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Sample records for adenoviral vectors carrying

  1. Construction of an adenoviral expression vector carrying FLAG and hrGFP-1 genes and its expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, G X; Hu, L; Zhang, Z; Liu, D P

    2014-02-20

    The aim of this study was to construct an adenoviral expression vector for vascular endothelium growth factor 121 (VEGF121)-FLAG and humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP-1) genes, and to observe their expressions in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Using pTG19T-VEGF121 as a template, polymerase chain reaction technology was adopted to mutate the VEGF121 gene by removing the stop codon and inserting NotI and XhoI restriction sites both before and after the gene sequences. The resultant gene was then subcloned into a pMD19-T plasmid, the pMD19-T-VEGF121 and pShuttle-CMV-IRES-hrGFP-1 plasmids were double-digested, and small and large fragments were linked after gel recovery to complete the construction of recombinant adenovirus vectors. After titer determination, the recombinant adenovirus vectors were used to affect rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and fluorescence intensity was observed under fluorescence microscopy. Enzyme digestion identification and sequencing confirmed that the recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed, and observations under fluorescence microscopy showed significant expression of green fluorescent protein in recombinant adenovirus-infected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The constructed adenoviral gene expression vectors carrying VEGF121-FLAG and hrGFP-1 can be expressed in eukaryotic cells, which may be used for gene therapy of ischemic disorders.

  2. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  3. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  4. Good manufacturing practice production of adenoviral vectors for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lusky, Monika

    2005-03-01

    The increasing importance of recombinant adenoviral vectors for gene therapy, cancer therapy, and the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has led to worldwide efforts toward scalable process development suitable for commercial manufacturing of replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. This review focuses on the manufacturing of adenovirus for clinical trials in the context of good manufacturing practice conditions and regulations. PMID:15812223

  5. Rare serotype adenoviral vectors for HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Michael, Nelson L

    2012-01-01

    Human adenoviral vectors are being developed for use in candidate vaccines for HIV-1 and other pathogens. However, this approach suffered a setback when an HIV-1 vaccine using an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector failed to reduce, and might even have increased, the rate of HIV infection in men who were uncircumcised and who had preexisting antibodies specific for Ad5. This increased interest in the evaluation of serologically distinct adenoviral vectors. In this issue of the JCI, Frahm and coworkers report evidence that preexisting cellular immune responses directed toward Ad5 reduce the immunogenicity of antigens expressed in Ad5-vectored vaccines and have cross-reacting potential with non-Ad5 adenoviral vectors. The implications of this observation need to be carefully evaluated in future clinical trials of all serotypes of adenovirus-vectored vaccines.

  6. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  7. Adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Breyer, B; Jiang, W; Cheng, H; Zhou, L; Paul, R; Feng, T; He, T C

    2001-07-01

    Human gene therapy promises to change the practice of medicine by treating the causes of disease rather than the symptoms. Since the first clinical trial made its debut ten years ago, there are over 400 approved protocols in the United States alone, most of which have failed to show convincing data of clinical efficacy. This setback is largely due to the lack of efficient and adequate gene transfer vehicles. With the recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and the imminent arrival of the post genomic era, there are increasing numbers of therapeutic genes or targets that are available for gene therapy. Therefore, the urgency and need for efficacious gene therapies are greater than ever. Clearly, the current fundamental obstacle is to develop delivery vectors that exhibit high efficacy and specificity of gene transfer. Recombinant adenoviruses have provided a versatile system for gene expression studies and therapeutic applications. Of late, there has been a remarkable increase in adenoviral vector-based clinical trials. Recent endeavors in the development of recombinant adenoviral vectors have focused on modification of virus tropism, accommodation of larger genes, increase in stability and control of transgene expression, and down-modulation of host immune responses. These modifications and continued improvements in adenoviral vectors will provide a great opportunity for human gene therapy to live up to its enormous potential in the second decade.

  8. Current Strategies and Future Directions for Eluding Adenoviral Vector Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors can efficiently transduce a broad range of cell types and have been used extensively in preclinical and clinical studies for gene delivery applications. The presence of preexisting Ad immunity in the majority of human population and a rapid development of immune response against the Ad vector backbone following the first inoculation with the vector have impeded clinical use of these vectors. In addition, a number of animal inoculation studies have demonstrated that high systemic doses of Ad vectors invariably lead to initiation of acute inflammatory responses. This is mainly due to activation of innate immunity by vector particles. In general, vector and innate immune responses drastically limit the vector transduction efficiency and the duration of transgene expression. In order to have a predictable response with Ad vectors for gene therapy applications, the above limitations must be overcome. Strategies that are being examined to circumvent these drawbacks of Ad vectors include immunosuppression, immunomodulation, serotype switching, use of targeted Ad vectors, microencapsulation of Ad vectors, use of helper-dependent (HD) Ad vectors, and development of nonhuman Ad vectors. Here we review the current understanding of immune responses to Ad vectors, and recent advances in the strategies for immune evasion to improve the vector transduction efficiency and the duration of transgene expression. Development of novel strategies for targeting specific cell types would further boost the utility of Ad vectors by enhancing the safety, efficacy and duration of transgene expression. PMID:16611043

  9. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  10. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks. PMID:22799886

  11. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  12. Generation of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Pastore, Lucio; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2002-02-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD-Ad) represent a potentially valuable tool for safe and prolonged gene expression in vivo. The current approach for generating these vectors is based on ligation of the expression cassette into large plasmids containing the viral inverted terminal repeats flanking "stuffer" DNA to maintain a final size above the lower limit for efficient packaging into the adenovirus capsid (approximately 28 kb). The ligation to produce the viral plasmid is generally very inefficient. Similar problems in producing first-generation adenoviral (FG-Ad) vectors were circumvented with the development of a system taking advantage of efficient homologous recombination between a shuttle plasmid containing the expression cassette and a FG-Ad vector backbone in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. Here we describe a method for fast and efficient generation of HD-Ad vector plasmids that can accommodate expression cassettes of any size up to 35 kb. To validate the system, we generated a HD-Ad vector expressing the fusion protein between beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance genes under the control of the SR alpha promoter, and one expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The viruses were rescued and tested in vitro and for in vivo expression in mice. The data collected indicate the possibility for achieving a high level of hepatocyte transduction using HD-Ad vectors derived from plasmids obtained by homologous recombination in E. coli, with no significant alteration of liver enzymes and a less severe, transient thrombocytopenia in comparison with previous reports with similar doses of a FG-Ad vector. PMID:11829528

  13. Circumventing antivector immunity: potential use of nonhuman adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Podgorski, Iva I; Downes, Nicholas; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Adenoviruses are efficient gene delivery vectors based on their ability to transduce a wide variety of cell types and drive high-level transient transgene expression. While there have been advances in modifying human adenoviral (HAdV) vectors to increase their safety profile, there are still pitfalls that need to be further addressed. Preexisting humoral and cellular immunity against common HAdV serotypes limits the efficacy of gene transfer and duration of transgene expression. As an alternative, nonhuman AdV (NHAdV) vectors can circumvent neutralizing antibodies against HAdVs in immunized mice and monkeys and in human sera, suggesting that NHAdV vectors could circumvent preexisting humoral immunity against HAdVs in a clinical setting. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in developing NHAdV vectors for gene delivery in humans. In this review, we outline the recent advances and limitations of HAdV vectors for gene therapy and describe examples of NHAdV vectors focusing on their immunogenicity, tropism, and potential as effective gene therapy vehicles.

  14. Photochemical control of the infectivity of adenoviral vectors using a novel photocleavable biotinylation reagent.

    PubMed

    Pandori, Mark W; Hobson, David A; Olejnik, Jerzy; Krzymanska-Olejnik, Edyta; Rothschild, Kenneth J; Palmer, Abraham A; Phillips, Tamara J; Sano, Takeshi

    2002-05-01

    We have explored a novel strategy for controlling the infectivity of adenoviral vectors. This strategy involves a method whereby the infectivity of adenoviral vectors is neutralized by treatment of viral particles with a water-soluble, photocleavable biotinylation reagent. These modified viral vectors possess little to no infectivity for target cells. Exposure of these modified viral vectors to 365 nm light induces a reversal of the neutralizing, chemical modification, resulting in restoration of infectivity to the viral vectors. The light-directed transduction of target cells by photoactivatable adenoviral vectors was demonstrated successfully both in vitro and in vivo. This photochemical infectivity trigger possesses great potential, both as a research tool and as a novel tactic for the delivery of gene-transfer agents, since the infectivity of adenoviral vectors can be controlled externally in a versatile manner. PMID:12031663

  15. Adenoviral vector-based strategies for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Tandon, Manish; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2009-01-01

    Definitive treatment of cancer has eluded scientists for decades. Current therapeutic modalities like surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and receptor-targeted antibodies have varied degree of success and generally have moderate to severe side effects. Gene therapy is one of the novel and promising approaches for therapeutic intervention of cancer. Viral vectors in general and adenoviral (Ad) vectors in particular are efficient natural gene delivery systems and are one of the obvious choices for cancer gene therapy. Clinical and preclinical findings with a wide variety of approaches like tumor suppressor and suicide gene therapy, oncolysis, immunotherapy, anti-angiogenesis and RNA interference using Ad vectors have been quite promising, but there are still many hurdles to overcome. Shortcomings like increased immunogenicity, prevalence of preexisting anti-Ad immunity in human population and lack of specific targeting limit the clinical usefulness of Ad vectors. In recent years, extensive research efforts have been made to overcome these limitations through a variety of approaches including the use of conditionally-replicating Ad and specific targeting of tumor cells. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of Ad vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:20160875

  16. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  17. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  18. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development.

  19. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  20. Rapid construction of capsid-modified adenoviral vectors through bacteriophage lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Campos, Samuel K; Barry, Michael A

    2004-11-01

    There are extensive efforts to develop cell-targeting adenoviral vectors for gene therapy wherein endogenous cell-binding ligands are ablated and exogenous ligands are introduced by genetic means. Although current approaches can genetically manipulate the capsid genes of adenoviral vectors, these approaches can be time-consuming and require multiple steps to produce a modified viral genome. We present here the use of the bacteriophage lambda Red recombination system as a valuable tool for the easy and rapid construction of capsid-modified adenoviral genomes.

  1. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors. PMID:17525704

  2. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  3. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-17

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  4. Robust Hepatic Gene Silencing for Functional Studies Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Rafaela; Witting, Scott R.; Saxena, Romil

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA interference is currently envisioned as the basis of gene function and drug target validation studies. This novel technology has the advantage of providing a remarkably faster tool for gene silencing than traditional transgenic animal methodologies. In vivo administration of short interfering RNA (siRNA) typically results in reduced target gene expression for approximately 1 week. Viral vectors offer the possibility to express constitutive levels of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) so that the effects of knocking down the target gene can be studied for a few weeks, rather than a few days. Helper-dependent vectors have a significant advantage over previous generations of adenoviral vectors because of their much higher cloning capacity, potential for long-term transgene expression, and enhanced safety profiles on administration in vivo. Therefore, this advanced type of vector is an excellent tool to carry out in vivo studies directed at constitutive expression of shRNA. Here we show it is possible to obtain more than 90% target gene knockdown in an animal model of type 2 diabetes for several weeks, thereby consolidating this technology as an alternative to generating liver-specific knockout animals. PMID:18828727

  5. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vectors: highly efficient vectors with an enhanced safety profile.

    PubMed

    Croyle, M A; Le, H T; Linse, K D; Cerullo, V; Toietta, G; Beaudet, A; Pastore, L

    2005-04-01

    Transgene expression from helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors is effective and long lasting, but not permanent. Their use is also limited by the host response against capsid proteins that precludes successful gene expression upon readministration. In this report, we test the hypothesis that PEGylation of HD-Ad reduces its toxicity and promotes transgene expression upon readministration. PEGylation did not compromise transduction efficiency in vitro and in vivo and reduced peak serum IL-6 levels two-fold. IL-12 and TNF-alpha levels were reduced three- and seven-fold, respectively. Thrombocytopenia was not detected in mice treated with the PEGylated vector. Serum transaminases were not significantly elevated in mice treated with either vector. Mice immunized with 1 x 10(11) particles of unmodified HD-Ad expressing human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) were rechallenged 28 days later with 8 x 10(10) particles of unmodified or PEG-conjugated vector expressing beta-galactosidase. Trace levels of beta-galactosidase (52.23+/-19.2 pg/mg protein) were detected in liver homogenates of mice that received two doses of unmodified HD-Ad. Mice rechallenged with PEGylated HD-Ad produced significant levels of beta-galactosidase (5.1+/-0.4 x 10(5) pg/mg protein, P=0.0001). This suggests that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors may be appropriate for their safe and efficient use in the clinic. PMID:15647765

  6. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  7. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells

    PubMed Central

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M.; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A. F. V.

    2013-01-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 ‘safe harbor’ locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform. PMID:23275534

  8. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+) T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  9. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd) vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application. PMID:21994713

  10. Avidin-based targeting and purification of a protein IX-modified, metabolically biotinylated adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Campos, Samuel K; Parrott, M Brandon; Barry, Michael A

    2004-06-01

    While genetic modification of adenoviral vectors can produce vectors with modified tropism, incorporation of targeting peptides/proteins into the structural context of the virion can also result in destruction of ligand targeting or virion integrity. To combat this problem, we have developed a versatile targeting system using metabolically biotinylated adenoviral vectors bearing biotinylated fiber proteins. These vectors have been demonstrated to be useful as a platform for avidin-based ligand screening and vector targeting by conjugating biotinylated ligands to the virus using high-affinity tetrameric avidin (K(d) = 10(-15) M). The biotinylated vector could also be purified by biotin-reversible binding on monomeric avidin (K(d) = 10(-7) M). In this report, a second metabolically biotinylated adenovirus vector, Ad-IX-BAP, has been engineered by fusing a biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) to the C-terminus of the adenovirus pIX protein. This biotinylated vector displays twice as many biotins and was markedly superior for single-step affinity purification on monomeric avidin resin. However, unlike the fiber-biotinylated vector, Ad-IX-BAP failed to retarget to cells with biotinylated antibodies including anti-CD71 against the transferrin receptor. In contrast, Ad-IX-BAP was retargeted if transferrin, the cognate ligand for CD71, was used as a ligand rather than the anti-CD71. This work demonstrates the utility of metabolic biotinylation as a molecular screening tool to assess the utility of different viral capsid proteins for ligand display and the biology and compatibility of different ligands and receptors for vector targeting applications. These results also demonstrate the utility of the pIX-biotinylated vector as a platform for gentle single-step affinity purification of adenoviral vectors.

  11. Current Advances and Future Challenges in Adenoviral Vector Biology and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on Adenoviral (Ad) vectors have enormous potential for the treatment of both hereditary and acquired disease. Detailed structural analysis of the Ad virion, combined with functional studies has broadened our knowledge of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host cells/tissues and substantial achievement has been made towards a thorough understanding of the biology of Ad vectors. The widespread use of Ad vectors for clinical gene therapy is compromised by their inherent immunogenicity. The generation of safer and more effective Ad vectors, targeted to the site of disease, has therefore become a great ambition in the field of Ad vector development. This review provides a synopsis of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host systems and summarizes the many innovative approaches towards achieving Ad vector targeting. PMID:17584037

  12. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  13. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  14. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors and Their Use for Neuroscience Applications.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Mónica S; Satterfield, Rachel; Young, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience research has been revolutionized by the use of recombinant viral vector technology from the basic, preclinical and clinical levels. Currently, multiple recombinant viral vector types are employed with each having its strengths and weaknesses depending on the proposed application. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HdAd) are emerging as ideal viral vectors that solve a major need in the neuroscience field: (1) expression of transgenes that are too large to be packaged by other viral vectors and (2) rapid onset of transgene expression in the absence of cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the methods for large-scale production of HdAd viral vectors for in vivo use with neurospecific transgene expression. PMID:27515075

  15. Improved Gene Delivery to Intestinal Mucosa by Adenoviral Vectors Bearing Subgroup B and D Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lecollinet, S.; Gavard, F.; Havenga, M. J. E.; Spiller, O. B.; Lemckert, A.; Goudsmit, J.; Eloit, M.; Richardson, J.

    2006-01-01

    A major obstacle to successful oral vaccination is the lack of antigen delivery systems that are both safe and highly efficient. Conventional replication-incompetent adenoviral vectors, derived from human adenoviruses of subgroup C, are poorly efficient in delivering genetic material to differentiated intestinal epithelia. To date, 51 human adenovirus serotypes have been identified and shown to recognize different cellular receptors with different tissue distributions. This natural diversity was exploited in the present study to identify suitable adenoviral vectors for efficient gene delivery to the human intestinal epithelium. In particular, we compared the capacities of a library of adenovirus type 5-based vectors pseudotyped with fibers of several human serotypes for transduction, binding, and translocation toward the basolateral pole in human and murine tissue culture models of differentiated intestinal epithelia. In addition, antibody-based inhibition was used to gain insight into the molecular interactions needed for efficient attachment. We found that vectors differing merely in their fiber proteins displayed vastly different capacities for gene transfer to differentiated human intestinal epithelium. Notably, vectors bearing fibers derived from subgroup B and subgroup D serotypes transduced the apical pole of human epithelium with considerably greater efficiency than a subgroup C vector. Such efficiency was correlated with the capacity to use CD46 or sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates as opposed to CAR as attachment receptors. These results suggest that substantial gains could be made in gene transfer to digestive epithelium by exploiting the tropism of existing serotypes of human adenoviruses. PMID:16501084

  16. The role of chromatin in adenoviral vector function.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; McFall, Emily R; Burns, Joseph K; Parks, Robin J

    2013-06-01

    Vectors based on adenovirus (Ad) are one of the most commonly utilized platforms for gene delivery to cells in molecular biology studies and in gene therapy applications. Ad is also the most popular vector system in human clinical gene therapy trials, largely due to its advantageous characteristics such as high cloning capacity (up to 36 kb), ability to infect a wide variety of cell types and tissues, and relative safety due to it remaining episomal in transduced cells. The latest generation of Ad vectors, helper-dependent Ad (hdAd), which are devoid of all viral protein coding sequences, can mediate high-level expression of a transgene for years in a variety of species ranging from rodents to non-human primates. Given the importance of histones and chromatin in modulating gene expression within the host cell, it is not surprising that Ad, a nuclear virus, also utilizes these proteins to protect the genome and modulate virus- or vector-encoded genes. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the contribution of chromatin to Ad vector function. PMID:23771241

  17. Gene transfer into neural cells in vitro using adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Southgate, T D; Kingston, P A; Castro, M G

    2001-05-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have become a very attractive and versatile vector system for delivering genes into brain cells in vitro and in vivo. One of the main attractions of Ads is that they can mediate gene transfer into post-mitotic cells, i.e. neurons. Ads are easy to grow and manipulate, stable, and their biology is very well understood. This unit is designed to help newcomers into the field, to design, prepare and grow replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vectors with the aim of transferring genes into neurons and glial cells in primary culture. It provides step-by-step methods describing the preparation of brain cell cultures, their infection using recombinant adenovirus vectors and also the assessment of transgene expression using a variety of techniques including fluorescence immunocytochemistry and fluorescence activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis. The methods described will be useful to scientists wishing to enter the adenovirus field to construct adenovirus vectors to be used for gene transfer into neural cells.

  18. Adenoviral-vector-mediated gene transfer to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Crystal, R G

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen presenting cells capable of initiating T-cell-dependent immune responses (1-5). This biologic potential can be harnessed to elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses by transferring the relevant antigens to the DC. Once the DC have been mobilized and purified, the relevant antigens can be transferred to the DC as intact proteins, or as peptides representing specific epitopes, or with gene transfer using sequences of DNA or RNA coding for the pertinent antigen(s) (6-15). Theoretically, genetically modifying DC with genes coding for specific antigens has potential advantages over pulsing the DC with peptides repeating the antigen or antigen fragment. First, the genetically modified DC may present previously unknown epitopes in association with different MHC molecules. Second, gene transfer to DC ensures that the gene product is endogenously processed, leading to the generation of MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), the effector arm of cell-mediated immune responses. Finally, in addition to genes coding for the antigen(s), genetic modification of the DC can induce genes coding for mediators relevant to generation of the immune response to the antigen(s), further boosting host responses to the antigens presented by the modified DC. Different gene transfer approaches have been explored to genetically modify DC, including retroviral vectors (16-18), recombinant vaccinia virus vectors (19), and recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors (19-23). The focus of this chapter is on using recombinant Ad vectors to transfer genes to murine DC. We have used a similar strategy to transfer genes to human DC (24). As an example of the power of this technology, we will describe the use of Ad-vector-modified DC to suppress the growth of tumor cells modified to express a specific antigen.

  19. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  20. A novel and simple method for rapid generation of recombinant porcine adenoviral vectors for transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Du, Enqi; Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620 ± 49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes.

  1. Immune responses to adenoviral vectors during gene transfer in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Byrnes, A P; Charlton, H M; Wood, M J; Wood, K J

    1997-02-10

    We have investigated the immune response to E1-deleted adenovirus vectors encoding the lacZ gene introduced into the brains of adult mice. Injection of these nonreplicating vectors caused a marked inflammatory response in the brain as assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry of leukocytes. Infiltrating leukocytes were detectable within 2 days of injection and reached a maximum by 9 days. Thereafter, the number of infiltrating cells decreased, but a small number persisted in the brain until day 60. Between 2 and 4 days after injection, the percentage of CD8+ cells detectable increased whereas the percentage of CD4+ cells present in the infiltrating population did not significantly increase until day 6, peaking on day 15. Activated CD25+ T cells were detectable between days 6 and 15. beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal), the product of the lacZ gene encoded by the vector, was also detected, both at the injection site in the striatum and also in the substantia nigra. Expression peaked between 4 and 6 days but a small number of beta-Gal+ cells was still seen at 60 days after injection. This study demonstrates that a quantitative analysis of the immune responses caused by a nonreplicating adenovirus vector is possible in the brain. E1-deleted adenoviral vectors trigger a strong inflammatory response in the brain, but this immune response is not sufficient to eliminate completely expression of genes encoded by the adenoviral construct. PMID:9048192

  2. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  3. Development of an adenoviral vector with robust expression driven by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a new adenoviral vector where transgene expression is driven by p53. We first developed a synthetic promoter, referred to as PGTx{beta}, containing a p53-responsive element, a minimal promoter and the first intron of the rabbit {beta}-globin gene. Initial assays using plasmid-based vectors indicated that expression was tightly controlled by p53 and was 5-fold stronger than the constitutive CMV immediate early promoter/enhancer. The adenoviral vector, AdPG, was also shown to offer p53-responsive expression in prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP (wt p53), DU-145 (temperature sensitive mutant of p53) and PC3 (p53-null, but engineered to express temperature-sensitive p53 mutants). AdPG served as a sensor of p53 activity in LNCaP cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Since p53 can be induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this new vector could be further developed for use in combination with conventional therapies to bring about cooperation between the genetic and pharmacologic treatment modalities.

  4. Adenoviral vector-mediated insulin gene transfer in the mouse pancreas corrects streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, A L; Auricchio, A; Yu, Q C; Wilson, J; Raper, S E

    2001-10-01

    Therapy for type 1 diabetes consists of tight blood glucose (BG) control to minimize complications. Current treatment relies on multiple insulin injections or an insulin pump placement, beta-cell or whole pancreas transplantation. All approaches have significant limitations and have led to the realization that novel treatment strategies are needed. Pancreatic acinar cells have features that make them a good target for insulin gene transfer. They are not subject to autoimmune attack, a problem with pancreas or islets transplantation, they are avidly transduced by recombinant adenoviral vectors, and capable of exporting a variety of peptides into the portal circulation. Recombinant adenoviral vectors were engineered to express either wild-type or furin-modified human insulin cDNA (AdCMVhInsM). Immunodeficient mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin and injected intrapancreatically with the vectors. BG and blood insulin levels have normalized after administration of AdCMVhInsM. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy showed the presence of insulin in acinar cells throughout the pancreas and localization of insulin molecules to acinar cell vesicles. The data clearly establish a relationship between intrapancreatic vector administration, decreased BG and elevated blood insulin levels. The findings support the use of pancreatic acinar cells to express and secrete insulin into the blood stream. PMID:11593361

  5. Challenges in manufacturing adenoviral vectors for global vaccine product deployment.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, Jort; Smith, J Patrick; Lipiec, Agnieszka; Majhen, Dragomira; Lemckert, Angelique; van Ooij, Mark; Ives, Paul; Yallop, Christopher; Custers, Jerome; Havenga, Menzo

    2014-04-01

    Abstract Once adenovirus vector-based vaccines are licensed for the prevention of important infectious diseases, manufacturing processes capable of reliably delivering large numbers of vaccine doses will be required. The highest burden of disease for many infectious pathogens under investigation occurs in resource-poor settings. Therefore, the price per dose will be an important determinant of success. This review describes common practices for manufacturing replication-incompetent adenovirus vectors at clinical scale. Recent innovations and strategies aimed at improving the cost-effectiveness of manufacturing and ensuring high-volume vaccine production and purification are described. Hereto, technologies to increase bioreactor yields are reviewed. In addition, the use of single-use perfusion bioreactors, modification of some purification steps to avoid the use of expensive endonucleases, and use of charged filters during anion exchange all have the potential to bring down the cost of goods and are thus described. Finally, processes for ensuring quality throughout the manufacturing process, methods for testing viral identity, and safety of master seeds through to the end vaccine product are described.

  6. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-07-19

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose.

  7. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose. PMID:27434682

  8. [Transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to malignant hematopoietic cells of different origins].

    PubMed

    Wabg, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qinag; Yuan, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to hematopoietic malignant cells lines of various origins and AD5/F35 cytotoxicity. The hematologic malignant cell lines of various origins were transfected by AD5/F35-EGFP at different multiple of infection (MOI) and AD5-EGFP was used as control; the proportion of fluorescence positive cells was detected by flow cytometry; the killing effect of virus on infective target cells was assayed by MTT and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector to cell line of myeloid origin was > 99% at MOI = 30, the transfective efficiency of AD5 vector was 26.4% at MOI = 1,000; the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector and AD5 vector to cell line of B cell origin were 11.7% and 5.7%, respectively, at MOI = 1,000. AD5/F35 and AD5 vectors could not effectively transfect cells of T cell origin, no fluorescence positive cells were detected at MOI = 1,000; no significant killing effect of AD5/F35 vector on infective target cells was observed at MOI = 1,000. It is concluded that AD5/F35 vector infection has definite selectivity to hematologic malignant cells of various origin, the infection ability of AD5/F35 vector to cells of myeloid origin is stronger than that to cells of B cell origin, the cytotoxicity of AD5/F35 vector to infective target cells is small. The AD5/F35 vector is preferable to AD5 vector in respect of infection ability and offers good prospects of application in gene therapy for myeloid leukemia cells as target cells.

  9. Cytosine deaminase adenoviral vector and 5-fluorocytosine selectively reduce breast cancer cells 1 million-fold when they contaminate hematopoietic cells: a potential purging method for autologous transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, F; Pizzorno, G; Fu, S Q; Nanakorn, T; Krause, D S; Liang, J; Adams, E; Leffert, J J; Yin, L H; Cooperberg, M R; Hanania, E; Wang, W L; Won, J H; Peng, X Y; Cote, R; Brown, R; Burtness, B; Giles, R; Crystal, R; Deisseroth, A B

    1998-07-15

    Ad.CMV-CD is a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven transcription unit of the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene. The CD transcription unit in this vector catalyzes the deamination of the nontoxic pro-drug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), thus converting it to the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This adenoviral vector prodrug activation system has been proposed for use in selectively sensitizing breast cancer cells, which may contaminate collections of autologous stem cells products from breast cancer patients, to the toxic effects of 5-FC, without damaging the reconstitutive capability of the normal hematopoietic cells. This system could conceivably kill even the nondividing breast cancer cells, because the levels of 5-FU generated by this system are 10 to 30 times that associated with systemic administration of 5-FU. The incorporation of 5-FU into mRNA at these high levels is sufficient to disrupt mRNA processing and protein synthesis so that even nondividing cells die of protein starvation. To test if the CD adenoviral vector sensitizes breast cancer cells to 5-FC, we exposed primary explants of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and the established breast cancer cell (BCC) lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 to the Ad.CMV-CD for 90 minutes. This produced a 100-fold sensitization of these epithelial cells to the effects of 48 hours of exposure to 5-FC. We next tested the selectivity of this system for BCC. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), collected from cancer patients during the recovery phase from conventional dose chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, were exposed to the Ad.CMV-CD for 90 minutes in serum-free conditions, little or no detectable conversion of 5-FC into 5-FU was seen even after 48 hours of exposure to high doses of 5-FC. In contrast, 70% of 5-FC was converted into the cytotoxic agent 5-FU when MCF-7 breast cancer cells (BCCs) were exposed to the same Ad.CMV-CD vector followed by 5-FC for

  10. Copy number of adenoviral vector genome transduced into target cells can be measured using quantitative PCR: application to vector titration.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zheng; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu

    2012-01-20

    Both transfection and adenovirus vectors are commonly used in studies measuring gene expression. However, the real DNA copy number that is actually transduced into target cells cannot be measured using quantitative PCR because attached DNA present on the cell surface is difficult to distinguish from successfully transduced DNA. Here, we used Cre/loxP system to show that most of the transfected DNA was in fact attached to the cell surface; in contrast, most of the viral vector DNA used to infect the target cells was present inside the cells after the cells were washed according to the conventional infection protocol. We applied this characteristic to adenoviral vector titration. Current methods of vector titration using the growth of 293 cells are influenced by the effect of the expressed gene product as well as the cell conditions and culture techniques. The titration method proposed here indicates the copy numbers introduced to the target cells using a control vector that is infected in parallel (relative vector titer: rVT). Moreover, the new titration method is simple and reliable and may replace the current titration methods of viral vectors.

  11. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field. In briefProgressHDAds provide stable, long-term transgene expression in small and large animal models without chronic toxicity for liver-directed gene therapy.High vector doses are required for efficient hepatocyte transduction by systemic administration.Strategies to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd are available or currently under investigation for liver-directed gene therapy.High-efficiency pulmonary transduction and clinically relevant end points can be achieved delivering HDAd in conjunction with tight junction opening agents for CF gene therapy.HDAd delivered with an intracorporeal nebulizing catheter results in high-efficiency transduction of the respiratory epithelium in large animals.Encouraging results have been obtained with HDAd for brain- and muscle-directed gene therapy in animal models.ProspectsA better understanding of the acute innate response will provide new targets for pharmacological blockade to improve the therapeutic index of the vector.Further optimization of preferential liver targeting by HDAd through balloon catheter delivery has the potential of providing a clinically attractive method of vector delivery.Further assessment of Ad PEGylation and modulation of the liver fenestrations may provide attractive strategies to increase the therapeutic index of the vector.Capsid modification to increase the affinity of Ad for hepatocytes has the potential to improve

  12. Hepatic Delivery of Artificial Micro RNAs Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Carol; Mowa, Betty; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The potential of RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has been demonstrated in many studies. However, clinical application of this technology has been hampered by a paucity of efficient and safe methods of delivering the RNAi activators. Prolonged transgene expression and improved safety of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD AdVs) makes them well suited to delivery of engineered artificial intermediates of the RNAi pathway. Also, AdVs' natural hepatotropism makes them potentially useful for liver-targeted gene delivery. HD AdVs may be used for efficient delivery of cassettes encoding short hairpin RNAs and artificial primary microRNAs to the mouse liver. Methods for the characterization of HD AdV-mediated delivery of hepatitis B virus-targeting RNAi activators are described here.

  13. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle.

  14. Short-term Correction of Arginase Deficiency in a Neonatal Murine Model With a Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Chia-Ling; Rosenblatt, Robin A; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lay, Fides D; Dow, Adrienne C; Livesay, Justin; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy has the potential to ameliorate abnormalities before disease onset. Our gene knockout of arginase I (AI) deficiency is characterized by increasing hyperammonemia, neurological deterioration, and early death. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDV) carrying AI and examined for correction of this defect. Neonates were administered 5 × 109 viral particles/g and analyzed for survival, arginase activity, and ammonia and amino acids levels. The life expectancy of arg−/− mice increased to 27 days while controls died at 14 days with hyperammonemia and in extremis. Death correlated with a decrease in viral DNA/RNA per cell as liver mass increased. Arginase assays demonstrated that vector-injected hepatocytes had ~20% activity of heterozygotes at 2 weeks of age. Hepatic arginine and ornithine in treated mice were similar to those of saline-injected heterozygotes at 2 weeks, whereas ammonia was normal. By 26 days, arginase activity in the treated arg−/− livers declined to <10%, and arginine and ornithine increased. Ammonia levels began increasing by day 25, suggesting the cause of death to be similar to that of uninjected arg−/− mice, albeit at a later time. These studies demonstrate that the AI deficient newborn mouse can be temporarily corrected and rescued using a HDV. PMID:19367256

  15. Process Development of Adenoviral Vector Production in Fixed Bed Bioreactor: From Bench to Commercial Scale.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Hanna P; Heikkilä, Kati M; Lipponen, Eevi M; Valonen, Piia; Müller, Achim; Räsänen, Eva; Tuunanen, Tarja; Hassinen, Minna M; Parker, Nigel; Karhinen, Minna; Shaw, Robert; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale vector manufacturing for phase III and beyond has proven to be challenging. Upscaling the process with suspension cells is increasingly feasible, but many viral production applications are still applicable only in adherent settings. Scaling up the adherent system has proven to be troublesome. The iCELLis(®) disposable fixed-bed bioreactors offer a possible option for viral vector manufacturing in large quantities in an adherent environment. In this study, we have optimized adenovirus serotype 5 manufacturing using iCELLis Nano with a cultivation area up to 4 m(2). HEK293 cell cultivation, infection, and harvest of the virus (by lysing the cells inside the bioreactor) proved possible, reaching total yield of up to 1.6×10(14) viral particles (vp)/batch. The iCELLis 500 is designed to satisfy demand for large-scale requirements. Inoculating a large quantity of cell mass into the iCELLis 500 was achieved by first expanding the cell mass in suspension. Upscaling the process into an iCELLis 500/100 m(2) cultivation area cassette was practical and produced up to 6.1×10(15) vp. Flask productivity per cm(2) in iCELLis Nano and iCELLis 500 was in the same range. As a conclusion, we showed for the first time that iCELLis 500 equipment has provided an effective way to manufacture large batches of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26176404

  16. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells. PMID:25323393

  17. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  18. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  19. Reduced inflammation and improved airway expression using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with a K18 promoter.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Koehler, David R; Finegold, Milton J; Lee, Brendan; Hu, Jim; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2003-05-01

    Efforts have been made to deliver transgenes to the airway epithelia of laboratory animals and humans to develop gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. These investigations have been disappointing due to combinations of transient and low-level gene expression, acute toxicity, and inflammation. We have developed new helper-dependent adenoviral vectors to deliver an epithelial cell-specific keratin 18 expression cassette driving the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) or human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) reporter genes. Following intranasal administration to mice, we found that the reporter genes were widely expressed in airway epithelial and submucosal cells, and secreted human AFP was also detectable in serum. In contrast to a first-generation adenoviral vector, inflammation was negligible at doses providing efficient transduction, and expression lasted longer than typically reported-up to 28 days with beta-gal and up to 15 weeks with human AFP. These results suggest that delivery to the airway of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors utilizing a tissue-specific promoter could be a significant advance in the development of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. PMID:12718908

  20. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  1. Tropism-modification strategies for targeted gene delivery using adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L; Bradshaw, Angela C; McNeish, Iain A; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2010-10-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and "bridging" interactions. "Bridging" interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of "bridging interactions" such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated "stealth" vectors

  2. Administration of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors and sequential delivery of different vector serotype for long-term liver-directed gene transfer in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Morral, Núria; O’Neal, Wanda; Rice, Karen; Leland, Michele; Kaplan, Johanne; Piedra, Pedro A.; Zhou, Heshan; Parks, Robin J.; Velji, Rizwan; Aguilar-Córdova, Estuardo; Wadsworth, Samuel; Graham, Frank L.; Kochanek, Stefan; Carey, K. Dee; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of first-generation adenoviral vectors as gene delivery tools is often limited by the short duration of transgene expression, which can be related to immune responses and to toxic effects of viral proteins. In addition, readministration is usually ineffective unless the animals are immunocompromised or a different adenovirus serotype is used. Recently, adenoviral vectors devoid of all viral coding sequences (helper-dependent or gutless vectors) have been developed to avoid expression of viral proteins. In mice, liver-directed gene transfer with AdSTK109, a helper-dependent adenoviral (Ad) vector containing the human α1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene, resulted in sustained expression for longer than 10 months with negligible toxicity to the liver. In the present report, we have examined the duration of expression of AdSTK109 in the liver of baboons and compared it to first-generation vectors expressing hAAT. Transgene expression was limited to approximately 3–5 months with the first-generation vectors. In contrast, administration of AdSTK109 resulted in transgene expression for longer than a year in two of three baboons. We have also investigated the feasibility of circumventing the humoral response to the virus by sequential administration of vectors of different serotypes. We found that the ineffectiveness of readministration due to the humoral response to an Ad5 first-generation vector was overcome by use of an Ad2-based vector expressing hAAT. These data suggest that long-term expression of transgenes should be possible by combining the reduced immunogenicity and toxicity of helper-dependent vectors with sequential delivery of vectors of different serotypes. PMID:10536005

  3. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  4. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  5. Factors involved in the maturation of murine dendritic cells transduced with adenoviral vector variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Naoko; Koretomo, Ryosuke; Murakami, Sayaka |; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki |; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Fujita, Takuya |; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Naoki |

    2008-05-10

    Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is an attractive method for manipulating the immunostimulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immunotherapy. DCs treated with Ad have phenotype alterations (maturation) that facilitate T cell sensitization. We investigated the mechanisms of DC maturation with Ad transduction. Expression levels of a maturation marker (CD40) on DCs treated with conventional Ad, fiber-modified Ads (AdRGD, AdF35, AdF35{delta}RGD), or a different serotype Ad (Ad35) were correlated with their transduction efficacy. The {alpha}{sub v}-integrin directional Ad, AdRGD, exhibited the most potent ability to enhance both foreign gene expression and CD40 expression, and induced secretion of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and interferon-{alpha} in DCs. The presence of a foreign gene expression cassette in AdRGD was not necessary for DC maturation. Maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD was suppressed by destruction of the Ad genome, inhibition of endocytosis, or endosome acidification, whereas proteasome inhibition increased CD40 expression levels on DCs. Moreover, inhibition of {alpha}{sub v}-integrin signal transduction and blockade of cytokine secretion affected the maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD only slightly or not at all, respectively. Thus, our data provide evidence that Ad-induced DC maturation is due to Ad invasion of the DCs, followed by nuclear transport of the Ad genome, and not to the expression of foreign genes.

