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Sample records for adenovirus encoding human

  1. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  2. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  3. Breast cancer gene therapy using an adenovirus encoding human IL-2 under control of mammaglobin promoter/enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, S; Hew, P; Crosley, P; Sharon, D; Potts, K; Agopsowicz, K; Long, M; Shi, C; Hitt, M M

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used clinically for the treatment of some malignancies, but the toxicities associated with systemic IL-2 therapy are a major challenge. Here we have determined whether transcriptional targeting of IL-2 to breast cancer (BrCa) using an engineered human mammaglobin promoter/enhancer (MPE2) is a feasible option for reducing IL-2-associated toxicities while still achieving a meaningful antitumor effect. We have constructed nonreplicating adenovirus vectors encoding either a reporter gene (luciferase) or human IL-2 (hIL-2) complementary DNA under control of the MPE2 sequence, the murine cytomegalovirus immediate early (MCMV) promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. Luciferase and hIL-2 complementary DNAs under the control of the MPE2 sequence in adenovirus vectors were expressed at high levels in BrCa cells and at lower levels in normal cells of human and murine origin. Cancer specificity of the hTERT promoter was found to be similar to that of the MPE2 promoter in cells of human origin, but reduced specificity in murine cells. The MPE2 regulatory sequence demonstrated excellent tissue specificity in a mouse tumor model. Whereas the MCMV promoter-controlled IL-2 vector generated high liver toxicity in mice, the MPE2-controlled IL-2 vector generated little or no liver toxicity. Both IL-2 vectors exerted significant tumor growth delay; however, attempts to further enhance antitumor activity of the IL-2 vectors by combining with the proapoptotic drug procaspase activating compound 1 (PAC1) were unsuccessful. PMID:27151235

  4. Human adenovirus early region 4 open reading frame 1 genes encode growth-transforming proteins that may be distantly related to dUTP pyrophosphatase enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R S; Lee, S S; Prasad, B V; Javier, R T

    1997-01-01

    An essential oncogenic determinant of subgroup D human adenovirus type 9 (Ad9), which uniquely elicits estrogen-dependent mammary tumors in rats, is encoded by early region 4 open reading frame 1 (E4 ORF1). Whereas Ad9 E4 ORF1 efficiently induces transformed foci on the established rat embryo fibroblast cell line CREF, the related subgroup A Ad12 and subgroup C Ad5 E4 ORF1s do not (R. T. Javier, J. Virol. 68:3917-3924, 1994). In this study, we found that the lack of transforming activity associated with non-subgroup D adenovirus E4 ORF1s in CREF cells correlated with significantly reduced protein levels compared to Ad9 E4 ORF1 in these cells. In the human cell line TE85, however, the non-subgroup D adenovirus E4 ORF1s produced protein levels higher than those seen in CREF cells as well as transforming activities similar to that of Ad9 E4 ORF1, suggesting that all adenovirus E4 ORF1 polypeptides possess comparable cellular growth-transforming activities. In addition, searches for known proteins related to these novel viral transforming proteins revealed that the E4 ORF1 proteins had weak sequence similarity, over the entire length of the E4 ORF1 polypeptides, with a variety of organismal and viral dUTP pyrophosphatase (dUTPase) enzymes. Even though adenovirus E4 ORF1 proteins lacked conserved protein motifs of dUTPase enzymes or detectable enzymatic activity, E4 ORF1 and dUTPase proteins were predicted to possess strikingly similar secondary structure arrangements. It was also established that an avian adenovirus protein, encoded within a genomic location analogous to that of the human adenovirus E4 ORF1s, was a genuine dUTPase enzyme. Although no functional similarity was found for the E4 ORF1 and dUTPase proteins, we propose that human adenovirus E4 ORF1 genes have evolved from an ancestral adenovirus dUTPase and, from this structural framework, developed novel transforming properties. PMID:9032316

  5. Structure of human adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2012-07-11

    A detailed structural analysis of the entire human adenovirus capsid has been stymied by the complexity and size of this 150 MDa macromolecular complex. Over the past 10 years, the steady improvements in viral genome manipulation concomitant with advances in crystallographic techniques and data processing software has allowed structure determination of this virus by X-ray diffraction at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution. The virus structure revealed the location, folds, and interactions of major and minor (cement proteins) on the inner and outer capsid surface. This new structural information sheds further light on the process of adenovirus capsid assembly and virus-host cell interactions.

  6. Phosphorylation in vitro of Escherichia coli-produced 235R and 266R tumor antigens encoded by human adenovirus type 12 early transformation region 1A.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1985-01-01

    The tumor (T) antigens encoded by the human adenovirus early transforming region 1A (E1A) are gene regulatory proteins whose functions can immortalize cells. We have recently described the synthesis in Escherichia coli and the purification of the complete T antigens encoded by the adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) E1A 12S mRNA (235-residue [235R] T antigen) and 13S mRNA (266R T antigen). In this study, we show that the Ad12 E1A T antigens are extensively phosphorylated in Ad12-infected mammalian cells but are not phosphorylated in E. coli. Inasmuch as posttranslational phosphorylation at specific amino acid sites may be important for biological activity, we have studied the phosphorylation of the E. coli-produced T antigens in vitro by using a kinase activity isolated from cultured human KB cells. The kinase was purified about 300-fold and appears to be a cyclic AMP-independent, Ca2+-independent protein kinase requiring only ATP and Mg2+ for activity. To determine which amino acids are phosphorylated and whether phosphorylation in vitro occurs at the same amino acid sites that are phosphorylated in vivo, the Ad12 E1A T-antigen species synthesized by infected cells were metabolically labeled with 32Pi and compared with the E. coli-produced E1A T antigens labeled in vitro with [gamma-32P]ATP by using the partially purified kinase. Partial V8 proteolysis analysis gave similar patterns for in vivo- and in vitro-phosphorylated T antigen. Two-dimensional maps of tryptic phosphopeptides and of chymotryptic phosphopeptides suggested that mainly the same amino acid sites are phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo and that phosphorylation occurred at multiple sites distributed throughout the T-antigen molecule. Serine was the only amino acid that was phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro, and, surprisingly, most serines appeared to be phosphorylated. The feasibility of faithfully phosphorylating T antigens in vitro suggests that the E. coli-produced Ad12 E1A 235R and 266R T antigens

  7. Synthesis in Escherichia coli of human adenovirus type 12 transforming proteins encoded by early region 1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kimelman, D; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Ptashne, M; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad)-encoded early region 1A (E1A) tumor (T) antigens have been implicated in the positive regulation of viral early genes, the positive and negative regulation of some cellular genes, and cell immortalization and transformation. To further study the Ad E1A T antigens and to facilitate their purification, we have cloned cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA downstream of a hybrid Escherichia coli trp-lac (tac) promoter. Up to 8% of the protein synthesized in E. coli cells transformed by each of the two different Ad12 E1A cDNA constructs were immunoprecipitated as a Mr 47,000 protein by antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded in the Ad12 E1A DNA sequence. Both proteins produced in E. coli appear to be authentic and complete Ad12 E1A T antigens because they possess (i) the Ad12 E1A NH2-terminal amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence; (ii) the Ad12 E1A COOH-terminal sequence, as shown by immunoprecipitation with anti-peptide antibody; and (iii) a molecular weight and an acidic isoelectric point similar to that of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected and transformed mammalian cells. The T antigens were purified to near homogeneity in yields of 100-200 micrograms per g wet weight of transformed E. coli cells. Images PMID:6387701

  8. Adenovirus type 2 encoded early 11 kDa protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.V.K.N.; Kapoor, Q.S.

    1986-05-01

    Several adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) encoded early proteins have been identified in viral infected human KB cells. These proteins are of great interest as they play key roles in cell transformation, viral DNA synthesis and gene expression. They have partially purified an AD2 encoded early polypeptide of an apparent molecular weight of 11 kilodaltons from the nuclei of viral infected cells labelled with /sup 35/S-methionine. After DNA removal from the nuclear extracts, the polypeptide was isolated using DEAE-Sephacel anion exchange and Biogel P-10 gel filtration columns. This simple two step procedure yielded several fold purification of the polypeptide. Antisera raised in mice against an Ad2 transformed rat cell line 8617 was found to immunoprecipitate the 11 kDa polypeptide from the nuclear extract of Ad2 infected KB cells. After relating this protein to an open reading frame of an Ad2 early gene block by matching the amino acid sequences to the nucleotide sequences of early genes, they plan to functionally characterize this protein by using monoclonal antibodies in in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  9. Human adenovirus 5-vectored Plasmodium falciparum NMRC-M3V-Ad-PfCA vaccine encoding CSP and AMA1 is safe, well-tolerated and immunogenic but does not protect against controlled human malaria infection

    PubMed Central

    Tamminga, Cindy; Sedegah, Martha; Maiolatesi, Santina; Fedders, Charlotte; Reyes, Sharina; Reyes, Anatalio; Vasquez, Carlos; Alcorta, Yolanda; Chuang, Ilin; Spring, Michele; Kavanaugh, Michael; Ganeshan, Harini; Huang, Jun; Belmonte, Maria; Abot, Esteban; Belmonte, Arnel; Banania, JoGlenna; Farooq, Fouzia; Murphy, Jittawadee; Komisar, Jack; Richie, Nancy O; Bennett, Jason; Limbach, Keith; Patterson, Noelle B; Bruder, Joseph T; Shi, Meng; Miller, Edward; Dutta, Sheetij; Diggs, Carter; Soisson, Lorraine A; Hollingdale, Michael R; Epstein, Judith E; Richie, Thomas L

    2013-01-01

    Background: In a prior study, a DNA prime / adenovirus boost vaccine (DNA/Ad) expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) (NMRC-M3V-D/Ad-PfCA Vaccine) induced 27% protection against controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). To investigate the contribution of DNA priming, we tested the efficacy of adenovirus vaccine alone (NMRC-M3V-Ad-PfCA ) in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Methodology/Principal Findings: The regimen was a single intramuscular injection with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovectors encoding CSP and AMA1, respectively. One x 1010 particle units of each construct were combined prior to administration. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated. Four weeks later, 18 study subjects received P. falciparum CHMI administered by mosquito bite. None were fully protected although one showed delayed onset of parasitemia. Antibody responses were low, with geometric mean CSP ELISA titer of 381 (range < 50–1626) and AMA1 ELISA of 4.95 µg/mL (range 0.2–38). Summed ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses to overlapping peptides were robust, with geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells [sfc/m] for CSP of 273 (range 38–2550) and for AMA1 of 1303 (range 435–4594). CD4+ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP were positive by flow cytometry in 25% and 56% of the research subjects, respectively, and to AMA1 in 94% and 100%, respectively. Significance: In contrast to DNA/Ad, Ad alone did not protect against CHMI despite inducing broad, cell-mediated immunity, indicating that DNA priming is required for protection by the adenovirus-vectored vaccine. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00392015. PMID:23899517

  10. Low-Dose Adenovirus Vaccine Encoding Chimeric Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen-Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Proteins Induces Enhanced E7-Specific Antibody and Cytotoxic T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A.; Juárez, Victoria; zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (106 infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8+-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein. PMID:16188983

  11. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  12. Protective avian influenza in ovo vaccination with non-replicating human adenovirus vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single dose in ovo vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus vector (Ad5) encoding an avian AI virus H5 hemagglutinin. Vaccinated chickens were protected against both H5N1 and H5...

