of industrial importance. However, the existing techniques have limitations when it comes to achieve the desired genetic modifications, especially for efficient gene targeting. In this study, we used Aspergillus carbonarius as a host strain due to its potential as a cell factory, and compared three gene targeting techniques by disrupting the ayg1 gene involved in the biosynthesis of conidial pigment in A. carbonarius. The absence of the ayg1 gene leads to phenotypic change in conidia color, which facilitated the analysis on the gene targeting frequency. The examined transformation techniques included Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) and protoplast-mediated transformation (PMT). Furthermore, the PMT for the disruption of the ayg1 gene was carried out with bipartite gene targeting fragments and the recently adapted CRISPR-Cas9 system. All three techniques were successful in generating Δayg1 mutants, but showed different efficiencies. The most efficient method for gene targeting was AMT, but further it was shown to be dependent on the choice of Agrobacterium strain. However, there are different advantages and disadvantages of all three gene targeting methods which are discussed, in order to facilitate future approaches for fungal strain improvements.

  19. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  20. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia in gunn rats by surgical delivery of low doses of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Françoise; Pastore, Nunzia; Abarrategui-Pontes, Cecilia; Flageul, Maude; Myara, Anne; Laplanche, Sophie; Labrune, Philippe; Podevin, Guillaume; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors are attractive for liver-directed gene therapy because they can drive sustained high levels of transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with