  6. Evaluation of CD46 re-targeted adenoviral vectors for clinical ovarian cancer intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hulin-Curtis, S L; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Jones, R; Hanna, L; Chester, J D; Parker, A L

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer accounts for >140 000 deaths globally each year. Typically, disease is asymptomatic until an advanced, incurable stage. Although response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is frequently observed, resistance to conventional platinum-based therapies develop rapidly. Improved treatments are therefore urgently required. Virotherapy offers great potential for ovarian cancer, where the application of local, intraperitoneal delivery circumvents some of the limitations of intravenous strategies. To develop effective, adenovirus (Ad)-based platforms for ovarian cancer, we profiled the fluid and cellular components of patient ascites for factors known to influence adenoviral transduction. Levels of factor X (FX) and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in ascitic fluid were quantified and tumor cells were assessed for the expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and CD46. We show that clinical ascites contains significant levels of FX but consistently high CD46 expression. We therefore evaluated in vitro the relative transduction of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) by Ad5 (via CAR) and Ad5 pseudotyped with the fiber of Ad35 (Ad5T*F35++) via CD46. Ad5T*F35++ achieved significantly increased transduction in comparison to Ad5 (P<0.001), independent of FX and nAb levels. We therefore propose selective transduction of CD46 over-expressing EOCs using re-targeted, Ad35-pseudotyped Ad vectors may represent a promising virotherapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:27229159

  7. Evaluation of CD46 re-targeted adenoviral vectors for clinical ovarian cancer intraperitoneal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hulin-Curtis, S L; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Jones, R; Hanna, L; Chester, J D; Parker, A L

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer accounts for >140 000 deaths globally each year. Typically, disease is asymptomatic until an advanced, incurable stage. Although response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is frequently observed, resistance to conventional platinum-based therapies develop rapidly. Improved treatments are therefore urgently required. Virotherapy offers great potential for ovarian cancer, where the application of local, intraperitoneal delivery circumvents some of the limitations of intravenous strategies. To develop effective, adenovirus (Ad)-based platforms for ovarian cancer, we profiled the fluid and cellular components of patient ascites for factors known to influence adenoviral transduction. Levels of factor X (FX) and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in ascitic fluid were quantified and tumor cells were assessed for the expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and CD46. We show that clinical ascites contains significant levels of FX but consistently high CD46 expression. We therefore evaluated in vitro the relative transduction of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) by Ad5 (via CAR) and Ad5 pseudotyped with the fiber of Ad35 (Ad5T*F35++) via CD46. Ad5T*F35++ achieved significantly increased transduction in comparison to Ad5 (P<0.001), independent of FX and nAb levels. We therefore propose selective transduction of CD46 over-expressing EOCs using re-targeted, Ad35-pseudotyped Ad vectors may represent a promising virotherapy for ovarian cancer.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  9. Novel recombinant adenoviral vector that targets the interleukin-13 receptor alpha2 chain permits effective gene transfer to malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ulasov, Ilya V; Tyler, Matthew A; Han, Yu; Glasgow, Joel N; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2007-02-01

    Transduction of malignant glioma with adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors is limited by the low levels of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, malignant brain tumors have been found to overexpress a glioma-associated receptor, interleukin-13 receptor alpha2 chain (IL-13Ralpha2), a marker of both glial transformation and tumor grade. To selectively target Ad5 to IL-13Ralpha2, we constructed a replication-deficient adenoviral vector that possesses an IL-13 ligand presented by a T4 phage fibritin shaft, and designated the new virus LU-13. Western blot and sequence analyses confirmed proper trimerization and ligand presentation by the T4 fibritin shaft. Confocal microscopy analysis of primary glioma suspensions incubated with viral recombinants showed that LU-13 colocalized with IL-13Ralpha2. Luciferase transduction assays conducted in both primary and passaged glioma cell cultures exhibited at least 10-fold enhanced gene transduction. Moreover, the virus preferentially bound to glioma cells, as documented by increased adenoviral E4 DNA copy number. In vitro competition assays performed with anti-human IL-13 monoclonal antibody confirmed significant attenuation of LU-13 transduction. These results were further confirmed in vivo, where LU-13 showed a 300-fold increase in transgene expression. In summary, we describe here the development of a novel and targeted adenoviral vector that binds IL-13Ralpha2. Our findings confirm the ability of LU-13 to bind IL-13Ralpha2 and increase transgene expression, making it an attractive gene therapy vector for the treatment of malignant glioma in a clinical setting.

  10. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  11. Efficient gene transfer into normal human B lymphocytes with the chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daniel; Néron, Sonia; Drouin, Mathieu; Jacques, Annie

    2005-09-01

    The failure to efficiently introduce genes into normal cells such as human B lymphocytes limits the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Recent studies have shown that a new adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 can efficiently transduce human haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells. In this study, we compared the gene transfer efficiencies of the Ad5/F35 vector to that of the parental vector Ad5 in human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells obtained from healthy individuals were cultured in vitro using CD40-CD154 system. Normal B lymphocytes were infected with replication-defectives Ad5 and Ad5/F35, both containing the GFP reporter gene, and transduction efficiencies were monitored by flow cytometry. Ad5 was highly ineffective, infecting only about 5% of human B lymphocytes. In contrast, Ad5/F35 transduced up to 60% of human B lymphocytes and GFP expression could be detected for up to 5 days post infection. Importantly, physiology of B lymphocytes such as proliferation, viability and antibodies secretion were unaffected following Ad5/F35 transduction. Finally, we observed that memory B lymphocytes were more susceptible to Ad5/F35 infection than naïve B lymphocytes. Thus, our results demonstrate that the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 is an efficient tool for the functional characterization of genes in B lymphopoiesis.

  12. Transgene Expression up to 7 Years in Nonhuman Primates Following Hepatic Transduction with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David; Cioffi, William; Stapleton, Gary; Law, Mark; Breinholt, John; Palmer, Donna; Grove, Nathan; Rice, Karen; Bauer, Cassondra; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur; Mullins, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) have been shown to mediate a considerably longer duration of transgene expression than first-generation adenoviral vectors. We have previously shown that transgene expression from HDAd-transduced hepatocytes can persist at high levels for up to 2.6 years in nonhuman primates following a single-vector administration. Because duration of transgene expression and long-term toxicity are critical for risk:benefit assessment, we have continued to monitor these animals. We report here that transgene expression has persisted for the entire observation period of up to 7 years for all animals without long-term adverse effects. However, in all cases, transgene expression level slowly declined over time to less than 10% of peak values by the end of the observation period but remained 2.3–111-fold above baseline values. These results will provide important information for a more informed risk:benefit assessment before clinical application of HDAd. PMID:23902403

  13. Ex Vivo Adenoviral Vector Gene Delivery Results in Decreased Vector-associated Inflammation Pre- and Post–lung Transplantation in the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  14. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  15. Correction of the nonlinear dose response improves the viability of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Robin J; Li, Chester; Cherry, Maribeth; Zhu, Yunxiang; Hempel, Donna; van Rooijen, Nico; Ioannou, Yiannis A; Desnick, Robert J; Goldberg, Mark A; Yew, Nelson S; Cheng, Seng H

    2002-05-20

    Systemic administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of chronic diseases such as Fabry disease can be limited by dose-dependent toxicity. Because administration of a high dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal encoding human alpha-galactosidase A results in expression of supraphysiological levels of the enzyme, we sought to determine whether lower doses would suffice to correct the enzyme deficiency and lysosomal storage abnormality observed in Fabry mice. Reducing the dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal by 10-fold (from 10(11) to 10(10) particles/mouse) resulted in a greater than 200-fold loss in transgene expression. In Fabry mice, the reduced expression of alpha-galactosidase A, using the lower dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal, was associated with less than optimal clearance of the accumulated glycosphingolipid (GL-3) from the affected lysosomes. It was determined that this lack of linearity in dose response was not due to an inability to deliver the recombinant viral vectors to the liver but rather to sequestration, at least in part, of the viral vectors by the Kupffer cells. This lack of correlation between dose and expression levels could be obviated by supplementing the low dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal with an unrelated adenoviral vector or by depleting the Kupffer cells before administration of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal. Prior removal of the Kupffer cells, using clodronate liposomes, facilitated the use of a 100-fold lower dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal (10(9) particles/mouse) to effect the nearly complete clearance of GL-3 from the affected organs of Fabry mice. These results suggest that practical strategies that minimize the interaction between the recombinant adenoviral vectors and the reticuloendothelial system (RES) may improve the therapeutic window of this vector system. In this regard, we showed that pretreatment of mice with gamma globulins also resulted in significantly enhanced adenovirus-mediated transduction and expression of alpha-galactosidase A in the

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27245510

  17. The spread of adenoviral vectors to central nervous system through pathway of cochlea in mimetic aging and young rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhao, X; Hu, Y; Lan, F; Sun, H; Fan, G; Sun, Y; Wu, J; Kong, W; Kong, W

    2015-11-01

    There is no definitive conclusion concerning the spread of viral vectors to the brain after a cochlear inoculation. In addition, some studies have reported different distribution profiles of viral vectors in the central auditory system after a cochlear inoculation. Thus, rats were grouped into either a mimetic aging group or a young group and transfected with adenoviral vectors (AdVs) by round window membrane injection. The distribution of AdV in central nervous system (CNS) was demonstrated in the two groups with transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. We found that the AdV could disseminate into the CNS and that the neuronal damage and stress-induced GRP78 expression were reduced after transfection with PGC-1α, as compared with the control vectors, especially in the mimetic aging group. We also found that the host immune response was degraded in CNS in the mimetic aging group after transduction through the cochlea, as compared with the young group. These results demonstrate that viral vectors can disseminate into the CNS through the cochlea. Moreover, mimetic aging induced by D-galactose could facilitate the spread of viral vectors into the CNS from the cochlea. These findings may indicate a new potential approach for gene therapy against age-related diseases in the CNS.

  18. Quantification of High-Capacity Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector Genomes In Vitro and In Vivo, Using Quantitative TaqMan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    PUNTEL, M.; CURTIN, J.F.; ZIRGER, J.M.; MUHAMMAD, A.K.M.; XIONG, W.; LIU, C.; HU, J.; KROEGER, K.M.; CZER, P.; SCIASCIA, S.; MONDKAR, S.; LOWENSTEIN, P.R.; CASTRO, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    First-generation adenoviral (Ad) and high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors are efficient delivery vehicles for transferring therapeutic transgenes in vivo into tissues/organs. The initial successes reported with adenoviral vectors in preclinical trials have been limited by immune-related adverse side effects. This has been, in part, attributed to the use of poorly characterized preparations of adenoviral vectors and also to the untoward immune adverse side effects elicited when high doses of these vectors were used. HC-Ads have several advantages over Ads, including the lack of viral coding sequences, which after infection and uncoating, makes them invisible to the host’s immune system. Another advantage is their large cloning capacity (up to ~35 kb). However, accurate characterization of HC-Ad vectors, and of contaminating replication-competent adenovirus (RCA) or helper virus, is necessary before these preparations can be used safely in clinical trials. Consequently, the development of accurate, simple, and reproducible methods to standardize and validate adenoviral preparations for the presence of contaminant genomes is required. By using a molecular method that allows accurate, reproducible, and simultaneous determination of HC-Ad, contaminating helper virus, and RCA genome copy numbers based on real-time quantitative PCR, we demonstrate accurate detection of these three genomic entities, within CsCl-purified vector stocks, total DNA isolated from cells transduced in vitro, and from brain tissue infected in vivo. This approach will allow accurate assessment of the levels and biodistribution of HC-Ad and improve the safety and efficacy of clinical trials. PMID:16716110

  19. A novel adenoviral vector-mediated mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D (CMT2D).

    PubMed

    Seo, Ah Jung; Shin, Youn Ho; Lee, Seo Jin; Kim, Doyeun; Park, Byung Sun; Kim, Sunghoon; Choi, Kyu Ha; Jeong, Na Young; Park, Chan; Jang, Ji-Yeon; Huh, Youngbuhm; Jung, Junyang

    2014-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D is a hereditary axonal and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)-associated neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in GARS. Here, we report a novel GARS-associated mouse neuropathy model using an adenoviral vector system that contains a neuronal-specific promoter. In this model, we found that wild-type GARS is distributed to peripheral axons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell bodies, central axon terminals, and motor neuron cell bodies. In contrast, GARS containing a G240R mutation was localized in DRG and motor neuron cell bodies, but not axonal regions, in vivo. Thus, our data suggest that the disease-causing G240R mutation may result in a distribution defect of GARS in peripheral nerves in vivo. Furthermore, a distributional defect may be associated with axonal degradation in GARS-associated neuropathies.

  20. Neo-islet formation in liver of diabetic mice by helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongying; Oka, Kazuhiro; Yechoor, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Until now insulin replacement is still the major therapy, because islet transplantation has been limited by donor availability and by the need for long-term immunosuppression. Induced islet neogenesis by gene transfer of Neuogenin3 (Ngn3), the islet lineage-defining specific transcription factor and Betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are highly efficient gene transfer vector; however, early generation Ads have several disadvantages for in vivo use. Helper-dependent Ads (HDAds) are the most advanced Ads that were developed to improve the safety profile of early generation of Ads and to prolong transgene expression(1). They lack chronic toxicity because they lack viral coding sequences(2-5) and retain only Ad cis elements necessary for vector replication and packaging. This allows cloning of up to 36 kb genes. In this protocol, we describe the method to generate HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc and to deliver these vectors into STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our results show that co-injection of HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc induces 'neo islets' in the liver and reverses hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. PMID:23093064

  1. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  2. Chimeric Adenoviral Vectors Incorporating a Fiber of Human Adenovirus 3 Efficiently Mediate Gene Transfer into Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Miho; Ugai, Hideyo; Belousova, Natalya; Pereboev, Alexander; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B.; Everts, Maaike; Curiel, David T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have developed a range of adenoviral (Ad) vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) displaying the fiber shaft and knob domains of species B viruses (HAdV-3, HAdV-11, or HAdV-35). These species B Ads utilize different cellular receptors than HAdV-5 for infection. We evaluated whether Ad vectors displaying species B fiber shaft and knob domains (Ad5F3Luc1, Ad5F11Luc1, and Ad5F35Luc1) would efficiently infect cancer cells of distinct origins, including prostate cancer. METHODS The fiber chimeric Ad vectors were genetically generated and compared with the original Ad vector (Ad5Luc1) for transductional efficiency in a variety of cancer cell lines, including prostate cancer cells and primary prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), using luciferase as a reporter gene. RESULTS Prostate cancer cell lines infected with Ad5F3Luc1 expressed higher levels of luciferase than Ad5Luc1, as well as the other chimeric Ad vectors. We also analyzed the transductional efficiency via monitoring of luciferase activity in prostate cancer cells when expressed as a fraction of the gene transfer in PrEC cells. In the PC-3 and DU145 cell lines, the gene transfer ratio of cancer cells versus PrEC was once again highest for Ad5F3Luc1. CONCLUSION Of the investigated chimeric HAdV-5/species B vectors, Ad5F3Luc1 was judged to be the most suitable for targeting prostate cancer cells as it showed the highest transductional efficiency in these cells. It is foreseeable that an Ad vector incorporating the HAdV-3 fiber could potentially be used for prostate cancer gene therapy. PMID:19902467

  3. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P.; Norona, Wilma S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lee, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    Crigler–Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to «1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 × 1012 viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIα and XIIIα in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 × 1011 viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler–Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  4. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P; Norona, Wilma S; Finegold, Milton J; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2005-03-15

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to <1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 x 10(12) viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIalpha and XIIIalpha in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 x 10(11) viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  5. Correction of Hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn Rats Using Clinically Relevant Low Doses of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, David; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Palmer, Donna J.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Crigler–Najjar syndrome type I is a severe inborn error of bilirubin metabolism caused by a complete deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) and results in life-threatening unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Lifelong correction of hyperbilirubinemia by liver-directed gene therapy using a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector has been previously reported in the Gunn rat, a model of Crigler–Najjar syndrome, but was only achieved using high doses (≥3 × 1012 viral particles [vp]/kg), which are likely to elicit a severe toxic response in humans. Therefore, in this study, we investigate strategies to achieve correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses. We have found that correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved with a low dose of 5 × 1011 vp/kg by using an HDAd vector bearing a more potent UGT1A1 expression cassette. Furthermore, by using hydrodynamic injection of the improved HDAd vector, correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved using an even lower dose of 5 × 1010 vp/kg. Although hydrodynamic injection as performed in rats is not acceptable in humans, clinically attractive, minimally invasive methods have been successfully developed to mimic hydrodynamic injection of HDAd vector in non-human primates. Therefore, using an improved expression cassette combined with a more efficient method of vector delivery permits correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses and may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd vectors for Crigler–Najjar syndrome gene therapy. PMID:20973621

  6. Adenoviral vector which delivers FasL-GFP fusion protein regulated by the tet-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Rubinchik, S; Ding, R; Qiu, A J; Zhang, F; Dong, J

    2000-05-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is a member of the tumor necrosis family and when bound to its receptor, Fas, induces apoptosis. It plays important roles in immune response, degenerative and lymphoproliferative diseases, development and tumorigenesis. It is also involved in generation of immune privilege sites in the eye and testis. Harnessing the power of this molecule is expected to lead to a powerful chemotherapeutic. We describe the construction and characterization of replication-deficient adenoviral vectors that express a fusion of murine FasL and green fluorescent protein (GFP). FasL-GFP retains full activity of wild-type FasL, at the same time allowing for easy visualization and quantification in both living and fixed cells. The fusion protein is under the control of a tetracycline-regulated gene expression system. Tight control of expression is achieved by creating a novel 'double recombinant' Ad vector, in which the tet-responsive element and the transactivator element are built into the opposite ends of the same vector to avoid enhancer interference. Expression can be conveniently regulated by tetracycline or its derivatives in a dose-dependent manner. The vector was able to deliver FasL-GFP gene to cells in vitro efficiently, and the expression level and function of the fusion protein was modulated by the concentration of doxycycline. This regulation allows us to produce high titers of the vector by inhibiting FasL expression in an apoptosis-resistant cell line. Induction of apoptosis was demonstrated in all cell lines tested. These results indicate that our vector is a potentially valuable tool for FasL-based gene therapy of cancer and for the study of FasL/Fas-mediated apoptosis and immune privilege. PMID:10845726

  7. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Knippertz, Ilka; Deinzer, Andrea; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B' core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based "modular promoter" system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B' core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  8. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  9. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Racel G.; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential “cure.” Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained. PMID:21245323

  10. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  11. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as "off-the-shelf" therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  12. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients.

  13. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  14. Combined use of adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA enhances the therapeutic efficacy of adenoviral-mediated p53 gene transfer in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cun, Yanping; Zhang, Qinhong; Xiong, Chengjie; Li, Mengxia; Dai, Nan; Zhang, Shiheng; Wang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. In order to establish a more effective therapeutic strategy against unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we evaluated, in the present study, the effects of combined treatment with adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-siAPE1) and adenoviral-mediated p53 gene transfer (Ad-p53) in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Infection of SMMC-7721 cells with Ad5/F35-siAPE1 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease of APE1 protein, while Ad-p53 treatment led to a time- and dose-dependent increase of p53 protein expression. Ad5/F35-siAPE1 significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effect of SMMC-7721 cells to Ad-p53 in cell survival assays, associated with increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, administration of Ad5/F35-siAPE1 and Ad-p53 into nude mice resulted in tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in SMMC-7721 xenografts compared to administration of either agent alone. These results suggest that combination of Ad5/F35-siAPE1 and Ad-p53 could be a promising gene therapeutic approach against human HCC.

  15. Selective depletion or blockade of Kupffer cells leads to enhanced and prolonged hepatic transgene expression using high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schiedner, Gudrun; Hertel, Sabine; Johnston, Marion; Dries, Volker; van Rooijen, Nico; Kochanek, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Tissue macrophages, in particular hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs), contribute to early inflammatory responses following adenoviral vector administration. This study evaluates the effect of selective and transient (3 days) depletion of KCs by a single injection of clodronate liposomes on the in vivo performance of high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors. In KC-depleted C57BL/6 and C3H mice increased and stabilized hAAT levels were observed following intravenous injection of HC-Ad vectors expressing human alpha-1 anti-trypsin (hAAT) either from the hAAT promoter or from the human cytomegalovirus promoter. Comparable increases in hAAT levels were obtained in mice preinjected with a transcriptionally silent HC-Ad vector. Interestingly, in the majority of animals of both strains depletion of KCs was sufficient to prevent the generation of anti-hAAT antibodies, resulting in prolonged transgene expression. Thus, short-term and selective depletion of hepatic macrophages at the same time significantly increased hepatic transgene expression and reduced the humoral immune response to the transgenic protein.

  16. Chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA enhances sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, D-B; Chen, Z-T; Wang, D; Li, M-X; Xie, J-Y; Zhang, Y-S; Qing, Y; Li, Z-P; Xie, J

    2008-10-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), a bifunctional AP endonuclease/redox factor, is important in DNA repair and redox signaling, may be associated with radioresistance. Here we investigate whether targeted inhibition of APE1 can sensitize tumor cells to irradiation in vitro and in vivo. We first constructed chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 carrying human APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA). The infectivity of chimeric Ad5/F35 to LOVO colon cancer cells was greater than that of Ad5. APE1 was strongly expressed and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), a downstream molecule of APE1, known as a radioresistance factor, was constitutively active in LOVO cells. Infection of LOVO cells with Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of APE1 protein and AP endonuclease activity in vitro. Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA significantly enhanced sensitivity of LOVO cells to irradiation in clonogenic survival assays, associated with increased cell apoptosis. The APE1 expression in LOVO cells was induced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with the enhancement of DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB and Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA effectively inhibited constitutive and irradiation-induced APE1 expression and NF-kappaB activation. In a subcutaneous nude mouse colon cancer model, Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA (5 x 10(8) IU, intratumoral injection) inhibited the expression of APE1 protein in LOVO xenografts, and significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth by irradiation. In conclusion, APE1 may be involved as one of the radioresistance factors, and targeted inhibition of APE1 shows an effective means of enhancing tumor sensitivity to radiotherapy.

  17. Modulation of TNFalpha, a determinant of acute toxicity associated with systemic delivery of first-generation and helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Mane, V P; Toietta, G; McCormack, W M; Conde, I; Clarke, C; Palmer, D; Finegold, M J; Pastore, L; Ng, P; Lopez, J; Lee, B

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the determinants of the host innate immune response to systemic administration of adenoviral (Ad) vectors is critical for clinical gene therapy. Acute toxicity occurs within minutes to hours after vector administration and is characterized by activation of innate immune responses. Our data indicate that in mice, indicators of vector toxicity include elevations of cytokine levels, liver transaminase levels and thrombocytopenia. To discern potential targets for blunting this host response, we evaluated genetic factors in the host response to systemically administered first-generation Ad vectors (FGV) and helper-dependent Ad vectors (HDV) containing beta-galactosidase expression cassettes. A preliminary screen for modulation of vector-induced thrombocytopenia revealed no role for interferon-gamma, mast cells or perforin. However, vector-induced thrombocytopenia and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression are less evident in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-deficient mice. Moreover, we also demonstrated that TNFalpha blockade via antibody or huTNFR:Fc pretreatment attenuates both thrombocytopenia (>40% increase in platelet count) and IL-6 expression (>80% reduction) without affecting interleukin 12 , liver enzymes, hematological indices or vector transduction in a murine model. Our data indicate that the use of HDV, in combination with clinically approved TNFalpha immunomodulation, may represent an approach for improving the therapeutic index of Ad gene therapy for human clinical trials. PMID:16708078

  18. Construction and evaluation of an adenoviral vector for the liver-specific expression of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, SRSF3.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, Amanda L; Salati, Lisa M

    2015-11-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor-3 (SRSF3), alternatively known as SRp20, is a member of the highly-conserved SR protein family of mRNA splicing factors. SRSF3 generally functions as an enhancer of mRNA splicing by binding to transcripts in a sequence-specific manner to both recruit and stabilize the binding of spliceosomal components to the mRNA. In liver, expression of SRSF3 is relatively low and its activity is increased in response to insulin and feeding a high carbohydrate diet. We sought to over-express SRSF3 in primary rat hepatocytes to identify regulatory targets. A standard adenoviral shuttle vector system containing an epitope-tagged SRSF3 under the transcriptional control of the CMV promoter could not be used to produce infectious adenoviral particles. SRSF3 over-expression in the packaging cell line prevented the production of infectious adenovirus particles by interfering with the viral splicing program. To circumvent this issue, SRSF3 expression from the shuttle vector was blocked by placing its expression under the control of the liver-specific albumin promoter. In this system, the FLAG-SRSF3 transgene is only expressed in the target cells (hepatocytes) but not in the packaging cell line. An additional benefit of the albumin promoter is that expression of the transgene does not require the addition of hormones or antibiotics to drive SRSF3 expression in the hepatocytes. Robust expression of FLAG-SRSF3 protein is detected in both HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes infected with adenovirus prepared from this new shuttle vector. Furthermore, abundances of several known and suspected mRNA targets of SRSF3 action are increased in response to over-expression using this virus. This report details the construction of the albumin promoter-driven adenoviral shuttle vector, termed pmAlbAd5-FLAG.SRSF3, that can be used to generate functional adenovirus to express FLAG-SRSF3 specifically in liver. This vector would be suitable for over-expression of

  19. Prime/Boost Immunization with DNA and Adenoviral Vectors Protects from Hepatitis D Virus (HDV) Infection after Simultaneous Infection with HDV and Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Anna; Schumann, Alexandra; Brovko, Olena; Walker, Andreas; Lu, Mengji; Johrden, Lena; Mayer, Anja; Wildner, Oliver; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) superinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers causes severe liver disease and a high rate of chronicity. Therefore, a vaccine protecting HBV carriers from HDV superinfection is needed. To protect from HDV infection an induction of virus-specific T cells is required, as antibodies to the two proteins of HDV, p24 and p27, do not neutralize the HBV-derived envelope of HDV. In mice, HDV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses were induced by a DNA vaccine expressing HDV p27. In subsequent experiments, seven naive woodchucks were immunized with a DNA prime and adenoviral boost regimen prior to simultaneous woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and HDV infection. Five of seven HDV-immunized woodchucks were protected against HDV infection, while acute self-limiting WHV infection occurred as expected. The two animals with the breakthrough had a shorter HDV viremia than the unvaccinated controls. The DNA prime and adenoviral vector boost vaccination protected woodchucks against HDV infection in the setting of simultaneous infection with WHV and HDV. In future experiments, the efficacy of this protocol to protect from HDV infection in the setting of HDV superinfection will need to be proven. PMID:23637419

  20. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  1. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Matthews, Qiana L

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors׳ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2.

  2. The effectiveness of the oncolytic activity induced by Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector is dependent on the cumulative cellular conditions of survival and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Y; Kang, Sujin; Song, Jae J; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2013-04-01

    To overcome the poor tumor transduction efficiency of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) observed in several types of cancer, the fiber region of Ad5, apart from its tail, was replaced by adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35). The chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector did not exhibit any significant enhancement of transduction efficiency. CD46, a receptor for Ad35, was expressed in relatively small amounts in most of the cancer cells examined. Therefore, we investigated the pivotal factor(s) that render cancer cells susceptible to transduction. We discovered that the tumor transduction efficiency of Ad5/F35 was enhanced in the presence of rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, in some cancer cells. Analysis of survival potential and cell proliferation rates revealed that Ad5/F35 exerted a more pronounced oncolytic effect in cancer cells with higher survival potential in the presence of rapamycin.

  3. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors’ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  4. Delivery of adenoviral DNA to mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Sheila; Mech, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The liver represents a major target organ for gene delivery owing to its high biosynthetic capacity and access to the bloodstream. Adenoviral vectors are highly efficient gene-transfer vehicles, making them among the most promising systems for in vivo gene transfer to the liver. Following intravenous administration of adenoviral vectors to a variety of mammalian models, including mice, dogs, and monkeys, hepatocytes are efficiently transduced. Several delivery methods to the liver have been described, including portal vein (2-4), hepatic artery (3,5), and peripheral vein infusions (6). This chapter describes the simple, nonsurgical method of intravenous (iv) administration of adenoviral vectors in mice, and an immunohistochemical method to qualitatively evaluate liver transduction efficiency following delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding a bgalactosidase (beta-gal) marker gene. Additionally, several alternative methods to verify efficient liver transduction are introduced.

  5. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  6. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  7. Standard free droplet digital polymerase chain reaction as a new tool for the quality control of high-capacity adenoviral vectors in small-scale preparations.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-02-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy.

  8. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; E. Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide; Dorigo, Natalia A.; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAbs) induced in mice with the levels of Ad5NAb titers found in humans. The data indicate that approximately 60% of the human serum samples tested displayed Ad5NAb levels that could be overcome with a prime-boost vaccination protocol. These results suggest that recombinant HAd5V vectors are potentially useful for prime-boost vaccination strategies, at least when pre-existing immunity against HAd5V is at low or medium levels. PMID:26679149

  9. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  10. Development of Novel Adenoviral Vectors to Overcome Challenges Observed With HAdV-5–based Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Papp, Tibor; Kaján, Győző L; Benkő, Mária; Havenga, Menzo; Lemckert, Angelique; Harrach, Balázs; Baker, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) have been extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials over the past two decades. However, the thorough understanding of the HAdV-5 interaction with human subjects has uncovered major concerns about its product applicability. High vector-associated toxicity and widespread preexisting immunity have been shown to significantly impede the effectiveness of HAdV-5–mediated gene transfer. It is therefore that the in-depth knowledge attained working on HAdV-5 is currently being used to develop alternative vectors. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of data obtained in recent years disqualifying the HAdV-5 vector for systemic gene delivery as well as novel strategies being pursued to overcome the limitations observed with particular emphasis on the ongoing vectorization efforts to obtain vectors based on alternative serotypes. PMID:26478249

  11. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smethells, John R; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector injection was examined in rats on measures of anxiety, body weight, cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. To examine anxiety, periadolescent rats were tested in an elevated-plus maze. Weight gain was then examined under four rodent diets. Ten months after CocH-injection, adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine intravenously and, subsequently, cocaine-induced locomotion was tested. Viral gene transfer produced sustained plasma levels of CocH for over 13 months of testing. CocH-treated rats did not differ from controls in measures of anxiety, and only showed a transient reduction in weight gain during the first 3 weeks postinjection. However, CocH-treated rats were insensitive to cocaine. At 10 months postinjection, none of the CocH-treated rats initiated cocaine self-administration, unlike 90% of the control rats. At 13 months postinjection, CocH-treated rats showed no cocaine-induced locomotion, whereas control rats showed a dose-dependent enhancement of locomotion. CocH vector produced a long-term blockade of the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine in rats, emphasizing its role as a promising therapeutic intervention in cocaine abuse.

  12. Recombinant low-seroprevalent adenoviral vectors Ad26 and Ad35 expressing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein induce protective immunity against RSV infection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N; Bogaert, Lies; Meek, Bob; Zahn, Roland; Vellinga, Jort; Custers, Jerome; Serroyen, Jan; Radošević, Katarina; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-10-01

    RSV is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children, the elderly and in those with underlying medical conditions. Although the high disease burden indicates an urgent need for a vaccine against RSV, no licensed RSV vaccine is currently available. We developed an RSV vaccine candidate based on the low-seroprevalent human adenovirus serotypes 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35) encoding the RSV fusion (F) gene. Single immunization of mice with either one of these vectors induced high titers of RSV neutralizing antibodies and high levels of F specific interferon-gamma-producing T cells. A Th1-type immune response was indicated by a high IgG2a/IgG1 ratio of RSV-specific antibodies, strong induction of RSV-specific interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha cytokine producing CD8 Tcells, and low RSV-specific CD4 T-cell induction. Both humoral and cellular responses were increased upon a boost with RSV-F expressing heterologous adenovirus vector (Ad35 boost after Ad26 prime or vice versa). Both single immunization and prime-boost immunization of cotton rats induced high and long-lasting RSV neutralizing antibody titers and protective immunity against lung and nasal RSV A2 virus load up to at least 30 weeks after immunization. Cotton rats were also completely protected against challenge with a RSV B strain (B15/97) after heterologous prime-boost immunization. Lungs from vaccinated animals showed minimal damage or inflammatory infiltrates post-challenge, in contrast to animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated virus. Our results suggest that recombinant human adenoviral Ad26 and Ad35 vectors encoding the RSV F gene have the potential to provide broad and durable protection against RSV in humans, and appear safe to be investigated in infants.

  13. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smethells, John R; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector injection was examined in rats on measures of anxiety, body weight, cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. To examine anxiety, periadolescent rats were tested in an elevated-plus maze. Weight gain was then examined under four rodent diets. Ten months after CocH-injection, adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine intravenously and, subsequently, cocaine-induced locomotion was tested. Viral gene transfer produced sustained plasma levels of CocH for over 13 months of testing. CocH-treated rats did not differ from controls in measures of anxiety, and only showed a transient reduction in weight gain during the first 3 weeks postinjection. However, CocH-treated rats were insensitive to cocaine. At 10 months postinjection, none of the CocH-treated rats initiated cocaine self-administration, unlike 90% of the control rats. At 13 months postinjection, CocH-treated rats showed no cocaine-induced locomotion, whereas control rats showed a dose-dependent enhancement of locomotion. CocH vector produced a long-term blockade of the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine in rats, emphasizing its role as a promising therapeutic intervention in cocaine abuse. PMID:26968195

  14. Peptide-Based Technologies to Alter Adenoviral Vector Tropism: Ways and Means for Systemic Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reetz, Julia; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Pützer, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fundamental progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and the arrival of the post-genomic era, increasing numbers of therapeutic genes and cellular targets are available for gene therapy. Meanwhile, the most important challenge is to develop gene delivery vectors with high efficiency through target cell selectivity, in particular under in situ conditions. The most widely used vector system to transduce cells is based on adenovirus (Ad). Recent endeavors in the development of selective Ad vectors that target cells or tissues of interest and spare the alteration of all others have focused on the modification of the virus broad natural tropism. A popular way of Ad targeting is achieved by directing the vector towards distinct cellular receptors. Redirecting can be accomplished by linking custom-made peptides with specific affinity to cellular surface proteins via genetic integration, chemical coupling or bridging with dual-specific adapter molecules. Ideally, targeted vectors are incapable of entering cells via their native receptors. Such altered vectors offer new opportunities to delineate functional genomics in a natural environment and may enable efficient systemic therapeutic approaches. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art techniques to specifically target adenovirus-based gene delivery vectors. PMID:24699364

  15. Optimization of HEK-293S cell cultures for the production of adenoviral vectors in bioreactors using on-line OUR measurements.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, J; Lecina, M; Solà, C; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F

    2012-01-01

    The culture of HEK-293S cells in a stirred tank bioreactor for adenoviral vectors production for gene therapy is studied. Process monitoring using oxygen uptake rate (OUR) was performed. The OUR was determined on-line by the dynamic method, providing good information of the process evolution. OUR enabled cell activity monitoring, facilitating as well the determination of the feeding rate in perfusion cultures and when to infect the culture. Batch cultures were used to validate the monitoring methodology. A cell density of 10×10(5)cell/mL was infected, producing 1.3×10(9) infectious viral particles/mL (IVP/mL). To increase cell density values maintaining cell specific productivity, perfusion cultures, based on tangential flow filtration, were studied. In this case, OUR measurements were used to optimize the dynamic culture medium feeding strategy, addressed to avoid any potential nutrient limitation. Furthermore, the infection protocol was defined in order to optimize the use of the viral inoculum, minimizing the uncontrolled release of particles through the filter unit mesh. All these developments enabled an infection at 78×10(5)cell/mL with the consequent production of 44×10(9)IVP/mL, representing a cell specific productivity 4.3 times higher than for the batch culture.

  16. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Dolzhikova, Inna V.; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N.; Zubkova, Olga V.; Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Tukhvatulin, Amir I.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Logunov, Denis Y.; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L.

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  17. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Burmistrova, Daria A; Tillib, Sergey V; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V; Dolzhikova, Inna V; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N; Zubkova, Olga V; Ivanova, Tatiana I; Tukhvatulin, Amir I; Shmarov, Maxim M; Logunov, Denis Y; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  18. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yuanhui; He, Jinsheng; Zheng, Xianxian; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yan; Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin; Hong, Tao

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  19. Enhancement of Protective Efficacy through Adenoviral Vectored Vaccine Priming and Protein Boosting Strategy Encoding Triosephosphate Isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. Conclusions/Significance The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China. PMID:25793406

  20. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  1. Long-term reduction of cocaine self-administration in rats treated with adenoviral vector-delivered cocaine hydrolase: evidence for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Saykao, Amy T; Parks, Robin J; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2014-05-01

    A new pharmacokinetic approach treating cocaine addiction involves rapidly metabolizing cocaine before it reaches brain reward centers using mutated human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) or cocaine hydrolase (CocH). Recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated plasma CocH reduced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and prevented reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior up to 6 months in rats. The present study investigated whether hdAD-CocH could decrease ongoing intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) self-administration. The hdAD-CocH vector was injected into self-administering rats, and after accumulation of plasma CocH, there was a dramatic reduction in cocaine infusions earned under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement that lasted for the length of the study (>2 months). Pretreatment with the selective BChE and CocH inhibitor iso-OMPA (1.5 mg/kg) restored cocaine intake; therefore, the decline in self-administration was likely due to rapid CocH-mediated cocaine metabolism. Direct measurements of cocaine levels in plasma and brain samples taken after the conclusion of behavioral studies provided strong support for this conclusion. Further, rats injected with hdAD-CocH did not experience a deficit in operant responding for drug reinforcement and self-administered methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg) at control levels. Overall, these outcomes suggest that viral gene transfer can yield plasma CocH levels that effectively diminish long-term cocaine intake and may have potential treatment implications for cocaine-dependent individuals seeking to become and remain abstinent. PMID:24407266

  2. Efficient targeting of adenoviral vectors to integrin positive vascular cells utilizing a CAR-cyclic RGD linker protein.

    PubMed

    Krom, Y D; Gras, J C E; Frants, R R; Havekes, L M; van Berkel, T J; Biessen, E A L; van Dijk, K Willems

    2005-12-16

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial cells (EC) are particularly resistant to infection by type 5 adenovirus (Ad) vectors. To overcome this limitation and target Ad vectors to ubiquitously expressed alpha(V)beta(3/5) integrins, we have generated a linker protein consisting of the extracellular domain of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) connected via avidin to a biotinylated cyclic (c) RGD peptide. After optimization of CAR to cRGD and to Ad coupling, infection of mouse heart endothelial cells (H5V) could be augmented significantly, as demonstrated by 600-fold increased transgene expression levels. In EOMAs, a hemangioendothelioma-derived cell line, the fraction of infected cells was enhanced 4- to 6-fold. Furthermore, the fraction of infected primary mouse VSMC was increased from virtually 0% to 25%. Finally, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the number of GFP positive cells was enhanced from 2% to 75%. In conclusion, CAR-cRGD is a versatile and highly efficient construct to target Ad vectors to both transformed and primary VSMC and EC.