  13. human adenoviruses role in ophthalmic pterygium formation

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Mishar; Kelishadi, Mandana; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Javid, Naeme; Bazouri, Masoud; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmic pterygium is a common benign lesion of unknown origin and the pathogenesis might be vision-threatening. This problem is often associated with exposure to solar light. Recent evidence suggests that potentially oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Expression of specific adenovirus genes such as E1A and E1B, which potentially have many functions, may contribute to their oncogenic activity as well as relevance to cellular immortalization. Objectives: For the first time, we aimed to investigate involvement of adenoviruses in pterygium formation. Patients and Methods: Fifty tissue specimens of pterygium from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (as cases), 50 conjunctival swab samples from the same patients and 10 conjunctival biopsy specimens from individuals without pterygium such as patients undergoing cataract surgery (as controls) were analyzed for evidence of adenovirus infection with polymerase chain reaction using specific primers chosen from the moderately conserved region of the hexon gene. Furthermore, β-globin primers were used to access the quality of extracted DNA. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16) software. Results: Of 50 patients, 20 were men and 30 women with mean age of 61.1 ± 16.9 years ranged between 22 and 85 years. All samples of pterygia had positive results for adenoviruses DNA with polymerase chain reaction, but none of the negative control groups displayed adenoviruses. The pterygium group and the control groups were β-globin positive. Direct sequencing of PCR products confirmed Adenovirus infection. Conclusions: Adenoviruses might act as a possible cause of pterygium formation and other factors could play a synergistic role in the development. However, further larger studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26034543

  14. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-01-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  15. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-05-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  16. Generation of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against a Conformational Epitope of Human Adenovirus Type 7 (HAdv-7) Incorporated in Capsid Encoded in a HAdv-3-Based Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Zhou, Zhichao; Li, Chenyang; Zhou, Rong

    2014-01-01

    The generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by epitope-based immunization is difficult because the immunogenicity of simple peptides is poor and T cells must be potently stimulated and immunological memory elicited. A strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein has been used previously to develop antibody responses against several vaccine targets and may offer a solution to this problem. In this study, we used a similar strategy to develop HAdv-7-neutralizing MAbs using rAdMHE3 virions into which hexon hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7) was incorporated. The epitope mutant rAdMHE3 was generated by replacing HVR5 of Ad3EGFP, a recombinant HAdv-3-based vector expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein, with HVR5 of HAdv-7. We immunized BALB/c mice with rAdMHE3 virions and produced 22 different MAbs against them, four of which showed neutralizing activity against HAdv-7 in vitro. Using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis and an antibody-binding-competition ELISA with Ad3EGFP, HAdv-7, and a series of chimeric adenoviral particles containing epitope mutants, we demonstrated that the four MAbs recognize the neutralization site within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion. Using an immunoblotting analysis and ELISA with HAdv-7, recombinant peptides, and a synthetic peptide, we also showed that the neutralizing epitope within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion is a conformational epitope. These findings suggest that it is feasible to use a strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein to generate neutralizing MAbs. This strategy may also be useful for developing therapeutic neutralizing MAbs and designing recombinant vector vaccines against HAdv-7, and in structural analysis of adenoviruses. PMID:25054273

  17. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  18. [Disparity of apoptotic response in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 after infection with recombinant adenovirus encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursail disease virus].

    PubMed

    Shin, Tan Seok; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd; Rahman, Sheikh-Omar Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease virus (ADV-VP2) has shown potent anti-tumour effects due to its capability of apoptotic induction in cancer cells. In the present study, human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were infected with ADV-VP2. The expression of VP2 protein was registered 4 h post-infection, particularly in MCF-7 cells. Multiple time-point DNA ladder assay demonstrated that ADV-VP2 infected MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells endured apoptosis as early as 8 and 12 h post-infection, respectively. Apoptosis induction in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, albeit different start points, lasted til 36 h post-infection. The induction of apoptosis by ADV-VP2 was further shown by the TUNEL assay, with dark brown discoloration of apoptotic cells. The present study also explored the different stages of apoptosis by Annexin V/PI double staining flow cytometry quantification. Treated MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively detected 25.58 +/- 9.02 and 14.51 +/- 3.12% of early apoptotic cells, 6.09 +/- 4.06 and 77.12 +/- 5.09% of late apoptotic cells. Results revealed that there were significant differences in the number of cells of both types which underwent early and late apoptosis. Significant differences were also observed among viable and apoptotic cells which have been post treated with ADV-VP2. The apoptotic effects of ADV-VP2 on human breast cancer cell lines were consistently demonstrated by three apoptosis detection methods. Therefore, a cancer vaccine basing on gene therapy could be developed in the near future using the present construct. PMID:25842834

  19. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Jing; Wan, Wen-Yan; Li, Hong-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-Tao; Chang, Hong-Tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-Qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry. PMID:26850542

  20. Characteristics of Noncultivable Adenoviruses Associated with Diarrhea in Infants: A New Subgroup of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gary, G. William; Hierholzer, John C.; Black, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Virus particles morphologically resembling adenovirus were found in fecal specimens from infants and were examined for cultivability with standard cell culture techniques and for characteristics of human adenoviruses. Specimens from 13 of 15 infants could not be cultivated in cell cultures. The two adenoviruses that were cultivated, types 1 and 31, reacted in the expected manner in all tests. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis with group-specific anti-hexon serum confirmed that the observed particles in the 15 specimens were human adenoviruses. The buoyant density in sucrose of five of the noncultivable adenoviruses in original stool suspensions averaged 1.335 g/cm3 and that of the two cultivable ones averaged 1.332 g/cm3; both groups had typical adenovirus morphology by electron microscopy. Treatment of the specimens and of a variety of tissue culture cells with proteolytic and other enzymes did not improve cultivability. Examination of partially purified virus by immunoelectron microscopy did not reveal evidence of immunoglobulin A, G, or M coating on the particles, an indication that coproantibody inhibition was not the cause of noncultivability. Fluorescent-antibody studies with an antihexon conjugate and counterimmunoelectrophoresis studies of serially passaged noncultivable viruses indicated that the viruses are infecting cells but are not undergoing effective replication. Antisera to three of the noncultivable viruses demonstrated homologous reactions in counterimmunoelectrophoresis with the respective immunizing antigens but showed only low levels of hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing activity to a few of the known human adenoviruses. We concluded that the noncultivable viruses in these infant diarrhea cases were indeed human adenoviruses, were not defective particles, were not bound to coproantibody, were infectious but incapable of effective relication in conventional cell cultures, were serologically related to types 11, 17, 32, and 33, and should be

  1. Homologous Recombination in E3 Genes of Human Adenovirus Species D

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurdeep; Robinson, Christopher M.; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Genes within the E3 transcription unit of human adenoviruses modulate host immune responses to infection. A comprehensive genomics and bioinformatics analysis of the E3 transcription unit for 38 viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D) revealed distinct and surprising patterns of homologous recombination. Homologous recombination was identified in open reading frames for E3 CR1α, CR1β, and CR1γ, similar to that previously observed with genes encoding the three major structural capsid proteins, the penton base, hexon, and fiber. PMID:24027303

  2. Avian influenza vaccination in chickens and pigs with replication-competent adenovirus-free human recombinant adenovirus 5.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; van Ginkel, Frederik W; Tang, De-Chu C; Schemera, Bettina; Rodning, Soren; Newton, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Protective immunity to avian influenza (AI) virus can be elicited in chickens by in ovo or intramuscular vaccination with replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) encoding AI virus H5 (AdTW68.H5) or H7 (AdCN94.H7) hemagglutinins. We evaluated bivalent in ovo vaccination with AdTW68.H5 and AdCN94.H7 and determined that vaccinated chickens developed robust hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels to both H5 and H7 AI strains. Additionally, we evaluated immune responses of 1-day-old chickens vaccinated via spray with AdCN94.H7. These birds showed increased immunoglobulin A responses in lachrymal fluids and increased interleukin-6 expression in Harderian gland-derived lymphocytes. However, specific HI antibodies were not detected in the sera of these birds. Because pigs might play a role as a "mixing vessel" for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses we explored the use of RCA-free adenovirus technology to immunize pigs against AI virus. Weanling piglets vaccinated intramuscularly with a single dose of RCA-free AdTW68.H5 developed strong systemic antibody responses 3 wk postvaccination. Intranasal application of AdTW68.H5 in piglets resulted in reduced vaccine coverage, i.e., 33% of pigs (2/6) developed an antibody response, but serum antibody levels in those successfully immunized animals were similar to intramuscularly vaccinated animals. PMID:20521636

  3. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Sing, Chor Wing

    2010-01-01

    There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F), with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  4. Protective avian influenza in ovo vaccination with non-replicating human adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; Tang, De-chu C; Suarez, David L; Sylte, Matt J; Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Van Kampen, Kent R

    2007-04-12

    Protective immunity against avian influenza virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose in ovo vaccination with a non-replicating human adenovirus vector encoding an H5N9 avian influenza virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated chickens were protected against both H5N1 (89% hemagglutinin homology; 68% protection) and H5N2 (94% hemagglutinin homology; 100% protection) highly pathogenic avian influenza virus challenges. This vaccine can be mass-administered using available robotic in ovo injectors which provide a major advantage over current vaccination regimens. In addition, this class of adenovirus-vectored vaccines can be produced rapidly with improved safety since they do not contain any replication-competent adenoviruses. Furthermore, this mode of vaccination is compatible with epidemiological surveys of natural avian influenza virus infections. PMID:17055126

  5. Human adenovirus: Viral pathogen with increasing importance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the biology of human adenovirus (HAdV), the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of adenoviral epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and to present a practical update on its diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis. There are two well-defined adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis clinical syndromes: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) and pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF), which are caused by different HAdV serotypes. The exact incidence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is still poorly known. However, cases are more frequent during warmer months. The virus is endemic in the general population, and frequently causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients, especially the pediatric patients. Contagion is possible through direct contact or fomites, and the virus is extremely resistant to different physical and chemical agents. The clinical signs or symptoms of conjunctival infection are similar to any other conjunctivitis, with a higher incidence of pseudomembranes. In the cornea, adenoviral infection may lead to keratitis nummularis. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, but its etiology can be confirmed using cell cultures, antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction or immunochromatography. Multiple treatments have been tried for this disease, but none of them seem to be completely effective. Prevention is the most reliable and recommended strategy to control this contagious infection. PMID:24678403

  6. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  7. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  8. Physical organization of subgroup B human adenovirus genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, C

    1977-01-01

    Cleavage sites of nine bacterial restriction endonucleases were mapped in the DNA of adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) and Ad7, representative serotypes of the "weakly oncogenic" subgroup B human adenoviruses. Of 94 sites mapped, 82 were common to both serotypes, in accord with the high overall sequence homology of DNA among members of the same subgroups. Of the sites in Ad3 and Ad7 DNA, fewer than 20% corresponded to mapped restriction sites in the DNA of Ad2 or Ad5. The latter serotypes represent the "nononcogenic" subgroup C, having only 10 to 20% overall sequence homology with the DNA of subgroup B adenoviruses. Hybridization mapping of viral mRNA from Ad7-infected cells resulted in a complex physical map that was nearly identical to the map of early and late gene clusters in Ad2 DNA. Thus the DNA sequences of human adenoviruses of subgroups B and C have significantly diverged in the course of viral evolution, but the complex organization of the adenovirus genome has been rigidly conserved. Images PMID:916027

  9. Species-Specific Identification of Human Adenoviruses in Sewage.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Magdalena; Krzysztoszek, Arleta; Witek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) diversity in sewage was assessed by species-specific molecular methods. Samples of raw sewage were collected in 14 sewage disposal systems from January to December 2011, in Poland. HAdVs were detected in 92.1% of the analysed sewage samples and was significantly higher at cities of over 100 000 inhabitants. HAdV DNA was detected in sewage during all seasons. The most abundant species identified were HAdV-F (average 89.6%) and -A (average 19.6%), which are associated with intestine infections. Adenoviruses from B species were not detected. The result of the present study demonstrate that human adenoviruses are consistently present in sewage in Poland, demonstrating the importance of an adequate treatment before the disposal in the environment. Multiple HAdV species identified in raw sewage provide new information about HAdV circulation in the Polish population. PMID:26094312

  10. mRNAs from human adenovirus 2 early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Gilardi, P; Näslund, A; LeMoullec, J M; Pettersson, U; Perricaudet, M

    1984-01-01

    The molecular structure of the mRNAs from early region 4 of human adenovirus 2 has been studied by Northern blot analysis, S1 nuclease analysis, and sequence analysis of cDNA clones. The results make it possible to identify four different splice donor sites and six different splice acceptor sites. The structure of 12 different mRNAs can be deduced from the analysis. The mRNAs have identical 5' and 3' ends and are thus likely to be processed from a common mRNA precursor by differential splicing. The different mRNA species are formed by the removal of one to three introns, and they all carry a short 5' leader segment. The introns appear to serve two functions; they either place a 5' leader segment in juxtaposition with an open reading frame or fuse two open translational reading frames. The early region 4 mRNAs can encode at least seven unique polypeptides. Images PMID:6088804

  11. Analysis of T cell responses to chimpanzee adenovirus vectors encoding HIV gag–pol–nef antigen

    PubMed Central

    Herath, S.; Le Heron, A.; Colloca, S.; Bergin, P.; Patterson, S.; Weber, J.; Tatoud, R.; Dickson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses have been shown to be both immunogenic and efficient at presenting HIV proteins but recent trials have suggested that they may play a role in increasing the risk of HIV acquisition. This risk may be associated with the presence of pre-existing immunity to the viral vectors. Chimpanzee adenoviruses (chAd) have low seroprevalence in human populations and so reduce this risk. ChAd3 and chAd63 were used to deliver an HIV gag, pol and nef transgene. ELISpot analysis of T cell responses in mice showed that both chAd vectors were able to induce an immune response to Gag and Pol peptides but that only the chAd3 vector induced responses to Nef peptides. Although the route of injection did not influence the magnitude of immune responses to either chAd vector, the dose of vector did. Taken together these results demonstrate that chimpanzee adenoviruses are suitable vector candidates for the delivery of HIV proteins and could be used for an HIV vaccine and furthermore the chAd3 vector produces a broader response to the HIV transgene. PMID:26546736

  12. Analysis of T cell responses to chimpanzee adenovirus vectors encoding HIV gag-pol-nef antigen.

    PubMed

    Herath, S; Le Heron, A; Colloca, S; Bergin, P; Patterson, S; Weber, J; Tatoud, R; Dickson, G

    2015-12-16

    Adenoviruses have been shown to be both immunogenic and efficient at presenting HIV proteins but recent trials have suggested that they may play a role in increasing the risk of HIV acquisition. This risk may be associated with the presence of pre-existing immunity to the viral vectors. Chimpanzee adenoviruses (chAd) have low seroprevalence in human populations and so reduce this risk. ChAd3 and chAd63 were used to deliver an HIV gag, pol and nef transgene. ELISpot analysis of T cell responses in mice showed that both chAd vectors were able to induce an immune response to Gag and Pol peptides but that only the chAd3 vector induced responses to Nef peptides. Although the route of injection did not influence the magnitude of immune responses to either chAd vector, the dose of vector did. Taken together these results demonstrate that chimpanzee adenoviruses are suitable vector candidates for the delivery of HIV proteins and could be used for an HIV vaccine and furthermore the chAd3 vector produces a broader response to the HIV transgene. PMID:26546736

  13. Genetic organization, size, and complete sequence of early region 3 genes of human adenovirus type 41.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, H Y; Pieniazek, N; Pieniazek, D; Luftig, R B

    1996-01-01

    The complete nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences for open reading frames (ORFs) of the human adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) early region 3 (E3) gene have been determined. The sequence of the Ad41 E3 gene (map units 74 to 83.9) consists of 3,373 nucleotides and has one TATA box and two polyadenylation signals (AATAAA). Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the E3 gene can encode six ORFs, designated RL1 to RL6. These are all expressed at the mRNA level, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis of AD41-infected cell RNA. When compared with known E3 sequences of most other human adenoviruses deposited in GenBank, the sequences of RL1 to RL3 were found to be unique to subgroup F adenoviruses (Ad40 and Ad41). They encode putative proteins of 173 amino acids (19.4 kDa) and 276 amino acids (31.6 kDa) in one reading frame as well as a 59- amino-acid (6.7 kDa) protein in an overlapping reading frame. RL4 encodes a 90-amino-acid protein (10.1 kDa) with 40% homology to the Ad2 E3 10.4-kDa protein, which induces degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and functions together with the Ad2 E3 14.5-kDa protein to protect mouse cell lines against lysis. RL5 encodes a protein of 107 amino acid residues (12.3 kDa) and is analogous to the Ad E3 14.5-kDa protein. RL6 codes for a protein of 122 amino acids (14.7 kDa) that is analogous to the Ad2 14.7-kDa protein, which functions to protect Ad-infected cells from tumor necrosis factor-induced cytolysis. This finding of three unique (RL1 to RL3) E3 gene ORFs may explain why subgroup F adenoviruses differ substantially from other human adenoviruses in their host range; i.e., they replicate predominantly in the host's gastrointestinal rather than respiratory tract. A recent phylogenetic study that compared subgroup F Ad40 DNA sequences with representatives of subgroups B (Ad3), C (Ad2), and E (Ad4) reached a similar conclusion about the uniqueness of RL1 and RL2. PMID:8642703

  14. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran-yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-ling; Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Li, Li-xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  15. Rejection of adenovirus infection is independent of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nian-Hua; Peng, Rui-Qing; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2016-08-01

    The adenovirus vector-based cancer gene therapy is controversial. Low transduction efficacy is believed to be one of the main barriers for the decreased expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, the expression of CAR on primary tumor tissue and tumor tissue survived from treatment has still been not extensively studied. The present study analyzed the adenovirus infection rates and CAR expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant subline A549/DDP. The results showed that although the CAR expression in A549 and A549/DDP was not different, compared with the A549, A549/DDP appeared obviously to reject adenovirus infection. Moreover, we modified CAR expression in the two cell lines with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), and analyzed the adenovirus infection rates after modifying agent treatments. Both TSA and MG-132 pretreatments could increase the CAR expression in the two cell lines, but the drug pretreatments could only make A549 cells more susceptible to adenovirus infectivity. PMID:27373420

  16. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  17. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Hee; Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Youngjoo; Nguyen, Huan H; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP) of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d)-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus. PMID:24086536

  18. Computational analysis of four human adenovirus type 4 genomes reveals molecular evolution through two interspecies recombination events

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Seto, Jason; Liu, Elizabeth B.; Walsh, Michael P.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Computational analysis of human adenovirus type 4 (HAdV-E4), a pathogen that is the only HAdV member of species E, provides insights into its zoonotic origin and molecular adaptation. Its genome encodes a domain of the major capsid protein, hexon, from HAdV-B16 recombined into the genome chassis of a simian adenovirus. Genomes of two recent field strains provide a clue to its adaptation to the new host: recombination of a NF-I binding site motif, which is required for efficient viral replication, from another HAdV genome. This motif is absent in the chimpanzee adenoviruses and the HAdV-E4 prototype, but is conserved amongst other HAdVs. This is the first report of an interspecies recombination event for HAdVs, and the first documentation of a lateral partial gene transfer from a chimpanzee AdV. The potential for such recombination events are important when considering chimpanzee adenoviruses as candidate gene delivery vectors for human patients. PMID:23763770

  19. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection. PMID:20573817

  20. Antitumor efficacy of a recombinant adenovirus encoding endostatin combined with an E1B55KD-deficient adenovirus in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene therapy using a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) encoding secretory human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to be a promising antiangiogenesis and antitumor strategy of in animal models and clinical trials. The E1B55KD-deficient Ad dl1520 was also found to replicate selectively in and destroy cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of antiangiogenic agent Ad-Endo combined with the oncolytic Ad dl1520 on gastric cancer (GC) in vitro and in vivo and determine the mechanisms of these effects. Methods The Ad DNA copy number was determined by real-time PCR, and gene expression was assessed by ELISA, Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. The anti-proliferation effect (cytotoxicity) of Ad was assessed using the colorimetry-based MTT cell viability assay. The antitumor effects were evaluated in BALB/c nude mice carrying SGC-7901 GC xenografts. The microvessel density and Ad replication in tumor tissue were evaluated by checking the expression of CD34 and hexon proteins, respectively. Results dl1520 replicated selectively in GC cells harboring an abnormal p53 pathway, including p53 mutation and the loss of p14ARF expression, but did not in normal epithelial cells. In cultured GC cells, dl1520 rescued Ad-Endo replication, and dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In turn, the addition of Ad-Endo enhanced the inhibitory effect of dl1520 on the proliferation of GC cells. The transgenic expression of Ad5 E1A and E1B19K simulated the rescue effect of dl1520 supporting Ad-Endo replication in GC cells. In the nude mouse xenograft model, the combined treatment with dl1520 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited tumor angiogenesis and the growth of GC xenografts through the increased endostatin expression and oncolytic effects. Conclusions Ad-Endo combined with dl1520 has more antitumor efficacy against GC than Ad-Endo or dl1520 alone. These findings indicate that the

  1. SUPPRESSION OF VIRAL REPLICATION BY GUANIDINE: A COMPARISON OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES AND ENTEROVIRUSES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of laboratory strain human adenoviruses and enteroviruses, and recently isolated human enteroviruses, to the presence of guanidine hydrochloride in cell culture media. The concentration of guanidine hydrochloride used was 100 mi...

  2. First report of human salivirus/klassevirus in respiratory specimens of a child with fatal adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Pei, Na; Zhang, Jiaosheng; Ma, Jinmin; Li, Liqiang; Li, Meng; Li, Jiandong; Sun, Yisuo; Ji, Jingkai; Jiang, Hui; Hou, Yong; Xu, Fengping; Lu, Haorong; Zhang, Ruimu; Wei, Xuemei; Xu, Xun; Deng, Jikui

    2016-10-01

    Adenovirus is a leading cause of respiratory infection in children. Salivirus/klassevirus was first identified as an etiologic agent of gastroenteritis and was never reported in respiratory infection cases. The case being discussed here caught our attention because, although it is a common respiratory infection, it was fatal, while similar cases were mild. In order to find potential causes in the fatal case, we describe the clinical diagnosis and treatment, the sequencing analysis of the salivirus/klassevirus, and the co-infectious adenovirus. Metagenomics sequencing was conducted on the samples from a nasopharyngeal swab of the children with adenovirus infection. Sequences were assembled using IDBA-ud (1.1.1); phylogenetic analysis was performed using MEGA 5.2. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR were performed to verify the existence of the virus in the samples. A nearly full genome of this new virus strain was obtained with 7633 nt encoding a polyprotein of 2331 aa. Meanwhile, it was detected specifically in the nasopharyngeal swab by RT-PCR. Further, homology analysis indicated that the virus has a closer relationship with Salivirus A strain in Shanghai (GU245894). Our study reports the first case of Human salivirus/klassevirus in respiratory specimens of a child with fatal adenovirus infection in Shenzhen, China. The finding and investigation of the virus will provide more useful information for the clinical diagnosis of unexplained lethal infection and expand our knowledge of the new family, salivirus/klassevirus in picornavirus. PMID:27314269

  3. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  4. Construction and characterization of a recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Guoxian; Li, Chen; Liu, Danping

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to construct and characterize a novel recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). The BMP2 gene in the plasmid pcDNA3-BMP2 was sequenced and the restriction enzyme recognition sites were analyzed. Following mutagenesis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the gene sequence after the translation termination codon was removed and new restriction sites were added. The mutated BMP2 gene (BMP2(+) gene) was cloned into an adenovirus shuttle vector to obtain pShuttle cytomegalovirus (CMV)-BMP2(+)-internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-hrGFP-1. The adenovirus plasmid pAd CMV-BMP2(+)-IRES-hrGFP-1 was constructed by homologous recombination and was transfected into HEK293A cells, followed by adenovirus packaging. pAd CMV-BMP2 was used as the control. The two types of adenovirus were transfected into marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The expression of BMP2 and GFP, as well as the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of expressed BMP2 were detected. Following mutagenesis, the BMP2 gene sequence and recombinant adenovirus vector were as predicted. The novel adenovirus vector expressed both BMP2 and GFP, indicating that a novel recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing BMP2 had been successfully constructed. PMID:24137184

  5. The adenovirus e3 promoter is sensitive to activation signals in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Jeffrey A; Boss, Jeremy M; Gooding, Linda R

    2003-01-01

    The group C adenoviruses typically cause acute respiratory disease in young children. In addition, a persistent phase of infection has been observed in which virus may be shed for years without producing overt pathology. Our laboratory recently reported that group C adenovirus DNA can be found in tonsil and adenoid T lymphocytes from the majority of pediatric donors (C. T. Garnett, D. Erdman, W. Xu, and L. R. Gooding, J. Virol. 76:10608-10616, 2002). This finding suggests that immune evasion strategies of human adenoviruses may be directed, in part, toward protection of persistently or latently infected T lymphocytes. Many of the adenoviral gene products implicated in prevention of immune destruction of virus-infected cells are encoded within the E3 transcription unit. In this study, the E3 promoter was evaluated for sensitivity to T-cell activation signals by using a promoter reporter plasmid. Indeed, this promoter is extremely sensitive to T-cell activation, with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin increasing E3-directed transcription 100-fold. By comparison, in the same cells E1A expression leads to a 5.5-fold increase in transcription from the E3 promoter. In contrast to induction by E1A, activation by PMA plus ionomycin requires the two E3 NF-kappaB binding sites. Interestingly, expression of E1A inhibits induction of the E3 promoter in response to T-cell activation while increasing E3 promoter activity in unactivated cells. Collectively, these data suggest that the E3 promoter may have evolved the capacity to respond to T-cell activation in the absence of E1A expression and may act to upregulate antiapoptotic gene expression in order to promote survival of persistently infected T lymphocytes. PMID:12502827