  3. Tuning Surface Charge and PEGylation of Biocompatible Polymers for Efficient Delivery of Nucleic Acid or Adenoviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Jaesung; Bui, Quang Nam; Li, Yi; Yun, Chae-Ok; Lee, Doo Sung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-08-19

    As an effective and safe strategy to overcome the limits of therapeutic nucleic acid or adenovirus (Ad) vectors for in vivo application, various technologies to modify the surface of vectors with nonimmunogenic/biocompatible polymers have been emerging in the field of gene therapy. However, the transfection efficacy of the polymer to transfer genetic materials is still relatively weak. To develop more advanced and effective polymers to deliver not only Ad vectors, but also nucleic acids, 6 biocompatible polymers were newly designed and synthesized to different sizes (2k, 3.4k, or 5k) of poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) and different numbers of amine groups (2 or 5) based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]-l-glutamate (PNLG). We characterized size distribution and surface charge of 6 PNLGs after complexation with either nucleic acid or Ad. Among all 6 PNLGs, the 5 amine group PNLG showed the strongest efficacy in delivering nucleic acid as well as Ad vectors. Interestingly, cellular uptake results showed higher uptake ability in Ad complexed with 2 amine group PNLG than Ad/5 amine group PNLG, suggesting that the size of Ad/PNLGs is more essential than the surface charge for cellular uptake in polymers with charges greater than 30 mV. Moreover, the endosome escape ability of Ad/PNLGs increased depending on the number of amine groups, but decreased by PEG size. Cancer cell killing efficacy and immune response studies of oncolytic Ad/PNLGs showed 5 amine group PNLG to be a more effective and safe carrier for delivering Ad. Overall, these studies provide new insights into the functional mechanism of polymer-based approaches to either nucleic acid or Ad/nanocomplex. Furthermore, the identified ideal biocompatible PNLG polymer formulation (5 amine/2k PEG for nucleic acid, 5 amine/5k PEG for Ad) demonstrated high transduction efficiency as well as therapeutic value (efficacy and safety) and thus has strong potential for in vivo therapeutic

  4. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  5. A new model for CD8+ T cell memory inflation based upon a recombinant adenoviral vector1

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Sims, Stuart; O’Hara, Geraldine; de Lara, Catherine; Tchilian, Elma; Firner, Sonja; Engeler, Daniel; Ludewig, Burkhard; Klenerman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cell memory inflation, first described in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, is characterized by the accumulation of high-frequency, functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cell pools with an effector-memory phenotype and enrichment in peripheral organs. Although persistence of antigen is considered essential, the rules underpinning memory inflation are still unclear. The MCMV model is, however, complicated by the virus’s low-level persistence, and stochastic reactivation. We developed a new model of memory inflation based upon a βgal-recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-LacZ). After i.v. administration in C57BL/6 mice we observe marked memory inflation in the βgal96 epitope, while a second epitope, βgal497, undergoes classical memory formation. The inflationary T cell responses show kinetics, distribution, phenotype and functions similar to those seen in MCMV and are reproduced using alternative routes of administration. Memory inflation in this model is dependent on MHC Class II. As in MCMV, only the inflating epitope showed immunoproteasome-independence. These data define a new model for memory inflation, which is fully replication-independent, internally controlled and reproduces the key immunologic features of the CD8+ T cell response. This model provides insight into the mechanisms responsible for memory inflation, and since it is based on a vaccine vector, also is relevant to novel T cell-inducing vaccines in humans. PMID:23509359

  6. Characterization of 911: a new helper cell line for the titration and propagation of early region 1-deleted adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Fallaux, F J; Kranenburg, O; Cramer, S J; Houweling, A; Van Ormondt, H; Hoeben, R C; Van Der Eb, A J

    1996-01-20

    Currently, the preferred host for the production of early region-1 (E1)-deleted recombinant adenoviruses (rAdV) is cell line 293, which was generated by transformation of human embryonic kidney cells by sheared adenovirus 5 (Ad5) DNA. To develop alternative hosts for the production of rAdV, we generated adenovirus-transformed human cell lines by transformation of human embryonic retinoblasts (HER) with a plasmid containing base pairs 79-5789 of the Ad5 genome. One of the established HER cell lines, which we called 911, exhibited favorable growth characteristics and was chosen for further study. This cell line is demonstrated to have several characteristics in common with the well-known 293 cell line: The 911 cell line is highly transfectable, and exhibits similar frequencies of homologous recombination. However, it has additional characteristics that make it a useful alternative for 293. The 911 cells perform particularly well in plaque assays. Upon infection with E1-deleted adenoviruses, plaques become apparent in monolayers of 911 cells already after 3-4 days versus 4-10 days in monolayers of 293 cells, thereby reducing the time required for quantitative plaque assays. Furthermore, yields of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors up to three times as high as those achieved with 293 cells can be obtained with 911 cells. Finally, the Ad5-DNA content of the 911 cell line is completely known. These features make the 911 cell line a useful alternative for the construction, propagation, and titration of E1-deleted recombinant adenoviruses.

  7. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  8. Genetic vaccination against murine cysticercosis by using a plasmid vector carrying Taenia solium paramyosin.

    PubMed

    Solís, Carlos F; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Lugo-Martínez, Verónica H; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Laclette, Juan Pedro

    2005-03-01

    A plasmid vector carrying the immunoprotective amino-terminal fragment of Taenia solium paramyosin (VW2-1) was designed for genetic vaccination studies. Mice that were genetically immunized with VW2-1 and challenged by intraperitoneal inoculation of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci showed 43 to 48% reductions in the parasite burden, values which were similar to values obtained previously when the recombinant protein was used.

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Magnitude, Quality, Phenotype and Protective Capacity of SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Human-, Simian- and Chimpanzee-Derived Recombinant Adenoviral Vector Immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Costa, Andreia Da; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G.D.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. Here we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16), or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared to human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 107 to 109 PU), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses, from most to least as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFNγ+TNFα+IL-2+ and KLRG1+CD127- CD8+ T cells, but strikingly ~30–80% of memory CD8+ T cells co-expressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimise CD8+ T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ~60% of total CD8+ T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8+ T cell responses compared to prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8+ T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively. PMID:23390298

  10. Targeting of adenovirus vectors carrying a tumor cell-specific peptide: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Rittner, K; Schreiber, V; Erbs, P; Lusky, M

    2007-05-01

    Previously, we have identified a tumor cell-specific peptide, HEW, by panning of phage display libraries on the human colorectal cancer cell line WiDr. In this report we demonstrate that this peptide can modify the infection properties of adenovirus vectors. Increased infectivity of replication-deficient adenovirus 5 vectors in WiDr cells was observed upon genetic insertion of the HEW peptide in the HI loop of the fiber knob. Moreover, whereas the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-ablating fiber mutation S408E abolished apparent infection in CAR-positive WiDr cells, the insertion of HEW completely restored infectivity toward these cells in vitro. To assess whether the de- and re-targeted infection profile was maintained in vivo, the fiber-modified adenovirus vectors were injected intratumorally or intravenously in WiDr tumor-bearing Swiss nu/nu mice. No significant differences in efficiency of infection could be observed suggesting alternative viral uptake mechanisms in vivo. Next, we have included the fiber shaft mutation S(*) in our studies, which was described to confer a de-targeted phenotype in vivo. Reduced gene transfer due to the S(*) mutation both in vitro and in vivo could be confirmed. Insertion of HEW in the HI knob loop of shaft-mutated fiber, however, did not rescue infectivity in target cells neither in vitro nor in vivo. We demonstrate the efficient ligand-mediated re-targeting of adenoviral vector infection to the human cancer cell line WiDr. The lack of apparent re-targeting in the in vivo situation is described. PMID:17318198

  11. Construction of a stable expression vector carrying sop genes [ZJ1].

    PubMed

    Du, X; Ding, J; Wu, X; Yu, Z; Men, D

    1996-01-01

    Mini-F, the fifth fragment of F plasmid from EcoRI digestion, is known to carry an efficient partitioning function. Two pBR322 plasmid derivatives, pDMC32 and pDMC311, have been constructed from this fragment. The plasmid pDMC32 carries all the relative genes for plasmid stability, ccd, repD, and sop genes (sopA, sopB, and sopC), along with oriS and oriV, while pDMC311 carries only sop genes (sopA, sopB, and sopC). The plasmid maintenance proportions for pDMC32 and pDMC311 in E. coli were 93% and 100%, respectively, after 100 generations continuous cultivation of cells harboring the derivatives, MI32 (pDMC32) and MI311 (pDMC311), in a phosphate-limited basal medium. As a control, the maintenance proportion of plasmid pBR322 dropped down to a low of 10% at generation 55 of continuous cultivation of E. coli MIR322 (pBR322) in the same medium. In order to make a stable expression vector that carries only sop genes, plasmid pDMC40 was constructed by adding a trp promoter from pDR720 to pBR322. The stable expression vector pDMC48 was then derived from pDMC40 by inserting sop genes into it from pDMC311. The maintenance proportion of plasmid pDMC48 in E. coli was still 100% after 100 generations of continuous cultivation of cells harboring the plasmid in phosphate-limited basal medium.

  12. [Construction of venus vector carrying IGFBP7 gene and its expression in K562 cells].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shui-Yan; Hu, Shao-Yan; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to construct venus vector carrying the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), which provides an effective platform for exploring the function of this gene in leukemia. After digestion by restriction endonuclease, the IGFBP7 gene was recombined with the transfer plasmid. The venus particles were packaged using 293T cells to transfect K562 cells, and identification was performed by means of flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blot. The results showed that the sequence of cloned IGFBP7 gene was the same as that in GenBank. The size of product restricted by BamHI was same as the predicted one. GFP expression was observed in 293T and K562 cells with the fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The expression level of mRNA and protein of IGFBP7 was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting in K562 cells. It is concluded that venus vector carrying IGFBP7 gene has been successfully constructed and provides basis for exploring function of IGFBP7 in K562 cells.

  13. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  14. Protein Kinase Cδ Targets Mitochondria, Alters Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Induces Apoptosis in Normal and Neoplastic Keratinocytes When Overexpressed by an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Lorenzo, Patricia S.; Bogi, Krisztina; Blumberg, Peter M.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) is associated with resistance to terminal cell death in epidermal tumor cells, suggesting that activation of PKCδ in normal epidermis may be a component of a cell death pathway. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an adenovirus vector carrying an epitope-tagged PKCδ under a cytomegalovirus promoter to overexpress PKCδ in normal and neoplastic keratinocytes. While PKCδ overexpression was detected by immunoblotting in keratinocytes, the expression level of other PKC isozymes, including PKCα, PKCɛ, PKCζ, and PKCη, did not change. Calcium-independent PKC-specific kinase activity increased after infection of keratinocytes with the PKCδ adenovirus. Activation of PKCδ by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at a nanomolar concentration was lethal to normal and neoplastic mouse and human keratinocytes overexpressing PKCδ. Lethality was inhibited by PKC selective inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-32-0432. TPA-induced cell death was apoptotic as evidenced by morphological criteria, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) assay, DNA fragmentation, and increased caspase activity. Subcellular fractionation indicated that PKCδ translocated to a mitochondrial enriched fraction after TPA activation, and this finding was confirmed by confocal microscopy of cells expressing a transfected PKCδ-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. Furthermore, activation of PKCδ in keratinocytes altered mitochondrial membrane potential, as indicated by rhodamine-123 fluorescence. Mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone and antimycin A, reduced TPA-induced cell death in PKCδ-overexpressing keratinocytes. These results indicate that PKCδ can initiate a death pathway in keratinocytes that involves direct interaction with mitochondria and alterations of mitochondrial function. PMID:10567579

  15. Bovine adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine overcomes exceptionally high levels of pre-existing immunity against human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Pandey, Aseem; Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Mittal, Suresh K

    2008-05-01

    Because of the high prevalence of adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans, it is believed that pre-existing Ad-neutralizing antibodies (vector immunity) may negatively impact the immune response to vaccine antigens when delivered by human Ad (HAd) vectors. In order to evaluate whether bovine Ad subtype 3 (BAd3), a non-HAd vector, can effectively elude high levels of pre-existing vector immunity, naïve and HAd serotype 5 (HAd)-primed mice were immunized with BAd-H5HA [BAd3 vector expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 influenza virus]. Even in the presence of very high levels of HAd-specific neutralizing antibody, no significant reductions in HA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were observed in HAd-primed mice immunized with BAd-H5HA. In naïve mice immunized with HAd-H5HA (HAd5 vector expressing H5N1 HA) and boosted with BAd-H5HA, the humoral responses elicited were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than with either HAd-H5HA or BAd-H5HA alone, while the CMI responses were comparable in the groups. This finding underlines the importance of a heterologous prime-boost approach for achieving an enhanced immune response. The immunization of naïve or HAd-primed mice with BAd-H5HA bestowed full protection from morbidity and mortality following a potentially lethal challenge with A/Hong Kong/483/97. These results demonstrate the importance of BAd vectors as an alternate or supplement to HAd vectors for influenza pandemic preparedness.

  16. E1(-)E4(+) adenoviral gene transfer vectors function as a "pro-life" signal to promote survival of primary human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, R; Rafii, S; Worgall, S; Brough, D E; Crystal, R G

    1999-05-01

    Although endothelial cells are quiescent and long-lived in vivo, when they are removed from blood vessels and cultured in vitro they die within days to weeks. In studies of the interaction of E1(-)E4(+) replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors and human endothelium, the cells remained quiescent and were viable for prolonged periods. Evaluation of these cultures showed that E1(-)E4(+) Ad vectors provide an "antiapoptotic" signal that, in association with an increase in the ratio of Bcl2 to Bax levels, induces the endothelial cells to enter a state of "suspended animation," remaining viable for at least 30 days, even in the absence of serum and growth factors. Although the mechanisms initiating these events are unclear, the antiapoptoic signal requires the presence of E4 genes in the vector genome, suggesting that one or more E4 open reading frames of subgroup C Ad initiate a "pro-life" program that modifies cultured endothelial cells to survive for prolonged periods.

  17. Replication-attenuated Human Adenoviral Type 4 vectors elicit capsid dependent enhanced innate immune responses that are partially dependent upon interactions with the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Appledorn, Daniel M.; Serra, Delila; Glass, Oliver; Mendelson, Todd; Clay, Timothy M.; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Human Adenovirus Type 4 (HAdV-4) is responsible for epidemic outbreaks of Acute Respiratory Disease (especially in military recruits), and is known to cause significant morbidity with several reported cases of mortality. However, we do not understand why this serotype causes such high morbidity, and have little insight into the immunobiology of HAdV-4 infections. We have now developed a replication attenuated HAdV-4 vector system, and through it, demonstrate that HAdV-4 virions have enhanced infectivity of certain cell types and reveal aspects of the serotype-specific heightened innate immunogenicity of infectious HAdV-4 capsids both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that elements of this serotype-specific immunogenicity were dependent upon interactions with the complement system. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms possibly underlying the known morbidity accompanying wild-type HAdV-4 infections as well as highlight important considerations when considering development of alternative serotype vectors. PMID:18280530

  18. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  19. Gene Editing of Human Embryonic Stem Cells via an Engineered Baculoviral Vector Carrying Zinc-finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yuning; Lee, Chi-Lin; Joo, Kye-Il; Zarzar, Jonathan; Liu, Yarong; Dai, Bingbing; Fox, Victoria; Wang, Pin

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are renewable cell sources that have potential applications in regenerative medicine. The development of technologies to produce permanent and site-specific genome modifications is in demand to achieve future medical implementation of hES cells. We report herein that a baculoviral vector (BV) system carrying zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) can successfully modify the hES cell genome. BV-mediated transient expression of ZFNs specifically disrupted the CCR5 locus in transduced cells and the modified cells exhibited resistance to HIV-1 transduction. To convert the BV to a gene targeting vector, a DNA donor template and ZFNs were incorporated into the vector. These hybrid vectors yielded permanent site-specific gene addition in both immortalized human cell lines (10%) and hES cells (5%). Modified hES cells were both karyotypically normal and pluripotent. These results suggest that this baculoviral delivery system can be engineered for site-specific genetic manipulation in hES cells. PMID:21326219

  20. Readministration of adenoviral gene delivery to dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sarah C; McMenamin, Margaret M; Charlton, Harry M; Goodman, James; Lantos, Tibor; Simpson, Christine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2007-10-01

    An approach currently being explored as treatment for Parkinson's disease is gene therapy. An important question concerns the duration of transgene expression in dopamine neurons and the issues of vector persistence, neuronal damage and the feasibility of readministering vector to the same neuronal population. We show, using an adenoviral vector expressing the LacZ reporter gene, that transgene expression declined over time but with minimal loss of dopamine neurons or vector DNA. Readministration of vector resulted in low levels of transgene delivery to the neurons. Moreover, the neurons to which vector had already been delivered were unable to transport the retrograde tracer fluorogold. Our findings indicate that transgene expression declined in dopamine neurons despite the persistence of virus, and the capacity to readminister vector to these neurons was limited. PMID:17885611

  1. Large-Scale Production of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Serotype-9 Carrying the Human Survival Motor Neuron Gene.

    PubMed

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Chermahini, Gholamhossein Amini; Li, Shaoyong; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors are a suitable vector for gene therapy studies because of desired characteristics such as low immunogenicity, transfection of non-dividing and dividing cells, and long-term expression of the transgene. In this study, the large-scale production of single stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the human survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (AAV9-SMN) suitable for in vivo gene therapy studies of SMA was described. SMN cDNA has been cloned into pAAV-CB6-PI and pAAVsc-CB6-PI with and without its specific UTRs, respectively. Both plasmids bear CMV enhancer/beta-actin (CB) promoter, CMV IE enhancer, and polyadenylation signal sequences. 2.5 μg of constructed pAAV-CB6-PI-SMN and pAAVsc-CB6-PI-SMN cause to, respectively, 4.853- and 2.321-fold increases in SMN protein levels in transfected cells compared to untransfected cells. Ss and scAAV9-SMN vectors were also produced from these plasmids by transient transfection of HEK293 cells using CaCl2 solution. The silver staining and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated good quality of both isolated vectors, ssAAV9-SMN and scAAV9-SMN, with the titers of 2.00E+13 and 1.00E+13 GC/ml. The results of this study show that, the plasmid containing UTR elements causes to twice more SMN gene expression in transfected cells. The quality control results show that both produced ss and scAAV9-SMN are suitable for in vivo studies.

  2. Homologous Boosting with Adenoviral Serotype 5 HIV Vaccine (rAd5) Vector Can Boost Antibody Responses despite Preexisting Vector-Specific Immunity in a Randomized Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E.; Plummer, Sarah A.; Koup, Richard A.; Nason, Martha C.; Bailer, Robert T.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Needle-free delivery improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines but is also associated with more local reactogenicity. Here we report the first comparison of Biojector and needle administration of a candidate rAd5 HIV vaccine. Methods Thirty-one adults, 18–55 years, 20 naive and 11 prior rAd5 vaccine recipients were randomized to receive single rAd5 vaccine via needle or Biojector IM injection at 1010 PU in a Phase I open label clinical trial. Solicited reactogenicity was collected for 5 days; clinical safety and immunogenicity follow-up was continued for 24 weeks. Results Overall, injections by either method were well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events. Frequency of any local reactogenicity was 16/16 (100%) for Biojector compared to 11/15 (73%) for needle injections. There was no difference in HIV Env-specific antibody response between Biojector and needle delivery. Env-specific antibody responses were more than 10-fold higher in subjects receiving a booster dose of rAd5 vaccine than after a single dose delivered by either method regardless of interval between prime and boost. Conclusions Biojector delivery did not improve antibody responses to the rAd5 vaccine compared to needle administration. Homologous boosting with rAd5 gene-based vectors can boost insert-specific antibody responses despite pre-existing vector-specific immunity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00709605 NCT00709605 PMID:25264782

  3. Production of anti TNF-α antibodies in eukaryotic cells using different combinations of vectors carrying heavy and light chains.

    PubMed

    Balabashin, Dmitriy; Kovalenko, Elena; Toporova, Viktoria; Aliev, Teimur; Panina, Anna; Svirshchevskaya, Elena; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a key role in rheumatoid arthritis and some other autoimmune diseases. Therapy with anti-TNF-α recombinant antibodies (Ab) appears to be highly effective. Production of new hyper-producing eukaryotic cell lines can decrease the treatment cost, which currently is very high. However, due to the complexity of protein transcription, translation, processing, and secretion in mammalian cells, the stages at which antibody expression is affected are still poorly determined. The aim of this work was to compare the productivity of two cell lines developed in CHO DG44 cells, deficient in dihydrofolate reductase, transfected with vectors carrying either heavy (H) or light (L) chains of chimeric antibody under different combinations of selective elements. Both H and L chains were cloned either in pOptiVEC or pcDNA3.3 vectors and different combinations were used to produce HL and LH cell lines. We have shown that Ab production has been low and comparable between HL and LH cells until selection on methotrexate (MTX) when LH but not HL cells have responded with 3.5 times increased productivity. Flow cytometry analysis has demonstrated that intracellular concentration of full size Abs in LH cells was 5.6 times higher than in HL ones due to higher amount of H chain synthesis. No differences in viability between HL and LH cells have been found. We have concluded that the expression of H chain in the pOptiVEC vector, which is responsible for MTX resistance, has led to the suppression of H chain synthesis and limitation in full Ab assembly.

  4. Lentiviral vectors carrying enhancer elements of Hb9 promoter drive selective transgene expression in mouse spinal cord motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Marco; Kurosaki, Mami; Terao, Mineko; Lidonnici, Dario; Gensano, Francesco; Battaglia, Elisa; Tortarolo, Massimo; Piva, Roberto; Bendotti, Caterina

    2012-03-30

    Recombinant lentiviral vectors (rLVs) have emerged as versatile tools for gene delivery applications due to a number of favorable features, such as the possibility to maintain long-term transgene expression, the flexibility in the design of the expression cassettes and recent improvements in their biosafety profile. Since rLVs are able to infect multiple cell types including post-mitotic cells such as neurons and skeletal muscle cells, several studies have been exploring their application for the study and cure of neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, the introduction of rLVs carrying cell-type specific promoters could restrict the transgene expression either to neuronal or glial cells, thus helping to better dissect in vivo the role played by these cell populations in several neurodegenerative processes. In this study we developed rLVs carrying motor neuron specific regulatory sequences derived from the promoter of homeobox gene Hb9, and demonstrated that these constructs can represent a suitable platform for selective gene-targeting of murine spinal cord motor neurons, in vivo. This tool could be instrumental in the dissection of the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective degeneration of motor neurons occurring in Motor Neuron Diseases.

  5. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  6. Elucidation of insertion elements carried on plasmids and in vitro construction of shuttle vectors from the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Guntram; Goesmann, Alexander; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2014-08-01

    Several gene clusters that are responsible for toxin synthesis in bloom-forming cyanobacteria have been found to be associated with transposable elements (TEs). In particular, insertion sequence (IS) elements were shown to play a role in the inactivation or recombination of the genes responsible for cyanotoxin synthesis. Plasmids have been considered important vectors of IS element distribution to the host. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the IS elements propagated on the plasmids and the chromosome of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA126/8 by means of high-throughput sequencing. In total, five plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14, pPA50, pPA79, and pPA115, of 5, 6, 50, 79, and 120 kbp, respectively) were elucidated, and two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA115) were found to propagate full IS element copies. Large stretches of shared DNA information between plasmids were constituted of TEs. Two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14) were used as candidates to engineer shuttle vectors (named pPA5.5SV and pPA14SV, respectively) in vitro by PCR amplification and the subsequent transposition of the Tn5 cat transposon containing the R6Kγ origin of replication of Escherichia coli. While pPA5.5SV was found to be fully segregated, pPA14SV consistently co-occurred with its wild-type plasmid even under the highest selective pressure. Interestingly, the Tn5 cat transposon became transferred by homologous recombination into another plasmid, pPA50. The availability of shuttle vectors is considered to be of relevance in investigating genome plasticity as a consequence of homologous recombination events. Combining the potential of high-throughput sequencing and in vitro production of shuttle vectors makes it simple to produce species-specific shuttle vectors for many cultivable prokaryotes.

  7. Polyethyleneimine-coating enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xinglei; Zhou, Na; Wan, Li; Su, Xiaodong; Sun, Zhao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Zhao, Robert Chunhua; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential, which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential for basic research in developmental biology and for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs), but not into MSCs, which lack CAR expression. To overcome this problem, an Adv coated with cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) was developed. In this study, we demonstrated that PEI coating with an optimal ratio can enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without cytotoxicity. We also investigated the physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms of the PEI-coated Adv. These results could help to evaluate the potentiality of the PEI-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction into MSCs. PMID:24727452

  8. Elucidation of Insertion Elements Carried on Plasmids and In Vitro Construction of Shuttle Vectors from the Toxic Cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Guntram; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Several gene clusters that are responsible for toxin synthesis in bloom-forming cyanobacteria have been found to be associated with transposable elements (TEs). In particular, insertion sequence (IS) elements were shown to play a role in the inactivation or recombination of the genes responsible for cyanotoxin synthesis. Plasmids have been considered important vectors of IS element distribution to the host. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the IS elements propagated on the plasmids and the chromosome of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA126/8 by means of high-throughput sequencing. In total, five plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14, pPA50, pPA79, and pPA115, of 5, 6, 50, 79, and 120 kbp, respectively) were elucidated, and two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA115) were found to propagate full IS element copies. Large stretches of shared DNA information between plasmids were constituted of TEs. Two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14) were used as candidates to engineer shuttle vectors (named pPA5.5SV and pPA14SV, respectively) in vitro by PCR amplification and the subsequent transposition of the Tn5 cat transposon containing the R6Kγ origin of replication of Escherichia coli. While pPA5.5SV was found to be fully segregated, pPA14SV consistently co-occurred with its wild-type plasmid even under the highest selective pressure. Interestingly, the Tn5 cat transposon became transferred by homologous recombination into another plasmid, pPA50. The availability of shuttle vectors is considered to be of relevance in investigating genome plasticity as a consequence of homologous recombination events. Combining the potential of high-throughput sequencing and in vitro production of shuttle vectors makes it simple to produce species-specific shuttle vectors for many cultivable prokaryotes. PMID:24907328

  9. Early osteoblastic differentiation induced by dexamethasone enhances adenoviral gene delivery to marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jeremy S; Parrott, M Brandon; Mikos, Antonios G; Barry, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the implications of induced osteogenic differentiation on gene delivery in multipotent rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Prior to genetic manipulation cells were cultured with or without osteogenic supplements (5x10(-8) M dexamethasone, 160 microM l-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate). Comparison of liposome, retroviral, and adenoviral vectors demonstrated that all three vectors could mediate gene delivery to primary rat MSCs. When these vectors were applied in the absence or presence of osteogenic supplements, we found that MSCs differentiated prior to transduction with adenovirus type 5 vectors produced a 300% increase in transgene expression compared to MSCs that were not exposed to osteogenic supplements. This differentiation effect appeared specific to adenoviral mediated gene delivery, since there was minimal increase in retroviral gene delivery and no increase in liposome gene delivery when MSCs were treated with osteogenic supplements. In addition, we also determined this increase in transgene production to occur at a higher concentration of dexamethasone (5x10(-8) M) in the culture medium of MSCs prior to adenoviral transduction. We found that this increased transgene production could be extended to the osteogenic protein, human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2). When delivered by an adenoviral vector, hBMP-2 transgene production could be increased from 1.4 ng/10(5) cells/3 days to 4.3 ng/10(5) cells/3 days by culture of MSCs with osteogenic supplements prior to transduction. These results indicate that the utility of MSCs as a therapeutic protein delivery mechanism through genetic manipulation can be enhanced by pre-culture of these cells with dexamethasone. PMID:15013104

  10. Methods and clinical development of adenovirus-vectored vaccines against mucosal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Sam; Yao, Yushi; Xing, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses represent the most widely used viral-vectored platform for vaccine design, showing a great potential in the fight against intracellular infectious diseases to which either there is a lack of effective vaccines or the traditional vaccination strategy is suboptimal. The extensive understanding of the molecular biology of adenoviruses has made the new technologies and reagents available to efficient generation of adenoviral-vectored vaccines for both preclinical and clinical evaluation. The novel adenoviral vectors including nonhuman adenoviral vectors have emerged to be the further improved vectors for vaccine design. In this review, we discuss the latest adenoviral technologies and their utilization in vaccine development. We particularly focus on the application of adenoviral-vectored vaccines in mucosal immunization strategies against mucosal pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, flu virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:27162933

  11. Methods and clinical development of adenovirus-vectored vaccines against mucosal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Afkhami, Sam; Yao, Yushi; Xing, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses represent the most widely used viral-vectored platform for vaccine design, showing a great potential in the fight against intracellular infectious diseases to which either there is a lack of effective vaccines or the traditional vaccination strategy is suboptimal. The extensive understanding of the molecular biology of adenoviruses has made the new technologies and reagents available to efficient generation of adenoviral-vectored vaccines for both preclinical and clinical evaluation. The novel adenoviral vectors including nonhuman adenoviral vectors have emerged to be the further improved vectors for vaccine design. In this review, we discuss the latest adenoviral technologies and their utilization in vaccine development. We particularly focus on the application of adenoviral-vectored vaccines in mucosal immunization strategies against mucosal pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, flu virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:27162933

  12. Formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a cationic emulsion as a vehicle for improving adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2014-11-20

    Advancements in the use of adenoviral vectors in gene therapy have been limited by the need for specific receptors on targeted cell types, immunogenicity and hepatotoxicity following systemic administration. In an effort to overcome the current limitations of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, cationic emulsions were explored as a vehicle to improve adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer. Complexation of adenovirus with emulsions containing the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP) enhanced the potency of adenoviral gene transfer as compared to DOTAP liposomes. Among the various emulsion formulations examined, those containing the iodized oil, Lipiodol, as an inner core and stabilized by DOTAP/cholesterol/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxy(poly-ethylene glycol)-5000 most efficiently enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Optimized Lipiodol-containing emulsions appear to be more strongly associated with adenoviral particles, exhibiting higher complex stability compared to other formulations. They provide the adenovirus with an additional cellular entry mechanism through caveolae-dependent endocytosis, thereby increasing adenovirus entry into cells. Furthermore, adenovirus-emulsion complexation significantly reduced transgene expression in the liver following systemic administration. These findings indicate that emulsion complexation may be a promising strategy for overcoming many of the challenges associated with the use of adenoviruses in gene therapy. Additionally, the observation of increased transgene expression in lung together with reduced expression in liver demonstrates that the adenovirus-emulsion complex may act as a lung-targeting adenoviral gene delivery system.

  13. Targeting the Immune System to Fight Cancer Using Chemical Receptor Homing Vectors Carrying Polyinosine/Cytosine (PolyIC).

    PubMed

    Levitzki, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, polyinosine/cytosine (polyIC), into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA-binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-1), and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1) recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2) The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3) The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4) The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which can be a small molecule, a single chain antibody, or an affibody

  14. Targeting the Immune System to Fight Cancer Using Chemical Receptor Homing Vectors Carrying Polyinosine/Cytosine (PolyIC)

    PubMed Central

    Levitzki, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, polyinosine/cytosine (polyIC), into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA-binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-1), and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1) recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2) The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3) The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4) The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which can be a small molecule, a single chain antibody, or an affibody

  15. Receptor interactions involved in adenoviral-mediated gene delivery after systemic administration in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theodore A G; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Marshall-Neff, Jennifer; Rollence, Michele L; Wright, Patrick; Kaloss, Michele; King, Laura; Mech, Christine; Dinges, Lisa; Iverson, William O; Sherer, Alfred D; Markovits, Judit E; Lyons, Russette M; Kaleko, Michael; Stevenson, Susan C

    2003-11-20

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors can bind at least three separate cell surface receptors for efficient cell entry: the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), alpha nu integrins, and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSG). To address the role of each receptor involved in adenoviral cell entry, we mutated critical amino acids in fiber or penton to inhibit receptor interaction. A series of five adenoviral vectors was prepared and the biodistribution of each was previously characterized in mice. To evaluate possible species differences in Ad vector tropism, we characterized the effects of each detargeting mutation in non-human primates after systemic delivery to confirm our conclusions made in mice. In non-human primates, CAR was found to have minimal effects on vector delivery to all organs examined including liver and spleen. Cell-surface alpha nu integrins played a significant role in delivery of vector to the spleen, lung and kidney. The fiber shaft mutation S*, which presumably inhibits HSG binding, was found to significantly decrease delivery to all organs examined. The ability to detarget the liver corresponded with decreased elevations in liver serum enzymes (aspartate transferase [AST] and alanine transferase [ALT]) 24 hr after vector administration and also in serum interleukin (IL)-6 levels 6 hr after vector administration. The biodistribution data generated in cynomolgus monkeys correspond with those data derived from mice, demonstrating that CAR binding is not the major determinant of viral tropism in vivo. Vectors containing the fiber shaft modification may provide for a detargeted adenoviral vector on which to introduce new tropisms for the development of targeted, systemically deliverable adenoviral vectors for human clinical application.

  16. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  17. Developing Universal Genetic Tools for Rapid and Efficient Deletion Mutation in Vibrio Species Based on Suicide T-Vectors Carrying a Novel Counterselectable Marker, vmi480

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peng; He, Xiangyan; Liu, Qiuting; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Despite that Vibrio spp. have a significant impact on the health of humans and aquatic animals, the molecular basis of their pathogenesis is little known, mainly due to the limited genetic tools for the functional research of genes in Vibrio. In some cases, deletion of target DNAs in Vibrio can be achieved through the use of suicide vectors. However, these strategies are time-consuming and lack universality, and the widely used counterselectable gene sacB does not work well in Vibrio cells. In this study, we developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient deletion mutations in Vibrio species based on suicide T-Vectors carrying a novel counterselectable marker, vmi480. We explored two uncharacterized genes, vmi480 and vmi470, in a genomic island from Vibrio mimicus VM573 and confirmed that vmi480 and vmi470 constitute a two-component toxin-antitoxin system through deletion and expression of vmi480 and vmi470. The product of vmi480 exhibited strong toxicity to Escherichia coli cells. Based on vmi480 and the PBAD or PTAC promoter system, we constructed two suicide T-vectors, pLP11 and pLP12, and each of these vectors contained a multiple cloning region with two AhdI sites. Both vectors linearized by AhdI digestion could be stored and directly ligated with purified PCR products without a digestion step. By using pLP11 and pLP12 coupled with a highly efficient conjugation system provided by E. coli β2163, six genes from four representative Vibrio species were easily deleted. By using the counterselective marker vmi480, we obtained 3–12 positive colonies (deletion mutants) among no more than 20 colonies randomly selected on counterselection plates. The strategy does not require the digestion of PCR products and suicide vectors every time, and it avoids large-scale screening colonies on counterselective plates. These results demonstrate that we successfully developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient gene deletion in Vibrio species. PMID

  18. Developing Universal Genetic Tools for Rapid and Efficient Deletion Mutation in Vibrio Species Based on Suicide T-Vectors Carrying a Novel Counterselectable Marker, vmi480.

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; He, Xiangyan; Liu, Qiuting; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Despite that Vibrio spp. have a significant impact on the health of humans and aquatic animals, the molecular basis of their pathogenesis is little known, mainly due to the limited genetic tools for the functional research of genes in Vibrio. In some cases, deletion of target DNAs in Vibrio can be achieved through the use of suicide vectors. However, these strategies are time-consuming and lack universality, and the widely used counterselectable gene sacB does not work well in Vibrio cells. In this study, we developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient deletion mutations in Vibrio species based on suicide T-Vectors carrying a novel counterselectable marker, vmi480. We explored two uncharacterized genes, vmi480 and vmi470, in a genomic island from Vibrio mimicus VM573 and confirmed that vmi480 and vmi470 constitute a two-component toxin-antitoxin system through deletion and expression of vmi480 and vmi470. The product of vmi480 exhibited strong toxicity to Escherichia coli cells. Based on vmi480 and the PBAD or PTAC promoter system, we constructed two suicide T-vectors, pLP11 and pLP12, and each of these vectors contained a multiple cloning region with two AhdI sites. Both vectors linearized by AhdI digestion could be stored and directly ligated with purified PCR products without a digestion step. By using pLP11 and pLP12 coupled with a highly efficient conjugation system provided by E. coli β2163, six genes from four representative Vibrio species were easily deleted. By using the counterselective marker vmi480, we obtained 3-12 positive colonies (deletion mutants) among no more than 20 colonies randomly selected on counterselection plates. The strategy does not require the digestion of PCR products and suicide vectors every time, and it avoids large-scale screening colonies on counterselective plates. These results demonstrate that we successfully developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient gene deletion in Vibrio species.

  19. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection.

  20. Rapid titration of adenoviral infectivity by flow cytometry in batch culture of infected HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Vincent; Negrete-Virgen, Juan A; Lyddiatt, Andrew; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    There is a constant and growing interest in exploitingadenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy when transientexpression of a therapeutic protein is necessary. Therequirement for an increased viral titre has prompted asearch for techniques by which this virus may be assayedwith greater speed and simplicity. Conventional plaqueassay for quantification of adenoviral vectors titre incurrent use is laborious and time-consuming (up to 14days). We report herein a method for the monitoring ofadenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein thatincorporates rapid and easy sample handling by means offlow cytometric analysis. Cells (HEK293) were infectedwith adenovirus at various multiplicity of infection(MOI), harvested 17 to 20 h post infection and analysedby flow cytometry. Assumptions were made that onefluorescent cell was infected by a single infectiousparticle at a relatively low MOI. The adenoviral titrewas subsequently estimated from cell analysis in arelatively short time. The results obtained with an E1-complementing cell line (HEK293) were compared with thatobtained using a non-complementing cell line (A549). APoisson distribution successfully modelled the profile ofinfection as a function of MOI. This provided a betterunderstanding of adenoviral infection at the earlieststage possible. Monitoring of GFP fluorescence and viruspropagation in a batch culture of infected cells wassubsequently used as a practical application of thevalidated method.

  1. Expression of hepatitis B virus S gene by herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors carrying alpha- and beta-regulated gene chimeras.

    PubMed

    Shih, M F; Arsenakis, M; Tiollais, P; Roizman, B

    1984-09-01

    The domain of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) S gene specifying the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and comprising 25 base pairs of the 5'-transcribed noncoding region, the structural gene sequences, and the 3'-noncoding gene sequences including the polyadenylylation site was fused to the promoter-regulatory regions of the beta-thymidine kinase and of the alpha 4 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The chimeric constructs were then inserted into the HSV-1 genome and specifically into the thymidine kinase gene by homologous recombination through flanking sequences. Cells infected with recombinants carrying the chimeric genes produced and excreted the HBsAg into the extracellular medium for at least 12 hr concurrently with the multiplication of the HSV-1 vector. The temporal patterns of expression and the observation that HBV S gene linked to the HSV-1 alpha promoter-regulatory region was regulated as an HSV-1 alpha gene indicate that the HBsAg gene chimeras inserted into the virus were regulated as viral genes. The HBsAg banded in isopycnic CsCl density gradients at a density of 1.17 g/cm3. Electron microscopic studies revealed that HBsAg harvested from the extracellular medium and banded in CsCl density gradients contained spherical particles 15-22 nm in diameter, characteristic of empty HBV envelopes. The results indicate that HSV-1 is a suitable vector for the expression of foreign genes placed under the control of HSV promoter-regulatory regions.

  2. A stable cell line carrying adenovirus-inducible rep and cap genes allows for infectivity titration of adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Clark, K R; Voulgaropoulou, F; Johnson, P R

    1996-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are being developed for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to human cells. At present, widespread usage of AAV vectors is limited primarily by difficulties in generating recombinant virions on a scale sufficient for in-depth preclinical and clinical trials. However, recent work in several laboratories suggests that this technical obstacle should be overcome in the near future. As a result, it can be anticipated that the interest in AAV vectors will expand, Thus, it becomes important to develop assay systems that will permit accurate quantification of the infectivity of AAV vectors derived from a variety of sources. We have developed an assay using a cell line that expresses AAV helper functions (rep and cap) upon induction by adenovirus infection. This assay system is based on the replication of input rAAV genomes rather than transgene expression (transduction). Thus, infectivity titrations in this system yield an estimation of rAAV infectious particles irrespective of the promoter or transgene present in the vector genome. Moreover, this assay method is more sensitive than conventional methods being used in other laboratories.

  3. Coding potential and transcript analysis of fowl adenovirus 4: insight into upstream ORFs as common sequence features in adenoviral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Bryan D; Nagy, Eva

    2011-06-01

    Recombinant fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) have been successfully used as veterinary vaccine vectors. However, insufficient definitions of the protein-coding and non-coding regions and an incomplete understanding of virus-host interactions limit the progress of next-generation vectors. FAdVs are known to cause several diseases of poultry. Certain isolates of species FAdV-C are the aetiological agent of inclusion body hepatitis/hydropericardium syndrome (IBH/HPS). In this study, we report the complete 45667 bp genome sequence of FAdV-4 of species FAdV-C. Assessment of the protein-coding potential of FAdV-4 was carried out with the Bio-Dictionary-based Gene Finder together with an evaluation of sequence conservation among species FAdV-A and FAdV-D. On this basis, 46 potentially protein-coding ORFs were identified. Of these, 33 and 13 ORFs were assigned high and low protein-coding potential, respectively. Homologues of the ancestral adenoviral genes were, with few exceptions, assigned high protein-coding potential. ORFs that were unique to the FAdVs were differentiated into high and low protein-coding potential groups. Notable putative genes with high protein-coding capacity included the previously unreported fiber 1, hypothetical 10.3K and hypothetical 10.5K genes. Transcript analysis revealed that several of the small ORFs less than 300 nt in length that were assigned low coding potential contributed to upstream ORFs (uORFs) in important mRNAs, including the ORF22 mRNA. Subsequent analysis of the previously reported transcripts of FAdV-1, FAdV-9, human adenovirus 2 and bovine adenovirus 3 identified widespread uORFs in AdV mRNAs that have the potential to act as important translational regulatory elements.

  4. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of adenovirus design and production.

    PubMed

    Alba, Raul; Baker, Andrew H; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviruses have many attributes, which have made them one of the most widely investigated vectors for gene therapy applications. These include ease of genetic manipulation to produce replication-deficient vectors, ability to readily generate high titer stocks, efficiency of gene delivery into many cell types, and ability to encode large genetic inserts. Recent advances in adenoviral vector engineering have included the ability to genetically manipulate the tropism of the vector by engineering of the major capsid proteins, particularly fiber and hexon. Furthermore, simple replication-deficient adenoviral vectors deleted for expression of a single gene have been complemented by the development of systems in which the majority of adenoviral genes are deleted, generating sophisticated Ad vectors which can mediate sustained transgene expression following a single delivery. This chapter outlines methods for developing simple transgene over expressing Ad vectors and detailed strategies to engineer mutations into the major capsid proteins.

  5. Magnetically Responsive Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhance Adenoviral Gene Transfer in Cultured Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chorny, Michael; Fishbein, Ilia; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral (Ad) vectors have shown promise as a tool for gene delivery-based therapeutic applications. Their clinical use is however limited by therapeutically suboptimal transduction levels in cell types expressing low levels of Coxsackie-Ad receptor (CAR), the primary receptor responsible for the cell entry of the virus, and by systemic adverse reactions. Targeted delivery achievable with Ad complexed with biodegradable magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNP) may therefore be instrumental for improving both the safety and efficiency of these vectors. Our hypothesis was that magnetically driven delivery of Ad affinity-bound to biodegradable MNP can substantially increase transgene expression in CAR deficient vascular cells in culture. Fluorescently labeled MNP were formulated from polylactide with inclusion of iron oxide and surface-modified with the D1 domain of CAR as an affinity linker. MNP cellular uptake and GFP reporter transgene expression were assayed fluorimetrically in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells using λex/λem of 540 nm/575 nm and 485 nm/535 nm, respectively. Stable vector-specific association of Ad with MNP resulted in formation of MNP–Ad complexes displaying rapid cell binding kinetics following a brief exposure to a high gradient magnetic field with resultant gene transfer levels significantly increased compared to free vector or nonmagnetic control treatment. Multiple regression analysis suggested a mechanism of MNP–Ad mediated transduction distinct from that of free Ad, and confirmed the major contribution of the complexes to the gene transfer under magnetic conditions. The magnetically enhanced transduction was achieved without compromising the cell viability or growth kinetics. The enhancement of adenoviral gene delivery by affinity complexation with biodegradable MNP represents a promising approach with a potential to extend the applicability of the viral gene therapeutic strategies. PMID:19496618

  6. [Construction of recombinant retroviral vector carrying Lab gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus and its expression in bovine kidney (MDBK) cells].

    PubMed

    Cong, Guozheng; Zhou, Jianhua; Gao, Shandian; Du, Junzheng; Shao, Junjun; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Xie, Qingge

    2008-05-01

    In this study, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain OA/58 RNAs were used as templates for RT-PCR. By the molecular cloning, the Lab gene encoding leader protease called Lpro were cloned in retroviral vector pBPSTR1 to obtain reconstruction retroviral vector termed pBPSTR1-Lab. At different concentrations of puromycin and tetracycline respectively in the cell culture mediums, the growth of bovine kidney cells (MDBK) showed that the optimal puromycin resistant selection concentration was 3 microg/mL and tetracycline regulatory concentration was 1 microg/mL. Pseudotyped retroviral virus particles were produced by transiently co-tansfecting GP2-293 cells with a retroviral vector DNA and VSV-G plasmid. Then MDBK cells were infected by pseudotyped retroviral virus and were continually seeded in the medium at the optimal tetracycline regulatory concentration and puromycin selection concentration for 12 days to obtain puromycin resistant colonies whose genomes contained the Lab gene. After tetracycline removal, synthesis of Lpro induced severe morphological changes in the puromycin resistant MDBK cells. PCR and Western blotting proved that a stable MDBK cell line inducibly expressing the Lab gene under the control of tetracycline was obtained. The experiment might provide a basis for studying that Lpro of FMDV plays an important role in MDBK cell pathogenesis.

  7. Strategies to enhance transductional efficiency of adenoviral-based gene transfer to primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes as a platform in dermal wounds

    PubMed Central

    Stoff, Alexander; Rivera, Angel A.; Banerjee, N. S.; Mathis, J. Michael; Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Antonio; Le, Long P.; De la Torre, Jorge I.; Vasconez, Luis O.; Broker, Thomas R.; Richter, Dirk F.; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam A.; Curiel, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Genetically modified keratinocytes and fibroblasts are suitable for delivery of therapeutic genes capable of modifying the wound healing process. However, efficient gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy of wounds. Whereas adenoviral vectors (Ads) exhibit superior levels of in vivo gene transfer, their transductional efficiency to cells resident within wounds may nonetheless be suboptimal, due to deficiency of the primary adenovirus receptor, coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). We explored CAR-independent transduction to fibroblasts and keratinocytes using a panel of CAR-independent fiber-modified Ads to determine enhancement of infectivity. These fiber-modified adenoviral vectors included Ad 3 knob (Ad5/3), canine Ad serotype 2 knob (Ad5CAV-2), RGD (Ad5.RGD), polylysine (Ad5.pK7), or both RGD and polylysine (Ad5.RGD.pK7). To evaluate whether transduction efficiencies of the fiber-modified adenoviral vectors correlated with the expression of their putative receptors on keratinocytes and fibroblasts, we analyzed the mRNA levels of CAR, αυ integrin, syndecan-1, and glypican-1 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Analysis of luciferase and green fluorescent protein transgene expression showed superior transduction efficiency of Ad5.pK7 in keratinocytes and Ad5.RGD.pK7 in fibroblasts. mRNA expression of αυ integrin, syndecan-1 and glypican-1 was significantly higher in primary fibroblasts than CAR. In keratinocytes, syndecan-1 expression was significantly higher than all the other receptors tested. Significant infectivity enhancement was achieved in keratinocytes and fibroblasts using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. These strategies to enhance infectivity may help to achieve higher clinical efficacy of wound gene therapy. PMID:17014674

  8. In the rat liver, Adenoviral gene transfer efficiency is comparable to AAV.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Miranda, P S; Pichard, V; Aubert, D; Ten Bloemendaal, L; Duijst, S; de Waart, D R; Ferry, N; Bosma, P J

    2014-02-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) and Adenovirus-associated viral (AAV) vectors both are used for in vivo gene therapy of inherited liver disorders, such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, both vectors efficiently correct the severe hyperbilirubinemia characteristic of this liver disorder. Although the clinical use of AAV is more advanced, as demonstrated by the successful phase 1 trial in hemophilia B patients, because of its large cloning capacity AdV remains an attractive option. A direct comparison of the efficacy of these two vectors in the liver in a relevant disease model has not been reported. Aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of clinically applicable doses of both vectors in the Gunn rat. AdV or scAAV (self-complimentary AAV) ferrying identical liver-specific expression cassettes of the therapeutic gene, UGT1A1, were injected into the tail vein. As the titration methods of these two vectors are very different, a comparison based on vector titers is not valid. Therefore, their efficacy was compared by determining the amount of vector genomes delivered to the liver required for therapeutic correction of serum bilirubin. Like AAV, the liver-specific first-generation AdV also provided sustained correction in this relevant disease model. UGT1A1 mRNA expression provided per genome was comparable for both vectors. Flanking the expression cassette in AdV with AAV-ITRs (inverted terminal repeats), increased UGT1A1 mRNA expression eightfold which resulted in a significant improvement of efficacy. Compared with AAV, less AdV genomes were needed for complete correction of hyperbilirubinemia.

  9. Lipid- and adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into AIDS-Kaposi's sarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campain, J A; Matassa, A A; Felgner, P L; Barnhart, K M; Curiel, D T; Harrison, G S

    1998-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent malignancy occurring in HIV-positive individuals. AIDS-KS is a more aggressive disease than the classical form, frequently having a rapid clinical course with numerous serious complications. Current systemic treatments for KS, such as chemotherapy and the administration of biological modifiers, are complicated by both the drug resistance of the tumor and the dose-limiting toxicity of the reagents. The relative accessibility of many KS lesions makes the disease a particularly attractive candidate for in vivo gene therapy protocols. In this regard, we are interested in delivering conditionally toxic suicide and/or antiangiogenic vectors to accomplish targeted cell death selectively in AIDS-KS cells. To this end, we examined both cationic lipid- and adenoviral-mediated DNA transfection methods. Using the firefly luciferase reporter gene, we optimized numerous variables known to be important in lipid-mediated DNA transfection, including lipid formulation, the amount of lipid and DNA, lipid/DNA ratio, and cell concentration. Under optimal transfection conditions, approximately 5-25% of KS cells expressed the introduced DNA sequences. Adenoviral-mediated DNA delivery was more efficient than lipid delivery in 4 of 5 primary KS cell lines. Two of the lines (RW248 and RW376) were transduced by adenovirus at frequencies approaching 100%; two cell lines (CVU-1 and RW80) gave efficiencies of 20-35%. Two immortalized KS cell lines (KS Y-1 and KS SLK) were poorly infected, giving a transduction efficiency of <5%. These findings demonstrate that gene transfer into AIDS-KS cells is feasible, and suggest that vector strategies may be permissive for translating gene therapy approaches for the disease.

  10. Adenoviral protein VII packages intracellular viral DNA throughout the early phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, P K; Vayda, M E; Flint, S J

    1986-01-01

    The proteins associated with parental, adenoviral DNA in productively-infected HeLa cells have been examined both directly and indirectly. HeLa cells infected with 32P-labelled Ad2 were irradiated with u.v. light at various points in the infectious cycle. Following degradation of the DNA, nuclear proteins carrying cross-linked nucleotides, or oligonucleotides, were distinguished from virion phosphoproteins by the resistance of their 32P radioactivity to 1 M NaOH. The major core protein of the virion, protein VII, was found to be associated with viral DNA throughout infection, even when cells were infected at a multiplicity of 0.14. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of intranuclear viral DNA 4 h after infection liberated two nucleoprotein particles containing viral DNA, neither of which co-migrated with HeLa cell mononucleosomes. These results indicate that core protein VII remains associated with parental adenoviral DNA during productive infections. The observation that protein VII can be cross-linked to DNA in cells infected at very low multiplicity, together with the results of a comparison of proteins cross-linkable to viral DNA in cells infected by wild-type virus and a non-infectious mutant containing the precursor to protein VII, suggest that nucleoproteins comprising viral DNA and protein VII must be the templates for expression of pre-early and early viral genes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3743550

  11. Adenoviral-mediated RNA interference targeting URG11 inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Li, Xiaohua; Du, Wenqi; Zou, Xue; Du, Rui; Zhao, Lina; Luo, Guanhong; Mo, Ping; Xia, Lin; Pan, Yanglin; Shi, Yongquan; Lian, Zhaorui; Feitelson, Mark A; Nie, Yongzhan; Liu, Jie; Fan, Daiming

    2011-06-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common malignancy in Asia, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5% due to high recurrence after surgery and resistance to chemotherapy. A variety of therapeutic interventions to treat HCC, particularly gene therapy, have recently been investigated in tumor model systems to provide a more complete understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis and effectively design therapeutic strategies to treat this disease. In our study, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting a newly discovered gene named upregulated gene 11 (URG11). We introduced this vector into HCC cells to investigate the role of URG11 in HCC carcinogenesis. We observed that upon URG11 knockdown, HCC cell proliferation was inhibited through downregulation of several G1-S phase related molecules including cyclin D1 and apoptosis was induced as a result of Bcl-2 downregulation. Besides decreased expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, pRb and Bcl-2, URG11 also suppressed several other proteins including CAPN9, which was identified by cDNA microarray and 2D gel electrophoresis. Moreover, Ad-URG11-siRNA significantly suppressed HCC tumor growth in nude mice. In conclusion, Ad-URG11-siRNA can significantly suppress HCC tumor growth in vitro and in vivo by silencing the URG11 gene, and the use of this vector for gene therapy may represent a novel strategy to treat human HCC.

  12. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant adenoviral based vaccine expressing heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guangcun; Li, Wu; Wu, Xiaoling; Bao, Shaowen; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Ning; Luo, Meihui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-12-01

    The diarrheal disease of domestic animals or in humans caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections remains a major issue for public health in developing countries. Unfortunately, there is no effective vaccine available for preventing from an ETEC infection. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine against ETEC is urgently needed. In the present study, A recombinant adenoviral vector Ad5-STa-K99 that capable of expressing a fusion protein of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of ETEC was generated and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a murine model. The intestinal mucosal secretory IgA(sIgA), serum anti-STa-K99 antibody responses, antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells frequencies, as well as T-cell proliferation of mice immunized with the viral vector were determined as immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that Ad5-STa-K99 was able to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG antibody, and an elevated production of intestinal sIgA in immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of both of humoral and mucosal immune responses. In addition, this adenoviral vector could significantly promote splenic T cell proliferation and increase the frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations in mice, indicative of a capacity to activate T cell responses. More importantly, vaccination of the Ad5-STa-K99 showed a potential to evoke a protective effect from ETEC challenge in mice. These data indicate that the Ad5-STa-K99 is a highly immunogenic vector able to induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, and evoke a protective immune response against ETEC infections, implying that it may be a novel vaccine candidate warranted for further investigation.

  14. The Role of Endosomal Escape and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Adenoviral Activation of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Xu, Zhili; Tian, Jie; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) activate multiple signaling pathways associated with innate immune responses, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this study, we investigated how systemically-injected AdVs activate two MAPK pathways (p38 and ERK) and the contribution of these kinases to AdV-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in mice. Mice were injected intravenously either with a helper-dependent Ad2 vector that does not express viral genes or transgenes, or with the Ad2 mutant ts1, which is defective in endosomal escape. We found that AdV induced rapid phosphorylation of p38 and ERK as well as a significant cytokine response, but ts1 failed to activate p38 or ERK and induced only a limited cytokine response. These results demonstrate that endosomal escape of virions is a critical step in the induction of these innate pathways and responses. We then examined the roles of p38 and ERK pathways in the innate cytokine response by administering specific kinase inhibitors to mice prior to AdV. The cytokine and chemokine response to AdV was only modestly suppressed by a p38 inhibitor, while an ERK inhibitor has mixed effects, lowering some cytokines and elevating others. Thus, even though p38 and ERK are rapidly activated after i.v. injection of AdV, cytokine and chemokine responses are mostly independent of these kinases. PMID:22046344

  15. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  16. Adenoviral vector-mediated overexpression of osteoprotegerin accelerates osteointegration of titanium implants in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, G; Chen, J; Wei, S; Wang, H; Chen, Q; Lin, Y; Hu, J; Luo, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of human osteoprotegerin (hOPG) transgene to accelerate osteointegration of titanium implant in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Bone marrow stromal cells transduced with Ad-hOPG-EGFP could sustainedly express hOPG. Osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells treated by the hOPG were examined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and bone slice resorption assay. The results showed differentiation and function of osteoclasts were significantly suppressed by hOPG in vitro. Ad-hOPG-EGFP was locally administered to the bone defect prior to implant placement in OVX and sham rats. After 3, 7, 28 days of implantation, the femurs were harvested for molecular and histological analyses. Successful transgene expression was confirmed by western blot and cryosectioning. A significant reduction in TRAP+ numbers was detected in Ad-hOPG-EGFP group. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR examination revealed that hOPG transgene markedly diminished the expression of cathepsin K and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κ B ligand in vivo. The transgene hOPG modification revealed a marked increasing osteointegration and restored implant stability in OVX rats (P<0.01), compared with the control groups (Ad-EGFP or sterilized phosphate-buffered saline) 28 days after implantation. In conclusion, hOPG via direct adenovirus-mediated gene transfer could accelerate osteointegration of titanium implants in OVX rats. Osteoprotegerin gene therapy may be an effective strategy to osteointegration of implants under osteoporotic conditions.

  17. Development of hybrid viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuohao; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral, retroviral/lentiviral, adeno-associated viral, and herpesviral vectors are the major viral vectors used in gene therapy. Compared with non-viral methods, viruses are highly-evolved, natural delivery agents for genetic materials. Despite their remarkable transduction efficiency, both clinical trials and laboratory experiments have suggested that viral vectors have inherent shortcomings for gene therapy, including limited loading capacity, immunogenicity, genotoxicity, and failure to support long-term adequate transgenic expression. One of the key issues in viral gene therapy is the state of the delivered genetic material in transduced cells. To address genotoxicity and improve the therapeutic transgene expression profile, construction of hybrid vectors have recently been developed. By adding new abilities or replacing certain undesirable elements, novel hybrid viral vectors are expected to outperform their conventional counterparts with improved safety and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. This review provides a comprehensive summary of current achievements in hybrid viral vector development and their impact on the field of gene therapy.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure. PMID:24477283

  19. Adenoviral protein V promotes a process of viral assembly through nucleophosmin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, Hideyo; Dobbins, George C.; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Curiel, David T.

    2012-10-25

    Adenoviral infection induces nucleoplasmic redistribution of a nucleolar nucleophosmin 1/NPM1/B23.1. NPM1 is preferentially localized in the nucleoli of normal cells, whereas it is also present at the nuclear matrix in cancer cells. However, the biological roles of NPM1 during infection are unknown. Here, by analyzing a pV-deletion mutant, Ad5-dV/TSB, we demonstrate that pV promotes the NPM1 translocation from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm in normal cells, and the NPM1 translocation is correlated with adenoviral replication. Lack of pV causes a dramatic reduction of adenoviral replication in normal cells, but not cancer cells, and Ad5-dV/TSB was defective in viral assembly in normal cells. NPM1 knockdown inhibits adenoviral replication, suggesting an involvement of NPM1 in adenoviral biology. Further, we show that NPM1 interacts with empty adenovirus particles which are an intermediate during virion maturation by immunoelectron microscopy. Collectively, these data implicate that pV participates in a process of viral assembly through NPM1.

  20. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  1. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy.

  2. Retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Dusty

    2014-01-01

    In this unit, the basic protocol generates stable cell lines that produce retroviral vectors that carry selectable markers. Also included are an alternate protocol that applies when the retroviral vector does not carry a selectable marker, and another alternate protocol for rapidly generating retroviral vector preparations by transient transfection. A support protocol describes construction of the retroviral vectors. The methods for generating virus from retroviral vector plasmids rely on the use of packaging cells that synthesize all of the retroviral proteins but do not produce replication-competent virus. Additional protocols detail plasmid transfection, virus titration, assay for replication-competent virus, and histochemical staining to detect transfer of a vector encoding alkaline phosphatase.

  3. Transformation of a plasmid-free, genital tract isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis with a plasmid vector carrying a deletion in CDS6 revealed that this gene regulates inclusion phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Clarke, Ian N

    2013-03-01

    The development of a plasmid-based genetic transformation protocol for Chlamydia trachomatis provides the basis for the detailed investigation of the function of the chlamydial plasmid and its individual genes or coding sequences (CDS). In this study we constructed a plasmid vector with CDS6 deleted (pCDS6KO) from the original Escherichia coli/C. trachomatis shuttle vector pGFP::SW2. pCDS6KO was transformed into a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis from Sweden that is plasmid-free (C. trachomatis SWFP-). Penicillin-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. These transformants did not stain with iodine, indicating that this property is regulated by CDS6 or its gene product. In addition, mature inclusions of C. trachomatis SWFP- transformed by pCDS6KO displayed an identical morphological phenotype to the untransformed plasmid-free recipient host. In this phenotype the morphology of inclusions was altered with the chlamydiae lining the periphery of the inclusion leaving a 'hole' in the centre. These green fluorescent inclusions appear 'doughnut-shaped' with an empty centre when examined under blue light, giving rise to a characteristic 'black hole' phenotype. Our study demonstrates the power of the new genetic system for investigating chlamydial gene function using gene deletion technology. PMID:23620154

  4. Transformation of a plasmid-free, genital tract isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis with a plasmid vector carrying a deletion in CDS6 revealed that this gene regulates inclusion phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Clarke, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    The development of a plasmid-based genetic transformation protocol for Chlamydia trachomatis provides the basis for the detailed investigation of the function of the chlamydial plasmid and its individual genes or coding sequences (CDS). In this study we constructed a plasmid vector with CDS6 deleted (pCDS6KO) from the original Escherichia coli/C. trachomatis shuttle vector pGFP::SW2. pCDS6KO was transformed into a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis from Sweden that is plasmid-free (C. trachomatis SWFP–). Penicillin-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. These transformants did not stain with iodine, indicating that this property is regulated by CDS6 or its gene product. In addition, mature inclusions of C. trachomatis SWFP– transformed by pCDS6KO displayed an identical morphological phenotype to the untransformed plasmid-free recipient host. In this phenotype the morphology of inclusions was altered with the chlamydiae lining the periphery of the inclusion leaving a ‘hole’ in the centre. These green fluorescent inclusions appear ‘doughnut-shaped’ with an empty centre when examined under blue light, giving rise to a characteristic ‘black hole’ phenotype. Our study demonstrates the power of the new genetic system for investigating chlamydial gene function using gene deletion technology. PMID:23620154

  5. Adenoviral Delivery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-2 Enables Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy of Immunosuppressive Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Saha, Dipongkor; Lumen, Dave; Airaksinen, Anu J; Tähtinen, Siri; Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is a promising treatment approach for metastatic cancer, but efficacy in solid tumors has only been achieved with toxic pre- and postconditioning regimens. Thus, adoptive T-cell therapies would benefit from complementary modalities that enable their full potential without excessive toxicity. We aimed to improve the efficacy and safety of adoptive T-cell transfer by using adenoviral vectors for direct delivery of immunomodulatory murine cytokines into B16.OVA melanoma tumors with concomitant T-cell receptor transgenic OT-I T-cell transfer. Armed adenoviruses expressed high local and low systemic levels of cytokine when injected into B16.OVA tumors, suggesting safety of virus-mediated cytokine delivery. Antitumor efficacy was significantly enhanced with adenoviruses coding for murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (mTNFα) when compared with T-cell transfer alone or viruses alone. Further improvement in efficacy was achieved with a triple combination of mIL-2, mTNFα, and OT-I T-cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that mIL-2 has an important role in activating T-cells at the tumor, while mTNFα induces chemokine expression. Furthermore, adenovirus treatments enhanced tumor-infiltration of OT-I T-cells as demonstrated by SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled cells. Our results suggest the utility of cytokine-coding adenoviruses for improving the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  6. Effect of adenoviral mediated overexpression of fibromodulin on human dermal fibroblasts and scar formation in full-thickness incisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Stoff, Alexander; Rivera, Angel A; Mathis, J Michael; Moore, Steven T; Banerjee, N S; Everts, Maaike; Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Antonio; Novak, Zdenek; Vasconez, Luis O; Broker, Thomas R; Richter, Dirk F; Feldman, Dale; Siegal, Gene P; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam A; Curiel, David T

    2007-05-01

    Fibromodulin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, has been recently suggested as a biologically significant mediator of fetal scarless repair. To assess the role of fibromodulin in the tissue remodeling, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing human fibromodulin cDNA. We evaluated the effect of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of fibromodulin in vitro on transforming growth factors and metalloproteinases in fibroblasts and in vivo on full-thickness incisional wounds in a rabbit model. In vitro, we found that Ad-Fibromodulin induced a decrease of expression of TGF-beta(1) and TGF-beta(2) precursor proteins, but an increase in expression of TGF-beta(3) precursor protein and TGF-beta type II receptor. In addition, fibromodulin overexpression resulted in decreased MMP-1 and MMP-3 protein secretion but increased MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 secretion, whereas MMP-9 and MMP-13 were not influenced by fibromodulin overexpression. In vivo evaluation by histopathology and tensile strength demonstrated that Ad-Fibromodulin administration could ameliorate wound healing in incisional wounds. In conclusion, although the mechanism of scar formation in adult wounds remains incompletely understood, we found that fibromodulin overexpression improves wound healing in vivo, suggesting that fibromodulin may be a key mediator in reduced scarring.

  7. Intra-testicular injection of adenoviral constructs results in Sertoli cell-specific gene expression and disruption of the seminiferous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hooley, R P; Paterson, M; Brown, P; Kerr, K; Saunders, P T K

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that cannot be modelled in vitro. The somatic Sertoli cells (SCs) within the seminiferous tubules perform a key role in supporting maturation of germ cells (GCs). Progress has been made in determining what aspects of SC function are critical to maintenance of fertility by developing rodent models based on the Cre/LoxP system; however, this is time-consuming and is only applicable to mice. The aim of the present study was to establish methods for direct injection of adenoviral vectors containing shRNA constructs into the testis as a way of inducing target-selective knock-down in vivo. This paper describes a series of experiments using adenovirus expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene. Injection via the efferent ductules resulted in SC-specific expression of GFP; expression levels paralleled the amount of infective viral particles injected. At the highest doses of virus seminiferous tubule architecture were grossly disturbed and immune cell invasion noted. At lower concentrations, the expression of GFP was variable/negligible, the seminiferous tubule lumen was maintained but stage-dependent GC loss and development of numerous basal vacuoles was observed. These resembled intercellular dilations of SC junctional complexes previously described in rats and may be a consequence of disturbances in SC function due to interaction of the viral particles with the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor that is a component of the junctional complexes within the blood testis barrier. In conclusion, intra-testicular injection of adenoviral vectors disturbs SC function in vivo and future work will therefore focus on the use of lentiviral delivery systems. PMID:18955374

  8. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Curiel, David T.; Leppla, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  9. Micro-computed tomography of pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by adenoviral gene transfer of biologically active transforming growth factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a novel tool for monitoring acute and chronic disease states in small laboratory animals. Its value for assessing progressive lung fibrosis in mice has not been reported so far. Here we examined the importance of in vivo micro-CT as non-invasive tool to assess progression of pulmonary fibrosis in mice over time. Methods Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal delivery of an adenoviral gene vector encoding biologically active TGF-ß1 (AdTGF-ß1). Respiratory gated and ungated micro-CT scans were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post pulmonary adenoviral gene or control vector delivery, and were then correlated with respective histopathology-based Ashcroft scoring of pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Visual assessment of image quality and consolidation was performed by 3 observers and a semi-automated quantification algorithm was applied to quantify aerated pulmonary volume as an inverse surrogate marker for pulmonary fibrosis. Results We found a significant correlation between classical Ashcroft scoring and micro-CT assessment using both visual assessment and the semi-automated quantification algorithm. Pulmonary fibrosis could be clearly detected in micro-CT, image quality values were higher for respiratory gated exams, although differences were not significant. For assessment of fibrosis no significant difference between respiratory gated and ungated exams was observed. Conclusions Together, we show that micro-CT is a powerful tool to assess pulmonary fibrosis in mice, using both visual assessment and semi-automated quantification algorithms. These data may be important in view of pre-clinical pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of lung fibrosis in small laboratory animals. PMID:21176193

  10. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  11. Protein Transduction Domains Fused to Virus Receptors Improve Cellular Virus Uptake and Enhance Oncolysis by Tumor-Specific Replicating Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kühnel, Florian; Schulte, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas; Woller, Norman; Schäfers, Sonja; Zender, Lars; Manns, Michael; Kubicka, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Expression of cellular receptors determines viral tropism and limits gene delivery by viral vectors. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) have been shown to deliver proteins, antisense oligonucleotides, liposomes, or plasmid DNA into cells. In our study, we investigated the role of several PTD motifs in adenoviral infection. When physiologically expressed, a PTD from human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (Tat) did not improve adenoviral infection. We therefore fused PTDs to the ectodomain of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CARex) to attach PTDs to adenoviral fiber knobs. CARex-Tat and CARex-VP22 allowed efficient adenoviral infection in nonpermissive cells and significantly improved viral uptake rates in permissive cells. Dose-dependent competition of CARex-PTD-mediated infection using CARex and inhibition experiments with heparin showed that binding of CARex-PTD to both adenoviral fiber and cellular glycosaminoglycans is essential for the improvement of infection. CARex-PTD-treated adenoviruses retained their properties after density gradient ultracentrifugation, indicating stable binding of CARex-PTD to adenoviral particles. Consequently, the mechanism of CARex-PTD-mediated infection involves coating of the viral fiber knobs by CARex-PTD, rather than placement of CARex domains on cell surfaces. Expression of CARex-PTDs led to enhanced lysis of permissive and nonpermissive tumor cells by replicating adenoviruses, indicating that CARex-PTDs are valuable tools to improve the efficacy of oncolytic therapy. Together, our study shows that CARex-PTDs facilitate gene transfer in nonpermissive cells and improve viral uptake at reduced titers and infection times. The data suggest that PTDs fused to virus binding receptors may be a valuable tool to overcome natural tropism of vectors and could be of great interest for gene therapeutic approaches. PMID:15564483

  12. Adenoviral expression of murine serum amyloid A proteins to study amyloid fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kindy, M S; King, A R; Yu, J; Gerardot, C; Whitley, J; de Beer, F C

    1998-06-15

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are one of the most inducible acute-phase reactants and are precursors of secondary amyloidosis. In the mouse, SAA1 and SAA2 are induced in approximately equal quantities in response to amyloid induction models. These two isotypes differ in only 9 of 103 amino acid residues; however, only SAA2 is selectively deposited into amyloid fibrils. SAA expression in the CE/J mouse species is an exception in that gene duplication did not occur and the CE/J variant is a hybrid molecule sharing features of SAA1 and SAA2. However, even though it is more closely related to SAA2 it is not deposited as amyloid fibrils. We have developed an adenoviral vector system to overexpress SAA proteins in cell culture to determine the ability of these proteins to form amyloid fibrils, and to study the structural features in relation to amyloid formation. Both the SAA2 and CE/J SAA proteins were synthesized in large quantities and purified to homogeneity. Electron microscopic analysis of the SAA proteins revealed that the SAA2 protein was capable of forming amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J SAA was incapable. Radiolabelled SAAs were associated with normal or acute-phase high-density lipoproteins (HDLs); we examined them for their clearance from the circulation. In normal mice, SAA2 had a half-life of 70 min and CE/J SAA had a half-life of 120 min; however, in amyloid mice 50% of the SAA2 cleared in 55 min, compared with 135 min for the CE/J protein. When the SAA proteins were associated with acute-phase HDLs, SAA2 clearance was decreased to 60 min in normal mice compared with 30 min in amyloidogenic mice. Both normal and acute-phase HDLs were capable of depositing SAA2 into preformed amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J protein did not become associated with amyloid fibrils. This established approach opens the doors for large-scale SAA production and for the examination of specific amino acids involved in the fibrillogenic capability of the SAA2 molecule in vitro

  13. Off-the-shelf adenoviral-mediated immunotherapy via bicistronic expression of tumor antigen and iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kemnade, Jan Ole; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Narayanan, Priya; Levitt, Jonathan M; McCormick, Alison A; Spencer, David M

    2012-07-01

    Recent modest successes in ex vivo dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy have motivated continued innovation in the area of DC manipulation and activation. Although ex vivo vaccine approaches continue to be proving grounds for new DC manipulation techniques, the intrinsic limits of ex vivo therapy, including high cost, minimal standardization, cumbersome delivery, and poor accessibility, incentivizes the development of vaccines compatible with in vivo DC targeting. We describe here a method to co-deliver both tumor-specific antigen (TSA) and an iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant (iMC), to DCs that combines toll-like receptor (TLR) and CD40 signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that simple TSA delivery via adenoviral vectors results in strong antitumor immunity. Addition of iMC delivered in a separate vector is insufficient to enhance this effect. However, when delivered simultaneously with TSA in a single bicistronic vector (BV), iMC is able to significantly enhance antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses and inhibit established tumor growth. This study demonstrates the spatial-temporal importance of concurrent DC activation and TSA presentation. Further, it demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular enhancement of DCs necessary for effective antitumor immune responses.

  14. Adenoviral-E2F-1 radiosensitizes p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh H.; Hachem, Paul; Khor, L.-Y.; Salem, Naji; Hunt, Kelly K.; Calkins, Peter R.; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: E2F-1 is a transcription factor that enhances the radiosensitivity of various cell lines by inducing apoptosis. However, there are conflicting data concerning whether this enhancement is mediated via p53 dependent pathways. Additionally, the role of E2F-1 in the response of human prostate cancer to radiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of Adenoviral-E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) on the radiosensitivity of p53{sup wild-type} (LNCaP) and p53{sup null} (PC3) prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: LNCaP and PC3 cells were transduced with Ad-E2F-1, Adenoviral-Luciferase (Ad-Luc) control vector, or Adenoviral-p53 (Ad-p53). Expression of E2F-1 and p53 was examined by Western blot analysis. Annexin V and caspase 3 + 7 assays were performed to estimate the levels of apoptosis. Clonogenic survival assays were used to determine overall cell death. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance, using the Bonferroni method to correct for multiple comparisons. Results: Western blot analysis confirmed the efficacy of transductions with Ad-E2F-1 and Ad-p53. Ad-E2F-1 transduction significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased clonogenic survival in both cell lines. These effects were compounded by the addition of RT. Although E2F-1-mediated radiosensitization was independent of p53 status, this effect was more pronounced in p53{sup wild-type} LNCaP cells. When PC3 cells were treated with Ad-p53 in combination with RT and Ad-E2F-1, there was at least an additive reduction in clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Ad-E2F-1 significantly enhances the response of p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy, although radiosensitization is more pronounced in the presence of p53. Ad-E2F-1 may be a useful adjunct to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Regulation of the Target Protein (Transgene) Expression in the Adenovirus Vector Using Agonists of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bagaev, A. V.; Pichugin, A. V.; Lebedeva, E. S.; Lysenko, A. A.; Shmarov, M. M.; Logunov, D. Yu.; Naroditsky, B. S.; Ataullakhanov, R. I.; Khaitov, R. M.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are effective molecular tools for both gene therapy and gene vaccination. Using such vectors one can deliver and express target genes in different epithelial, liver, hematopoietic and immune system cells of animal and human origin. The success of gene therapy and gene vaccination depends on the production intensity of the target protein encoded by the transgene. In this work, we studied influence of Toll-like receptors (TLR) agonists on transduction and expression efficacy of adenoviral vectors in animal and human antigen-presenting cells. We found that agonists of TLR2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 significantly enhance a production of the target protein in cells transduced with adenoviral vector having the target gene insert. The enhancement was observed in dendritic cells and macrophages expressing cytoplasmic (GFP), membrane (HA) or secretory (SEAP) proteins encoded by the respective rAd-vectors. Experiments in mice showed that enhancement of the transgene expression can be achieved in the organism of animals using a pharmaceutical-grade TLR4-agonist. In contrast to other TLR-agonists, the agonist of TLR3 substantially suppressed the expression of transgene in cells transduced with adenoviral vectors having insert of GFP or SEAP target genes. We propose that the enhancement of transgene expression is linked to the activation of MyD88→ NF-kB, while the inhibition of transgene expression depends on TRIF→ IRF signaling pathways. Both of these pathways jointly exploited by TLR4-agonists lead to the enhancement of transgene expression due to the dominant role of the MyD88→ NF-kB signaling. PMID:25558392

  16. Treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in an infant with adenoviral conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Con, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC) has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC) is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases.

  17. Linearized oncolytic adenoviral plasmid DNA delivered by bioreducible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaesung; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Nam, Hye Yeong; Lee, Jung-Sun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-01-01

    As an effort to overcome limits of adenovirus (Ad) as a systemic delivery vector for cancer therapy, we developed a novel system using oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with two bioreducible polymers: arginine-grafted bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)polymer (ABP) and PEG5k-conjugated ABP (ABP5k) in expectation of oncolytic effect caused by progeny viral production followed by replication. The linearized Ad DNAs for active viral replication polyplexed with each polymer were able to replicate only in humancancer cells and produce progeny viruses. The non-immunogenic polymers delivering the DNAs markedly elicited to evade the innate and adaptive immune response. The biodistribution ratio of the polyplexes administered systemically was approximately 99% decreased in liver when compared with naked Ad. Moreover, tumor-to-liver ratio of the Ad DNA delivered by ABP or ABP5k was significantly elevated at 229- or 419-fold greater than that of naked Ad, respectively. The ABP5k improved the chance of the DNA to localize within tumor versus liver with 1.8-fold increased ratio. In conclusion, the innovative and simple system for delivering oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with the bioreducible polymers, skipping time-consuming steps such as generation and characterization of oncolytic Ad vectors, can be utilized as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. PMID:22207073

  18. Inhibition of apoptosis reduces immunogeneic potential of adenoviral-treated syngeneic liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Puellmann, Kerstin; Beham, Alexander; Kienle, Klaus; Vogel, Mandy; Schlitt, Hans Juergen; Jauch, Karl Walter; Rentsch, Markus

    2006-11-27

    Effects of adenoviral therapy and reduced apoptosis on immune response were investigated in a rat liver transplantation model after prolonged ischemia-reperfusion. Liver donors were treated i.v. either with an adenoviral construct, expressing bcl-2, green-fluorescent-protein, or doxycyclin. Intrahepatic apoptosis was assessed by terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The intrahepatic presence of CD4, CD8a, CD163, immunoglobulin (Ig)beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and myeloperoxidase (MPO) was quantified by realtime polymerase chain reaction at 24 hours and seven days after transplantation. Bcl-2 expression abrogated the TNF-alpha elevation and reduced apoptosis of hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells as compared to advCMV green fluorescent protein. No effects on CD4, CD8a, CD163 and MPO expression were noticed in bcl-2 pretreated livers, whereas Igbeta was slightly enhanced compared to controls. Adenoviral infected liver grafts trigger an immune response but reduced apoptosis resulted in down-regulation of TNF-alpha. Thus, bcl-2 transfer might simultaneously reduce graft ischemia reperfusion injury and immunogenicity. PMID:17130789

  19. Carrying Backpacks: Physical Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is estimated that more than 40 million U.S. youth carry school materials in backs, routinely carrying books, laptop computers, personal and other items used on a daily basis. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that 7,277 emergency visits each year result from injuries related to backpacks. Injury can occur when a child…

  20. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  1. Osteogenic gene regulation and relative acceleration of healing by adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-2 or -6 in equine osteotomy and ostectomy models.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Shields, Kathleen M; Litsky, Alan S; Mattoon, John S; Weisbrode, Steven E; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Bertone, Alicia L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated healing of equine metatarsal osteotomies and ostectomies in response to percutaneous injection of adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, Ad-BMP-6, or beta-galactosidase protein vector control (Ad-LacZ) administered 14 days after surgery. Radiographic and quantitative computed tomographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater and earlier mineralized callus in both the osteotomies and ostectomies of the metatarsi injected with Ad-BMP-2 or Ad-BMP-6. Peak torque to failure and torsional stiffness were greater in osteotomies treated with Ad-BMP-2 than Ad-BMP-6, and both Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated osteotomies were greater than Ad-LacZ or untreated osteotomies. Gene expression of ostectomy mineralized callus 8 weeks after surgery indicated upregulation of genes related to osteogenesis compared to intact metatarsal bone. Expression of transforming growth factor beta-1, cathepsin H, and gelsolin-like capping protein were greater in Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated callus compared to Ad-LacZ-treated or untreated callus. Evidence of tissue biodistribution of adenovirus in distant organs was not identified by quantitative PCR, despite increased serum antiadenoviral vector antibody. This study demonstrated a greater relative potency of Ad-BMP-2 over Ad-BMP-6 in accelerating osteotomy healing when administered in this regimen, although both genes were effective at increasing bone at both osteotomy and ostectomy sites.