  6. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Gibson, J; Wu, J; Shaffer, L G; Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    1999-10-01

    Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Many studies have implicated the enteroviruses and, particularly, the Coxsackievirus-B family as etiologic agents of the acquired forms of these diseases. However, we have shown the group-C adenoviruses to be as commonly detected as enteroviruses in the myocardium of children and adults with these diseases. It has remained something of a conundrum why two such divergent virus families cause these diseases. The recent description of the common human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor (CAR) offers at least a partial explanation. In order to characterize the CAR gene, we screened a bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) library (RPCI11) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product derived from the 3' end of the CAR cDNA sequence. This identified 13 BACs that were further characterized by PCR amplification of seven contiguous regions of the entire cDNA sequence. Eleven of the BACs were determined to encode pseudogenes while the other two BACs (131J5 and 246M1) encoded the presumed functional gene. PCR amplification of a monochromosomal hybrid panel indicated the presence of pseudogenes on chromosomes 15, 18, and 21 while the functional gene is encoded on chromosome 21. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the gene is located at 21q11.2. DNA sequencing of BACs 131J5 and 246M1 revealed the presence of seven exons. The DNA sequences have been determined for each exon-intron boundary, and putative promoter sequences and transcription initiation sites identified. No consensus polyadenylation signal was identified. PMID:10543405

  7. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  8. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding soluble globular head of hemagglutinin protects mice against lethal influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Youngjoo; Nguyen, Huan H; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Influenza virus is one of the major sources of respiratory tract infection. Due to antigenic drift in surface glycoproteins the virus causes annual epidemics with severe morbidity and mortality. Although hemagglutinin (HA) is one of the highly variable surface glycoproteins of the influenza virus, it remains the most attractive target for vaccine development against seasonal influenza infection because antibodies generated against HA provide virus neutralization and subsequent protection against the virus infection. Combination of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector-based vaccine and mucosal administration is a promising regimen for safe and effective vaccination against influenza. In this study, we constructed rAd encoding the globular head region of HA from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus as vaccine candidate. The rAd vaccine was engineered to express high level of the protein in secreted form. Intranasal or sublingual immunization of mice with the rAd-based vaccine candidates induced significant levels of sustained HA-specific mucosal IgA and IgG. When challenged with lethal dose of homologous virus, the vaccinated mice were completely protected from the infection. The results demonstrate that intranasal or sublingual vaccination with HA-encoding rAd elicits protective immunity against infection with homologous influenza virus. This finding underlines the potential of our recombinant adenovirus-based influenza vaccine candidate for both efficacy and rapid production. PMID:24385946

  9. A first exon-encoded domain of E1A sufficient for posttranslational modification, nuclear-localization, and induction of adenovirus E3 promoter expression in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J D; Young, P; Jones, N C; Krippl, B; Rosenberg, M; Ferguson, B

    1985-01-01

    The purified Escherichia coli-expressed human subgroup C adenovirus E1A 13S mRNA product induces expression from the adenovirus type 5 E3 promoter when injected into Xenopus oocytes. In the present communication, the E. coli-expressed E1A 13S and 12S mRNA products are shown to undergo a posttranslational modification in microinjected Xenopus oocytes, which causes a 2- to 4-kDa increase in apparent molecular size, identical to that occurring in HeLa cells expressing the E1A gene. The E. coli-expressed E1A proteins are similarly modified in vitro in a soluble rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The modified form of the E1A proteins preferentially localizes to the oocyte nucleus following cytoplasmic microinjection. The use of various deleted forms of E1A protein synthesized in E. coli shows that a first exon-encoded domain of E1A, residing between amino acid residues 23 and 120, is sufficient for the posttranslational modification and nuclear localization of E1A and also for the trans-activation of the E3 promoter by E1A in Xenopus oocytes. These results suggest that the posttranslational modification of E1A protein may be important for its function. Images PMID:2934733

  10. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R; Hackney, Jason A; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus-host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus-host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  11. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R.; Hackney, Jason A.; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J.; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T.; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E.; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus–host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus–host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  12. Adenovirus type 5 interactions with human blood cells may compromise systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mark; Onion, David; Green, Nicky K; Aslan, Kriss; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Phipps, Sue; Hale, Sarah; Mautner, Vivien; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2006-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenovirus vectors requires that the virus is not inactivated in the bloodstream. Serum neutralizing activity is well documented, but we show here that type 5 adenovirus also interacts with human blood cells. Over 90% of a typical virus dose binds to human (but not murine) erythrocytes ex vivo, and samples from a patient administered adenovirus in a clinical trial showed that over 98% of viral DNA in the blood was cell associated. In contrast, nearly all viral genomes in the murine bloodstream are free in the plasma. Adenovirus bound to human blood cells fails to infect A549 lung carcinoma cells, although dilution to below 1.7 x 10(7) blood cells/ml relieves this inhibition. Addition of blood cells can prevent infection by adenovirus that has been prebound to A549 cells. Adenovirus also associates with human neutrophils and monocytes ex vivo, particularly in the presence of autologous plasma, giving dose-dependent transgene expression in CD14-positive monocytes. Finally, although plasma with a high neutralizing titer (defined on A549 cells) inhibits monocyte infection, weakly neutralizing plasma can actually enhance monocyte transduction. This may increase antigen presentation following intravenous injection, while blood cell binding may both decrease access of the virus to extravascular targets and inhibit infection of cells to which the virus does gain access. PMID:16580883

  13. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. PMID:26711435

  14. Inactivation of human adenovirus by sequential disinfection with an alternative UV technology and free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Keun; Shin, Gwy-Am

    2011-03-01

    There has been growing concern over human exposure to adenoviruses through drinking water due to the extreme resistance of human adenoviruses to the traditional UV technology (low-pressure (LP) UV). As an effort to develop an effective treatment strategy against human adenoviruses in drinking water, we determined the effectiveness of sequential disinfection with an alternative UV technology (medium-pressure (MP) UV) and free chlorine. Human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) was irradiated with a low dose of MP UV irradiation (10 mJ/cm(2)) through UV collimated apparatus and then exposed to a low dose of free chlorine (0.17 mg/L) at pH 8 and 5°C using a bench-scale chemical disinfection system. A significant inactivation (e.g. 4 log(10)) of Ad2 was achieved with the low doses of MP UV and free chlorine within a very short contact time (∼1.5 min) although there was no apparent synergistic effect on Ad2 between MP UV and free chlorine. Overall, it is likely that the sequential disinfection with UV irradiation and free chlorine should control the contamination of drinking water by human adenoviruses within practical doses of UV and free chlorine typically used in drinking water treatment processes. PMID:21301114

  15. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  16. Human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis with large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment: an endemic outbreak with uncommon manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Chang; Chen, Nancy; Huang, I-Tsong; Yang, Hui-Hua; Huang, Chin-Te; Chen, Li-Kuang; Sheu, Min-Muh

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic viral conjunctivitis is a highly contagious disease that is encountered year-round. The causative agents are mainly adenoviruses and enteroviruses. It occurs most commonly upon infection with subgroup D adenoviruses of types 8, 19, or 37. For common corneal involvement of human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, full-layer epithelial detachment is rarely seen. Herein, we report three cases of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis during an outbreak which manifested as large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment within a few days. The lesions healed without severe sequelae under proper treatment. The unique manifestation of this outbreak may indicate the evolution of human adenovirus type 8. PMID:26060391

  17. Simian adenovirus type 35 has a recombinant genome comprising human and simian adenovirus sequences, which predicts its potential emergence as a human respiratory pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Seto, Jason; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Emergent human and simian adenoviruses (HAdVs) may arise from genome recombination. Computational analysis of SAdV type 35 reveals a genome comprising a chassis with elements mostly from two simian adenoviruses, SAdV-B21 and -B27, and regions of high sequence similarity shared with HAdV-B21 and HAdV-B16. Although recombination direction cannot be determined, the presence of these regions suggests prior infections of humans by an ancestor of SAdV-B35, and/or vice versa. Absence of this virus in humans may reflect non-optimal conditions for zoonosis. The presence of both a critical viral replication element found in HAdV genomes and genes that are highly similar to ones in HAdVs suggest the potential to establish in a human host. This allows a prediction that this virus may be a nascent human respiratory pathogen. The recombination potential of human and simian adenovirus genomes should be considered in the use of SAdVs as vectors for gene delivery in humans. PMID:24210123

  18. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  19. Reference equine antisera to 33 human adenovirus types: homologous and heterologous titers.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Gamble, W C; Dowdle, W R

    1975-01-01

    Equine antisera to human adenovirus types 1 to 33 were prepared and evaluated by hemagglutination-inhibition and serum neutralization tests. Detailed data on the potency and purity of the immunizing antigens were tabulated as one means of evaluating the antisera. Most of the 52 hemagglutination-inhibition and 25 serum neutralization major or minor heterotypic responses among the equine antisera were observed at similar levels in previous studies with rabbit antisera and appeared to represent genuine antigenic relationships among the human adenoviruses. Equine antisera to human adenoviruses 1 to 33 and a similarly packaged normal horse serum served as lots of fully tested sera for definitive typing of isolates and as reference standards for evaluating other antisera. PMID:1236869

  20. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  1. [Preparation of Recombinant Human Adenoviruses Labeled with miniSOG].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Xiao, Rong; Guo, Xiaojuan; Qu, Jianguo; Lu, Zhuozhuang; Hong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We wished to study the intracellular transport of adenoviruses. We constructed a novel recombinant adenovirus in which the structural protein IX was labeled with a mini-singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG). The miniSOG gene was synthesized by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned to the pcDNA3 vector, and expressed in 293 cells. Activation of miniSOG generated sufficient numbers of singlet oxygen molecules to catalyze polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product resolvable by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To construct miniSOG-labelled recombinant adenoviruses, the miniSOG gene was subcloned downstream of the IX gene in a pShuttle plasmid. Adenoviral plasmid pAd5-IXSOG was generated by homologous recombination of the modified shuttle plasmid (pShuttle-IXSOG) with the backbone plasmid (pAdeasy-1) in the BJ5183 strain of Eschericia coli. Adenovirus HAdV-5-IXSOG was rescued by transfection of 293 cells with the linearized pAd5-IXSOG. After propagation, virions were purified using the CsC1 ultracentrifugation method. Finally, HAdV-5-IXSOG in 2.0 mL with a particle titer of 6 x 1011 vp/mL was obtained. Morphology of HAdV-5-IXSOG was verified by TEM. Fusion of IX with the miniSOG gene was confirmed by PCR. In conclusion, miniSOG-labeled recombinant adenoviruses were constructed, which could be valuable tools for virus tracking by TEM. PMID:27295881

  2. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV)...

  3. [Mutagenic effect of human adenovirus type I on the somatic and sex cells of male mice].