  2. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  3. Enhanced anti-tumor effects of combined MDR1 RNA interference and human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) radioiodine gene therapy using an adenoviral system in a colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, S J; Jeon, Y H; Lee, Y J; Lee, Y L; Lee, S-W; Ahn, B-C; Ha, J-H; Lee, J

    2010-01-01

    Using an adenoviral system as a delivery mediator of therapeutic gene, we investigated the therapeutic effects of the use of combined MDR1 shRNA and human NIS (hNIS) radioiodine gene therapy in a mouse colon xenograft model. In vitro uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi was increased approximately two-fold in cells infected with an adenovirus vector that expressed MDR1 shRNA (Ad-shMDR1) and I-125 uptake was 25-fold higher in cells infected with an adenovirus vector that expressed human NIS (Ad-hNIS) as compared with control cells. As compared with doxorubicin or I-131 treatment alone, the combination of doxorubicin and I-131 resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity for both Ad-shMDR1- and Ad-hNIS-infected cells, but not for control cells. In vivo uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m pertechnetate was twofold and 10-fold higher for Ad-shMDR1 and Ad-hNIS-infected tumors as compared with tumors infected with a control adenovirus construct that expressed β-galactrosidase (Ad-LacZ), respectively. In mice treated with either doxorubicin or I-131 alone, there was a slight delay in tumor growth as compared to mice treated with Ad-LacZ. However, combination therapy with doxorubicin and I-131 induced further significant inhibition of tumor growth as compared with mice treated with Ad-LacZ. We have shown successful therapeutic efficacy of combined MDR shRNA and hNIS radioiodine gene therapy using an adenoviral vector system in a mouse colon cancer model. Adenovirus-mediated cancer gene therapy using MDR1 shRNA and hNIS would be a useful tool for the treatment of cancer cells expressing multi-drug resistant genes. PMID:20186172

  4. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-6 gene accelerates healing in a rabbit ulnar osteotomy model.

    PubMed

    Bertone, A L; Pittman, D D; Bouxsein, M L; Li, J; Clancy, B; Seeherman, H J

    2004-11-01

    This study evaluated healing of rabbit bilateral ulnar osteotomies 6 and 8 weeks after surgery in response to percutaneous injection of transgenic adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) vector or green fluorescent protein vector control (Ad-GFP) administered 7 days after surgery compared to untreated osteotomy controls. The amount, composition and biomechanical properties of the healing bone repair tissue were compared among groups and to historical data for intact rabbit ulnae obtained from similar studies at the same institution. Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine area, density and mineral content of the mineralized callus in the harvested ulnae. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were determined at 1.5 degrees /s. Calcified sections of excised ulnae (5 microm) were stained with Goldner's Trichrome and Von Kossa, and evaluated for callus composition, maturity, cortical continuity, and osteotomy bridging. Radiographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater mineralized callus in the ulnae injected with Ad-hBMP-6 as early as 1 week after treatment (2 weeks after surgery) compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.006) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.002). Quantitative computed tomography confirmed greater bone area and bone mineral content at the osteotomy at 6 weeks in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy as compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.001) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.01). Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae were stronger (p < 0.001 and 0.003) and stiffer (p < 0.004 and 0.003) in torsion at 6 weeks than untreated osteotomy ulnae or Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae, respectively. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were greater in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae compared to their respective untreated contralateral osteotomy ulnae at 8 weeks [p < 0.03]. Maximum torque and torsional stiffness in the Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae

  5. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  6. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  7. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  8. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  9. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  10. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  11. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  12. Altered hyaluronic acid content in tear fluid of patients with adenoviral conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Juliana L; Regatieri, Caio V; Coelho, Bruno; Barbosa, José B; De Freitas, Denise; Nader, Helena B; Martins, João R

    2015-03-01

    The adenoviral conjunctivitis is one of the biggest causes of conjunctival infection in the world. Conjunctivitis causes relatively nonspecific symptoms, as hyperaemia and chemosis. Even after biomicroscopy, complex laboratory tests, such as viral culture, are necessary to identify the pathogen or its etiology. To contribute to the better understanding of the pathobiology of the adenoviral conjunctivitis, the tear fluids of patients with unilateral acute adenovirus conjunctivitis (UAAC), normal donors (control) and patients with allergic conjunctivitis were analyzed. Tear samples were collected with Schirmer strips from control, allergic conjunctivitis and UAAC patients, diagnosed by clinical signs. UAAC tears were tested positive in viral cultures. After the elution, HA was quantified using an ELISA-like fluorometric assay and the protein profile was determined by SDS-PAGE. A profound increase in the HA tear content in UAAC patients was found when compared to control and ALC. This HA increase in UAAC tears remarkably was not observed in tears from contralateral eyes without clinical signs, nor in allergic conjunctivitis. In addition a distinct profile of UAAC tear proteins was observed in patients with UAAC. The quantification of HA in the tear fluid is a rapid, sensitive and specific test. This molecule might be a biomarker candidate for acute conjunctivitis.

  13. Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Aboumohamed, Ahmed; Flechner, Stuart M; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Srinivas, Titte R; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-11-01

    Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function. PMID:23816478

  14. Adenoviral infection or deferoxamine? Two approaches to overexpress VEGF in beta-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Allan; Bietiger, William; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence; Sigrist, Severine

    2009-07-01

    Rapid and adequate revascularization of transplanted islets is important for their survival and function during transplantation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a critical role with respect to islet revascularization. The aim of this study was to compare two strategies that are used to overexpress VEGF in beta-cells: (1) gene therapy through adenoviral infection and (2) a pharmacological approach using deferoxamine (DFO). beta-Cell lines from rat insulinoma (RINm5F) were either infected using an adenovirus encoding the gene of human VEGF 165 or incubated with DFO. One day after treatment, the viability of RINm5F cells was preserved with 10 micromol/L of DFO (103.95 +/- 5.66% toward control; n = 4). In addition, adenoviral infection maintained the viability of cells for all the concentrations used. In both treatments, overexpression of VEGF was in a comparable level. Finally, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 indicated that the apoptosis increased in infected beta-cells whereas treatment with DFO seems to be antiapoptotic. Our results suggest that the use of DFO could be a realistic approach to improve the vascularization of islets during transplantation. PMID:19527112

  15. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  16. Adenoviral Gene Transfer of PLD1-D4 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Mice by Disrupting Phospholipase D1 Interaction with PED/PEA-15

    PubMed Central

    Fiory, Francesca; Nigro, Cecilia; Ulianich, Luca; Castanò, Ilenia; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Terracciano, Daniela; Pastore, Lucio; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco; Miele, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15) causes insulin resistance by interacting with the D4 domain of phospholipase D1 (PLD1). Indeed, the disruption of this association restores insulin sensitivity in cultured cells over-expressing PED/PEA-15. Whether the displacement of PLD1 from PED/PEA-15 improves insulin sensitivity in vivo has not been explored yet. In this work we show that treatment with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human D4 cDNA (Ad-D4) restores normal glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Tg ped/pea-15) by improving both insulin sensitivity and secretion. In skeletal muscle of these mice, D4 over-expression inhibited PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction, decreased Protein Kinase C alpha activation and restored insulin induced Protein Kinase C zeta activation, leading to amelioration of insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Interestingly, Ad-D4 administration improved insulin sensitivity also in high-fat diet treated obese C57Bl/6 mice. We conclude that PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction may represent a novel target for interventions aiming at improving glucose tolerance. PMID:23585839

  17. "Christian carrying goomies".

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Passingan Usurup tells critics of his pragmatic approach on condom promotion that he is a Christian carrying condoms for Christ. He is head of the University of Papua New Guinea Medical Center and is credited with developing an AIDS/HIV policy for the Papua New Guinea Defence Force. The condoms were named Goomy and promoted at launching in 1992 in a blue packet under the slogan "The bond that guards." Goomy was chosen as the name because it is pidgin for rubber, chewing gum, and anything associated with rubber. Blue packets were chosen over the calls of most soldiers for a camouflage design because of its universal appeal as the color of the sea and sky and because it was the preference of women in the airlines. Once firmly ensconced in his role at the University, Usurup plans to develop a policy for students and staff and help to conduct AIDS prevention and education activities on campus. He will encourage students to test for HIV rather than highlighting the gloom and doom of infection and disease.

  18. Modifications to the INSM1 promoter to preserve specificity and activity for use in adenoviral gene therapy of neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Akerstrom, V; Chen, C; Lan, M S; Breslin, M B

    2012-12-01

    The INSM1 gene encodes a transcriptional repressor that is exclusively expressed in neuronal and neuroendocrine tissue during embryonic development that is re-activated in neuroendocrine tumors. Using the 1.7 kbp INSM1 promoter, an adenoviral HSV thymidine kinase gene therapy was tested for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. An unforeseen interference on the INSM1 promoter specificity from the adenoviral genome was observed. Attempts were made to protect the INSM1 promoter from the influence of essential adenoviral sequences and to further enhance the tissue specificity of the INSM1 promoter region. Using the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator sequence, we eliminated off-target tissue expression from the Ad-INSM1 promoter-luciferase2 constructs in vivo. In addition, inclusion of two copies of the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (n(AchR)) neuronal-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) reduced nonspecific activation of the INSM1 promoter both in vitro and in vivo. Further, inclusion of both the HS4 insulator with the n(AchR) 2 × NRSE modification showed a two log increase in luciferase activity measured from the NCI-H1155 xenograft tumors compared with the original adenovirus construct. The alterations increase the therapeutic potential of adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven suicide gene therapy for the treatment of a variety of neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:23079673

  19. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  20. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  1. Lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Giry-Laterrière, Marc; Verhoeyen, Els; Salmon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have evolved over the last decade as powerful, reliable, and safe tools for stable gene transfer in a wide variety of mammalian cells. Contrary to other vectors derived from oncoretroviruses, they allow for stable gene delivery into most nondividing primary cells. In particular, lentivectors (LVs) derived from HIV-1 have gradually evolved to display many desirable features aimed at increasing both their safety and their versatility. This is why lentiviral vectors are becoming the most useful and promising tools for genetic engineering, to generate cells that can be used for research, diagnosis, and therapy. This chapter describes protocols and guidelines, for production and titration of LVs, which can be implemented in a research laboratory setting, with an emphasis on standardization in order to improve transposability of results between laboratories. We also discuss latest designs in LV technology.

  2. Infection with an apathogenic fowl adenovirus serotype-1 strain (CELO) prevents adenoviral gizzard erosion in broilers.

    PubMed

    Grafl, Beatrice; Prokofieva, Irina; Wernsdorf, Patricia; Steinborn, Ralf; Hess, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Gizzard erosion in broilers due to an infection with virulent fowl adenovirus serotype 1 (FAdV-1) is an emerging disease. Although experimental studies were performed, a possible prevention strategy was not reported so far. The present study was set up to determine (i) a possible influence of birds' age at time of inoculation on the pathogenicity of a European FAdV-1 field strain (PA7127), (ii) the virulence of a apathogenic FAdV-1 strain (CELO), and (iii) its capability to protect SPF broilers from adenoviral gizzard erosion caused by the field virus. Oral infection of birds with PA7127 at 1-, 10- and 21-days of life, resulted in reduced weight gain compared to non-infected birds, with significance for birds infected at day-old. Independent of the birds' age at time of inoculation, clinical signs appearing approximately one week after challenge coincided with gizzard lesions. Birds infected exclusively with CELO at the first day of life did not show any clinical signs or pathological changes in the gizzard, confirming the apathogenicity of this European FAdV-1. A similar result was obtained for birds orally infected at the first day of life with CELO and challenged three weeks later with the pathogenic PA7127 strain. Therefore, complete protection of adenoviral gizzard erosion in broilers by vaccination of day-old birds could be demonstrated for the first time, although virus excretion was detected post challenge. Establishment of an amplification refractory mutation system quantitative PCR (ARMS-qPCR) facilitated the identification of the FAdV-1 strain and presence of challenges virus was confirmed in one sample.

  3. Group V and X secretory phospholipase A2 prevents adenoviral infection in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuishi, Michiko; Masuda, Seiko; Kudo, Ichiro; Murakami, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2) enzymes have been implicated in various biological events, yet their precise physiological functions remain largely unresolved. In the present study we show that group V and X sPLA2s, which are two potent plasma membrane-acting sPLA2s, are capable of preventing host cells from being infected with an adenovirus. Bronchial epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts pre-expressing group V and X sPLA2s showed marked resistance to adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in a manner dependent on their catalytic activity. Although adenovirus particles were insensitive to recombinant group V and X sPLA2s, direct addition of these enzymes to 293A cells suppressed both number and size of adenovirus plaque formation. Group V and X sPLA2s retarded the entry of adenovirus into endosomes. Moreover, adenoviral infection was suppressed by LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine), a membrane-hydrolytic product of these sPLA2s. Thus hydrolysis of the plasma membrane by these sPLA2s may eventually lead to the protection of host cells from adenovirus entry. Given that group V and X sPLA2s are expressed in human airway epithelium and macrophages and that the expression of endogenous group V sPLA2 is upregulated by virus-related stimuli in these cells, our present results raise the possibility that group V and X sPLA2s may play a role in innate immunity against adenoviral infection in the respiratory tract. PMID:16146426

  4. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  5. 35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE BOILER SHOP IS ON THE RIGHT, IN FRONT OF HOT BLAST STOVES. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  6. On fast carry select adders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  7. Carrying Position Influences Infant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A total of 32 3-month-old infants were carried by their mothers in a soft infant carrier designed to place the infants facing either inward or outward. A within-subject comparison found that when infants were carried facing in, they spent significantly more time sleeping, while infants carried facing out were more active. (MDM)

  8. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  9. Comparison of Replication-Competent, First Generation, and Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Eric A.; Nehete, Pramod N.; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Senac, Julien S.; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    All studies using human serotype 5 Adenovirus (Ad) vectors must address two major obstacles: safety and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies. Helper-Dependent (HD) Ads have been proposed as alternative vectors for gene therapy and vaccine development because they have an improved safety profile. To evaluate the potential of HD-Ad vaccines, we compared replication-competent (RC), first-generation (FG) and HD vectors for their ability to induce immune responses in mice. We show that RC-Ad5 and HD-Ad5 vectors generate stronger immune responses than FG-Ad5 vectors. HD-Ad5 vectors gave lower side effects than RC or FG-Ad, producing lower levels of tissue damage and anti-Ad T cell responses. Also, HD vectors have the benefit of being packaged by all subgroup C serotype helper viruses. We found that HD serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6 induce anti-HIV responses equivalently. By using these HD serotypes in heterologous succession we showed that HD vectors can be used to significantly boost anti-HIV immune responses in mice and in FG-Ad5-immune macaques. Since HD vectors have been show to have an increased safety profile, do not possess any Ad genes, can be packaged by multiple serotype helper viruses, and elicit strong anti-HIV immune responses, they warrant further investigation as alternatives to FG vectors as gene-based vaccines. PMID:19333387

  10. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  11. Dilated cardiomyopathy alters the expression patterns of CAR and other adenoviral receptors in human heart.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Kovanen, Petri T; Savontaus, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Gene therapy trials for heart failure have demonstrated the key role of efficient gene transfer in achieving therapeutic efficacy. An attractive approach to improve adenoviral gene transfer is to use alternative virus serotypes with modified tropism. We performed a detailed analysis of cardiac expression of receptors for several adenovirus serotypes with a focus on differential expression of CAR and CD46, as adenoviruses targeting these receptors have been used in various applications. Explanted hearts from patients with DCM and healthy donors were analyzed using Q-RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Q-RT-PCR and Western analyses revealed robust expression of all receptors except CD80 in normal hearts with lower expression levels in DCM. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that CD46 expression was somewhat higher than CAR both in normal and DCM hearts with highest levels of expression in intramyocardial coronary vessels. Total CAR expression was upregulated in DCM. Triple staining on these vessels demonstrated that both CAR and CD46 were confined to the subendothelial layer in normal hearts. The situation was clearly different in DCM, where both CAR and CD46 were expressed by endothelial cells. The induction of expression of CAR and CD46 by endothelial cells in DCM suggests that viruses targeting these receptors could more easily gain entry to heart cells after intravascular administration. This finding thus has potential implications for the development of targeted gene therapy for heart failure.

  12. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  13. Adeno-associated virus protects the retinoblastoma family of proteins from adenoviral-induced functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Shammas, Masood A; Wang, Jing Yi; Freeman, John; Rosen, Nancy; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2002-05-15

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to inhibit virally mediated oncogenic transformation. One of the early events of adenovirus (Ad) infection is the functional inactivation of cell cycle regulatory retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins, which consists of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), p107, and p130. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of anti-oncogenic properties of AAV, we studied the effects of AAV expression on these proteins in cells infected with Ad. Western blot analysis showed that AAV interferes with the adenoviral-induced degradation and hyperphosphorylation of the pRB family of proteins in normal human fibroblasts as well as in HeLa and 293 cell lines. RNase protection assay showed enhanced expression of pocket protein gene by AAV expression. We also demonstrate that Rep proteins, the major AAV regulatory proteins, bind to E1A, the immediate early gene of Ad responsible for hyperphosphorylation and dissociation of pRB-E2F complex. This binding of AAV Rep proteins to E1A leads to decreased association between E1A and pRB leading to protection of pocket proteins from degradation, decreased expression of S phase genes and inhibition of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activity of AAV against Ad is mediated, at least in part, by effects of AAV Rep proteins on the Rb family of proteins.

  14. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J.; Chester, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCARlow/EGFRhigh cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Mariana Santos de; Rodrigues, William Costa; Barbosa, Glaucia; Trilles, Luciana; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Silva, Manuela da

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis) positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants) found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus. PMID:22666855

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Mariana Santos de; Rodrigues, William Costa; Barbosa, Glaucia; Trilles, Luciana; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Silva, Manuela da

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis) positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants) found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus.

  17. Label-free biochemical analytic method for the early detection of adenoviral conjunctivitis using human tear biofluids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Moon, Sung Woon; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk; Jin, Kyung-Hyun

    2014-11-18

    Cell culture and polymerase chain reaction are currently regarded as the gold standard for adenoviral conjunctivitis diagnosis. They maximize sensitivity and specificity but require several days to 3 weeks to get the results. The aim of this study is to determine the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a stand-alone analytical tool for clinical diagnosis of adenoviral conjunctivitis using human tear fluids. A drop-coating deposition surface enhanced Raman scattering (DCD-SERS) method was identified as the most effective method of proteomic analysis in tear biofluids. The proposed DCD-SERS method (using a 2-μL sample) led to Raman spectra with high reproducibility, noise-independence, and uniformity. Additionally, the spectra were independent of the volume of biofluids used and detection zones, including the ring, middle, and central zone, with the exception of the outer layer of the ring zone. Assessments with an intensity ratio of 1242-1342 cm(-1) achieved 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the central zone. Principal component analysis assessments achieved 0.9453 in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as well as 93.3% sensitivity and 94.5% specificity in the central zone. Multi-Gaussian peak assessments showed that the differences between these two groups resulted from the reduction of the amide III α-helix structures of the proteins. The presence of adenovirus in tear fluids could be detected more accurately in the center of the sample than in the periphery. The DCD-SERS technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of adenoviral conjunctivitis. Therefore, we are hopeful that the DCD-SERS method will be approved for use in ophthalmological clinics in the near future.

  18. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs.

  19. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs. PMID:26026665

  20. A novel adenovirus vector for easy cloning in the E3 region downstream of the CMV promoter.

    PubMed

    Mailly, Laurent; Boulade-Ladame, Charlotte; Orfanoudakis, Georges; Deryckere, François

    2008-01-01

    The construction of expression vectors derived from the human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5), usually based on homologous recombination, is time consuming as a shuttle plasmid has to be selected before recombination with the viral genome. Here, we describe a method allowing direct cloning of a transgene in the E3 region of the Ad5 genome already containing the immediate early CMV promoter upstream of three unique restriction sites. This allowed the construction of recombinant adenoviral genomes in just one step, reducing considerably the time of selection and, of course, production of the corresponding vectors. Using this vector, we produced recombinant adenoviruses, each giving high-level expression of the transgene in the transduced cells. PMID:18538014

  1. Hybrid Nonviral/Viral Vector Systems for Improved piggyBac DNA Transposon In Vivo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Ashley L; Singh, Brajesh K; Sinn, Patrick L

    2015-01-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is a potential therapeutic agent for multiple genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Recombinant piggyBac transposon and transposase are typically codelivered by plasmid transfection; however, plasmid delivery is inefficient in somatic cells in vivo and is a barrier to the therapeutic application of transposon-based vector systems. Here, we investigate the potential for hybrid piggyBac/viral vectors to transduce cells and support transposase-mediated genomic integration of the transposon. We tested both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as transposon delivery vehicles. An Ad vector expressing hyperactive insect piggyBac transposase (iPB7) was codelivered. We show transposase-dependent transposition activity and mapped integrations in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo from each viral vector platform. We also demonstrate efficient and persistent transgene expression following nasal delivery of piggyBac/viral vectors to mice. Furthermore, using piggyBac/Ad expressing Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), we show persistent correction of chloride current in well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells derived from CF patients. Combining the emerging technologies of DNA transposon-based vectors with well-studied adenoviral and AAV delivery provides new tools for in vivo gene transfer and presents an exciting opportunity to increase the delivery efficiency for therapeutic genes such as CFTR. PMID:25557623

  2. Enhanced Prostacyclin Synthesis by Adenoviral Gene Transfer Reduced Glial Activation and Ameliorated Dopaminergic Dysfunction in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng; Yu, Nien-Chu; Liou, Dann-Ying; Kuo, Fu-San; Huang, Ming-Chao; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Tam, Kabik; Shyue, Song-Kun; Cheng, Henrich

    2013-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2), a potent vasodilator and platelet antiaggregatory eicosanoid, is cytoprotective in cerebral circulation. It is synthesized from arachidonic acid (AA) by the sequential action of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 1 or 2 and prostacyclin synthase (PGIS). Because prostacyclin is unstable in vivo, PGI2 analogs have been developed and demonstrated to protect against brain ischemia. This work attempts to selectively augment PGI2 synthesis in mixed glial culture or in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by direct adenoviral gene transfer of prostacyclin biosynthetic enzymes and examines whether it confers protection in cultures or in vivo. Confluent mixed glial cultures actively metabolized exogenous AA into PGE2 and PGD2. These PGs were largely NS398 sensitive and considered as COX-2 products. Gene transfer of AdPGIS to the cultures effectively shunted the AA catabolism to prostacyclin synthesis and concurrently reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, PGIS overexpression significantly reduced LPS stimulation in cultures. In vivo, adenoviral gene transfer of bicistronic COX-1/PGIS to substantia nigra protected 6-OHDA- induced dopamine depletion and ameliorated behavioral deficits. Taken together, this study shows that enhanced prostacyclin synthesis reduced glial activation and ameliorated motor dysfunction in hemiparkinsonian rats. Prostacyclin may have a neuroprotective role in modulating the inflammatory response in degenerating nigra-striatal pathway. PMID:23691265

  3. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  4. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, A; Monti, M G; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, P N; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2006-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the beta-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) handling, oxygen consumption, and beta-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca(2+) handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca(2+)-force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6+/-0.2 versus 2.7+/-0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca(2+) available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca(2+) responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca(2+)-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca(2+)-force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. beta-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1

  5. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  6. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF ADENOVIRAL TRANSDUCTION OF AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR POSITIVE CELL LINE WITH AN MMTV-LUC REPORTER FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standardization and Validation of Adenoviral Transduction of an Androgen Receptor Positive Cell Line with an MMTV-Luc Reporter for Endocrine Screening P. Hartig, K . Bobseine,
    M. Cardon, C. Lambright and L. E. Gray, Jr. USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC...

  7. Targeting adeno-associated virus and adenoviral gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Gang; Huang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Bu-Yun; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) heavily endangers human heath worldwide. HCC is one of most frequent cancers in China because patients with liver disease, such as chronic hepatitis, have the highest cancer susceptibility. Traditional therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy in advanced liver cancer, and novel strategies are urgently needed to improve the limited treatment options for HCC. This review summarizes the basic knowledge, current advances, and future challenges and prospects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and adenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy of HCC. This paper also reviews the clinical trials of gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, immunotherapy, toxicity and immunological barriers for AAV and adenoviruses, and proposes several alternative strategies to overcome the therapeutic barriers to using AAV and adenoviruses as vectors. PMID:26755879

  8. Targeting adeno-associated virus and adenoviral gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Gang; Huang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Bu-Yun; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) heavily endangers human heath worldwide. HCC is one of most frequent cancers in China because patients with liver disease, such as chronic hepatitis, have the highest cancer susceptibility. Traditional therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy in advanced liver cancer, and novel strategies are urgently needed to improve the limited treatment options for HCC. This review summarizes the basic knowledge, current advances, and future challenges and prospects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and adenoviruses as vectors for gene therapy of HCC. This paper also reviews the clinical trials of gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, immunotherapy, toxicity and immunological barriers for AAV and adenoviruses, and proposes several alternative strategies to overcome the therapeutic barriers to using AAV and adenoviruses as vectors. PMID:26755879

  9. Loren Shriver carries Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the Center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  10. A New Type of Adenovirus Vector That Utilizes Homologous Recombination To Achieve Tumor-Specific Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin; Liang, Min; Ye, Xun; Ni, Shaoheng; Li, Zong-Yi; Ye, Sheng Long; Hu, Fang; Lieber, André

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new class of adenovirus vectors that selectively replicate in tumor cells. The vector design is based on our recent observation that a variety of human tumor cell lines support DNA replication of adenovirus vectors with deletions of the E1A and E1B genes, whereas primary human cells or mouse liver cells in vivo do not. On the basis of this tumor-selective replication, we developed an adenovirus system that utilizes homologous recombination between inverted repeats to mediate precise rearrangements within the viral genome resulting in replication-dependent activation of transgene expression in tumors (Ad.IR vectors). Here, we used this system to achieve tumor-specific expression of adenoviral wild-type E1A in order to enhance viral DNA replication and spread within tumor metastases. In vitro DNA replication and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the mechanism of E1A-enhanced replication of Ad.IR-E1A vectors is efficiently and specifically activated in tumor cells, but not in nontransformed human cells. Systemic application of the Ad.IR-E1A vector into animals with liver metastases achieved transgene expression exclusively in tumors. The number of transgene-expressing tumor cells within metastases increased over time, indicating viral spread. Furthermore, the Ad.IR-E1A vector demonstrated antitumor efficacy in subcutaneous and metastatic models. These new Ad.IR-E1A vectors combine elements that allow for tumor-specific transgene expression, efficient viral replication, and spread in liver metastases after systemic vector application. PMID:12368342

  11. Resistance to aphid vectors of virus disease.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jack H; Stevens, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The majority of plant viruses rely on vectors for their transmission and completion of their life cycle. These vectors comprise a diverse range of life forms including insects, nematodes, and fungi with the most common of these being insects. The geographic range of many of these vectors is continually expanding due to climate change. The viruses that they carry are therefore also expanding their range to exploit novel and naïve plant hosts. There are many forms of naturally occurring vector resistance ranging from broad nonhost resistance to more specific types of inducible resistance. Understanding and exploiting the many and varied forms of natural resistance to virus vectors is therefore extremely important for current and future agricultural production systems. To demonstrate the range and extent of these resistance mechanisms, this chapter will primarily focus on aphids to highlight key developments appropriate to plant-insect-virus interactions. PMID:20965074

  12. Immunogenicity without Efficacy of an Adenoviral Tuberculosis Vaccine in a Stringent Mouse Model for Immunotherapy during Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, S Anisah; Nolan, Scott T; Smith, Cara M R; Bishai, William R; Sadoff, Jerald; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if bacterial persistence during TB drug treatment could be overcome by modulation of host immunity, we adapted a clinically-relevant model developed for the evaluation of new drugs and examined if immunotherapy with two adenoviral vaccines, Ad35-TBS (AERAS-402) and Ad26-TBS, could shorten therapy in mice. Even though immunotherapy resulted in strong splenic IFN-γ responses, no effect on bacterial replication in the lungs was seen. Multiplex assay analysis of lung samples revealed the absence of cytokine augmentation such as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, suggesting that immunization failed to induce immunity in the lungs. In this model, we show that IFN-γ levels were not associated with protection against disease relapse. The results obtained from our study raise questions regarding the traits of protective TB immunity that are relevant for the development of future immunotherapeutic and post-exposure vaccination strategies. PMID:25996375

  13. Immunogenicity without Efficacy of an Adenoviral Tuberculosis Vaccine in a Stringent Mouse Model for Immunotherapy during Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alyahya, S. Anisah; Nolan, Scott T.; Smith, Cara M. R.; Bishai, William R.; Sadoff, Jerald; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if bacterial persistence during TB drug treatment could be overcome by modulation of host immunity, we adapted a clinically-relevant model developed for the evaluation of new drugs and examined if immunotherapy with two adenoviral vaccines, Ad35-TBS (AERAS-402) and Ad26-TBS, could shorten therapy in mice. Even though immunotherapy resulted in strong splenic IFN-γ responses, no effect on bacterial replication in the lungs was seen. Multiplex assay analysis of lung samples revealed the absence of cytokine augmentation such as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, suggesting that immunization failed to induce immunity in the lungs. In this model, we show that IFN-γ levels were not associated with protection against disease relapse. The results obtained from our study raise questions regarding the traits of protective TB immunity that are relevant for the development of future immunotherapeutic and post-exposure vaccination strategies. PMID:25996375

  14. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  15. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  16. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  17. Targeting gene therapy vectors to CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Spear, M A; Herrlinger, U; Rainov, N; Pechan, P; Weissleder, R; Breakefield, X O

    1998-04-01

    Gene therapy offers significant advantages to the field of oncology with the addition of specifically and uniquely engineered mechanisms of halting malignant proliferation through cytotoxicity or reproductive arrest. To confer a true benefit to the therapeutic ratio (the relative toxicity to tumor compared to normal tissue) a vector or the transgene it carries must selectively affect or access tumor cells. Beyond the selective toxicities of many transgene products, which frequently parallel that of contemporary chemotherapeutic agents, lies the potential utility of targeting the vector. This review presents an overview of current and potential methods for designing vectors targeted to CNS malignancies through selective delivery, cell entry, transport or transcriptional regulation. The topic of delivery encompasses physical and pharmaceutic means of increasing the relative exposure of tumors to vector. Cell entry based methodologies are founded on increasing relative uptake of vector through the chemical or recombinant addition of ligand and antibody domains which selectively bind receptors expressed on target cells. Targeted transport involves the potential for using cells to selectively carry vectors or transgenes into tumors. Finally, promoter and enhancer systems are discussed which have potential for selectivity activating transcription to produce targeted transgene expression or vector propagation. PMID:9584951

  18. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  19. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailbala; Nehete, Pramod N.; Yang, Guojun; He, Hong; Nehete, Bharti; Hanley, Patrick W.; Barry, Michael A.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT) cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors. PMID:25553254

  20. Vector adaptive predictive coder for speech and audio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Juin-Hwey (Inventor); Gersho, Allen (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A real-time vector adaptive predictive coder which approximates each vector of K speech samples by using each of M fixed vectors in a first codebook to excite a time-varying synthesis filter and picking the vector that minimizes distortion. Predictive analysis for each frame determines parameters used for computing from vectors in the first codebook zero-state response vectors that are stored at the same address (index) in a second codebook. Encoding of input speech vectors s.sub.n is then carried out using the second codebook. When the vector that minimizes distortion is found, its index is transmitted to a decoder which has a codebook identical to the first codebook of the decoder. There the index is used to read out a vector that is used to synthesize an output speech vector s.sub.n. The parameters used in the encoder are quantized, for example by using a table, and the indices are transmitted to the decoder where they are decoded to specify transfer characteristics of filters used in producing the vector s.sub.n from the receiver codebook vector selected by the vector index transmitted.

  1. Adenoviral Transduction of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase into Neo-Angiogenic Endothelium Radiosensitizes Tumor Cure

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, John D.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; García-Barros, Mónica; Feldman, Regina; Rao, Shyam; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Harats, Dror; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Sadelain, Michel; Kolesnick, Richard

    2013-01-01

    These studies define a new mechanism-based approach to radiosensitize tumor cure by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). Published evidence indicates that SDRT induces acute microvascular endothelial apoptosis initiated via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) translocation to the external plasma membrane. Ensuing microvascular damage regulates radiation lethality of tumor stem cell clonogens to effect tumor cure. Based on this biology, we engineered an ASMase-producing vector consisting of a modified pre-proendothelin-1 promoter, PPE1(3x), and a hypoxia-inducible dual-binding HIF-2α-Ets-1 enhancer element upstream of the asmase gene, inserted into a replication-deficient adenovirus yielding the vector Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase. This vector confers ASMase over-expression in cycling angiogenic endothelium in vitro and within tumors in vivo, with no detectable enhancement in endothelium of normal tissues that exhibit a minute fraction of cycling cells or in non-endothelial tumor or normal tissue cells. Intravenous pretreatment with Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase markedly increases SDRT cure of inherently radiosensitive MCA/129 fibrosarcomas, and converts radiation-incurable B16 melanomas into biopsy-proven tumor cures. In contrast, Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase treatment did not impact radiation damage to small intestinal crypts as non-dividing small intestinal microvessels did not overexpress ASMase and were not radiosensitized. We posit that combination of genetic up-regulation of tumor microvascular ASMase and SDRT provides therapeutic options for currently radiation-incurable human tumors. PMID:23936314

  2. Oncolytic Adenovirus: Strategies and Insights for Vector Design and Immuno-Oncolytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Hulin-Curtis, Sarah; Davies, James; Parker, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used both experimentally and clinically, including oncolytic virotherapy applications. In the clinical area, efficacy is frequently hampered by the high rates of neutralizing immunity, estimated as high as 90% in some populations that promote vector clearance and limit bioavailability for tumor targeting following systemic delivery. Active tumor targeting is also hampered by the ubiquitous nature of the Ad5 receptor, hCAR, as well as the lack of highly tumor-selective targeting ligands and suitable targeting strategies. Furthermore, significant off-target interactions between the viral vector and cellular and proteinaceous components of the bloodstream have been documented that promote uptake into non-target cells and determine dose-limiting toxicities. Novel strategies are therefore needed to overcome the obstacles that prevent efficacious Ad deployment for wider clinical applications. The use of less seroprevalent Ad serotypes, non-human serotypes, capsid pseudotyping, chemical shielding and genetic masking by heterologous peptide incorporation are all potential strategies to achieve efficient vector escape from humoral immune recognition. Conversely, selective vector arming with immunostimulatory agents can be utilized to enhance their oncolytic potential by activation of cancer-specific immune responses against the malignant tissues. This review presents recent advantages and pitfalls occurring in the field of adenoviral oncolytic therapies. PMID:26610547

  3. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  4. Pathogen-Induced Proapoptotic Phenotype and High CD95 (Fas) Expression Accompany a Suboptimal CD8+ T-Cell Response: Reversal by Adenoviral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Bruña–Romero, Oscar; Araújo, Adriano F.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Ersching, Jonatan; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Marcela F.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2012-01-01

    MHC class Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination. PMID:22615561

  5. Geoacoustic inversion using the vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Steven E.

    The main goal of this project was to study the use of the acoustic vector field, separately or in combination with the scalar field, to estimate the depth dependent geoacoustic properties of the seafloor via non-linear inversion. The study was performed in the context of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment 2004 (SAX04) conducted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where a small number of acoustic vector sensors were deployed in close proximity to the seafloor. A variety of acoustic waveforms were transmitted into the seafloor at normal incidence. The acoustic vector sensors were located both above and beneath the seafloor interface where they measured the acoustic pressure and the acoustic particle acceleration. Motion data provided by the buried vector sensors were affected by a suspension response that was sensitive to the mass properties of the sensor, the sediment density and sediment elasticity (e.g., shear wave speed). The suspension response for the buried vector sensors included a resonance within the analysis band of 0.4 to 2.0 kHz. The suspension resonance represented an unknown complex transfer function between the acoustic vector field in the seabed and data representing that field. Therefore, inverse methods developed for this study were required to 1) estimate dynamic properties of the sensor suspension resonance and 2) account for the associated corruption of vector field data. A method to account for the vector sensor suspense response function was integrated directly into the inversion methods such that vector channel data corruption was reduced and an estimate of the shear wave speed in the sediment was returned. Inversions of real and synthetic data sets indicated that information about sediment shear wave speed was carried by the suspension response of the buried sensors, as opposed to being contained inherently within the acoustic vector field.

  6. Vectorization of a Treecode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Junichiro

    1990-03-01

    Vectorized algorithms for the force calculation and tree construction in the Barnes-Hut tree algorithm are described. The basic idea for the vectorization of the force calculation is to vectorize the tree traversal across particles, so that all particles in the system traverse the tree simultaneously. The tree construction algorithm also makes use of the fact that particles can be treated in parallel. Thus these algorithms take advantage of the internal parallelism in the N-body system and the tree algorithm most effectively. As a natural result, these algorithms can be used on a wide range of vector/parallel architectures, including current supercomputers and highly parallel architectures such as the Connection Machine. The vectorized code runs about five times faster than the non-vector code on a Cyber 205 for an N-body system with N = 8192.

  7. Support vector tracking.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Shai

    2004-08-01

    Support Vector Tracking (SVT) integrates the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier into an optic-flow-based tracker. Instead of minimizing an intensity difference function between successive frames, SVT maximizes the SVM classification score. To account for large motions between successive frames, we build pyramids from the support vectors and use a coarse-to-fine approach in the classification stage. We show results of using SVT for vehicle tracking in image sequences.

  8. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes.

  9. Risk Behavior among Women enrolled in a Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine to Prevent HIV Acquisition: the Step Study

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard M.; Metch, Barbara; Buchbinder, Susan; Cabello, Robinson; Donastorg, Yeycy; Figoroa, John-Peter; Adbul-Jauwad, Hend; Joseph, Patrice; Koenig, Ellen; Metzger, David; Sobieszycz, Magda; Tyndall, Mark; Zorilla, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Report of risk behavior, HIV incidence, and pregnancy rates among women participating in the Step Study, a phase IIB trial of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef vaccine in HIV-negative individuals who were at high risk of HIV-1. Design Prospective multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial Methods Women were from North American (NA) and Caribbean and South America (CSA) sites. Risk behavior was collected at screening and 6-month intervals. Differences in characteristics between groups were tested with Chi-square, two-sided Fisher’s exact tests, and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess behavioral change. Results Among 1134 enrolled women, the median number of male partners was 18; 73.8% reported unprotected vaginal sex, 15.9% unprotected anal sex and 10.8% evidence of a sexually transmitted infection in the 6 months prior to baseline. With 3344 person-years (p–y) of follow up, there were 15 incident HIV infections: incidence rate was 0.45 per 100/p-y (95% CI 0.25, 0.74). Crack cocaine use in both regions (relative risk [RR]=2.4 [1.7,3.3]) and in CSA, unprotected anal sex (RR=6.4 [3.8. 10.7]) and drug use (RR=4.1 [2.1, 8.0]) were baseline risk behaviors associated with HIV acquisition. There was a marked reduction in risk behaviors after study enrollment with some recurrence in unprotected vaginal sex. Of 963 non-sterilized women, 304 (31.6%) became pregnant. Conclusions Crack cocaine use and unprotected anal sex are important risk criteria to identify high-risk women for HIV efficacy trials. Pregnancy during the trial was a common occurrence and needs to be considered in trial planning for prevention trials in women. PMID:23807272

  10. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  11. Vector processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.C.; Tjon-Pian-Gi, D.C.; Tucker, S.G.; Zajac, M.W.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes a data processing system comprising: memory means for storing instruction words of operands; a central processing unit (CPU) connected to the memory means for fetching and decoding instructions and controlling execution of instructions, including transfer of operands to and from the memory means, the control of execution of instructions is effected by a CPU clock and microprogram control means connected to the CPU clock for generating periodic execution control signals in synchronism with the CPU clock; vector processing means tightly coupled to the CPU for effecting data processing on vector data; and interconnection means, connecting the CPU and the vector processing means, including operand transfer lines for transfer of vector data between the CPU and the vector processing means, control lines, status lines for signalling conditions of the vector processor means to the CPU, and a vector timing signal line connected to one of the execution control signals from the microprogram control means, whereby the vector processing means receives periodic execution control signals at the clock rate and is synchronized with the CPU clock on a clock pulse by clock pulse basis during execution of instructions.

  12. Strain-dependent and distinctive T-cell responses to HIV antigens following immunisation of mice with differing chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors.

    PubMed

    Herath, S; Le Heron, A; Colloca, S; Patterson, S; Tatoud, R; Weber, J; Dickson, G

    2016-08-17

    In vivo vaccination studies are conventionally conducted in a single mouse strain with results, only reflecting responses to a single immunogenetic background. We decided to examine the immune response to an HIV transgene (gag, pol and nef fusion protein) in 3 strains of mice (CBA, C57BL/6 and BALB/c) to determine the spectrum of responses and in addition to determine whether the serotype of the adenoviral vector used (ChAd3 and ChAd63) impacted the outcome of response. Our results demonstrated that all three strains of mice responded to the transgene and that the magnitude of responses were different between the strains. The C57BL/6 strain showed the lowest range of responses compared to the other strains and, very few responses were seen to the same peptide pool in all three strains of mice. In CBA and BALB/c mice there were significant differences in IFNγ production dependent on the adenoviral vector used. Our results suggest that employing a single strain of mouse may underestimate the efficacy and efficiency of vaccine products. PMID:27452864

  13. Integration Profile and Safety of an Adenovirus Hybrid-Vector Utilizing Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase for Somatic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Muck-Hausl, Martin; Wang, Jichang; Sun, Chuanbo; Gebbing, Maren; Miskey, Csaba; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvak, Zsuzsanna; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We found that in all mice which received the hyperactive SB transposase, transgene expression levels were stabilized in a dose-dependent manner and that the highest vector dose was accompanied by fatalities in mice. To analyze potential genotoxic side-effects due to somatic integration into host chromosomes, we performed a genome-wide integration site analysis using linker-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) and linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR). Analysis of genomic DNA samples obtained from HSB5 treated female and male mice revealed a total of 1327 unique transposition events. Overall the chromosomal distribution pattern was close-to-random and we observed a random integration profile with respect to integration into gene and non-gene areas. Notably, when using the LM-PCR protocol, 27 extra-chromosomal integration events were identified, most likely caused by transposon excision and subsequent transposition into the delivered adenoviral vector genome. In total, this study provides a careful evaluation of the safety profile of adenovirus/Sleeping Beauty transposase hybrid-vectors. The obtained information will be useful when designing future preclinical studies utilizing hybrid-vectors in small and large animal models. PMID:24124483

  14. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  15. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  16. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  17. Vector generator scan converter

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1990-04-17

    This patent describes high printing speeds for graphics data that are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  18. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  19. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  20. Therapeutic angiogenesis due to balanced single-vector delivery of VEGF and PDGF-BB

    PubMed Central

    Banfi, Andrea; von Degenfeld, Georges; Gianni-Barrera, Roberto; Reginato, Silvia; Merchant, Milton J.; McDonald, Donald M.; Blau, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis by delivery of vascular growth factors is an attractive strategy for treating debilitating occlusive vascular diseases, yet clinical trials have thus far failed to show efficacy. As a result, limb amputation remains a common outcome for muscle ischemia due to severe atherosclerotic disease, with an overall incidence of 100 per million people in the United States per year. A challenge has been that the angiogenic master regulator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces dysfunctional vessels, if expressed outside of a narrow dosage window. We tested the hypothesis that codelivery of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), which recruits pericytes, could induce normal angiogenesis in skeletal muscle irrespective of VEGF levels. Coexpression of VEGF and PDGF-BB encoded by separate vectors in different cells or in the same cells only partially corrected aberrant angiogenesis. In marked contrast, coexpression of both factors in every cell at a fixed relative level via a single bicistronic vector led to robust, uniformly normal angiogenesis, even when VEGF expression was high and heterogeneous. Notably, in an ischemic hindlimb model, single-vector expression led to efficient growth of collateral arteries, revascularization, increased blood flow, and reduced tissue damage. Furthermore, these results were confirmed in a clinically applicable gene therapy approach by adenoviral-mediated delivery of the bicistronic vector. We conclude that coordinated expression of VEGF and PDGF-BB via a single vector constitutes a novel strategy for harnessing the potency of VEGF to induce safe and efficacious angiogenesis.—Banfi, A., von Degenfeld, G., Gianni-Barrera, R., Reginato, S., Merchant, M. J., McDonald, D. M., Blau, H. M. Therapeutic angiogenesis due to balanced single-vector delivery of VEGF and PDGF-BB. PMID:22391130

  1. Potent antitumor immunity generated by a CD40-targeted adenoviral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hangalapura, Basav N; Oosterhoff, Dinja; de Groot, Jan; Boon, Louis; Tüting, Thomas; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Beusechem, Victor W; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2011-09-01

    In situ delivery of tumor-associated antigen (TAA) genes into dendritic cells (DC) has great potential as a generally applicable tumor vaccination approach. Although adenoviruses (Ad) are an attractive vaccine vehicle in this regard, Ad-mediated transduction of DCs is hampered by the lack of expression of the Ad receptor CAR on the DC surface. DC activation also requires interaction of CD40 with its ligand CD40L to generate protective T-cell-mediated tumor immunity. Therefore, to create a strategy to target Ads to DCs in vivo, we constructed a bispecific adaptor molecule with the CAR ectodomain linked to the CD40L extracellular domain via a trimerization motif (CFm40L). By targeting Ad to CD40 with the use of CFm40L, we enhanced both transduction and maturation of cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. Moreover, we improved transduction efficiency of DCs in lymph node and splenic cell suspensions in vitro and in skin and vaccination site-draining lymph nodes in vivo. Furthermore, CD40 targeting improved the induction of specific CD8(+) T cells along with therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of melanoma. Taken together, our findings support the use of CD40-targeted Ad vectors encoding full-length TAA for in vivo targeting of DCs and high-efficacy induction of antitumor immunity.

  2. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production

    PubMed Central

    Carinhas, Nuno; Pais, Daniel A. M.; Koshkin, Alexey; Fernandes, Paulo; Coroadinha, Ana S.; Carrondo, Manuel J. T.; Alves, Paula M.; Teixeira, Ana P.

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamine, we apply for the first time 13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells metabolism during growth and CAV2 production. MDCK cells displayed a marked glycolytic and ammoniagenic metabolism, and 13C data revealed a large fraction of glutamine-derived labelling in TCA cycle intermediates, emphasizing the role of glutamine anaplerosis. 13C-MFA demonstrated the importance of pyruvate cycling in balancing glycolytic and TCA cycle activities, as well as occurrence of reductive alphaketoglutarate (AKG) carboxylation. By turn, CAV2 infection significantly upregulated fluxes through most central metabolism, including glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway, glutamine anaplerosis and, more prominently, reductive AKG carboxylation and cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A formation, suggestive of increased lipogenesis. Based on these results, we suggest culture supplementation strategies to stimulate nucleic acid and lipid biosynthesis for improved canine adenoviral vector production. PMID:27004747

  3. Polycistronic viral vectors.

    PubMed

    de Felipe, P

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, vectors for gene transfer/therapy experiments were mono- or bicistronic. In the latter case, vectors express the gene of interest coupled with a marker gene. An increasing demand for more complex polycistronic vectors has arisen in recent years to obtain complex gene transfer/therapy effects. In particular, this demand is stimulated by the hope of a more powerful effect from combined gene therapy than from single gene therapy in a process whose parallels lie in the multi-drug combined therapies for cancer or AIDS. In the 1980's we had only splicing signals and internal promoters to construct such vectors: now a new set of biotechnological tools enables us to design new and more reliable bicistronic and polycistronic vectors. This article focuses on the description and comparison of the strategies for co-expression of two genes in bicistronic vectors, from the oldest to the more recently described: internal promoters, splicing, reinitiation, IRES, self-processing peptides (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A), proteolytic cleavable sites (e.g. fusagen) and fusion of genes. I propose a classification of these strategies based upon either the use of multiple transcripts (with transcriptional mechanisms), or single transcripts (using translational/post-translational mechanisms). I also examine the different attempts to utilize these strategies in the construction of polycistronic vectors and the main problems encountered. Several potential uses of these polycistronic vectors, both in basic research and in therapy-focused applications, are discussed. The importance of the study of viral gene expression strategies and the need to transfer this knowledge to vector design is highlighted.

  4. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  5. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  6. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... and such practices can be expected to have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in...

  7. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  8. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  9. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  10. Biophysical characterization of the DNA binding and condensing properties of adenoviral core peptide mu.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael; Tagawa, Toshiaki; Preuss, Monika; Miller, Andrew D

    2002-01-15

    Cationic peptides containing Lys and Arg residues interact with DNA via charge-charge interactions and are known to play an important role in DNA charge neutralization and condensation processes. In this paper, we describe investigations of the interaction of the cationic adenovirus core complex peptide mu with a dodecameric ODN (12 bp) and pDNA (7528 bp) using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and photon correlation spectroscopy. Comparisons are made with protamine, a cationic peptide well-known for DNA charge neutralization and condensation. Equilibrium dissociation constants are derived independently by both CD and ITC methods for the interaction between protamine or mu with pDNA (K(d) = 0.6-1 microM). Thermodynamic data are also obtained by ITC, indicating strong charge-charge interactions. The interaction of protamine with pDNA takes place with decreasing entropy (-28.7 cal mol(-1) K(-1)); unusually, the interaction of mu with pDNA takes place with increasing entropy (Delta S degrees (bind) = 11.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1)). Although protamine and mu appear to destabilize pDNA double helix character to similar extents, according to CD thermal titration analyses, PCS studies show that interactions between mu and pDNA result in the formation of significantly more size-stable condensed particles than protamine. The enhanced flexibility and size stability of mu-DNA (MD) particles (80-110 nm) compared to protamine counterparts suggest that MD particles are ideal for use as a part of new nonviral gene delivery vectors.

  11. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  12. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  13. Carry it on the bad side!

    PubMed

    Tan, V; Klotz, M J; Greenwald, A S; Steinberg, M E

    1998-10-01

    Patients with diseased hips often must carry objects while walking, yet they are rarely instructed which hand to use because little has been published on the subject. We sought to evaluate the situation mathematically by determining the hip forces that result when a load is carried in the ipsilateral versus the contralateral hand. Using a free-body diagram of single-leg supported stance, we found that when a load was carried in the contralateral hand, the resultant forces on the hip were increased considerably. Conversely, when the weight was carried in the ipsilateral hand, the forces were actually lower than when no weight was carried at all. Thus, carrying a weight on the opposite side resulted in hip forces that were substantially greater than when the weight was carried on the same side. PMID:9796709

  14. Peri- and Postnatal Effects of Prenatal Adenoviral VEGF Gene Therapy in Growth-Restricted Sheep.

    PubMed

    Carr, David J; Wallace, Jacqueline M; Aitken, Raymond P; Milne, John S; Martin, John F; Zachary, Ian C; Peebles, Donald M; David, Anna L

    2016-06-01

    Uterine artery (UtA) adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances uterine blood flow in normal sheep pregnancy and increases fetal growth in the overnourished adolescent sheep model of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Herein, we examined its impact on gestation length, neonatal survival, early postnatal growth and metabolism. Singleton-bearing ewes were evenly allocated to receive Ad.VEGF-A165 (5 × 10(10) particles/ml, 10 ml, n = 17) or saline (10 ml, n = 16) injected into each UtA at laparotomy (0.6 gestation). Fetal growth was serially monitored (blind) by ultrasound until delivery. Lambs were weighed and blood was sampled weekly and a glucose tolerance test performed (68-day postnatal age). Hepatic DNA/RNA was extracted at necropsy (83-day postnatal age) to examine methylation status of eight somatotropic axis genes. IGF1 mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. All pregnancies remained viable following Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. Fetal abdominal circumference and renal volume were greater in the Ad.VEGF-A165 group compared with the saline group at 21/28 days (P ≤ 0.04) postinjection. At delivery, gestation length (P = 0.07), lamb birthweight (P = 0.08), umbilical girth (P = 0.06), and plasma glucose (P = 0.09) tended to be greater in Ad.VEGF-A165-treated lambs. Levels of neonatal intervention required to ensure survival was equivalent between groups. Absolute postnatal growth rate (P = 0.02), insulin area under the curve (P = 0.04) and carcass weight at necropsy (P = 0.04) were increased by Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. There was no impact on markers of insulin sensitivity or methylation/expression of key genes involved in somatic growth. Ad.VEGF-A165 gene therapy increased fetal growth in a sheep FGR model, and lambs continued to thrive during the neonatal and early postnatal period. PMID:27103444

  15. Peri- and Postnatal Effects of Prenatal Adenoviral VEGF Gene Therapy in Growth-Restricted Sheep.

    PubMed

    Carr, David J; Wallace, Jacqueline M; Aitken, Raymond P; Milne, John S; Martin, John F; Zachary, Ian C; Peebles, Donald M; David, Anna L

    2016-06-01

    Uterine artery (UtA) adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances uterine blood flow in normal sheep pregnancy and increases fetal growth in the overnourished adolescent sheep model of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Herein, we examined its impact on gestation length, neonatal survival, early postnatal growth and metabolism. Singleton-bearing ewes were evenly allocated to receive Ad.VEGF-A165 (5 × 10(10) particles/ml, 10 ml, n = 17) or saline (10 ml, n = 16) injected into each UtA at laparotomy (0.6 gestation). Fetal growth was serially monitored (blind) by ultrasound until delivery. Lambs were weighed and blood was sampled weekly and a glucose tolerance test performed (68-day postnatal age). Hepatic DNA/RNA was extracted at necropsy (83-day postnatal age) to examine methylation status of eight somatotropic axis genes. IGF1 mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. All pregnancies remained viable following Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. Fetal abdominal circumference and renal volume were greater in the Ad.VEGF-A165 group compared with the saline group at 21/28 days (P ≤ 0.04) postinjection. At delivery, gestation length (P = 0.07), lamb birthweight (P = 0.08), umbilical girth (P = 0.06), and plasma glucose (P = 0.09) tended to be greater in Ad.VEGF-A165-treated lambs. Levels of neonatal intervention required to ensure survival was equivalent between groups. Absolute postnatal growth rate (P = 0.02), insulin area under the curve (P = 0.04) and carcass weight at necropsy (P = 0.04) were increased by Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. There was no impact on markers of insulin sensitivity or methylation/expression of key genes involved in somatic growth. Ad.VEGF-A165 gene therapy increased fetal growth in a sheep FGR model, and lambs continued to thrive during the neonatal and early postnatal period.

  16. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  17. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Dias, Joao D.; Nokisalmi, Petri; Sloniecka, Marta; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Rajecki, Mari; Dobner, Thomas; Tenhunen, Mikko; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Ahtiainen, Laura Ph.D.; Hemminki, Akseli

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  18. INSM1 promoter-driven adenoviral herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase cancer gene therapy for the treatment of primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Breslin, Mary B; Chen, Chiachen; Akerstrom, Victoria; Zhong, Qiu; Lan, Michael S

    2009-11-01

    The INSM1 gene encodes a developmentally regulated zinc finger transcription factor. INSM1 expression is normally absent in adult tissues, but is reactivated in neuroendocrine tumor cells. In the present study, we analyzed the therapeutic potential of an adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) construct in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs). We constructed an adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven HSV-tk gene for therapy in PNETs. The PNET-specific adeno-INSM1 promoter HSV-tk construct was tested both in vitro and in vivo in a nude mouse tumor model. Northern blot analysis and transient transfection of an INSM1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene indicated that the INSM1 promoter was active in neuroblastoma (IMR-32), retinoblastoma (Y79), and medulloblastoma (D283 Med) cells, but not in glioblastoma (U-87 MG) cells. After Ad-INSM1p-HSV-tk infection, the levels of HSV-tk protein expression were consistent with INSM1 promoter activities. Furthermore, in vitro multiplicity of infection and ganciclovir (GCV) sensitivity studies indicated that the INSM1 promoter could mediate specific expression of the HSV-tk gene and selective killing of INSM1-positive PNETs. In vivo intratumoral adenoviral delivery demonstrated that the INSM1 promoter could direct HSV-tk gene expression in a nude mouse tumor model and effectively repressed tumor growth in response to GCV treatment. Taken together, our data show that the INSM1 promoter is specific and effective for targeted cancer gene therapy in PNETs. PMID:19604042

  19. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  20. Genomic DNA damage and ATR-Chk1 signaling determine oncolytic adenoviral efficacy in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Claire M.; Shibata, Atsushi; Tookman, Laura A.; Archibald, Kyra M.; Flak, Magdalena B.; Pirlo, Katrina J.; Lockley, Michelle; Wheatley, Sally P.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate selectively within and lyse malignant cells. As such, they are being developed as anticancer therapeutics. However, the sensitivity of ovarian cancers to adenovirus cytotoxicity varies greatly, even in cells of similar infectivity. Using both the adenovirus E1A-CR2 deletion mutant dl922-947 and WT adenovirus serotype 5 in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines that cover a 3-log range of sensitivity, we observed profound overreplication of genomic DNA only in highly sensitive cell lines. This was associated with the presence of extensive genomic DNA damage. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related checkpoint kinase 1 (ATR-Chk1), but not ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), promoted genomic DNA damage and overreplication in resistant and partially sensitive cells. This was accompanied by increased adenovirus cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. We also demonstrated that Cdc25A was upregulated in highly sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines after adenovirus infection and was stabilized after loss of Chk1 activity. Knockdown of Cdc25A inhibited virus-induced DNA damage in highly sensitive cells and blocked the effects of Chk1 inhibition in resistant cells. Finally, inhibition of Chk1 decreased homologous recombination repair of virus-induced genomic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, virus-induced host cell DNA damage signaling and repair are key determinants of oncolytic adenoviral activity, and promoting unscheduled DNA synthesis and/or impeding homologous recombination repair could potentiate the effects of oncolytic adenoviruses in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:21383502

  1. A novel CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in adenoviral E1A protein regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Olson, Melissa V; Medrano, Diana R; Lee, Ok-Hee; Xu, Jing; Piao, Yuji; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yung, W K Alfred; Fueyo, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Adenoviral E1A is a versatile protein that can reprogram host cells for efficient viral replication. The nuclear import of E1A is mediated by a nuclear localization signal; however, whether E1A can be actively exported from the nucleus is unknown. We first reported a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES) in E1A that is conserved in the group C adenoviruses. We showed that CRM1 and E1A coimmunoprecipitated and that blockage of CRM1 function by leptomycin B or small interfering RNA resulted in the nuclear localization of E1A. Through mutational analyses, we identified an active canonical NES element within the E1A protein spanning amino acids 70-80. We further demonstrated that phosphorylation of adjacent serine (S)89 resulted in the cytoplasmic accumulation of E1A. Interestingly, coincident with the accumulation of cells in the S/G2/M phase and histone H1 phosphorylation, E1A was relocated to the cytoplasm at the late stage of the viral cycle, which was blocked by the CDC2/CDK2 inhibitor roscovitine. Importantly, titration of the progenies of the viruses in infected cells showed that the replication efficiency of the NES mutant adenovirus was up to 500-fold lower than that of the wild-type adenovirus. Collectively, our data demonstrate the existence of a NES in E1A that is modulated by the phosphorylation of the S89 residue and the NES plays a role for an efficient viral replication in the host cells.

  2. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  3. The effect of adenovirus-specific antibodies on adenoviral vector–induced, transgene product–specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Small, Juliana C.; Haut, Larissa H.; Bian, Ang; Ertl, Hildegund C. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of neutralizing Abs to different serotypes of E1-deleted Ad vectors on the immunogenicity of the homologous Ad vector or a vector derived from a heterologous serotype. Our results showed that, as expected, even low titers of passively transferred neutralizing Abs significantly reduced the homologous vectors' ability to elicit transgene-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In addition, Abs changed the fate of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells by promoting their transition into the central memory cell pool, which resulted in markedly enhanced expansion of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells after a boost with a heterologous Ad vector. Non-neutralizing Abs specific to a distinct Ad serotype had no effect on the magnitude of transgene product-specific CD8+ T cells induced by a heterologous Ad vector, nor did such Abs promote induction of more resting memory CD8+ T cells. These results show that Abs to an Ad vaccine carrier affect not only the magnitude but also the profile of a vector-induced CD8+ T cell response. PMID:25082150

  4. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  5. Safety Profile of Gutless Adenovirus Vectors Delivered into the Normal Brain Parenchyma: Implications for a Glioma Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam Muhammad, A.K.M.; Xiong, Weidong; Puntel, Mariana; Farrokhi, Catherine; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Liu, Chunyan; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviral vectors (Ads) have been evaluated in clinical trials for glioma. However, systemic immunity against the vectors can hamper therapeutic efficacy. We demonstrated that combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy provides long-term survival in preclinical glioma models. Because helper-dependent high-capacity Ads (HC-Ads) elicit sustained transgene expression, in the presence of antiadenoviral immunity, we engineered HC-Ads encoding conditional cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase and immunostimulatory cytokine Fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand-3 under the control of the TetOn system. Escalating doses of combined HC-Ads (1×108, 1×109, and 1×1010 viral particles [VP]) were delivered into the rat brain. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points after vector delivery. Histopathological analysis did not reveal any evidence of toxicity or long-term inflammation at the lower doses tested. Vector genomes were restricted to the injection site. Serum chemistry did not uncover adverse systemic side effects at any of the doses tested. Taken together, our data indicate that doses of up to 1×109 VP of each HC-Ad can be safely administered into the normal brain. This comprehensive toxicity and biodistribution study will lay the foundations for implementation of a phase 1 clinical trial for GBM using HC-Ads. PMID:22950971

  6. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... factors, such as soil type, elevation, and topography, result in a significant difference of carrying... management and maintenance practices are improvements over those practices generally associated with...

  7. Molecular epidemiology of adenoviral conjunctivitis in Sapporo, Japan, and Manila, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Aoki, K; Kawana, R; Matsumoto, I; Shinagawa, M; Guo, D F; Fajardo, R V

    1987-01-01

    DNA restriction endonuclease analysis was carried out on 48 adenovirus isolates from the conjunctival swabs of patients with acute conjunctivitis. Samples were obtained in Sapporo, Japan, and Manila, the Philippines, from October 1983 to October 1984. We identified new genomic variants among the isolates of Ad3 in Sapporo, and Ad4 and Ad11 in Manila, and these were designated as Ad3f, Ad4b, Ad11a and Ad11b, respectively. Ad7 isolates in Manila were identical to Ad7b reported by Wadell et al. In Sapporo, no Ad7 was isolated during the period of this study. One isolate in Sapporo, which was neutralized by both Ad34 and Ad35 antisera, showed identical restriction patterns to Ad35 prototype strain (Holden) with SmaI, BamHI and HpaI. However, with HindIII, the pattern was identical to that of Ad34 prototype strain (Compton). This isolate was tentatively designated as Ad34/35. Ad8 isolates in Sapporo were identical to Ad8B detected there from 1977 to 1981, while Ad8 isolates in Manila were prototype (Trim) strains. In both cities Ad19 isolates were all identical to Ad19a and Ad37 isolates were all prototype (GW). Genomic variants of Ad isolates in both cities are as follows: (Table: see text). PMID:2834591

  8. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  9. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaty, B J; Bishop, D H

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of bunyaviruses have been applied to understanding bunyavirus-vector interactions. Such approaches have revealed which virus gene and gene products are important in establishing infections in vectors and in transmission of viruses. However, much more information is required to understand the molecular mechanisms of persistent infections of vectors which are lifelong but apparently exert no untoward effect. In fact, it seems remarkable that LAC viral antigen can be detected in almost every cell in an ovarian follicle, yet no untoward effect on fecundity and no teratology is seen. Similarly the lifelong infection of the vector would seem to provide ample opportunity for bunyavirus evolution by genetic drift and, under the appropriate circumstances, by segment reassortment. The potential for bunyavirus evolution by segment reassortment in vectors certainly exists. For example the Group C viruses in a small forest in Brazil seem to constitute a gene pool, with the 6 viruses related alternately by HI/NT and CF reactions, which assay respectively M RNA and S RNA gene products (Casals and Whitman, 1960; Shope and Causey, 1962). Direct evidence for naturally occurring reassortant bunyaviruses has also been obtained. Oligonucleotide fingerprint analyses of field isolates of LAC virus and members of the Patois serogroup of bunyaviruses have demonstrated that reassortment does occur in nature (El Said et al., 1979; Klimas et al., 1981; Ushijima et al., 1981). Determination of the genotypic frequencies of viruses selected by the biological interactions of viruses and vectors after dual infection and segment reassortment is an important issue. Should a virus result that efficiently interacts with alternate vector species, the virus could be expressed in different circumstances with serious epidemiologic consequences. Dual infection of vectors with different viruses is not unlikely, because many bunyaviruses are sympatric in

  10. Weapon-Carrying and Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Randy M.; Hammermeister, Jon

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence of weapon-carrying among adolescents, focusing on the reasons why they carry weapons, ways that firearms are obtained, firearms and violence, and the controlling of weapons in schools. Details weapon-security measures and argues for cooperative action among schools, communities, and government. (RJM)

  11. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and information…

  12. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  13. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  14. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  15. Identification of a Novel Immunodominant HLA-B*07: 02-restricted Adenoviral Peptide Epitope and Its Potential in Adoptive Transfer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Faist, Benjamin; Kayser, Simone; Hartl, Lena; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Stevanović, Stefan; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients, particularly following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are associated with morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of hexon-specific and penton-specific T cells has been successfully applied, but many approaches are impeded by the low number of HLA class I-restricted adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. We use a novel method to identify naturally presented adenoviral peptide epitopes from infected human cells, ectopically expressing defined HLA, using peptide elution and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the previously described HLA-A*01:01-restricted peptide epitope LTDLGQNLLY from hexon protein is naturally presented, and demonstrate the functionality of LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells. We further identify a novel immunodominant HLA-B*07:02-restricted peptide epitope VPATGRTLVL from protein 13.6 K, and demonstrate the high proliferative, cytotoxic, and IFN-γ-producing capacity of peptide-specific T cells. Lastly, LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells can be detected ex vivo following adoptive transfer therapy, and LTDLGQNLLY-specific and VPATGRTLVL-specific T cells have memory phenotypes ex vivo. Given their proliferative and cytotoxic capacity, such epitope-specific T cells are promising candidates for adoptive T-cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  16. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described: 1) Brief review of a standard problem; 2) Vector analysis; 3) Dimensionless variables; 4) Coupled differential equations; 5) Numerical solutions.

  17. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  18. Efficacy of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene in the treatment of lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    LI, KUN-LIN; KANG, JUN; ZHANG, PENG; LI, LI; WANG, YU-BO; CHEN, HENG-YI; HE, YONG

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion induced by lung cancer exerts a negative impact on quality of life and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of the recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene (rAd-p53) in the local treatment of lung cancer and its synergistic effect with chemotherapy. The present study retrospectively recruited 210 patients with lung cancer-mediated pleural effusion who had adopted a treatment strategy of platinum chemotherapy. Pleurodesis was performed via the injection of cisplatin or rAd-p53. Long-term follow-up was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effects of cisplatin and rAd-p53 administration on pleural effusion and other relevant clinical indicators. The short-term effect of pleurodesis was as follows: The efficacy rate of rAd-p53 therapy was significantly higher compared with cisplatin therapy (71.26 vs. 54.47%), and the efficacy of treatment with ≥2×1012 viral particles of rAd-p53 for pleurodesis was significantly greater than treatment with 40 mg cisplatin (P<0.05). Furthermore, efficacy analysis performed 6 and 12 months after pleurodesis indicated that the efficacy rate of rAd-p53 was significantly greater than that of cisplatin (P<0.05). A comparison of median progression-free survival (PFS) time identified a significant difference (P<0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (3.3 vs. 2.7 months); however, a comparison of median overall survival time identified no significant difference (P>0.05) between rAd-p53 and cisplatin therapy (9.6 vs. 8.7 months). In addition, Cox regression analysis indicated that PFS was not affected by clinical indicators such as age, gender, prognostic staging and smoking status; however, PFS was affected by pathological subtype (adenocarcinoma or squamous carcinoma) in the rAd-p53 group. rAd-p53 administration for pleurodesis exerts long-term therapeutic effects on the local treatment of lung cancer. Thus, a combination of rAd-p53 and chemotherapy may exert a synergistic effect and

  19. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  20. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  1. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  2. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  3. Gene transfer vector

    SciTech Connect

    Puhler, A.; Simon, R.

    1987-08-11

    A Tn-Mob vector is described comprising: (a) A replicon functional E. coli; and (b) A Tn-Mob element comprising a transposon containing (i) a functional selection marker, and (ii) a Mob-site and oriT located in a region of the transposon that is not essential to transposability.

  4. Redshifts and Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Alex; Schucking, Engelbert; Surowitz, Eugene J.

    2006-11-01

    Current approaches to physics stress the importance of conservation laws due to spacetime and internal symmetries. In special and general relativity the generators of these symmetries are known as Killing vectors. We use them for the rigorous determination of gravitational and cosmological redshifts.

  5. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years. PMID:20128467

  6. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years.

  7. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  8. CCP: Sierra Nevada Captive-Carry Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Space System's Dream Chaser design passed one of its most complex tests to date with a successful captive-carry test conducted near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan A...

  9. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Carrying capacities shall be stated in terms of sheep units yearlong, in the ratio of horses, mules, and..., goats, cattle, horses, mules, and burros one year of age or older shall be counted against the...

  10. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eczema should probably avoid aquariums. continue Dogs and Cats Dogs and cats are popular pets but can carry infections such ... be in the intestinal tract of infected dogs, cats, hamsters, birds, and certain farm animals. A person ...

  11. To carry or not to carry--is this the question? Disentangling the carry effect in multi-digit addition.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Dressel, Katharina; Domahs, Frank; Wood, Guilherme; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2010-09-01

    Recent research has suggested addition performance to be determined by both the need for a carry operation and problem size. Nevertheless, it has remained debatable, how these two factors are interrelated. In the current study, this question was pursued by orthogonally manipulating carry and problem size in two-digit addition verification. As the two factors interacted reliably, our results indicate that the carry effect is moderated by number magnitude processing rather than representing a purely procedural, asemantic sequence of processing steps. Moreover, it was found that the carry effect may not be a purely categorical effect but may be driven by continuous characteristics of the sum of the unit digits as well. Since the correct result of a carry problem can only be derived by integrating and updating the magnitudes of tens and units within the place-value structure of the Arabic number system, the present study provides evidence for the idea that decomposed processing of tens and units also transfers to mental arithmetic.

  12. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Lia Q.

    2008-04-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair-hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair-hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here.

  13. Vector control in some countries of Southeast Asia: comparing the vectors and the strategies.

    PubMed

    Meek, S R

    1995-04-01

    The use of information on malaria vector behaviour in vector control is discussed in relation to the area of Southeast Asia comprising Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The major vectors in the region are Anopheles dirus, An. minimus, An. maculatus and An. sundaicus, of which An. dirus is the most important. Options for vector control and the biological features of mosquitoes, which would make them amenable to control by these measures, are listed. The methods with the greatest potential for controlling each of the four vector species are described. Experiences of vector control by residual spraying, insecticide-treated nets and larva control and of personal protection against the four vectors are outlined, and it is noted that choice of control strategy is often determined by epidemiological, economic and political considerations, whilst entomological observations may help to explain failures of control and to indicate alternative strategies. Future research needs include basic entomological field studies using the most appropriate indicators to detect changes related to rapidly changing environmental conditions, such as loss of forest and climate change. Further studies of the efficacy of insecticide-treated mosquito nets, with greater attention to study design, are needed before it can be assumed that they will work in Southeast Asia. At the same time, research to improve sustainable utilization of nets is important, bearing in mind that nets are not the only means to control malaria and should not drain resources from supervision and training, which improve access to diagnosis and treatment of malaria and other diseases. Research is needed to make decisions on whether vector control is appropriate in different environments, and, if so, how to carry it out in different health systems. Researchers need to play a greater role in making operational research (entomological, epidemiological, social, economic and health systems research) of good quality

  14. Gun carrying by high school students in Boston, MA: does overestimation of peer gun carrying matter?

    PubMed

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1,700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a gun, 9% of boys and 2% of girls. Students substantially overestimated the percentage of their peers who carried guns; the likelihood that a respondent carried a gun was strongly associated with their perception of the level of peer gun carrying. Most respondents believed it was easier for other youth to obtain guns than it was for them. Social marketing campaigns designed to lower young people's perceptions about the prevalence of peer gun carrying may be a promising strategy for reducing actual gun carrying among youth.

  15. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task. PMID:26212410

  16. A negative effect of a pathogen on its vector? A plant pathogen increases the vulnerability of its vector to attack by natural enemies.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila F; Long, Elizabeth Y; Finke, Deborah L

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens that are dependent on arthropod vectors for transmission from host to host may enhance their own success by promoting vector survival and/or performance. The effect of pathogens on vectors may be direct or indirect, with indirect effects mediated by increases in host quality or reductions in the vulnerability of vectors to natural enemies. We investigated whether the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, a vector of cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV) in wheat, experiences a reduction in rates of attack by the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani when actively harboring the plant pathogen. We manipulated the vector status of aphids (virus carrying or virus free) and evaluated the impact on the rate of attack by wasps. We found that vector status did not influence the survival or fecundity of aphids in the absence of parasitoids. However, virus-carrying aphids experienced higher rates of parasitism and greater overall population suppression by parasitoid wasps than virus-free aphids. Moreover, virus-carrying aphids were accepted as hosts by wasps more often than virus-free aphids, with a greater number of wasps stinging virus-carrying aphids following assessment by antennal palpations than virus-free aphids. Therefore, counter to the prevailing idea that persistent vector-borne pathogens enhance the performance of their vectors, we found that infectious aphids actively carrying a plant pathogen experience greater vulnerability to natural enemies. Our results suggest that parasitoids may contribute to the successful biological control of CYDV by disproportionately impacting virus-carrying vectors, and thus reducing the proportion of vectors in the population that are infectious.

  17. A negative effect of a pathogen on its vector? A plant pathogen increases the vulnerability of its vector to attack by natural enemies.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila F; Long, Elizabeth Y; Finke, Deborah L

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens that are dependent on arthropod vectors for transmission from host to host may enhance their own success by promoting vector survival and/or performance. The effect of pathogens on vectors may be direct or indirect, with indirect effects mediated by increases in host quality or reductions in the vulnerability of vectors to natural enemies. We investigated whether the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, a vector of cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV) in wheat, experiences a reduction in rates of attack by the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani when actively harboring the plant pathogen. We manipulated the vector status of aphids (virus carrying or virus free) and evaluated the impact on the rate of attack by wasps. We found that vector status did not influence the survival or fecundity of aphids in the absence of parasitoids. However, virus-carrying aphids experienced higher rates of parasitism and greater overall population suppression by parasitoid wasps than virus-free aphids. Moreover, virus-carrying aphids were accepted as hosts by wasps more often than virus-free aphids, with a greater number of wasps stinging virus-carrying aphids following assessment by antennal palpations than virus-free aphids. Therefore, counter to the prevailing idea that persistent vector-borne pathogens enhance the performance of their vectors, we found that infectious aphids actively carrying a plant pathogen experience greater vulnerability to natural enemies. Our results suggest that parasitoids may contribute to the successful biological control of CYDV by disproportionately impacting virus-carrying vectors, and thus reducing the proportion of vectors in the population that are infectious. PMID:24322446

  18. [Vector control and malaria control].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, P; Mouchet, J

    1990-01-01

    Vector control is an integral part of malaria control. Limiting parasite transmission vector control must be considered as one of the main preventive measure. Indeed it prevents transmission of Plasmodium from man to vector and from vector to man. But vector control must be adapted to local situation to be efficient and feasible. Targets of vector control can be larval and/or adults stages. In both cases 3 main methods are currently available: physical (source reduction), chemical (insecticides) and biological tolls. Antilarval control is useful only in some particular circumstances (unstable malaria, island, oasis...) Antiadult control is mainly based upon house-spraying while pyrethroid treated bed nets is advocated regarding efficiency, simple technique and cheap price. Vector control measures could seem restricted but can be very efficient if political will is added to a right choice of adapted measures, a good training of involved personal and a large information of the population concerned with vector control.