    PubMed

    Podol'skaia, S V

    1986-01-01

    Human adenovirus 1 was studied for its effect on the chromosomal apparatus both in bone marrow cells and male sex cells of mice. Chromosome aberrations were most early detected in spermatocytes of the 1st order mice infected with human adenovirus 1. In bone marrow cells of mice the highest level of chromosome aberrations was observed 30, 60, 90 days after the inoculation, which corresponds to a more frequent detection of the adenoviral antigen. The UV-irradiated-virus caused chromosome aberrations in the later periods after the inoculation which might be induced by the virus reactivation in a cell. PMID:3705168

  4. Caveolin-1 Associated Adenovirus Entry into Human Corneal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Ramke, Mirja; Chodosh, James; Rajaiya, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The cellular entry of viruses represents a critical area of study, not only for viral tropism, but also because viral entry dictates the nature of the immune response elicited upon infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), is a severe, ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis has previously been shown to play a critical role in entry of other HAdV species into many host cell types. However, HAdV-D endocytosis into corneal cells has not been extensively studied. Herein, we show an essential role for cholesterol rich, lipid raft microdomains and caveolin-1, in the entry of HAdV-D37 into primary human corneal fibroblasts. Cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) profoundly reduced viral infection. When replenished with soluble cholesterol, the effect of MβCD was reversed, allowing productive viral infection. HAdV-D37 DNA was identified in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection. Src kinase activity was also increased in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection, and Src phosphorylation and CXCL1 induction were both decreased in caveolin-1-/- mice corneas compared to wild type mice. siRNA knock down of caveolin-1 in corneal cells reduced chemokine induction upon viral infection, and caveolin-1-/- mouse corneas showed reduced cellular entry of HAdV-D37. As a control, HAdV-C2, a non-corneal pathogen, appeared to utilize the caveolar pathway for entry into A549 cells, but failed to infect corneal cells entirely, indicating virus and cell specific tropism. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the presence of caveolin-1 in HAdV-D37-containing vesicles during the earliest stages of viral entry. Collectively, these experiments indicate for the first time that HAdV-D37 uses a lipid raft mediated caveolin-1 associated pathway for entry into corneal cells, and connects the processes of viral entry with downstream

  5. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  6. [Generation and preliminary immunological efficacy of a recombinant human adenovirus-rabies virus glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2011-09-01

    To construct a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing glycoprotein (GP) of attenuated rabies virus SRV9 and testing immunological efficacy on the immunized mice. Open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector of adenovirus expression system in multiple cloning sites to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9, cotransfection was performed into 293AD cells mediated by FuGENE Transfection Reagent with linearized backbone plasmid and recombinant shuttle plasmid, cell cultures were collected after CPE appearance and were identified by PCR and electronmicroscopy, virus titer was measured in 293AD cells. Kunming mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10(6) TCID50 adenovirus, blood for serum preparation was collected through caudal vein pre-immune and post-immune and tested for VNA appearance by fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test (FAVN) detection. Recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9 was constructed correctly. A recombinant human adenovirus type 5 was obtained expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9. The virus titer reached 10(6) CFU/mL at the least. All mice developed a certain amount of the anti-rabies neutralizing antibody 14 days after intraperitoneal inoculation, while the effective protection rates were 90%. In conclusion, Recombinant adenovirus expressing the rabies virus GP was constructed successfully and a certain amount of neutralizing antibodies were induced in mice, which laid the material foundation for further development of new rabies vaccine. PMID:21998956

  7. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  8. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  9. Biosynthesis and properties of the adenovirus 2 L1-encoded 52,000- and 55,000-Mr proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 L1 region, which is located at 30.7 to 39.2 map units on the viral genome, is transcribed from the major late promoter during both early and late stages of virus replication, and a 52,000-Mr (52K) protein-55K protein doublet has been translated in vitro on L1-specific RNA. To investigate the biosynthesis and properties of the L1 52K and 55K proteins, we prepared antibody against a synthetic peptide encoded near the predicted N terminus. As determined by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, the antipeptide antibody recognized major 52K and 55K proteins synthesized in adenovirus type 2-infected cells that appeared to be identical to the 52K-55K doublet translated in vitro. The immunoprecipitated 52K and 55K proteins were very closely related, as shown by a peptide map analysis. Both L1 proteins were phosphorylated, and they were phosphorylated at similar sites. No precursor-product relationship was detected between the 52K and 55K proteins by a pulse-chase analysis. Biosynthesis of the L1 52K and 55K proteins began about 6 to 7 h postinfection, after biosynthesis of the early region 1A and early region 1B 19K (175R) T antigens, and reached a maximum rate at about 15 h; the maximum rate was maintained until at least 25 h postinfection. At all times, the 55K protein appeared to be synthesized at a severalfold-higher level than the 52K protein. Both proteins were quite stable and accumulated until late times after infection. Viral DNA replication was not essential for formation of the L1 proteins. Thus, the L1 52K-55K gene appears to be regulated in a manner different from the classical early and late viral genes but similar to the protein encoded by the i-leader (Symington et al., J. Virol. 57:849-856, 1986). The L1 proteins were detected in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence microscopy with antipeptide antibody and were found to be primarily associated with the nuclear membrane by an immunoblot analysis of subcellular fractions

  10. Technical aspects of using human adenovirus as a viral water quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Rames, Emily; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Despite dramatic improvements in water treatment technologies in developed countries, waterborne viruses are still associated with many of cases of illness each year. These illnesses include gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis, and respiratory infections. Importantly, outbreaks of viral disease from waters deemed compliant from bacterial indicator testing still occur, which highlights the need to monitor the virological quality of water. Human adenoviruses are often used as a viral indicator of water quality (faecal contamination), as this pathogen has high UV-resistance and is prevalent in untreated domestic wastewater all year round, unlike enteroviruses and noroviruses that are often only detected in certain seasons. Standard methods for recovering and measuring adenovirus numbers in water are lacking, and there are many variations in published methods. Since viral numbers are likely under-estimated when optimal methods are not used, a comprehensive review of these methods is both timely and important. This review critically evaluates how estimates of adenovirus numbers in water are impacted by technical manipulations, such as during adenovirus concentration and detection (including culturing and polymerase-chain reaction). An understanding of the implications of these issues is fundamental to obtaining reliable estimation of adenovirus numbers in water. Reliable estimation of HAdV numbers is critical to enable improved monitoring of the efficacy of water treatment processes, accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, and to ensure microbiological safety of water. PMID:27065054

  11. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  12. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  13. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  14. Relative transport of human adenovirus and MS2 in porous media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent enteric virus found in the water environment by numerous monitoring studies and MS2 is the most common surrogate used for previous virus transport studies. However, the current knowledge on the transport behavior of HAdV in porous med...

  15. Severe Infections with Human Adenovirus 7d in 2 Adults in Family, Illinois, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7d, a genomic variant with no reported circulation in the United States, was isolated from 2 adults with severe respiratory infections in Illinois. Molecular typing identified a close relationship with strains of the same genome type isolated from cases of respiratory disease in several provinces of China since 2009. PMID:26982199

  16. Influence of Inorganic Ions and Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, influence of solution chemistries to the transport properties (aggregation and attachment behavior) of human adenovirus (HAdV) was investigated. Results showed isoelectric point (IEP) of HAdV in different salt conditions varied minimally, and it ranged from pH 3.5 ...

  17. Human adenovirus type 7 outbreak in Police Training Center, Malaysia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Mohd Apandi; Rashid, Tengku Rogayah Tengku Abdul; Thayan, Ravindran; Othman, Khairul Azuan; Hasan, Norhasnida Abu; Adnan, Norfaezah; Saat, Zainah

    2012-05-01

    In March 2011, an outbreak of acute respiratory disease was reported at the Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Police Training Centre. Approximately 100 trainees were hospitalized and 5 were admitted to the intensive care unit. Three of these 5 trainees died. Human adenovirus type 7 was identified as the etiologic agent. PMID:22515984

  18. Human adenovirus-host cell interactions: comparative study with members of subgroups B and C.

    PubMed Central

    Defer, C; Belin, M T; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Boulanger, P

    1990-01-01

    Host cell interactions of human adenovirus serotypes belonging to subgroups B (adenovirus type 3 [Ad3] and Ad7) and C (Ad2 and Ad5) were comparatively analyzed at three levels: (i) binding of virus particles with host cell receptors; (ii) cointernalization of macromolecules with adenovirions; and (iii) adenovirus-induced cytoskeletal alterations. The association constants with human cell receptors were found to be similar for Ad2 and Ad3 (8 x 10(9) to 9 x 10(9) M-1), and the number of receptor sites per cell ranged from 5,000 (Ad2) to 7,000 (Ad3). Affinity blottings, competition experiments, and immunofluorescence stainings suggested that the receptor sites for adenovirus were distinct for members of subgroups B and C. Adenovirions increased the permeability of cells to macromolecules. We showed that this global effect could be divided into two distinct events: (i) cointernalization of macromolecules and virions into endocytotic vesicles, a phenomenon that occurred in a serotype-independent way, and (ii) release of macromolecules into the cytoplasm upon adenovirus-induced lysis of endosomal membranes. The latter process was found to be type specific and to require unaltered and infectious virus particles of serotype 2 or 5. Perinuclear condensation of the vimentin filament network was observed at early stages of infection with Ad2 or Ad5 but not with Ad3, Ad7, and noninfectious particles of Ad2 or Ad5, obtained by heat inactivation of wild-type virions or with the H2 ts1 mutant. This phenomenon appeared to be a cytological marker for cytoplasmic transit of infectious virions within adenovirus-infected cells. It could be experimentally dissociated from vimentin proteolysis, which was found to be serotype dependent, occurring only with members of subgroup C, regardless of the infectivity of the input virus. Images PMID:2196380

  19. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  20. Delineation of Interfaces on Human Alpha-Defensins Critical for Human Adenovirus and Human Papillomavirus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Mayim E.; Lu, Wuyuan; Smith, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Human α-defensins are potent anti-microbial peptides with the ability to neutralize bacterial and viral targets. Single alanine mutagenesis has been used to identify determinants of anti-bacterial activity and binding to bacterial proteins such as anthrax lethal factor. Similar analyses of α-defensin interactions with non-enveloped viruses are limited. We used a comprehensive set of human α-defensin 5 (HD5) and human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1) alanine scan mutants in a combination of binding and neutralization assays with human adenovirus (AdV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). We have identified a core of critical hydrophobic residues that are common determinants for all of the virus-defensin interactions that were analyzed, while specificity in viral recognition is conferred by specific surface-exposed charged residues. The hydrophobic residues serve multiple roles in maintaining the tertiary and quaternary structure of the defensins as well as forming an interface for virus binding. Many of the important solvent-exposed residues of HD5 group together to form a critical surface. However, a single discrete binding face was not identified for HNP1. In lieu of whole AdV, we used a recombinant capsid subunit comprised of penton base and fiber in quantitative binding studies and determined that the anti-viral potency of HD5 was a function of stoichiometry rather than affinity. Our studies support a mechanism in which α-defensins depend on hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions to bind at high copy number to these non-enveloped viruses to neutralize infection and provide insight into properties that guide α-defensin anti-viral activity. PMID:25188351

  1. New human adenovirus isolated from a renal transplant recipient: description and characterization of candiate adenovirus type 34.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Atuk, N O; Gwaltney, J M

    1975-01-01

    An antigenically distinct adenovirus is described which was isolated in March 1972 from the urine of a 17-year-old Caucasian male who was experiencing fever after receiving a kidney transplant from a cadaver in February. The adenovirus could not be isolated in April from a pharyngeal swab which yielded cytomegalovirus. Complement-fixation, hemagglutination-inhibition, and/or serum-neutralization tests on sequential serum specimens from the patient confirmed that the adenovirus infection occurred during March and showed that infections with cytomegalovirus and respiratory syncytial virus also occurred during late March and April. The patient's persistent fever, for which other causes could not be found, may have been associated with one or more of these infections. Upper respiratory symptoms and lung involvement were not found during this period. Mild liver dysfunction during this time could not be clearly related to adenovirus infection because of the presence of multiple other causes. The adenovirus may have been latent in the donor kidney and become active in the new host as a consequence of immunological impairment. The adenovirus, purified by terminal dilution and plaque procedures, has antigenic, morphological, biophysical, host susceptibility, and hemagglutinating properties characteristic of adenovirus group IA. Buoyant densities in CsCl are 1.340 g/ml for the virion, 1.304 g/ml for the group CF antigen (hexon), 1.295 g/ml for the major soluble complete hemagglutinin (dodecon), and 1.206 g/ml for the minor soluble complete hemagglutinin (tentatively, fiber dimer). The virus does not cross-react in reciprocal hemagglutination-inhibition and serum-neutralization tests with antisera to adenovirus types 1 to 33. We propose this virus as candidate adenovirus type 34 (Compton). Images PMID:170313

  2. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. PMID:27176913

  3. Protection of chickens against avian influenza with non-replicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding a H7 hemagglutinin gene from a low pathogenic North American isolate (AdChNY94.H7). Chickens vaccinate...

  4. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control. PMID:18634509

  5. Synthesis of human adenovirus early RNA species is similar in productive and abortive infections of monkey and human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K P; Klessig, D F

    1982-01-01

    Northern (RNA) blot analysis has been used to show that synthesis of early mRNA species is similar in monkey cells productively or abortively infected with human adenovirus. mRNA species from all five major early regions (1A, 1B, 2, 3, 4) are identical in size and comparable in abundance whether isolated from monkey cells infected with adenovirus type 2 or with the host range mutant Ad2hr400 or coinfected with adenovirus type 2 plus simian virus 40. The mRNA species isolated from monkey cells are identical in size to those isolated from human cells. Production of virus-associated RNA is also identical in productive and abortive infections of monkey cells. Synthesis of virus-associated RNA is, however, significantly greater in HeLa cells than in CV1 cells at late times after infection regardless of which virus is used in the infection. Images PMID:6283181

  6. Prime and boost immunization with influenza and adenovirus encoding the Toxoplasma gondii surface antigen 2 (SAG2) induces strong protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Machado, Alexandre V; Caetano, Bráulia C; Barbosa, Rafael P; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Rabelo, Renata H; Garcia, Cristiana C; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Escriou, Nicolas; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2010-04-19

    In this work, we explored an original vaccination protocol using recombinant influenza and adenovirus. We constructed recombinant influenza viruses harboring dicistronic NA segments containing the surface antigen 2 (SAG2) from Toxoplasma gondii under control of the duplicated 3' promoter. Recombinant influenza viruses were able to drive the expression of the foreign SAG2 sequence in cell culture and to replicate efficiently both in cell culture and in lungs of infected mice. In addition, mice primed with recombinant influenza virus and boosted with a recombinant adenovirus encoding SAG2 elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses specific for SAG2. Moreover, when immunized animals were challenged with the cystogenic P-Br strain of T. gondii, they displayed up to 85% of reduction in parasite burden. These results demonstrate the potential use of recombinant influenza vectors harboring the dicistronic segments in the development of vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:20189485

  7. Vaccination using recombinants influenza and adenoviruses encoding amastigote surface protein-2 are highly effective on protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Rafael Polidoro Alves; Filho, Bruno Galvão; Dos Santos, Luara Isabela; Junior, Policarpo Ademar Sales; Marques, Pedro Elias; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; Cara, Denise Carmona; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Machado, Alexandre Vieira

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated the protection raised by immunization with recombinant influenza viruses carrying sequences coding for polypeptides corresponding to medial and carboxi-terminal moieties of Trypanosoma cruzi ´s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP2). Those viruses were used in sequential immunization with recombinant adenovirus (heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol) encoding the complete sequence of ASP2 (Ad-ASP2) in two mouse strains (C57BL/6 and C3H/He). The CD8 effector response elicited by this protocol was comparable to that observed in mice immunized twice with Ad-ASP2 and more robust than that observed in mice that were immunized once with Ad-ASP2. Whereas a single immunization with Ad-ASP2 sufficed to completely protect C57BL/6 mice, a higher survival rate was observed in C3H/He mice that were primed with recombinant influenza virus and boosted with Ad-ASP2 after being challenged with T. cruzi. Analyzing the phenotype of CD8+ T cells obtained from spleen of vaccinated C3H/He mice we observed that heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol elicited more CD8+ T cells specific for the immunodominant epitope as well as a higher number of CD8+ T cells producing TNF-α and IFN-γ and a higher mobilization of surface marker CD107a. Taken together, our results suggest that immunodominant subpopulations of CD8+ T elicited after immunization could be directly related to degree of protection achieved by different immunization protocols using different viral vectors. Overall, these results demonstrated the usefulness of recombinant influenza viruses in immunization protocols against Chagas Disease. PMID:23637908

  8. Evidence for the role of a human intestinal adenovirus in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kagnoff, M F; Paterson, Y J; Kumar, P J; Kasarda, D D; Carbone, F R; Unsworth, D J; Austin, R K

    1987-01-01

    We previously noted a region of amino acid sequence homology between A-gliadin, a major alpha-gliadin component known to activate coeliac disease, and the early region E1b protein of human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12), an adenovirus isolated from the human intestinal tract. In the present study sera from coeliac disease patients from the United Kingdom and the United States were assayed for neutralising antibody to Ad12 as evidence of past exposure to that virus and for antibody to synthetic peptides of A-gliadin from the region of shared sequence with the Ad12 E1b protein. Eighty nine per cent of untreated coeliac disease patients had evidence of previous Ad12 infection. There was also a significant increase in the prevalence of neutralising antibody to Ad12 among treated adults (33.3%) and children (30.8%) with coeliac disease compared with controls (0-12.8%) in the western USA and in London. There was no evidence for an increased prevalence of infection with a closely related adenovirus, adenovirus 18, or another enteric virus, Echovirus 11, among coeliac disease subjects. Additional studies documented that a region of A-gliadin that shares amino acid sequence homology with the adenovirus 12 E1b protein could be recognised as an antigenic determinant in active coeliac disease patients. Taken together, these data are compatible with the hypothesis that a viral protein may play a role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease, perhaps by virtue of immunological cross reactivity between antigenic determinants shared by the viral protein and alpha-gliadins. PMID:2822550

  9. Efficient adenovirus-mediated transfer of a human minidystrophin gene to skeletal muscle of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Ragot, T; Vincent, N; Chafey, P; Vigne, E; Gilgenkrantz, H; Couton, D; Cartaud, J; Briand, P; Kaplan, J C; Perricaudet, M

    1993-02-18

    Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy is a lethal and common X-linked genetic disease caused by the absence of dystrophin, a 427K protein encoded by a 14 kilobase transcript. Two approaches have been proposed to correct the dystrophin deficiency in muscle. The first, myoblast transfer therapy, uses cells from normal donors, whereas the second involves direct intramuscular injection of recombinant plasmids expressing dystrophin. Adenovirus is an efficient vector for in vivo expression of various foreign genes. It has recently been demonstrated that a recombinant adenovirus expressing the lac-Z reporter gene can infect stably many mouse tissues, particularly muscle and heart. We have tested the ability of a recombinant adenovirus, containing a 6.3 kilobase pair Becker-like dystrophin complementary DNA driven by the Rous sarcoma virus promoter to direct the expression of a 'minidystrophin' in infected 293 cells and C2 myoblasts, and in the mdx mouse, after intramuscular injection. We report here that in vivo, we have obtained a sarcolemmal immunostaining in up to 50% of fibres of the injected muscle. PMID:8437625

  10. Molecular epidemiological study of adenovirus infecting western lowland gorillas and humans in and around Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon).

    PubMed

    Nkogue, Chimène Nze; Horie, Masayuki; Fujita, Shiho; Ogino, Michiko; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mizukami, Keijiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Matsuu, Aya; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamato, Osamu; Ngomanda, Alfred; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-10-01

    Adenoviruses are widespread in human population as well as in great apes, although the data about the naturally occurring adenovirus infections remain rare. We conducted the surveillance of adenovirus infection in wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon), in order to investigate naturally occurring adenovirus in target gorillas and tested specifically a possible zoonotic transmission with local people inhabiting the vicinity of the park. Fecal samples were collected from western lowland gorillas and humans, and analyzed by PCR. We detected adenoviral genes in samples from both gorillas and the local people living around the national park, respectively: the overall prevalence rates of adenovirus were 24.1 and 35.0 % in gorillas and humans, respectively. Sequencing revealed that the adenoviruses detected in the gorillas were members of Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B), HAdV-C, or HAdV-E, and those in the humans belonged to HAdV-C or HAdV-D. Although HAdV-C members were detected in both gorillas and humans, phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus detected in gorillas are genetically distinct from those detected in humans. The HAdV-C constitutes a single host lineage which is compatible with the host-pathogen divergence. However, HAdV-B and HAdV-E are constituted by multiple host lineages. Moreover, there is no evidence of zoonotic transmission thus far. Since the gorilla-to-human transmission of adenovirus has been shown before, the current monitoring should be continued in a broader scale for getting more insights in the natural history of naturally occurring adenoviruses and for the safe management of gorillas' populations. PMID:27290717

  11. Human adenoviruses and coliphages in urban runoff-impacted coastal waters of Southern California.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Noble, R; Chu, W

    2001-01-01

    A nested-PCR method was used to detect the occurrence of human adenovirus in coastal waters of Southern California. Twenty- to forty-liter water samples were collected from 12 beach locations from Malibu to the border of Mexico between February and March 1999. All sampling sites were located at mouths of major rivers and creeks. Two ultrafiltration concentration methods, tangential flow filtration (TFF) and vortex flow filtration (VFF), were compared using six environmental samples. Human adenoviruses were detected in 4 of the 12 samples tested after nucleic acid extraction of VFF concentrates. The most probable number of adenoviral genomes ranged from 880 to 7,500 per liter of water. Coliphages were detected at all sites, with the concentration varying from 5.3 to 3332 PFU/liter of water. F-specific coliphages were found at 5 of the 12 sites, with the concentration ranging from 5.5 to 300 PFU/liter. The presence of human adenovirus was not significantly correlated with the concentration of coliphage (r = 0.32) but was significantly correlated (r = 0.99) with F-specific coliphage. The bacterial indicators (total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and enterococci) were found to exceed California recreational water quality daily limits at 5 of the 12 sites. However, this excess of bacterial indicators did not correlate with the presence of human adenoviruses in coastal waters. The results of this study call for both a reevaluation of our current recreational water quality standards to reflect the viral quality of recreational waters and monitoring of recreational waters for human viruses on a regular basis. PMID:11133443

  12. [Detection of antigen-antibody interaction of human adenovirus by the method of surface plasmon resonance].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L M; Boltovets', P M; Povnytsia, O Iu; Zhovnovata, V L; Zakharenko, O M; Snopok, B A; Shyrshov, Iu M; Diachenko, N S

    2005-01-01

    A possibility to detect adenoviral protein--hexon, using specific antibodies by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was demonstrated. The hexon of the human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) binds to antibodies immobilized on the sensor surface treated by KNCS and protein A Staphylococcus aureus. The specificity of antihexon antibodies was demonstrated by indirect method of fluorescent antibodies (MFA) and cellular variant of the immunoassay (cELISA). PMID:16250237

  13. Tracking novel adenovirus in environmental and human clinical samples: no evidence of endemic human adenovirus type 58 circulation in Córdoba city, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ferreyra, L J; Giordano, M O; Martínez, L C; Barril, P A; Masachessi, G; Isa, M B; Poma, R; Rajal, V; Biganzoli, P; Nates, S V; Pavan, J V

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, several types of human adenovirus (HAdV) have arisen from the recombination between two or more previously known HAdV types, but their epidemiology is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the circulation of HAdV-58, a recently described HAdV isolated from an HIV-positive patient in Córdoba city, Argentina. For this purpose, a 30-month survey was conducted to study the presence of this type of adenovirus in sewage samples collected at the inlet from a wastewater treatment plant in Córdoba city, Argentina. Complementarily, the virus was sought in stools of HIV-positive patients. Although HAdVs were detected in human stool samples and in a high percentage of sewage samples, no evidence of HAdV-58 circulation was detected. We suggest that there is no endemic circulation of HAdV-58 in the geographical local area. The trend is that the number of identified HAdVs increases over time. In this context, understanding the current circulating HAdVs may be biologically relevant. PMID:25165987

  14. A porcine adenovirus with low human seroprevalence is a promising alternative vaccine vector to human adenovirus 5 in an H5N1 virus disease model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Tikoo, Suresh; Kobinger, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus 5 (AdHu5) vectors are robust vaccine platforms however the presence of naturally-acquired neutralizing antibodies may reduce vector efficacy and potential for re-administration. This study evaluates immune responses and protection following vaccination with a replication-incompetent porcine adenovirus 3 (PAV3) vector as an alternative vaccine to AdHu5 using an avian influenza H5N1 disease model. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice following vaccination with different doses of the PAV3 vector expressing an optimized A/Hanoi/30408/2005 H5N1 hemagglutinin antigen (PAV3-HA) and compared with an AdHu5-HA control. PAV3-HA rapidly generated antibody responses, with significant neutralizing antibody titers on day 21, and stronger cellular immune responses detected on day 8, compared to AdHu5-HA. The PAV3-HA vaccine, administered 8 days before challenge, demonstrated improved survival and lower virus load. Evaluation of long-term vaccine efficacy at 12 months post-vaccination showed better protection with the PAV3-HA than with the AdHu5-HA vaccine. Importantly, as opposed to AdHu5, PAV3 vector was not significantly neutralized by human antibodies pooled from over 10,000 individuals. Overall, PAV3-based vector is capable of mediating swift, strong immune responses and offer a promising alternative to AdHu5. PMID:21179494