  19. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations. PMID:27627325

  20. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  1. Arithmetic coding with constrained carry operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfoodh, Abo-Talib; Said, Amir; Yea, Sehoon

    2015-03-01

    Buffer or counter-based techniques are adequate for dealing with carry propagation in software implementations of arithmetic coding, but create problems in hardware implementations due to the difficulty of handling worst-case scenarios, defined by very long propagations. We propose a new technique for constraining the carry propagation, similar to "bit-stuffing," but designed for encoders that generate data as bytes instead of individual bits, and is based on the fact that the encoder and decoder can maintain the same state, and both can identify the situations when it desired to limit carry propagation. The new technique adjusts the coding interval in a way that corresponds to coding an unused data symbol, but selected to minimize overhead. Our experimental results demonstrate that the loss in compression can be made very small using regular precision for arithmetic operations.

  2. Elusive vector glueball

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2002-05-01

    If the vector glueball {Omicron} exists in the mass range that theory suggests, its resonant production cross section can be detected in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation only if the decay width is very narrow ({le} a few MeV). Otherwise {Omicron} will be observed only indirectly through its mixing with {psi}{prime}. We propose a few tests of the {Omicron}-{psi}{prime} mixing for future charm factories.

  3. Vector soliton fission.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Lin, Q; Knox, W H; Agrawal, Govind P

    2004-10-29

    We investigate the vectorial nature of soliton fission in an isotropic nonlinear medium both theoretically and experimentally. As a specific example, we show that supercontinuum generation in a tapered fiber is extremely sensitive to the input state of polarization. Multiple vector solitons generated through soliton fission exhibit different states of elliptical polarization while emitting nonsolitonic radiation with complicated polarization features. Experiments performed with a tapered fiber agree with our theoretical description.

  4. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  5. Must-Carry and Public Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elizabeth K.

    Because of the United States Court of Appeal's ruling ("Quincy Cable TV vs. Federal Communications Commission") that government regulation of what cable television stations can broadcast violates their First Amendment rights, a number of consequences have arisen concerning what cable stations are required to broadcast (must-carry rules), and how…

  6. Lorentz Contraction and Current-Carrying Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kampen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The force between two parallel current-carrying wires is investigated in the rest frames of the ions and the electrons. A straightforward Lorentz transformation shows that what appears as a purely magnetostatic force in the ion frame appears as a combined magnetostatic and electrostatic force in the electron frame. The derivation makes use of a…

  7. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  8. Amelioration of carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis and portal hypertension in rat using adenoviral gene transfer of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Luo, Hong-Wu; Huang, Fei-Zhou; Liu, Xun-Yang; Wang, Yong-Heng

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether a virus constitutively expressing active Akt is useful to prevent cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). METHODS: Using cre-loxp technique, we created an Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus, in which Akt is labeled by a HA tag and its expression is driven by myr promoter. Further, through measuring enzyme levels and histological structure, we determined the efficacy of this Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus in inhibiting the development of cirrhosis induced by CCl4 in rats. Lastly, using western blotting, we examined the expression levels and/or phosphorylation status of Akt, apoptotic mediators, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and markers for hepatic stellate cells activation to understand the underlying mechanisms of protective role of this virus. RESULTS: The Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of inserted Akt gene and sequencing for full length of inserted fragment, which was consistent with the sequence reported in the GenBank. The concentrations of Ad-myr-HA-Akt and adenoviral enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) virus used in the current study were 5.5 × 1011 vp/mL. The portal vein diameter, peak velocity of blood flow, portal blood flow and congestion index were significantly increased in untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups when compared to normal control after the virus was introduced to animal through tail veil injection. In contrast, these parameters in the Akt cirrhosis group were comparable to normal control group. Compared to the normal control, the liver function (Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase and Albumin) was significantly impaired in the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Akt cirrhosis group showed significant improvement of liver function when compared to the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Hyp level and portal vein pressure in Akt cirrhosis groups were also significantly lower than other cirrhosis groups

  9. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  10. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread.

  11. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iteratively. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  12. A decimal carry-free adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikmehr, Hooman; Phillips, Braden; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2005-02-01

    Recently, decimal arithmetic has become attractive in the financial and commercial world including banking, tax calculation, currency conversion, insurance and accounting. Although computers are still carrying out decimal calculation using software libraries and binary floating-point numbers, it is likely that in the near future, all processors will be equipped with units performing decimal operations directly on decimal operands. One critical building block for some complex decimal operations is the decimal carry-free adder. This paper discusses the mathematical framework of the addition, introduces a new signed-digit format for representing decimal numbers and presents an efficient architectural implementation. Delay estimation analysis shows that the adder offers improved performance over earlier designs.

  13. Proof-Carrying Code with Correct Compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, Andrew W.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1990s, proof-carrying code was able to produce machine-checkable safety proofs for machine-language programs even though (1) it was impractical to prove correctness properties of source programs and (2) it was impractical to prove correctness of compilers. But now it is practical to prove some correctness properties of source programs, and it is practical to prove correctness of optimizing compilers. We can produce more expressive proof-carrying code, that can guarantee correctness properties for machine code and not just safety. We will construct program logics for source languages, prove them sound w.r.t. the operational semantics of the input language for a proved-correct compiler, and then use these logics as a basis for proving the soundness of static analyses.

  14. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Ferrante, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface. 8 figs.

  15. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Ferrante, Todd A.

    1998-01-01

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface.

  16. Thrust vectoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. J.; Schnelker, D.; Ward, J. W.; Dulgeroff, C.; Vahrenkamp, R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of thrust vectorable ion optical systems capable of controlling the thrust direction from both 5- and 30-cm diameter ion thrusters is described. Both systems are capable of greater than 10 deg thrust deflection in any azimuthal direction. The 5-cm system is electrostatic and hence has a short response time and minimal power consumption. It has recently been tested for more than 7500 hours on an operational thruster. The 30-cm system is mechanical, has a response time of the order of 1 min, and consumes less than 0.3% of the total system input power at full deflection angle.

  17. Vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.

    2011-10-15

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

  18. Data Analysis for the SOLIS Vector Spectromagnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Harvey, John W.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Solar Observatory's SOLIS Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM), which will produce three or more full-disk maps of the Sun's photospheric vector magnetic field every day for at least one solar magnetic cycle, is in the final stages of assembly. Initial observations, including cross-calibration with the current NASA/NSO spectromagnetograph (SPM) will soon be carried out at a test site in Tucson. This paper discusses data analysis techniques for reducing the raw data, calculation of line-of-sight magnetograms and both quick-look and high-precision inference of vector fields from Stokes spectral profiles. Existing SPM algorithms, suitably modified to accomodate the cameras, scanning pattern, and polarization calibration optics for the VSM, will be used to "clean" the raw data and to process line-of-sight, magnetograms. A recent. version of the High Altitude Observatory Milne-Eddington (HAO-ME) inversion code (Skumanich and Lites; 1987, 11)J 322, p. 473) will he used for high-precision vector fields since the algorithm has been extensively tested, is well understood, and is fast enough to complete data analysis within 24 hours of data acquisition. The simplified inversion algorithm of Auer, Heasley. arid House (1977, Sol. Phys. 55, p. 47) forms the initial guess for this version of the HAO-ME code and will be used for quick-look vector analysis of VSM data since its performance on simulated Stokes profiles is better than other candidate methods. Improvements (e.g., principal components analysis or neural networks) are under consideration and will be straightforward to implement. However, current resources are sufficient to store the original Stokes profiles only long enough for high-precision analysis. Retrospective reduction of Stokes data with improved methods will not be possible, and modifications will only be introduced when the advantages of doing so are compelling enough to justify discontinuity in the long-term data stream.

  19. Preclinical Assessment of Viral Vectored and Protein Vaccines Targeting the Duffy-Binding Protein Region II of Plasmodium Vivax.

    PubMed

    de Cassan, Simone C; Shakri, A Rushdi; Llewellyn, David; Elias, Sean C; Cho, Jee Sun; Goodman, Anna L; Jin, Jing; Douglas, Alexander D; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, François H; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce; Chitnis, Chetan E; Draper, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has largely focused on Plasmodium falciparum; however, a reawakening to the importance of Plasmodium vivax has spurred efforts to develop vaccines against this difficult to treat and at times severe form of relapsing malaria, which constitutes a significant proportion of human malaria cases worldwide. The almost complete dependence of P. vivax red blood cell invasion on the interaction of the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein region II (PvDBP_RII) with the human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) makes this antigen an attractive vaccine candidate against blood-stage P. vivax. Here, we generated both preclinical and clinically compatible adenoviral and poxviral vectored vaccine candidates expressing the Salvador I allele of PvDBP_RII - including human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5), chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors. We report on the antibody and T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines in mice or rabbits, either used alone in a viral vectored prime-boost regime or in "mixed-modality" adenovirus prime - protein-in--adjuvant boost regimes (using a recombinant PvDBP_RII protein antigen formulated in Montanide(®)ISA720 or Abisco(®)100 adjuvants). Antibodies induced by these regimes were found to bind to native parasite antigen from P. vivax infected Thai patients and were capable of inhibiting the binding of PvDBP_RII to its receptor DARC using an in vitro binding inhibition assay. In recent years, recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors have been quickly translated into human clinical trials for numerous antigens from P. falciparum as well as a growing number of other pathogens. The vectors reported here are immunogenic in small animals, elicit antibodies against PvDBP_RII, and have recently entered clinical trials, which will provide the first assessment of the safety and immunogenicity of the PvDBP_RII antigen in humans. PMID:26217340

  20. Fluorescent protein vectors for pancreatic islet cell identification in live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Hongyan; Xu, Yunjian; Yu, Qian; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-10-01

    The islets of Langerhans contain different types of endocrine cells, which are crucial for glucose homeostasis. β- and α-cells that release insulin and glucagon, respectively, are most abundant, whereas somatostatin-producing δ-cells and particularly pancreatic polypeptide-releasing PP-cells are more scarce. Studies of islet cell function are hampered by difficulties to identify the different cell types, especially in live-cell imaging experiments when immunostaining is unsuitable. The aim of the present study was to create a set of vectors for fluorescent protein expression with cell-type-specific promoters and evaluate their applicability in functional islet imaging. We constructed six adenoviral vectors for expression of red and green fluorescent proteins controlled by the insulin, preproglucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide promoters. After transduction of mouse and human islets or dispersed islet cells, a majority of the fluorescent cells also immunostained for the appropriate hormone. Recordings of the sub-plasma membrane Ca(2+) and cAMP concentrations with a fluorescent indicator and a protein biosensor, respectively, showed that labeled cells respond to glucose and other modulators of secretion and revealed a striking variability in Ca(2+) signaling among α-cells. The measurements allowed comparison of the phase relationship of Ca(2+) oscillations between different types of cells within intact islets. We conclude that the fluorescent protein vectors allow easy identification of specific islet cell types and can be used in live-cell imaging together with organic dyes and genetically encoded biosensors. This approach will facilitate studies of normal islet physiology and help to clarify molecular defects and disturbed cell interactions in diabetic islets.

  1. Fluorescent protein vectors for pancreatic islet cell identification in live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Hongyan; Xu, Yunjian; Yu, Qian; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-10-01

    The islets of Langerhans contain different types of endocrine cells, which are crucial for glucose homeostasis. β- and α-cells that release insulin and glucagon, respectively, are most abundant, whereas somatostatin-producing δ-cells and particularly pancreatic polypeptide-releasing PP-cells are more scarce. Studies of islet cell function are hampered by difficulties to identify the different cell types, especially in live-cell imaging experiments when immunostaining is unsuitable. The aim of the present study was to create a set of vectors for fluorescent protein expression with cell-type-specific promoters and evaluate their applicability in functional islet imaging. We constructed six adenoviral vectors for expression of red and green fluorescent proteins controlled by the insulin, preproglucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide promoters. After transduction of mouse and human islets or dispersed islet cells, a majority of the fluorescent cells also immunostained for the appropriate hormone. Recordings of the sub-plasma membrane Ca(2+) and cAMP concentrations with a fluorescent indicator and a protein biosensor, respectively, showed that labeled cells respond to glucose and other modulators of secretion and revealed a striking variability in Ca(2+) signaling among α-cells. The measurements allowed comparison of the phase relationship of Ca(2+) oscillations between different types of cells within intact islets. We conclude that the fluorescent protein vectors allow easy identification of specific islet cell types and can be used in live-cell imaging together with organic dyes and genetically encoded biosensors. This approach will facilitate studies of normal islet physiology and help to clarify molecular defects and disturbed cell interactions in diabetic islets. PMID:27539300

  2. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms

    PubMed Central

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent–cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent–cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  3. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms.

    PubMed

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent-cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent-cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  4. Spread of Plasmids Carrying Multiple GES Variants.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Bauraing, Caroline; Huang, Te-Din; Bonnin, Rémy A; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Five GES-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates that displayed an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype harbored two GES variants: GES-7 ESBL and GES-6 carbapenemase. In all isolates, the two GES alleles were located on the same integron that was inserted into an 80-kb IncM1 self-conjugative plasmid. Whole-genome sequencing suggested in vivo horizontal gene transfer of the plasmid along with clonal diffusion of Enterobacter cloacae To our knowledge, this is the first description in Europe of clustered Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying two GES β-lactamases, of which one has extended activity toward carbapenems. PMID:27216071

  5. Carrying Synchronous Voice Data On Asynchronous Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Buffers restore synchronism for internal use and permit asynchronism in external transmission. Proposed asynchronous local-area digital communication network (LAN) carries synchronous voice, data, or video signals, or non-real-time asynchronous data signals. Network uses double buffering scheme that reestablishes phase and frequency references at each node in network. Concept demonstrated in token-ring network operating at 80 Mb/s, pending development of equipment operating at planned data rate of 200 Mb/s. Technique generic and used with any LAN as long as protocol offers deterministic (or bonded) access delays and sufficient capacity.

  6. Cost of carrying out clinical diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D J; Bingle, J P; Garratt, C J

    1978-01-01

    The total cost of performing diagnostic tests in a hospital laboratory during one year was assessed. The largest single item of expenditure was the cost of the salaries of the technical staff, while the cost of reagents (including radiopharmaceuticals) was relatively small. The total costs of carrying out diagnostic tests are much higher than is often recognised by those who request them. The use of relatively expensive, commercially available assay kits saves time and gives good value for money. It may be worth taking this into account when planning hospital budgets. PMID:647338

  7. Transfer of stem cells carrying engineered chromosomes with XY clone laser system.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Current transgenic technologies for gene transfer into the germline of mammals cause a random integration of exogenous naked DNA into the host genome that can generate undesirable position effects as well as insertional mutations. The vectors used to generate transgenic animals are limited by the amount of foreign DNA they can carry. Mammalian artificial chromosomes have large DNA-carrying capacity and ability to replicate in parallel with, but without integration into, the host genome. Hence they are attractive vectors for transgenesis, cellular protein production, and gene therapy applications as well. ES cells mediated chromosome transfer by conventional blastocyst injection has a limitation in unpredictable germline transmission. The demonstrated protocol of laser-assisted microinjection of artificial chromosome containing ES cells into eight-cell mouse embryos protocol described here can solve the problem for faster production of germline transchromosomic mice.

  8. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass. PMID:24793822

  9. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  10. Multineuronal vectorization is more efficient than time-segmental vectorization for information extraction from neuronal activities in the inferior temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidekazu; Tamura, Hiroshi; Tate, Shunta; Kawashima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Shinya S; Fujita, Ichiro

    2010-08-01

    In order for patients with disabilities to control assistive devices with their own neural activity, multineuronal spike trains must be efficiently decoded because only limited computational resources can be used to generate prosthetic control signals in portable real-time applications. In this study, we compare the abilities of two vectorizing procedures (multineuronal and time-segmental) to extract information from spike trains during the same total neuron-seconds. In the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, we defined a response vector whose components represented the spike counts of one to five neurons. In the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, a response vector consisted of components representing a neuron's spike counts for one to five time-segment(s) of a response period of 1 s. Spike trains were recorded from neurons in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys presented with visual stimuli. We examined whether the amount of information of the visual stimuli carried by these neurons differed between the two vectorizing procedures. The amount of information calculated with the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, but not the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, significantly increased with the dimensions of the response vector. We conclude that the multineuronal vectorizing procedure is superior to the time-segmental vectorizing procedure in efficiently extracting information from neuronal signals.

  11. Covariant Lyapunov vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Chaté, Hugues; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) which span local intrinsic directions in the phase space of chaotic systems. Here, we review the basic results of ergodic theory, with a specific reference to the implications of Oseledets’ theorem for the properties of the CLVs. We then present a detailed description of a ‘dynamical’ algorithm to compute the CLVs and show that it generically converges exponentially in time. We also discuss its numerical performance and compare it with other algorithms presented in the literature. We finally illustrate how CLVs can be used to quantify deviations from hyperbolicity with reference to a dissipative system (a chain of Hénon maps) and a Hamiltonian model (a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain). This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  12. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  13. [West Nile virus and its vectors].

    PubMed

    Ozer, Nurdan

    2006-01-01

    There are more than five hundred known arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) all around the world and approximately hundred of them may cause disease in humans. During the past 20 years there has been a dramatic resurgence or emergence of epidemic arboviral diseases affecting both humans and domestic animals. Many factors play important roles in the emergence of arboviral diseases like Yellow Fever, Dengue, West Nile encephalitis, and of other diseases such as malaria and leishmaniasis in countries where they have not been previously encountered and in the increase in incidences where they have been under control. Some of these are demographic factors such as global population increase and uncontrolled urbanization; social changes such as modern transportation, human encroachment on natural disease hotspots; changes in agricultural activities such as the use of new irrigation techniques; deforestation; genetic changes in the pathogens; preventive measures and probably global climate changes. Mosquitoes are among the most important vectors carrying viruses belonging to Alphavirus, Flavivirus, Bunyavirus and Phlebovirus genera. All of the above factors have contributed to the increase in mosquito populations and closer contact between humans and mosquito vectors. West Nile virus notable after the epidemic of 1996 in Romania in Europe is one of the latest examples indicating that viruses can jump continents and produce epidemics. In this review article, the distribution of West Nile virus and its principal vectors and also its importance by means of public health, have been discussed.

  14. Delivery of an adenovirus vector plasmid by ultrapure oligochitosan based polyplexes.

    PubMed

    Agirre, Mireia; Zarate, Jon; Ojeda, Edilberto; Puras, Gustavo; Rojas, Luis A; Alemany, Ramón; Pedraz, José L

    2015-02-20

    Ultrapure oligochitosans have been recently reported as efficient non-viral vectors for the delivery of pCMS-EGFP plasmid (5.5kbp) to the cornea and retina. However, the delivery of oncolytic adenoviral plasmids (40kbp) represents a unique challenge. In this work, we elaborated self assembled O15 and O25 UOC/pAdTLRGD polyplexes, and we studied the influence of the N/P ratio, the pH of the transfection medium and the salt concentration on the particle size and zeta potential by an orthogonal experimental design. All polyplexes showed a particle size lower than 200nm and a positive zeta potential. These parameters were influenced by the N/P ratio, salt concentration, and pH of the transfection medium. The selected polyplexes were able to bind, release, and protect the plasmid from DNase degradation. Transfection experiments in HEK293 and A549 cell lines demonstrated that UOC/pAdTLRGD polyplexes were able to deliver the plasmid and transfect both cell lines. These results suggest that O15 and O25 UOC based polyplexes are suitable for future in vivo applications.

  15. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  16. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P.; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R.; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E.; Carpizo, Darren R.; Kim, Seung K.; Winslow, Monte M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  17. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  18. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD.

  19. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD. PMID:16247462

  20. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  1. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  2. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  3. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  4. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested.

  5. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  6. Vector Network Analysis

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore » to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  7. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  8. Global carrying capacity: how many people?

    PubMed

    1992-07-01

    During 1980-85 energy consumption in developing countries increased by 22%, of which 50% was used to maintain current levels of use and 50% pertained to real economic growth. Commercial energy consumption during 1970-89 tripled in developing countries. Population growth alone is expected to increase world energy consumption from the current 13.5 terawatts (13.5 trillion watts) to 18 terawatts by 2025 at the same level of use. The increased level of consumption (4.5 terawatts) is the equivalent of total current commercial energy consumption. One terawatt is equal to energy use from 5 billion barrels of oil yearly, 1 billion tons of coal, or 1.6 billion tons of wood. Economic development will require even greater levels of energy use. Since the oil price increases of the 1970s, developed countries increased their energy consumption by about 33%, even while becoming more fuel efficient. During 1990-2025, if developing countries double their per capita energy use and developed countries reduce their use by 50%, world energy consumption will still be almost 21 terawatts. If consumption remains constant at current levels without any population increase, the oil supply will be exhausted in 40 years. Coal consumption will last hundreds of years but air pollution will worsen, and global warming will be accelerated. Developed countries, which are wealthier, are having difficulty switching to non-fossil fuels, and the prospects for developing countries pose even greater challenges. Slowing growth buys time for technological development. World population is expected to reach 8 billion by 2020. Stabilization of growth at 8 billion would occur only if world fertility averages 1.7 children per woman by 2025. One opinion is that the carrying capacity has been reached with the present population of 5.4 billion. Others say that with changes in consumption and technological developments the earth can sustain 8 billion people. The physical limits are 1) the finite capacity of natural

  9. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  10. Successive refinement lattice vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debargha; Mitra, Sanjit K

    2002-01-01

    Lattice Vector quantization (LVQ) solves the complexity problem of LBG based vector quantizers, yielding very general codebooks. However, a single stage LVQ, when applied to high resolution quantization of a vector, may result in very large and unwieldy indices, making it unsuitable for applications requiring successive refinement. The goal of this work is to develop a unified framework for progressive uniform quantization of vectors without having to sacrifice the mean- squared-error advantage of lattice quantization. A successive refinement uniform vector quantization methodology is developed, where the codebooks in successive stages are all lattice codebooks, each in the shape of the Voronoi regions of the lattice at the previous stage. Such Voronoi shaped geometric lattice codebooks are named Voronoi lattice VQs (VLVQ). Measures of efficiency of successive refinement are developed based on the entropy of the indices transmitted by the VLVQs. Additionally, a constructive method for asymptotically optimal uniform quantization is developed using tree-structured subset VLVQs in conjunction with entropy coding. The methodology developed here essentially yields the optimal vector counterpart of scalar "bitplane-wise" refinement. Unfortunately it is not as trivial to implement as in the scalar case. Furthermore, the benefits of asymptotic optimality in tree-structured subset VLVQs remain elusive in practical nonasymptotic situations. Nevertheless, because scalar bitplane- wise refinement is extensively used in modern wavelet image coders, we have applied the VLVQ techniques to successively refine vectors of wavelet coefficients in the vector set-partitioning (VSPIHT) framework. The results are compared against SPIHT and the previous successive approximation wavelet vector quantization (SA-W-VQ) results of Sampson, da Silva and Ghanbari.

  11. Vector and Axial-Vector Structures of the Θ+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Ledwig, Tim; Goeke, Klaus

    We present in this talk recent results of the vector and axial-vector transitions of the nucleon to the pentaquark baryon Θ+, based on the SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. The results are summarized as follows: K*NΘ vector and tensor coupling constants turn out to be gK*NΘ ≃ 0.81 and fK*NΘ ≃ 0.84, respectively, and the KNΘ axial-vector coupling constant to be g*A ˜= 0.05. As a result, the total decay width for Θ+ → NK becomes very small: ΓΘ→NK ≃ 0.71 MeV, which is consistent with the DIANA result ΓΘ→NK = 0.36 ± 0.11 MeV.

  12. Colliders and brane vector phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Love, S. T.; Xiong, C.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2008-12-01

    Brane world oscillations manifest themselves as massive vector gauge fields. Their coupling to the standard model is deduced using the method of nonlinear realizations of the spontaneously broken higher dimensional space-time symmetries. Brane vectors are stable and weakly interacting and therefore escape particle detectors unnoticed. LEP and Tevatron data on the production of a single photon in conjunction with missing energy are used to delineate experimentally excluded regions of brane vector parameter space. The additional region of parameter space accessible to the LHC as well as a future lepton linear collider is also determined by means of this process.

  13. Initial conditions for vector inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    Recently, a model of inflation using non-minimally coupled massive vector fields has been proposed. For a particular choice of non-minimal coupling parameter and for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model, the model is reduced to the model of chaotic inflation with massive scalar field. We study the effect of non-zero curvature of the universe on the onset of vector inflation. We find that in a curved universe the dynamics of vector inflation can be different from the dynamics of chaotic inflation, and the fraction of the initial conditions leading to inflationary solutions is reduced as compared with the chaotic inflation case.

  14. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Dolder, Juliette; Walboomers, X Frank; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2007-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and dentin formation,in this study STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells were transfected with the adenoviral mediated human BMP-2 gene. Subsequently, the cells were evaluated for their odontogenic differentiation ability in medium not containing dexamethasone or other stimuli. Cultures were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase(ALP) activity, and calcium content. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for gene expression of Alp, osteocalcin, collagen type I, bone sialoprotein, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1. Finally, an oligo-microarray was used to profile the expression of odontogenesis-related genes. Results of ALP activity, calcium content, and real-time PCR showed that only BMP2-transfected cells had the ability to differentiate into the odontoblast phenotype and to produce a calcified extracellular matrix. SEM and oligo-microarray confirmed these results. In contrast, the non-transfected cells represented a less differentiated cell phenotype. Based on our results, we concluded that the adenovirus can transfect STRO-1 selected cells with high efficacy. After BMP2 gene transfection, these cells had the ability to differentiate into odontoblast phenotype, even without the addition of odontogenic supplements to the medium. PMID:17824831

  15. Regulation of human adenovirus alternative RNA splicing by the adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K proteins.

    PubMed

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-28

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins.

  16. Modulation of hormone-sensitive lipase and protein kinase A-mediated lipolysis by perilipin A in an adenoviral reconstituted system.

    PubMed

    Souza, Sandra C; Muliro, Kizito V; Liscum, Laura; Lien, Ping; Yamamoto, Mia T; Schaffer, Jean E; Dallal, Gerard E; Wang, Xinzhong; Kraemer, Fredric B; Obin, Martin; Greenberg, Andrew S

    2002-03-01

    Perilipin (Peri) A is a phosphoprotein located at the surface of intracellular lipid droplets in adipocytes. Activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) results in the phosphorylation of Peri A and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), the predominant lipase in adipocytes, with concurrent stimulation of adipocyte lipolysis. To investigate the relative contributions of Peri A and HSL in basal and PKA-mediated lipolysis, we utilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts lacking Peri A and HSL but stably overexpressing acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACS1) and fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). When incubated with exogenous fatty acids, ACS1/FATP1 cells accumulated 5 times more triacylglycerol (TG) as compared with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Adenoviral-mediated expression of Peri A in ACS1/FATP1 cells enhanced TG accumulation and inhibited lipolysis, whereas expression of HSL fused to green fluorescent protein (GFPHSL) reduced TG accumulation and enhanced lipolysis. Forskolin treatment induced Peri A hyperphosphorylation and abrogated the inhibitory effect of Peri A on lipolysis. Expression of a mutated Peri A Delta 3 (Ser to Ala substitutions at PKA consensus sites Ser-81, Ser-222, and Ser-276) reduced Peri A hyperphosphorylation and blocked constitutive and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis. Thus, perilipin expression and phosphorylation state are critical regulators of lipid storage and hydrolysis in ACS1/FATP1 cells. PMID:11751901

  17. Permissive environment in postnatal wounds induced by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 prevents scar formation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ashley; Kozin, Elliott D; Keswani, Sundeep G; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Katz, Anna B; Zoltick, Philip W; Favata, Michele; Radu, Antoneta P; Soslowsky, Louis J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing in the mid-gestation fetus is scarless with minimal inflammation and a unique extracellular matrix. We have previously documented the relative lack of inflammatory cytokines in this environment. We demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-10 is highly expressed in mid-gestation human fetal skin but is absent in postnatal human skin. We hypothesize that overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal skin may replicate a permissive environment for scarless healing. To study the mechanism underlying this process we performed immunohistochemistry for IL-10 in human mid-gestation fetal and postnatal skin. We also determined if adenoviral-mediated overexpression of IL-10 could allow for scarless wound healing in a murine incisional wound model. Wounds were analyzed at 1-90 days postwounding for effects on scar formation, inflammatory response, and biomechanical properties. Ad-IL-10 reconstitutes a permissive environment for scarless healing as shown by reconstitution of a normal dermal reticular collagen pattern and distribution of dermal elements. Compared with controls, Ad-IL-10 treated wounds showed reduced inflammatory response and no difference in biomechanical parameters. Therefore, overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal wounds results in a permissive environment for scarless wound repair, possibly by replicating a fetal wound environment. PMID:18086289

  18. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  19. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Luminita; Bromberg, Zohar; EL-Latif, Mahmoud Abd; Zeira, Evelyn; Oppenheim, Ariella; Weiss, Yoram G

    2007-01-01

    Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40) vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP). SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc) were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO) as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C). Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool. PMID:17967178

  20. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  1. Electromagnetic structure of vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuščín, C.; Dubnička, S.; Dubničková, A. Z.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic structure of the complete nonet of vector mesons (ρ0, ρ+, ρ-, ω, ϕ, K*0, K*+, K¯*0, K*-) is investigated in the framework of the Unitary and Analytic model and insufficient experimental information on it is discussed.

  2. Polynomial interpretation of multipole vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Gabriel; Weeks, Jeff

    2004-09-01

    Copi, Huterer, Starkman, and Schwarz introduced multipole vectors in a tensor context and used them to demonstrate that the first-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) quadrupole and octopole planes align at roughly the 99.9% confidence level. In the present article, the language of polynomials provides a new and independent derivation of the multipole vector concept. Bézout’s theorem supports an elementary proof that the multipole vectors exist and are unique (up to rescaling). The constructive nature of the proof leads to a fast, practical algorithm for computing multipole vectors. We illustrate the algorithm by finding exact solutions for some simple toy examples and numerical solutions for the first-year WMAP quadrupole and octopole. We then apply our algorithm to Monte Carlo skies to independently reconfirm the estimate that the WMAP quadrupole and octopole planes align at the 99.9% level.

  3. Brief history of vector Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Beach, Kirk W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the development of the directional Doppler by McLeod in 1967, methods of acquiring, analyzing, and displaying blood velocity information have been under constant exploration. These efforts are motivated by a variety of interest and objectives including, to: a) simplify clinical examination, examiner training, and study interpretation, b) provide more hemodynamic information, and c) reduce examination variability and improve accuracy. The vector Doppler technique has been proposed as one potential avenue to achieve these objects. Vector Doppler systems are those that determine the true 2D or 3D blood flow velocity by combining multiple independent velocity component measurements. Most instruments can be divided into two broad categories: 1) cross-beam and 2) time-domain. This paper provides a brief synopsis of the progression of vector Doppler techniques, from its onset in 1970 to present, as well as possible avenues for future work. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all vector Doppler systems.

  4. Unsupervised learning of binary vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli Lopes da Silva, Mauro

    In this thesis, unsupervised learning of binary vectors from data is studied using methods from Statistical Mechanics of disordered systems. In the model, data vectors are distributed according to a single symmetry-breaking direction. The aim of unsupervised learning is to provide a good approximation to this direction. The difference with respect to previous studies is the knowledge that this preferential direction has binary components. It is shown that sampling from the posterior distribution (Gibbs learning) leads, for general smooth distributions, to an exponentially fast approach to perfect learning in the asymptotic limit of large number of examples. If the distribution is non-smooth, then first order phase transitions to perfect learning are expected. In the limit of poor performance, a second order phase transition ("retarded learning") is predicted to occur if the data distribution is not biased. Using concepts from Bayesian inference, the center of mass of the Gibbs ensemble is shown to have maximal average (Bayes-optimal) performance. This upper bound for continuous vectors is extended to a discrete space, resulting in the clipped center of mass of the Gibbs ensemble having maximal average performance among the binary vectors. To calculate the performance of this best binary vector, the geometric properties of the center of mass of binary vectors are studied. The surprising result is found that the center of mass of infinite binary vectors which obey some simple constraints, is again a binary vector. When disorder is taken into account in the calculation, however, a vector with continuous components is obtained. The performance of the best binary vector is calculated and shown to always lie above that of Gibbs learning and below the Bayes-optimal performance. Making use of a variational approach under the replica symmetric ansatz, an optimal potential is constructed in the limits of zero temperature and mutual overlap 1. Minimization of this potential

  5. Improved self-inactivating retroviral vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P; Nelson, S; Dornburg, R

    1994-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors contain a deletion spanning most of the right long terminal repeat's (LTR's) U3 region. Reverse transcription copies this deletion to both LTRs. As a result, there is no transcription from the 5' LTR, preventing further replication. Many previously developed SIN vectors, however, had reduced titers or were genetically unstable. Earlier, we reported that certain SIN vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) experienced reconstitution of the U3-deleted LTR at high frequencies. This reconstitution occurred on the DNA level and appeared to be dependent on defined vector sequences. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we developed an almost completely U3-free retroviral vector. The promoter and enhancer of the left LTR were replaced with those of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early genes. This promoter swap did not impair the level of transcription or alter its start site. Our data indicate that SNV contains a strong initiator which resembles that of human immunodeficiency virus. We show that the vectors replicate with efficiencies similar to those of vectors possessing two wild-type LTRs. U3-deleted vectors carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene did not observably undergo LTR reconstitution, even when replicated in helper cells containing SNV-LTR sequences. However, vectors carrying the neomycin resistance gene did undergo LTR reconstitution with the use of homologous helper cell LTR sequences as template. This supports our earlier finding that sequences within the neomycin resistance gene can trigger recombination. Images PMID:7933088

  6. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  7. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  8. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  9. Sustained expression from DNA vectors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet Ping; Argyros, Orestis; Harbottle, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    DNA vectors have the potential to become powerful medical tools for treatment of human disease. The human body has, however, developed a range of defensive strategies to detect and silence foreign or misplaced DNA, which is more typically encountered during infection or chromosomal damage. A clinically relevant human gene therapy vector must overcome or avoid these protections whilst delivering sustained levels of therapeutic gene product without compromising the vitality of the recipient host. Many non-viral DNA vectors trigger these defense mechanisms and are subsequently destroyed or rendered silent. Thus, without modification or considered design, the clinical utility of a typical DNA vector is fundamentally limited due to the transient nature of its transgene expression. The development of safe and persistently expressing DNA vectors is a crucial prerequisite for its successful clinical application and subsequently remains, therefore, one of the main strategic tasks of non-viral gene therapy research. In this chapter we will describe our current understanding of the mechanisms that can destroy or silence DNA vectors and discuss strategies, which have been utilized to improve their sustenance and the level and duration of their transgene expression.

  10. Are Bred Vectors The Same As Lyapunov Vectors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Corazza, M.; Cai, M.

    Regional loss of predictability is an indication of the instability of the underlying flow, where small errors in the initial conditions (or imperfections in the model) grow to large amplitudes in finite times. The stability properties of evolving flows have been studied using Lyapunov vectors (e.g., Alligood et al, 1996, Ott, 1993, Kalnay, 2002), singular vectors (e.g., Lorenz, 1965, Farrell, 1988, Molteni and Palmer, 1993), and, more recently, with bred vectors (e.g., Szunyogh et al, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). Bred vectors (BVs) are, by construction, closely related to Lyapunov vectors (LVs). In fact, after an infinitely long breeding time, and with the use of infinitesimal ampli- tudes, bred vectors are identical to leading Lyapunov vectors. In practical applications, however, bred vectors are different from Lyapunov vectors in two important ways: a) bred vectors are never globally orthogonalized and are intrinsically local in space and time, and b) they are finite-amplitude, finite-time vectors. These two differences are very significant in a dynamical system whose size is very large. For example, the at- mosphere is large enough to have "room" for several synoptic scale instabilities (e.g., storms) to develop independently in different regions (say, North America and Aus- tralia), and it is complex enough to have several different possible types of instabilities (such as barotropic, baroclinic, convective, and even Brownian motion). Bred vectors share some of their properties with leading LVs (Corazza et al, 2001a, 2001b, Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). For example, 1) Bred vectors are independent of the norm used to define the size of the perturba- tion. Corazza et al. (2001) showed that bred vectors obtained using a potential enstro- phy norm were indistinguishable from bred vectors obtained using a streamfunction squared norm, in contrast with singular vectors. 2) Bred vectors are independent of the length of the rescaling period as long as the

  11. Scattering detection of a solenoidal Poynting vector field.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Salandrino, Alessandro; Samadi, Akbar; Heinrich, Matthias; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2016-08-01

    The Poynting vector S plays a central role in electrodynamics as it is directly related to the power and the momentum carried by an electromagnetic wave. In the presence of multiple electromagnetic waves with different polarizations and propagation directions, the Poynting vector may exhibit solenoidal components which are not associated to any power flow. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the presence of such solenoidal components has physical consequences, and it is not a mere artifact of the gauge invariance of S. In particular, we identify a simple field configuration displaying solenoidal components of S and theoretically show that a judiciously designed scatterer can act as a "Poynting vector detector" which when immersed in such field distribution would experience a transverse optical force orthogonal to the incidence plane. We experimentally validate our theoretical predictions by observing a pronounced asymmetry in the scattering pattern of a spherical nanoparticle. PMID:27472632

  12. Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K; Kersey, Paul J; Maslen, Gareth L; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; Oliva, Clelia F; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F Xavier; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Levashina, Elena A; Wilson, Anthony J; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector-pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations. PMID:27677378

  13. Black holes with vector hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider Einstein gravity coupled to a vector field, either minimally or non-minimally, together with a vector potential of the type V = 2{Λ}_0+1/2{m}^2{A}^2 + {γ}_4{A}^4 . For a simpler non-minimally coupled theory with Λ0 = m = γ4 = 0, we obtain both extremal and non-extremal black hole solutions that are asymptotic to Minkowski space-times. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics using Wald formalism. We find that the thermodynamical first law of the extremal black holes is modified by a one form associated with the vector field. In particular, due to the existence of the non-minimal coupling, the vector forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and partly contributes to the one form modifying the first law. For a minimally coupled theory with Λ0 ≠ 0, we also obtain one class of asymptotically flat extremal black hole solutions in general dimensions. This is possible because the parameters ( m 2 , γ4) take certain values such that V = 0. In particular, we find that the vector also forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and contributes to the corresponding first law, although the non-minimal coupling has been turned off. Thus all the extremal black hole solutions that we obtain provide highly non-trivial examples how the first law of thermodynamics can be modified by a either minimally or non-minimally coupled vector field. We also study Gauss-Bonnet gravity non-minimally coupled to a vector and obtain asymptotically flat black holes and Lifshitz black holes.

  14. VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Daniel; Arensburger, Peter; Atkinson, Peter; Besansky, Nora J; Bruggner, Robert V; Butler, Ryan; Campbell, Kathryn S; Christophides, George K; Christley, Scott; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Emmert, David; Hammond, Martin; Hill, Catherine A; Kennedy, Ryan C; Lobo, Neil F; MacCallum, M Robert; Madey, Greg; Megy, Karine; Redmond, Seth; Russo, Susan; Severson, David W; Stinson, Eric O; Topalis, Pantelis; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Birney, Ewan; Gelbart, William M; Kafatos, Fotis C; Louis, Christos; Collins, Frank H

    2007-01-01

    VectorBase (http://www.vectorbase.org/) is a web-accessible data repository for information about invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. VectorBase annotates and maintains vector genomes providing an integrated resource for the research community. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for two organisms: Anopheles gambiae, a vector for the Plasmodium protozoan agent causing malaria, and Aedes aegypti, a vector for the flaviviral agents causing Yellow fever and Dengue fever.