  15. Identification of adenovirus 12-encoded E1A tumor antigens synthesized in infected and transformed mammalian cells and in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Kimelman, D; Symington, J S; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Thornton, H; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    A 16-amino acid peptide, H2N-Arg-Glu-Gln-Thr-Val-Pro-Val-Asp-Leu-Ser-Val-Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Cys-COOH (peptide 204), targeted to the common C-terminus of human adenovirus 12 (Ad12) tumor antigens encoded by the E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA, has been synthesized. Antibody prepared in rabbits against peptide 204 immunoprecipitated two proteins of apparent Mr 47,000 and 45,000 from extracts of [35S]methionine-labeled Ad12-early infected KB cells and a 47,000 protein from extracts of the Ad12-transformed hamster cell line, HE C19. Immunoprecipitation analysis of infected and transformed cells labeled with 32Pi showed that both major Ad12 E1A T antigens are phosphoproteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Ad12-early infected KB cells with antipeptide antibody showed the site of E1A protein concentration to be predominantly nuclear. E1A proteins were detected by immunofluorescence at 4 to 6 h postinfection and continued to increase until at least 18 h postinfection. Antipeptide 204 antibody was used to analyze the proteins synthesized in Escherichia coli cells transformed by plasmids containing cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA or 12S mRNA under the control of the tac promoter (D. Kimelman, L. A. Lucher, M. Green, K. H. Brackmann, J. S. Symington, and M. Ptashne, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., in press). A major protein of ca. 47,000 was immunoprecipitated from extracts of each transformed E. coli cell clone. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of immunoprecipitates revealed that the T antigens synthesized in infected KB cells, transformed hamster cells, and transformed E. coli cells possess very similar molecular weights and acidic isoelectric points of 5.2 to 5.4. Images PMID:6384554

  16. Identification of adenovirus 12-encoded E1A tumor antigens synthesized in infected and transformed mammalian cells and in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lucher, L A; Kimelman, D; Symington, J S; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Thornton, H; Green, M

    1984-10-01

    A 16-amino acid peptide, H2N-Arg-Glu-Gln-Thr-Val-Pro-Val-Asp-Leu-Ser-Val-Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Cys-COOH (peptide 204), targeted to the common C-terminus of human adenovirus 12 (Ad12) tumor antigens encoded by the E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA, has been synthesized. Antibody prepared in rabbits against peptide 204 immunoprecipitated two proteins of apparent Mr 47,000 and 45,000 from extracts of [35S]methionine-labeled Ad12-early infected KB cells and a 47,000 protein from extracts of the Ad12-transformed hamster cell line, HE C19. Immunoprecipitation analysis of infected and transformed cells labeled with 32Pi showed that both major Ad12 E1A T antigens are phosphoproteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Ad12-early infected KB cells with antipeptide antibody showed the site of E1A protein concentration to be predominantly nuclear. E1A proteins were detected by immunofluorescence at 4 to 6 h postinfection and continued to increase until at least 18 h postinfection. Antipeptide 204 antibody was used to analyze the proteins synthesized in Escherichia coli cells transformed by plasmids containing cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA or 12S mRNA under the control of the tac promoter (D. Kimelman, L. A. Lucher, M. Green, K. H. Brackmann, J. S. Symington, and M. Ptashne, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., in press). A major protein of ca. 47,000 was immunoprecipitated from extracts of each transformed E. coli cell clone. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of immunoprecipitates revealed that the T antigens synthesized in infected KB cells, transformed hamster cells, and transformed E. coli cells possess very similar molecular weights and acidic isoelectric points of 5.2 to 5.4. PMID:6384554

  17. Combination of oncolytic adenovirus and endostatin inhibits human retinoblastoma in an in vivo mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiping; Wei, Fang; Li, Huiming; Ji, Xunda; Li, Shuxia; Chen, Xiafang

    2013-02-01

    There is a critical need for new paradigms in retinoblastoma (RB) treatment that would more efficiently inhibit tumor growth while sparing the vision of patients. Oncolytic adenoviruses with the ability to selectively replicate and kill tumor cells are a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy. Exploration of a novel targeting strategy for RB utilizing combined oncolytic adenovirus and anti-angiogenesis therapy was applied over the course of the current study with positive results. The oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 were constructed. The E1 region was regulated by the E2F-1 promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, respectively. Effects on both replication and promotion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression were observed in the replication-defective adenovirus Ad-EGFP in diverse cancer cell lines, HXO-RB44, Y79, Hep3B, NCIH460, MCF-7 and HLF. The cancer cell death induced by these agents was also explored. The in situ RB model demonstrated that mice with tumors treated with the oncolytic adenovirus and replication-defective adenovirus Ad-endostatin exhibited notable cancer cell death. This anticancer effect was further examined by stereo microscope, and the survival rate of experimental mice was determined. Both Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 replicated specifically in cancer cells in vitro and promoted EGFP expression in Ad-EGFP, although Ad-E2F1 p-E1A demonstrated superior EGFP promotion activity than Ad-TERT p-E1. In Hep3B, NCIH460 and MCF-7 cells, the number of Ad-TERT p-E1 copies was observed to exceed of the number of Ad-E2F1 p-E1A copies by a minimum of 10-fold. Furthermore, Ad-TERT p-E1 demonstrated significantly superior oncolytic effects in the RB mouse model, and Ad-endostatin effectively suppressed tumor growth and extended the overall lifespan of subjects; however, the Ad-E2F1 p-E1A was clearly less effective in attaining these goals. Most notably, the antitumor effect and

  18. Treatment of experimental human mesothelioma using adenovirus transfer of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, W R; Hwang, H C; Elshami, A A; Amin, K M; Eck, S L; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors demonstrate the ability of an adenovirus vector expressing the herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene to treat human malignant mesothelioma growing within the peritoneal cavity of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. BACKGROUND DATA: Introduction of the HSVtk gene into tumor cells renders them sensitive to the antiviral drug ganciclovir (GCV). This approach has been used previously to treat experimental brain tumors. Although malignant mesothelioma is refractory to current therapies, its localized nature and the accessibility of the pleural space make it a potential target for a similar type of in vivo gene therapy using adenovirus. METHODS: An adenovirus containing the HSVtk gene (Ad.RSVtk) was used to transduce mesothelioma cells in vitro. These cells were then injected into the flanks of SCID mice. Ad.RSVtk was also injected directly into the peritoneal cavity of SCID mice with established human mesothelioma tumors. Mice were subsequently treated for 7 days with GCV at a dose of 5 mg/kg. RESULTS: Mesothelioma cells transduced in vitro with Ad.RSVtk formed nodules when injected in the subcutaneous tissue. These tumors could be eliminated by the administration of GCV, even when as few as 10% of cells were transduced to express HSVtk (bystander effect). Administration of Ad.RSVtk into the peritoneal space of animals with established multifocal human mesothelioma followed by GCV therapy resulted in the eradication of macroscopic tumor in 90% of animals and microscopic tumor in 80% of animals when evaluated after 30 days. The median survival of animals treated with Ad.RSVtk/GCV was significantly longer than that of control animals treated with similar protocols. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that an adenoviral vector containing the HSVtk gene is effective in treating established malignant mesothelioma in an in vivo setting and raise the possibility of using adenovirus transfer of HSVtk for clinical trials in mesothelioma and

  19. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  20. Redirecting adenoviruses to tumour cells using therapeutic antibodies: Generation of a versatile human bispecific adaptor.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Snezana; Beale, Emma V; Bonomelli, Camille; Easthope, Iona S; Pritchard, Laura K; Seabright, Gemma E; Caputo, Alessandro T; Scanlan, Christopher N; Dalziel, Martin; Crispin, Max

    2015-12-01

    Effective use of adenovirus-5 (Ad5) in cancer therapy is heavily dependent on the degree to which the virus's natural tropism can be subverted to one that favours tumour cells. This is normally achieved through either engineering of the viral fiber knob or the use of bispecific adaptors that display both adenovirus and tumour antigen receptors. One of the main limitations of these strategies is the need to tailor each engineering event to any given tumour antigen. Here, we explore bispecific adaptors that can utilise established anti-cancer therapeutic antibodies. Conjugates containing bacterially derived antibody binding motifs are efficient at retargeting virus to antibody targets. Here, we develop a humanized strategy whereby we synthesise a re-targeting adaptor based on a chimeric Ad5 ligand/antibody receptor construct. This adaptor acts as a molecular bridge analogous to therapeutic antibody mediated cross-linking of cytotoxic effector and tumour cells during immunotherapy. As a proof or principle, we demonstrate how this adaptor allows efficient viral recognition and entry into carcinoma cells through the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies Herceptin/trastuzumab and bavituximab. We show that targeting can be augmented by use of contemporary antibody enhancement strategies such as the selective elimination of competing serum IgG using "receptor refocusing" enzymes and we envisage that further improvements are achievable by enhancing the affinities between the adaptor and its ligands. Humanized bispecific adaptors offer the promise of a versatile retargeting technology that can exploit both clinically approved adenovirus and therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26391350

  1. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  2. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Z Q; Greenberg, L; Ertl, H C; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  3. Comparison of human and monkey cells for the ability to attenuate transcripts that begin at the adenovirus major late promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Seiberg, M.; Aloni, Y. ); Levine, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Late transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter can terminate prematurely at a site 182 to 188 nucleotides downstream. Experiments have been designed, with run-on transcription in nuclei in vitro or riboprobe protection of RNA obtained both in vivo and in vitro, that demonstrate that the ratio of attenuator RNA to readthrough RNA is greater in monkey cells (CV-1) than in human cells (HeLa). This may explain, in part, why the human adenoviruses replicate more poorly in CV-1 cells than in HeLa cells. A mutant adenovirus that replicates better than wild-type virus in monkey cells produces less of the attenuator RNA than wild-type adenovirus does in monkey cells. Monkey cell extracts have been shown to contain a factor that, when added to human cell extracts transcribing adenovirus DNA in vitro, increases the production of attenuator RNA in these reactions. These observations help to explain a portion of the block to the production of infectious adenoviruses in monkey cells.

  4. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  5. Identification and gene mapping of a 14,700-molecular-weight protein encoded by region E3 of group C adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Wold, W S

    1988-01-01

    Early region E3 of adenovirus type 5 should encode at least nine proteins as judged by the DNA sequence and the spliced structures of the known mRNAs. Only two E3 proteins have been proved to exist, a glycoprotein (gp19K) and an 11,600-molecular-weight protein (11.6K protein). Here we describe an abundant 14.7K protein coded by a gene in the extreme 3' portion of E3. To identify this 14.7K protein, we constructed a bacterial vector which synthesized a TrpE-14.7K fusion protein, then we prepared antiserum against the fusion protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated the 14.7K protein from cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 2, as well as with a variety of E3 deletion mutants. Synthesis of the 14.7K protein correlated precisely with the presence or absence of the 14.7K gene and with the synthesis of the mRNA (mRNA h) which encodes the 14.7K protein. The 14.7K protein appeared as a triplet on immunoprecipitation gels and Western blots (immunoblots). Images PMID:3275435

  6. HUMAN ADENOVIRUS TYPE 37 AND THE BALB/C MOUSE: PROGRESS TOWARD A RESTRICTED ADENOVIRUS KERATITIS MODEL (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Chodosh, James

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To establish a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis in order to study innate immune mechanisms in the adenovirus-infected cornea. Methods Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts were inoculated with human adenovirus (HAdV) serotypes 8, 19, or 37 and observed for cytopathic effect. Viral growth titers were performed, and apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay. Viral and host cytokine gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR in cultured Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts and in the corneas of virus-injected Balb/c mice. Western blot analysis was performed to detect cell signaling in the virus-infected cornea. Results Only HAdV37 induced cytopathic effect in mouse cells. Viral gene expression was limited, and viral replication was not detected. Apoptotic cell death in HAdV37-infected Balb/c cells was evident 48 and 72 hours postinfection (P < .01). MCP-1, IL-6, KC, and IP-10 mRNA levels were increased maximally by 8.4, 9.6, 10.5, and 20.0-fold, respectively, at 30 to 90 minutes after HAdV37 infection. Similar cytokine elevations were observed in the corneas of Balb/c mice 4 hours after stromal injection of HAdV37, when viral gene expression for the viral capsid protein IIIa was not detected. Western blot showed increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 4 and 24 hours after corneal infection. Conclusions Despite limited viral gene expression, HAdV37 infection of Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts results in increased proinflammatory gene expression. A similar pattern of cytokine expression in the corneas of HAdV37-infected Balb/c mice suggests the mouse adenoviral keratitis model may be useful for the study of early innate immune responses in the adenovirus-infected corneal stroma. PMID:17471351