  15. The biological control of disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2012-09-21

    Vector-borne diseases are common in nature and can have a large impact on humans, livestock and crops. Biological control of vectors using natural enemies or competitors can reduce vector density and hence disease transmission. However, the indirect interactions inherent in host-vector disease systems make it difficult to use traditional pest control theory to guide biological control of disease vectors. This necessitates a conceptual framework that explicitly considers a range of indirect interactions between the host-vector disease system and the vector's biological control agent. Here we conduct a comparative analysis of the efficacy of different types of biological control agents in controlling vector-borne diseases. We report three key findings. First, highly efficient predators and parasitoids of the vector prove to be effective biological control agents, but highly virulent pathogens of the vector also require a high transmission rate to be effective. Second, biocontrol agents can successfully reduce long-term host disease incidence even though they may fail to reduce long-term vector densities. Third, inundating a host-vector disease system with a natural enemy of the vector has little or no effect on reducing disease incidence, but inundating the system with a competitor of the vector has a large effect on reducing disease incidence. The comparative framework yields predictions that are useful in developing biological control strategies for vector-borne diseases. We discuss how these predictions can inform ongoing biological control efforts for host-vector disease systems.

  16. Learning with LOGO: Logo and Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Tom; Tipps, Steve

    1986-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part series on the general concept of vector space. Provides tool procedures to allow investigation of vector properties, vector addition and subtraction, and X and Y components. Lists several sources of additional vector ideas. (JM)

  17. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  18. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  19. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukac, Rastislav; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Smolka, Bogdan; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03) in Grado, Italy.

  20. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers.

  1. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    PubMed

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats.

  2. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    PubMed

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats. PMID:1293885

  3. Biosafety of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Dismuke, David J; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Samulski, R Jude

    2013-12-01

    It is hoped that the use of gene transfer technology to treat both monogenetic and acquired diseases may soon become a common therapy option in medicine. For gene therapy to achieve this objective, any gene delivery method will have to meet several criteria, including ease of manufacturing, efficient gene transfer to target tissue, long-term gene expression to alleviate the disease, and most importantly safety in patients. Viral vectors are an attractive choice for use in gene therapy protocols due to their relative efficiency in gene delivery. Since there is inherent risk in using viruses, investigators in the gene therapy community have devoted extensive efforts toward reengineering viral vectors for enhance safety. Here we review the approaches and technologies that are being evaluated for the use of recombinant vectors based upon adeno-associated virus (AAV) in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. AAV is currently the only known human DNA virus that is non-pathogenic and AAV-based vectors are classified as Risk Group 1 agents for all laboratory and animal studies carried out in the US. Although its apparent safety in natural infection and animals appears well documented, we examine the accumulated knowledge on the biology and vectorology of AAV, lessons learned from gene therapy clinical trials, and how this information is impacting current vector design and manufacturing with an overall emphasis on biosafety. PMID:24195602

  4. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  5. Titration of serine/arginine (SR) splicing factors during adenoviral infection modulates E1A pre-mRNA alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, M; Cavaloc, Y; Chebli, K; Stévenin, J; Gattoni, R

    1995-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the adenovirus-2 E1A pre-mRNA involves the use of three 5' splice sites and is modulated during infection because the 13S mRNA and 9S mRNA reactions are predominant during the early and late periods, respectively. We had previously reproduced in vitro the 13S to 9S modulation with nuclear extracts isolated from infected HeLa cells and shown that high molecular weight viral RNAs are involved in this modulation, most likely by sequestering or titrating general splicing factors. To further test this hypothesis, we titrated splicing factors from an uninfected nuclear extract using competitor RNA or by progressive inactivation of splicing factors with monoclonal antibodies. We found that the 13S to 9S modulation occurs when titrating only with certain RNAs (essentially adenoviral RNAs), and also by progressively inactivating the 9G8 SR splicing factor. The demonstration that late nuclear extracts contain levels of active SR splicing factors limiting for the 13S reaction has been made by complementation experiments. We show that late nuclear extracts do not complement SR factor-deficient extracts, whereas late extracts treated with micrococcal nuclease complement them. Furthermore, complementation of late nuclear extracts with each of the three 30-35-kDa SR factors (9G8, SC35, and SF2/ASF) restores an efficient 13S mRNA reaction. Thus, our results provide evidence that the 13S to 9S modulation is triggered through a titration of SR factors required for the 13S mRNA reaction by major late transcripts that accumulate in nuclei late in infection.

  6. Adenoviral delivery of an antisense RNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits fibrogenic activities of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Arias, Monica; Lahme, Birgit; Van de Leur, Eddy; Gressner, Axel M; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a consequence of the transdifferentiationof hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblasts and is associated with an increased expression and activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. This pluripotent, profibrogenic cytokine stimulates matrix synthesis and decreases matrix degradation, resulting in fibrosis. Thus, blockade of synthesis or sequestering of mature TGF-beta1 is a primary target for the development of antifibrotic approaches. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the administration of adenoviruses constitutively expressing an antisense mRNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of TGF-beta1 is able to suppress the synthesis of TGF-beta1 in culture-activated hepatic stellate cells. We demonstrate that the adenoviral vehicle directs high-level expression of the transgene and proved that the transduced antisense is biologically active by immunoprecipitation, Western blot, quantitative TGF-beta1 ELISA, and cell proliferation assays. Additionally, the biological function of the transgene was confirmed by analysis of differential activity of TGF-beta1-responsive genes using cell ELISA, Northern blotting, and by microarray technology, respectively. Furthermore, we examined the effects of that transgene on the expression of TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, collagen type alpha1(I), latent transforming growth factor binding protein 1, types I and II TGF-beta receptors, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Our results indicate that the administration of antisense mRNA offers a feasible approach to block autocrine TGF-beta1 signaling in hepatic stellate cells and may be useful and applicable in future to the treatment of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

  7. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  8. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  9. Efficient production of dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for factor VIII delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Cao, Wenjing; Diao, Yong; Kapranov, Philipp; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have gained attention for human gene therapy because of their high safety and clinical efficacy profile. For factor VIII gene delivery, splitting the coding region between two AAV vectors remains a viable strategy to avoid the packaging capacity limitation (∼5.0 kb). However, it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to produce two rAAV vectors in separate batches. Here we demonstrated successful production of dual rAAV vectors for hemophilia A gene therapy in a single preparation. When the AAV vector plasmids carrying the human factor VIII heavy chain (hHC) and the light chain (hLC) expression cassettes were cotransfected into 293 cells along with the AAV rep&cap and mini-adenovirus helper plasmids, both rAAV-hHC and rAAV-hLC were produced at the desired ratio and in high titer. Interestingly, the rAAV-hHC vectors always yielded higher titers than rAAV-hLC vectors as a result of more efficient replication of rAAV-hHC genomes. The resulting vectors were effective in transducing the tissue culture cells in vitro. When these vectors were administered to hemophilia A mice, factor VIII was detected in the mouse plasma by both the activated partial thromboplastin time assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The functional activity as well as the antigen levels of secreted factor VIII were similar to those of vectors produced by the traditional method. The dual-vector production method has been successfully extended to both AAV2 and AAV8 serotypes. In conclusion, cotransfection of vector plasmids presents an efficient method for producing dual or multiple AAV vectors at significantly reduced cost and labor.

  10. Use of a mixture statistical model in studying malaria vectors density.

    PubMed

    Boussari, Olayidé; Moiroux, Nicolas; Iwaz, Jean; Djènontin, Armel; Bio-Bangana, Sahabi; Corbel, Vincent; Fonton, Noël; Ecochard, René

    2012-01-01

    Vector control is a major step in the process of malaria control and elimination. This requires vector counts and appropriate statistical analyses of these counts. However, vector counts are often overdispersed. A non-parametric mixture of Poisson model (NPMP) is proposed to allow for overdispersion and better describe vector distribution. Mosquito collections using the Human Landing Catches as well as collection of environmental and climatic data were carried out from January to December 2009 in 28 villages in Southern Benin. A NPMP regression model with "village" as random effect is used to test statistical correlations between malaria vectors density and environmental and climatic factors. Furthermore, the villages were ranked using the latent classes derived from the NPMP model. Based on this classification of the villages, the impacts of four vector control strategies implemented in the villages were compared. Vector counts were highly variable and overdispersed with important proportion of zeros (75%). The NPMP model had a good aptitude to predict the observed values and showed that: i) proximity to freshwater body, market gardening, and high levels of rain were associated with high vector density; ii) water conveyance, cattle breeding, vegetation index were associated with low vector density. The 28 villages could then be ranked according to the mean vector number as estimated by the random part of the model after adjustment on all covariates. The NPMP model made it possible to describe the distribution of the vector across the study area. The villages were ranked according to the mean vector density after taking into account the most important covariates. This study demonstrates the necessity and possibility of adapting methods of vector counting and sampling to each setting. PMID:23185626

  11. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  12. Anisotropic inflation from vector impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Kimura, Masashi; Soda, Jiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: mkimura@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We study an inflationary scenario with a vector impurity. We show that the universe undergoes anisotropic inflationary expansion due to a preferred direction determined by the vector. Using the slow roll approximation, we find a formula for determining the anisotropy of the inflationary universe. We discuss possible observable predictions of this scenario. In particular, it is stressed that primordial gravitational waves can be induced from curvature perturbations. Hence, even in low scale inflation, a sizable amount of primordial gravitational waves may be produced during inflation.

  13. Complexity of vector spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Yeo, J; Moore, M A

    2004-08-13

    We study the annealed complexity of the m-vector spin glasses in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick limit. The eigenvalue spectrum of the Hessian matrix of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer free energy is found to consist of a continuous band of positive eigenvalues in addition to an isolated eigenvalue and (m-1) null eigenvalues due to rotational invariance. Rather surprisingly, the band does not extend to zero at any finite temperature. The isolated eigenvalue becomes zero in the thermodynamic limit, as in the Ising case (m=1), indicating that the same supersymmetry breaking recently found in Ising spin glasses occurs in vector spin glasses.

  14. Use of simian virus 40 replication to amplify Epstein-Barr virus shuttle vectors in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, S S; Krysan, P J; Calos, M P; DuBridge, R B

    1988-01-01

    We have increased the copy number of Epstein-Barr virus vectors that also carry the origin of replication of simian virus 40 (SV40) by providing a transient dose of SV40 T antigen. T antigen was supplied in trans by transfection of a nonreplicating plasmid which expresses T antigen into cells carrying Epstein-Barr virus-SV40 vectors. A significant increase in vector copy number occurred over the next few days. We also observed a high frequency of intramolecular recombination when the vector carried a repeat segment in direct orientation, but not when the repeat was in inverted orientation or absent. Furthermore, by following the mutation frequency for a marker on the vector after induction of SV40 replication, it was determined that SV40 replication generates a detectable increase in the deletion frequency but no measurable increase in the frequency of point mutations. Images PMID:2843671

  15. Novel HDAd/EBV Reprogramming Vector and Highly Efficient Ad/CRISPR-Cas Sickle Cell Disease Gene Correction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Ding, Lei; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Wu, Li-Chen; Zhou, Dewang; Pawlik, Kevin M.; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Westin, Erik; Goldman, Frederick D.; Townes, Tim M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas enhanced correction of the sickle cell disease (SCD) genetic defect in patient-specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) provides a potential gene therapy for this debilitating disease. An advantage of this approach is that corrected iPSCs that are free of off-target modifications can be identified before differentiating the cells into hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation. In order for this approach to be practical, iPSC generation must be rapid and efficient. Therefore, we developed a novel helper-dependent adenovirus/Epstein-Barr virus (HDAd/EBV) hybrid reprogramming vector, rCLAE-R6, that delivers six reprogramming factors episomally. HDAd/EBV transduction of keratinocytes from SCD patients resulted in footprint-free iPSCs with high efficiency. Subsequently, the sickle mutation was corrected by delivering CRISPR/Cas9 with adenovirus followed by nucleoporation with a 70 nt single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN) correction template. Correction efficiencies of up to 67.9% (βA/[βS+βA]) were obtained. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of corrected iPSC lines demonstrated no CRISPR/Cas modifications in 1467 potential off-target sites and no modifications in tumor suppressor genes or other genes associated with pathologies. These results demonstrate that adenoviral delivery of reprogramming factors and CRISPR/Cas provides a rapid and efficient method of deriving gene-corrected, patient-specific iPSCs for therapeutic applications. PMID:27460639

  16. The role of working memory in carrying and borrowing.

    PubMed

    Imbo, Ineke; Vandierendonck, André; Vergauwe, Evie

    2007-07-01

    The present study analyzed the role of phonological and executive components of working memory in the borrow operation in complex subtractions (Experiments 1 and 2) and in the carry operation in complex multiplications (Experiments 3 and 4). The number of carry and borrow operations as well as the value of the carry were manipulated. Results indicated that both the number of carry/borrow operations and the value of the carry increased problem difficulty, resulting in higher reliance on phonological and executive working-memory components. Present results are compared with those obtained for the carry operation in complex addition and are further discussed in the broader framework of working-memory functions.

  17. Combining Viral Vectored and Protein-in-adjuvant Vaccines Against the Blood-stage Malaria Antigen AMA1: Report on a Phase 1a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel GW; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines—chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising “mixed-modality” regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  18. pUNISHER: a high-level expression cassette for use with recombinant viral vectors for rapid and long term in vivo neuronal expression in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Monica S; Chen, Zuxin; Young, Samuel M

    2011-12-01

    Fast onset and high-level neurospecific transgene expression in vivo is of importance for many areas in neuroscience, from basic to translational, and can significantly reduce the amount of vector load required to maintain transgene expression in vivo. In this study, we tested various cis elements to optimize transgene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels and combined them together to create the high-level neuronal transgene expression cassette pUNISHER. Using a second-generation adenoviral vector system in combination with the pUNISHER cassette, we characterized its rate of onset of detectable expression and levels of expression compared with a neurospecific expression cassette driven by the 470-bp human synapsin promoter in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate in primary neurons that the pUNISHER cassette, in a recombinant adenovirus type 5 background, led to a faster rate of onset of detectable transgene expression and higher level of transgene expression. More importantly, this cassette led to highly correlated neuronal expression in vivo and to stable transgene expression up to 30 days in the auditory brain stem with no toxicity on the characteristics of synaptic transmission and plasticity at the calyx of Held synapse. Thus the pUNISHER cassette is an ideal high-level neuronal expression cassette for use in vivo for neuroscience applications. PMID:21957229

  19. Combining viral vectored and protein-in-adjuvant vaccines against the blood-stage malaria antigen AMA1: report on a phase 1a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel Gw; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines--chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising "mixed-modality" regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  20. Primer vector theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A method developed to compute two-body, optimal, N-impulse trajectories was presented. The necessary conditions established define the gradient structure of the primer vector and its derivative for any set of boundary conditions and any number of impulses. Inequality constraints, a conjugate gradient iterator technique, and the use of a penalty function were also discussed.

  1. Interframe vector wavelet coding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wus, John P.; Li, Weiping

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet coding is often used to divide an image into multi- resolution wavelet coefficients which are quantized and coded. By 'vectorizing' scalar wavelet coding and combining this with vector quantization (VQ), vector wavelet coding (VWC) can be implemented. Using a finite number of states, finite-state vector quantization (FSVQ) takes advantage of the similarity between frames by incorporating memory into the video coding system. Lattice VQ eliminates the potential mismatch that could occur using pre-trained VQ codebooks. It also eliminates the need for codebook storage in the VQ process, thereby creating a more robust coding system. Therefore, by using the VWC coding method in conjunction with the FSVQ system and lattice VQ, the formulation of a high quality very low bit rate coding systems is proposed. A coding system using a simple FSVQ system where the current state is determined by the previous channel symbol only is developed. To achieve a higher degree of compression, a tree-like FSVQ system is implemented. The groupings are done in this tree-like structure from the lower subbands to the higher subbands in order to exploit the nature of subband analysis in terms of the parent-child relationship. Class A and Class B video sequences from the MPEG-IV testing evaluations are used in the evaluation of this coding method.

  2. [Vector control, perspectives and realities].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, P

    1995-01-01

    In the WHO Global Strategy for Malaria Control, selective and sustainable vector control is one of the measures to be implemented to complement case management and for the control of epidemics. Vector control can be targeted against larvae and adults, but two elements must be recognized: -vector control measures must be selected according to the existing eco-epidemiological diversity, which has to be well understood before embarking upon any extensive action; -efficient tools are currently available, both for large scale and household use. House spraying is still the method of choice for epidemic control but must be carefully considered and used selectively in endemic countries for various well known reasons. The promotion of personal protection measures for malaria prevention is advocated because insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other materials have proved to be effective in different situations. Implementation, sustainability and large scale use of impregnated nets implies a strong community participation supported by well motivated community health workers, the availability of suitable materials (insecticide, mosquito nets), intersectorial collaboration at all levels, well trained health workers from central to the most peripheral level and appropriate educational messages (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices) adapted and elaborated after surveys. It has to be kept in mind that the evaluation of the impact of vector control activities will be made in epidemiological terms such as the reduction of malaria morbidity and mortality.

  3. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  4. Transcriptomics and disease vector control.

    PubMed

    Vontas, John; Ranson, Hilary; Alphey, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever.

  5. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  6. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  7. Functional proteome of macrophage carried nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy demonstrates enhanced particle carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L; Veerubhotla, Ram S; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2013-05-01

    Our laboratory developed long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) to improve drug compliance, reduce toxicities, and facilitate access of drug to viral reservoirs. These all function to inevitably improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells' functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  8. Whole transcriptome characterization of aberrant splicing events induced by lentiviral vector integrations

    PubMed Central

    Cesana, Daniela; Sgualdino, Jacopo; Rudilosso, Laura; Merella, Stefania; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-retroviral/lentiviral vectors (γRV/LV) with self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) and internal moderate cellular promoters pose a reduced risk of insertional mutagenesis when compared with vectors with active LTRs. Yet, in a recent LV-based clinical trial for β-thalassemia, vector integration within the HMGA2 gene induced the formation of an aberrantly spliced mRNA form that appeared to cause clonal dominance. Using a method that we developed, cDNA linear amplification-mediated PCR, in combination with high-throughput sequencing, we conducted a whole transcriptome analysis of chimeric LV-cellular fusion transcripts in transduced human lymphoblastoid cells and primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We observed a surprising abundance of read-through transcription originating outside and inside the provirus and identified the vector sequences contributing to the aberrant splicing process. We found that SIN LV has a sharply reduced propensity to engage in aberrant splicing compared with that of vectors carrying active LTRs. Moreover, by recoding the identified vector splice sites, we reduced residual read-through transcription and demonstrated an effective strategy for improving vectors. Characterization of the mechanisms and genetic features underlying vector-induced aberrant splicing will enable the generation of safer vectors, with low impact on the cellular transcriptome. PMID:22523064

  9. Impact of the Adenoviral E4 Orf3 Protein on the Activity and Posttranslational Modification of p53

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Perlman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our previous studies have established that the p53 populations that accumulate in normal human cells exposed to etoposide or infected by an E1B 55-kDa protein-null mutant of human adenovirus type 5 carry a large number of posttranslational modifications at numerous residues (C. J. DeHart, J. S. Chahal, S. J. Flint, and D. H. Perlman, Mol Cell Proteomics 13:1–17, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M113.030254). In the absence of this E1B protein, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced, and it has been reported that the viral E4 Orf3 protein inactivates p53 (C. Soria, F. E. Estermann, K. C. Espantman, and C. C. O'Shea, Nature 466:1076–1081, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09307). As the latter protein disrupts nuclear Pml bodies, sites at which p53 is modified, we used mass spectrometry to catalogue the posttranscriptional modifications of the p53 population that accumulates when neither the E1B 55-kDa nor the E4 Orf3 protein is made in infected cells. Eighty-five residues carrying 163 modifications were identified. The overall patterns of posttranslational modification of this population and p53 present in cells infected by an E1B 55-kDa-null mutant were similar. The efficiencies with which the two forms of p53 bound to a consensus DNA recognition sequence could not be distinguished and were lower than that of transcriptionally active p53. The absence of the E4 Orf3 protein increased expression of several p53-responsive genes when the E1B protein was also absent from infected cells. However, expression of these genes did not attain the levels observed when p53 was activated in response to etoposide treatment and remained lower than those measured in mock-infected cells. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53, a master regulator of cellular responses to stress, is inactivated and destroyed in cells infected by species C human adenoviruses, such as type 5. It is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the action of a virus-specific E3

  10. Arthropods vector grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moyo, P; Allsopp, E; Roets, F; Mostert, L; Halleen, F

    2014-10-01

    Arthropod-mediated dispersal of pathogens is known in many cropping systems but has never been demonstrated for grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Arthropods from vineyards were screened for the presence of pathogens associated with Petri disease and esca using cultural and molecular techniques. The ability of the most abundant pathogen-carrying species to inoculate healthy grapevine vascular tissues was also determined. Millipedes and ants were allowed to associate with a DsRed- Express-transformed Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, after which they were exposed to freshly pruned healthy grapevines under controlled conditions and wounds were monitored for subsequent infection. In addition, the possibility of millipede excreta, commonly found on pruning wounds in the field, to act as inoculum source was determined. A diverse arthropod fauna was associated with declining grapevines and many of these carried trunk disease pathogens. However, spiders, the ant Crematogaster peringueyi, and the millipede Ommattoiulus moreleti were the most abundant pathogen carriers. The ant and millipede species fed on pruning wound sap and effectively transmitted trunk disease pathogens. Millipede excreta contained viable spores of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and may serve as an inoculum source. Numerous arthropods, including beneficial predators, are potential vectors of grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Our results highlight the need for an integrated approach, including targeted management of ants and millipedes at the time of pruning, to limit the spread of grapevine trunk diseases.

  11. 46 CFR 169.213 - Permit to carry excursion party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., the number of persons the vessel may carry, the crew required, and additional lifesaving or safety... permit to carry an excursion party must be in full compliance with the terms of its certificate...

  12. 46 CFR 176.204 - Permit to carry excursion party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may carry, the crew required, any additional lifesaving or safety equipment required, the route for... vessel operating under a permit to carry an excursion party must be in full compliance with the terms...

  13. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  14. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  15. 32 CFR 552.103 - Requirements for carrying and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements for carrying and use. Persons legally authorized to possess firearms, ammunition, knives (with... engaged in hunting or shooting. Knives will be carried in a sheath or scabbard worn in a clearly visible manner. Commanders may authorize the carrying of a privately-owned knife with a blade over 3 inches...

  16. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  17. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  18. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  19. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  20. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  1. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  2. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  3. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  4. 46 CFR 111.105-35 - Vessels carrying coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessels carrying coal. 111.105-35 Section 111.105-35...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-35 Vessels carrying coal. (a) The following are Class II, Division 1, (Zone 10 or Z) locations on a vessel that carries coal: (1) The interior of each...

  5. 46 CFR 111.105-35 - Vessels carrying coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessels carrying coal. 111.105-35 Section 111.105-35...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-35 Vessels carrying coal. (a) The following are Class II, Division 1, (Zone 10 or Z) locations on a vessel that carries coal: (1) The interior of each...

  6. 46 CFR 111.105-35 - Vessels carrying coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessels carrying coal. 111.105-35 Section 111.105-35...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-35 Vessels carrying coal. (a) The following are Class II, Division 1, (Zone 10 or Z) locations on a vessel that carries coal: (1) The interior of each...

  7. 46 CFR 111.105-35 - Vessels carrying coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessels carrying coal. 111.105-35 Section 111.105-35...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-35 Vessels carrying coal. (a) The following are Class II, Division 1, (Zone 10 or Z) locations on a vessel that carries coal: (1) The interior of each...

  8. 46 CFR 111.105-35 - Vessels carrying coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessels carrying coal. 111.105-35 Section 111.105-35...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-35 Vessels carrying coal. (a) The following are Class II, Division 1, (Zone 10 or Z) locations on a vessel that carries coal: (1) The interior of each...

  9. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  10. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  14. Genetic transformation of Brassica nigra by agrobacterium based vector and direct plasmid uptake.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Lakshmi Sita, G; Shaila, M S; Jagannathan, V

    1993-05-01

    Genetic transformation systems have been established for Brassica nigra (cv. IC 257) by using an Agrobacterium binary vector as well as by direct DNA uptake of a plasmid vector. Both the type of vectors carried nptII gene and gus gene. For Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hypocotyl tissue explants were used, and up to 33% of the explants produced calli on selection medium. All of these expressed B-glucuronidase gene on histochemical staining. Protoplasts isolated from hypocotyl tissues of seedlings could be transformed with a plasmid vector by FEG mediated uptake of vector DNA. A number of fertile kanamycin resistant plants were obtained using both the methods, and their transformed nature was confirmed by Southern blot analysis and histochemical staining for GUS. Backcrossed and selfed progenies of these transformed plants showed the presence of npt and gus genes. PMID:24197344

  15. Decoding the ubiquitin-mediated pathway of arthropod disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Choy, Anthony; Severo, Maiara S; Sun, Ruobai; Girke, Thomas; Gillespie, Joseph J; Pedra, Joao H F

    2013-01-01

    Protein regulation by ubiquitin has been extensively described in model organisms. However, characterization of the ubiquitin machinery in disease vectors remains mostly unknown. This fundamental gap in knowledge presents a concern because new therapeutics are needed to control vector-borne diseases, and targeting the ubiquitin machinery as a means for disease intervention has been already adopted in the clinic. In this study, we employed a bioinformatics approach to uncover the ubiquitin-mediated pathway in the genomes of Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus and Rhodnius prolixus. We observed that (1) disease vectors encode a lower percentage of ubiquitin-related genes when compared to Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens but not Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (2) overall, there are more proteins categorized as E3 ubiquitin ligases when compared to E2-conjugating or E1-activating enzymes; (3) the ubiquitin machinery within the three mosquito genomes is highly similar; (4) ubiquitin genes are more than doubled in the Chagas disease vector (R. prolixus) when compared to other arthropod vectors; (5) the deer tick I. scapularis and the body louse (P. humanus) genomes carry low numbers of E1-activating enzymes and HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligases; (6) R. prolixus have low numbers of RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases; and (7) C. quinquefasciatus present elevated numbers of predicted F-box E3 ubiquitin ligases, JAB and UCH deubiquitinases. Taken together, these findings provide novel opportunities to study the interaction between a pathogen and an arthropod vector. PMID:24205097

  16. Candidate insect vectors of apple proliferation in Northwest Spain.

    PubMed

    Miñarro, Marcos; Somoano, Aitor; Moreno, Aránzazu; García, Rocío Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The apple proliferation (AP) disease is spread mostly by two psyllids. Each species plays a predominant role as AP vector that changes regionally. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify the AP vectors in each region where the disease is present. This research aimed at identifying the psyllid community in apple orchards from Asturias (NW Spain) and studying their possible role in AP transmission. Yellow sticky traps were used to monitor psyllid community in five cider-apple orchards during 2 years. 3678 individuals belonging to 22 species were identified. We confirmed the presence of the two known vectors, Cacopsylla picta and Cacopsylla melanoneura, although they occurred in relatively low numbers (2.1 and 0.7 % of total catches, respectively). Most collected psyllids are not supposed to use apple as host, and their occurrence is likely favoured by landscape structure and an insect-friendly management. Phytoplasma detection was performed by squash-capture real-time PCR. The pathogen was detected in six species (Cacopsylla crataegi, Cacopsylla mali, Ctenarytaina spatulata, Ctenarytaina eucalypti and the two known AP vectors). Based on abundance and AP-detection rate C. picta is likely the main species spreading AP in our region. However, the low density of the known vectors does not match the widespread and high tree damage level observed in Asturias. The discovery of other four psyllid species carrying the phytoplasma reveals that our knowledge on the potential vectors is limited and that more research is clearly needed to unravel the role of the psyllid fauna in disease transmission in our orchards. PMID:27536523

  17. Adenoviral-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer has a protective effect on sciatic nerve following constriction-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  18. Present status of vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Monte Carlo applications have traditionally been limited by the large amounts of computer time required to produce acceptably small statistical uncertainties, so the immediate benefit of vectorization is an increase in either the number of jobs completed or the number of particles processed per job, typically by one order of magnitude or more. This results directly in improved engineering design analyses, since Monte Carlo methods are used as standards for correcting more approximate methods. The relatively small number of vectorized programs is a consequence of the newness of vectorized Monte Carlo, the difficulties of nonportability, and the very large development effort required to rewrite or restructure Monte Carlo codes for vectorization. Based on the successful efforts to date, it may be concluded that Monte Carlo vectorization will spread to increasing numbers of codes and applications. The possibility of multitasking provides even further motivation for vectorizing Monte Carlo, since the step from vector to multitasked vector is relatively straightforward.

  19. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  20. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  1. Advances in lentiviral vectors: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Picanco-Castro, Virginia; de Sousa Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Tadeu Covas, Dimas

    2012-08-01

    Lentiviral vectors are at the forefront of gene delivery systems for research and clinical applications. These vectors have the ability to efficiently transduce nondividing and dividing cells, to insert large genetic segment in the host chromatin, and to sustain stable long-term transgene expression. Most of lentiviral vectors systems in use are derived from HIV-1. Numerous modifications in the basic HIV structure have been made to ensure safety and to promote efficiency to vectors. Lentiviral vectors can be pseudotyped with distinct viral envelopes that influence vector tropism and transduction efficiency. Moreover, these vectors can be used to reprogram cells and generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This review aims to show the patents that resulted in improved safety and efficacy of lentiviral vector with important implications for clinical trials.

  2. Dynamic reduction of dimensions of a document vector in a document search and retrieval system

    DOEpatents

    Jiao, Yu; Potok, Thomas E.

    2011-05-03

    The method and system of the invention involves processing each new document (20) coming into the system into a document vector (16), and creating a document vector with reduced dimensionality (17) for comparison with the data model (15) without recomputing the data model (15). These operations are carried out by a first computer (11) while a second computer (12) updates the data model (18), which can be comprised of an initial large group of documents (19) and is premised on the computing an initial data model (13, 14, 15) to provide a reference point for determining document vectors from documents processed from the data stream (20).

  3. An rpsL-based allelic exchange vector for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chen, John; Ram, Geeta; Yoong, Pauline; Penadés, José R; Shopsin, Bo; Novick, Richard P

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most successful bacterial pathogens, harboring a vast repertoire of virulence factors in its arsenal. As such, the genetic manipulation of S. aureus chromosomal DNA is an important tool for the study of genes involved in virulence and survival in the host. Previously reported allelic exchange vectors for S. aureus are shuttle vectors that can be propagated in Escherichia coli, so that standard genetic manipulations can be carried out. Most of the vectors currently in use carry the temperature-sensitive replicon (pE194ts) that was originally developed for use in Bacillus subtilis. Here we show that in S. aureus, the thermosensitivity of a pE194ts vector is incomplete at standard non-permissive temperatures (42 °C), and replication of the plasmid is impaired but not abolished. We report rpsL-based counterselection vectors, with an improved temperature-sensitive replicon (pT181 repC3) that is completely blocked for replication in S. aureus at non-permissive and standard growth temperature (37 °C). We also describe a set of temperature-sensitive vectors that can be cured at standard growth temperature. These vectors provide highly effective tools for rapidly generating allelic replacement mutations and curing expression plasmids, and expand the genetic tool set available for the study of S. aureus.

  4. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  5. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  6. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  7. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  9. Benchmarking the IBM 3090 with Vector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brickner, R.G.; Wasserman, H.J.; Hayes, A.H.; Moore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The IBM 3090 with Vector Facility is an extremely interesting machine because it combines very good scaler performance with enhanced vector and multitasking performance. For many IBM installations with a large scientific workload, the 3090/vector/MTF combination may be an ideal means of increasing throughput at minimum cost. However, neither the vector nor multitasking capabilities are sufficiently developed to make the 3090 competitive with our current worker machines for our large-scale scientific codes.

  10. Chimpanzee adenovirus and MVA-vectored respiratory syncytial virus vaccine is safe and expands humoral and cellular immunity in adults

    PubMed Central

    Green, CA; Scarselli, E; Sande, CJ; Thompson, AJ; de Lara, CM; Taylor, K; Haworth, K; Del Sorbo, M; Angus, B; Siani, L; Di Marco, S; Traboni, C; Folgori, A; Colloca, S; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Cortese, R; Klenerman, P; Nicosia, A; Pollard, AJ

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory infection in annual epidemics, with infants and the elderly at particular risk of developing severe disease and death. However, despite its importance, no vaccine exists. The chimpanzee adenovirus, PanAd3-RSV, and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, MVA-RSV, are replication defective viral vectors encoding the RSV proteins F, N and M2-1 for the induction of humoral and cellular responses. We performed an open-label, dose-escalation, phase 1 clinical trial in 42 healthy adults in which four different combinations of prime/boost vaccinations were investigated for safety and immunogenicity, including both intra-muscular and intra-nasal administration of the adenoviral vectored vaccine. The vaccines were safe and well tolerated, with the most common reported adverse events being mild injection site reactions. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. RSV neutralising antibody titres rose in response to intramuscular (IM) prime with PanAd3-RSV, and after IM boost for individuals primed by the intra-nasal (IN) route. Circulating anti-F IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells (ASCs) were observed after IM prime and IM boost. RSV-specific T-cell responses were increased after IM PanAd3-RSV prime and were most efficiently boosted by IM MVA-RSV. IFNγ secretion after boost was from both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, without detectable Th2 cytokines that have been previously associated with immune pathogenesis following exposure to RSV after formalin inactivated RSV vaccine. In conclusion, PanAd3-RSV and MVA-RSV are safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy to assess their potential to reduce the burden of RSV disease. PMID:26268313

  11. Immune Protection of Nonhuman Primates against Ebola Virus with Single Low-Dose Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Modified GPs

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Joan B; Shedlock, Devon J; Xu, Ling; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Custers, Jerome H. H. V; Popernack, Paul M; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Pau, Maria G; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jahrling, Peter B; Nabel, Gary J

    2006-01-01

    Background Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAd) encoding the Ebola glycoprotein (GP) and nucleoprotein (NP) has been previously shown to confer specific protective immunity in nonhuman primates. GP can exert cytopathic effects on transfected cells in vitro, and multiple GP forms have been identified in nature, raising the question of which would be optimal for a human vaccine. Methods and Findings To address this question, we have explored the efficacy of mutant GPs from multiple Ebola virus strains with reduced in vitro cytopathicity and analyzed their protective effects in the primate challenge model, with or without NP. Deletion of the GP transmembrane domain eliminated in vitro cytopathicity but reduced its protective efficacy by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, a point mutation was identified that abolished this cytopathicity but retained immunogenicity and conferred immune protection in the absence of NP. The minimal effective rAd dose was established at 1010 particles, two logs lower than that used previously. Conclusions Expression of specific GPs alone vectored by rAd are sufficient to confer protection against lethal challenge in a relevant nonhuman primate model. Elimination of NP from the vaccine and dose reductions to 1010 rAd particles do not diminish protection and simplify the vaccine, providing the basis for selection of a human vaccine candidate. PMID:16683867

  12. Photoproduction of vector messons off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kossov, M.

    1994-04-01

    Vector mesons play an important role in photonuclear reactions because they carry the same quantum numbers as the incident photon. It has recently been suggested by G.E. Brown and M. Rho that the mass of vector mesons could decrease with increasing baryon density. This phenomenon would provide a physical observable for chiral symmetry ({xi}{sup S}) restoration at high baryon density, an essential non-perturbative phenomenon associated with the structure of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). According to the constituent quark model the difference between the mass of the valence quark m{sub v} and the mass of the current quark m{sub c} is expected to be proportional to the mean vacuum value of the quark condensate: m{sub v}-m{sub c} {proportional_to} ({psi}{psi}){sub v}. The mass difference appears because of chiral symmetry breaking {xi}{sup SB}. QCD sum rule calculations show that the value of this difference is about 300 MeV for all quarks. If the mean vacuum value differs from that for the hadron density in nuclei, then the constituent quark mass should be renormalized as follows: m{sub v}{sup l}=m{sub c} + ({psi}{psi})n/({psi}{psi})v {center_dot}300MeV, where the indices n correspond to nuclear matter and v to vacuum. The same conclusion was reached in a nuclear matter model based on quark degrees of freedom. Using the symmetry properties of QCD in an effective Lagrangian theory, Brown and Rho have found a scaling law for the vector meson masses at finite baryon density: M{sub N}{sup n}/M{sub N}{sup v}=M{sub V}{sup n}/M{sub V}{sup v}=f{sub {pi}}{sup n}/f{sub {pi}}{sup v}, where f{sub {pi}} is the {pi} {r_arrow}{mu}{nu} decay constant playing the role of an order parameter for the chiral symmetry restoration. At nuclear density the value of f{sub {pi}} was found to be 15-20% smaller than in vacuum. In contrast to the constituent quark model, it was found that M{sup n}/M=({sub n}/{sub v}){sup 1/3}.

  13. Ultrasonic Dynamic Vector Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Froggatt, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Stress inferred from measurements in specimens rather than in bonded gauges. Ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS) measures changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in material or structure at location touched by device when material or structure put under cyclic load. Includes phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe. Useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and evaluation of designs.

  14. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    STEINWART, INGO; HUSH, DON; SCOVEL, CLINT; LIST, NICOLAS

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  15. Quantum mechanics without state vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Because the state vectors of isolated systems can be changed in entangled states by processes in other isolated systems, keeping only the density matrix fixed, it is proposed to give up the description of physical states in terms of ensembles of state vectors with various probabilities, relying only on density matrices. The density matrix is defined here by the formula giving the mean values of physical quantities, which implies the same properties as the usual definition in terms of state vectors and their probabilities. This change in the description of physical states opens up a large variety of new ways that the density matrix may transform under various symmetries, different from the unitary transformations of ordinary quantum mechanics. Such new transformation properties have been explored before, but so far only for the symmetry of time translations into the future, treated as a semigroup. Here, new transformation properties are studied for general symmetry transformations forming groups, not just semigroups. Arguments that such symmetries should act on the density matrix as in ordinary quantum mechanics are presented, but all of these arguments are found to be inconclusive.

  16. MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector Level 3 Wednesday, November 7, 2012 ... A new version, F02_0002, of the MISR L3 CMV (Cloud Motion Vector) data product is now available. This new release provides finer ... coverage. These enhancements are the result of reorganizing motion vector information present in the recent Level 2 Cloud product as ...

  17. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  18. A drop theorem without vector topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chi-Wing

    2007-05-01

    Danes' drop theorem is extended to bornological vector spaces. An immediate application is to establish Ekeland-type variational principle and its equivalence, Caristi fixed point theorem, in bornological vector spaces. Meanwhile, since every locally convex space becomes a convex bornological vector space when equipped with the canonical von Neumann bornology, Qiu's generalization of Danes' work to locally convex spaces is recovered.

  19. Purification and Injection of Retroviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ayumu; Zhao, Chunmei; Suh, Hoonkyo; Gage, Fred H

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. This protocol discusses the production, purification, and use of replication-deficient retroviral vectors based on Moloney murine leukemia virus and lentivirus. It also describes the injection of a retroviral vector into the dentate gyrus of young adult mice to fluorescently label live murine brain tissue.

  20. Problems with the Method of Correlated Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, M.C.; Lee, K.

    2005-01-01

    The method of correlated vectors has been used widely to identify variables that are associated with general intelligence (g). Briefly, this method involves finding the correlation between the vector of intelligence subtests' g-loadings and the vector of those subtests' correlations with the variable in question. We describe two major problems…