  7. Selective induction of toxicity to human cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat by a conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, L K; Arens, M Q; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) primarily infect CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading eventually to the development of a systemic immune dysfunction termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An attractive strategy to combat HIV-mediated pathogenesis would be to eliminate the initial pool of infected cells and thus prevent disease progression. We have engineered a replication-defective, conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector, Ad-tk, whose action is dependent on the targeted expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (tk), cloned downstream of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, in human cells expressing the HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat. Infection of Tat-expressing human HeLa or Jurkat cells with Ad-tk resulted in high-level tk expression, which was not deleterious to the viability of these cells. However, in the presence of the antiherpetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir, Ad-tk infection resulted in a massive reduction in the viability of these Tat-expressing cell lines. As adenoviruses are natural passengers of the human lymphoid system, our results suggest adenovirus vector-based strategies for the targeted expression, under the control of cis-responsive HIV regulatory elements, of cytotoxic agents in HIV-infected cells for the therapy of HIV-mediated pathogenesis. Images PMID:2247444

  8. Vaccination with replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses encoding the main surface antigens of toxoplasma gondii induces immune response and protection against infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Bráulia C; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fux, Blima; Mendes, Erica A; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2006-04-01

    We have generated recombinant adenoviruses encoding three genetically modified surface antigens (SAGs) of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, that is, AdSAG1, AdSAG2, and AdSAG3. Modifications included the removal of their glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring motifs and, in some cases, the exchange of the native signal peptide for influenza virus hemagglutinin signal sequence. Adenovirus immunization of BALB/c mice elicited potent antibody responses against each protein, displaying a significant bias toward a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) profile in animals vaccinated with AdSAG1. Furthermore, the presence of parasite-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells was analyzed by proliferation assays and enzyme-linked immunospot assays in the same animals. Splenocytes from immunized mice secreted IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation with tachyzoite lysate antigen or with a fraction enriched for membrane-purified GPI-anchored proteins (F3) from the T. gondii tachyzoite surface. Epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells were identified in SAG1 and SAG3, but not SAG2, sequences, although this protein also induced a specific response. We also tested the capacity of the immune responses detected to protect mice against a challenge with live T. gondii parasites. Although no protection was observed against tachyzoites of the highly virulent RH strain, a significant reduction in cyst loads in the brain was observed in animals challenged with the P-Br strain. Thus, up to 80% of the cysts were eliminated from animals vaccinated with a mixture of the three recombinant viruses. Because adenoviruses seemed capable of inducing Th1-biased protective immune responses against T. gondii antigens, other parasite antigens should be tested alone or in combination with those described here to further develop a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. PMID:16610929

  9. Deletion of the gene encoding the adenovirus 5 early region 1b 21,000-molecular-weight polypeptide leads to degradation of viral and host cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Pilder, S; Logan, J; Shenk, T

    1984-01-01

    The adenovirus 5 mutant H5dl337 lacks 146 base pairs within early region 1B. The deletion removes a portion of the region encoding the E1B 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide, but does not disturb the E1B-55K/17K coding region. The virus is slightly defective for growth in cultured HeLa cells, in which its final yield is reduced ca. 10-fold compared with wild-type virus. The mutant displays a striking phenotype in HeLa cells. The onset of cytopathic effect is dramatically accelerated, and both host cell and viral DNAs are extensively degraded late after infection. This defect has been described previously for a variety of adenovirus mutants and has been termed a cytocidal (cyt) phenotype. H5dl337 serves to map this defect to the loss of E1B-21K polypeptide function. In addition to its defect in the productive growth cycle, H5dl337 is unable to transform rat cells at normal efficiency. Images PMID:6492257

  10. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  11. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Human Adenoviruses and Identification of Serotypes 40 and 41

    PubMed Central

    Jothikumar, Narayanan; Cromeans, Theresa L.; Hill, Vincent R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Sobsey, Mark D.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR assay for detection of human adenoviruses (HAdV) was developed using broadly reactive consensus primers and a TaqMan probe targeting a conserved region of the hexon gene. The TaqMan assay correctly identified 56 representative adenovirus prototype strains and field isolates from all six adenovirus species (A to F). Based on infectious units, the TaqMan assay was able to detect as few as 0.4 and 0.004 infectious units of adenovirus serotype 2 (AdV2) and AdV41, respectively, with results obtained in less than 90 min. Using genomic equivalents, the broadly reactive TaqMan assay was able to detect 5 copies of AdV40 (which had zero mismatches with the PCR primers and probe), 8 copies of AdV41, and 350 copies of AdV3 (which had the most mismatches [seven] of any adenovirus serotype tested). For specific detection and identification of F species serotypes AdV40 and AdV41, a second real-time PCR assay was developed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes that target the adenovirus fiber gene. The FRET-based assay had a detection limit of 3 to 5 copies of AdV40 and AdV41 standard DNA and was able to distinguish between AdV40 and AdV41 based on melting curve analysis. Both the TaqMan and FRET PCR assays were quantitative over a wide range of virus titers. Application of these assays for detection of adenoviruses and type-specific identification of AdV40 and AdV41 will be useful for identifying these viruses in environmental and clinical samples. PMID:15933012

  12. A Single Intraduodenal Administration of Human Adenovirus 40 Vaccine Effectively Prevents Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Satoshi; Miura, Yoshiaki; Davydova, Julia; Vickers, Selwyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine administration into the intestine is known to induce mucosal tolerance most efficiently. Therefore, developing a delivery system that targets the intestinal mucosa is expected to improve the efficiency of immunosuppression. Human enteric adenovirus serotype 40 (Ad40)-based vectors have the advantage of targeting intestinal mucosa, making them prime candidates as mucosal vaccine carriers for immunosuppression. Here, after both oral and intraduodenal administrations, the vector distribution of replication-defective recombinant Ad40 vectors (rAd40) was significantly higher than that of a conventional Ad vector based on human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) in ilea containing Peyer's patches. Single intraduodenal administration of rAd40 induced antigen-specific mucosal immunoreaction mediated by intestinal mucosal and systemic immunity. In ovalbumin-induced allergy mouse models, this approach inhibited antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, diarrhea occurrence, and systemic anaphylaxis. Thus, a single intraduodenal administration of rAd40 provides a potent method of inducing allergen-specific mucosal tolerance and a new allergen-specific immunotherapy for overcoming problems with current therapies against life-threatening allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. PMID:23885027

  13. Investigating the role of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in protecting Human Adenovirus from water disinfection treatment.

    PubMed

    Verani, Marco; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Tammaro, Carmine; Carducci, Annalaura

    2016-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical infections and are present in aquatic environments, including river, seawater, drinking-water and sewage. Free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba) in the same environments may internalize them and other microorganisms can act as a reservoir for the internalized viruses. In this study, we studied the interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Human Adenovirus type 5 (HAdV 5) to determine whether the amoeba played a role in protecting the internalized viruses from chemical disinfection. The efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfection against A. polyphaga and HAdV 5 either singly or in combination was assessed at three different concentrations. Individually, the amoeba were more resistant to chemical disinfection than HAdV 5 and remained alive after exposure to 5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. In contrast, HAdV 5 lost infectivity following exposure to 2.5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. When the amoeba and HAdV 5 were co-cultured, infectious virus was found in the cytoplasm of the amoeba at 5mg/l disinfectant concentration. These findings suggest that the A. polyphaga is providing protection for the HAdV 5. PMID:26999560

  14. Immortalisation of human oesophageal epithelial cells by a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, S.; Handa, H.; Imai, T.; Makuuchi, H.; Kidokoro, M.; Tohya, H.; Aizawa, S.; Shimamura, K.; Ueyama, Y.; Mitomi, T.

    1995-01-01

    We introduced the origin-defective SV40 early gene into cultured human oesophageal epithelial cells by infection of a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector. The virus-infected cells formed colonies 3-4 weeks after infection in medium containing fetal calf serum. When the cells derived from 'serum-resistant' colonies were then maintained in the serum-free medium with a low calcium ion concentration, some of them passed the cell crisis and kept growing for over 12 months. These cells, regarded as immortalised cells, resembled the primarily cultured oesophageal epithelial cells in morphology and had some of their original characteristics. Treatment of the cells with a high calcium concentration induced phenotypic changes. These cells still responded to transforming growth factor beta. When the immortalised cells were injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice, they transiently formed epithelial cysts, although the typical differentiation pattern of the oesophageal epithelium was not observed. These cysts regressed within 2 months without development into tumours. The results indicated that human oesophageal epithelial cells were reproducibly immortalised by infection with a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector at relatively high efficiency. The immortalised cells should be useful in studies on oesophageal carcinogenesis and in assessing the cooperative effects with other oncogene products or carcinogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7536023

  15. In vitro and in vivo synthesis of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen and of the receptor for polymerized human serum albumin from recombinant human adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ballay, A; Levrero, M; Buendia, M A; Tiollais, P; Perricaudet, M

    1985-01-01

    We have developed an adenovirus vector to express foreign proteins under the control of the adenovirus E1a promoter. Two recombinant plasmids, harbouring either the S gene or the pre-S2 region and the S gene of hepatitis B virus under the control of the E1a promoter, were used to construct two recombinant adenoviruses. These two viruses direct the synthesis of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) particles during the time course of an infectious cycle. When the pre-S2 region is present in the constructed virus, the synthesis of particles carrying the receptor for polymerized human serum albumin (pHSA) is observed. Moreover, the inoculation of rabbits with this latter purified recombinant adenovirus elicits the production of antibodies that react with both HBsAg and pHSA receptor. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3004975

  16. Attachment and Detachment Behavior of Human Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Margaret E; Sommer, Regina; Lindner, Gerhard; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Toze, Simon; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Blaschke, Alfred P; Sidhu, Jatinder P S

    2015-09-01

    The transport of human adenovirus, nanoparticles, and PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages was tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, South Australia. Comparison of transport and removal of virus surrogates with the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Because experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow-through soil columns were used. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material but not under high ionic strength or high pH conditions. It was also found that straining due to size and the charge of the colloid were not dominant removal mechanisms in this system. Implications of this study indicate that a certain surrogate may not represent a specific pathogen solely based on similar size, morphology, and/or surface charge. Moreover, if a particular surrogate is representative of a pathogen in one aquifer system, it may not be the most appropriate surrogate in another porous media system. This was apparent in the inferior performance of MS2 as a surrogate, which is commonly used in virus transport studies. PMID:26436257

  17. Human Adenovirus Type 7 Infection Associated with Severe and Fatal Acute Lower Respiratory Illness and Nosocomial Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianyan; Wen, Liang; Wu, Zhihao; Liu, Nan; Yang, Chaojie; Liu, Wei; Ba, Zhongwei; Wang, Jian; Yi, Shengjie; Li, Hao; Liang, Beibei; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Hao, Rongzhang; Wang, Ligui; Hua, Yuejin; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male died of severe pneumonia and respiratory failure in a tertiary hospital in Beijing, and 4 out of 55 close contacts developed fever. Molecular analysis confirmed human adenovirus type 7 (HAdV7) as the causative agent. We highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment and proper transmission control of HAdV7. PMID:25520444

  18. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FM...

  19. Functional Heterogeneity of Virions in Human Adenovirus Types 2 and 12

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mak, Stanley

    1970-01-01

    Purified preparations of adenovirus types 2 and 12 were used to infect KB cells at different input multiplicities. The resulting infected cultures were scored for inclusion body formation, production of infectious centers, and cloning efficiency. Both preparations were found to contain some defective particles capable of preventing a cell from cloning but unable to induce inclusion bodies or form plaques. The proportion of such defective particles in adenovirus 12 was about 10 times that in adenovirus 2. At high input multiplicities, the percentage of cells displaying an inclusion body was less than that predicted by the Poisson distribution and reached a maximum of 40 to 60% for adenovirus 2 and 12 to 15% for adenovirus 12. This reduction may be due to interference by large numbers of non-plaque-producing particles infecting each cell. The per cent of cells forming infectious centers was substantially greater for adenovirus 2 than for adenovirus 12 when compared at the same input plaque-forming units, reaching a maximum of 35 to 73% for adenovirus 2 and 5 to 10% for adenovirus 12. The low value for adenovirus 12 may be a result of the same interference phenomenon. Images PMID:4194167

  20. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  1. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  2. Recombinant adenovirus encoding the HA gene from swine H3N2 influenza virus partially protects mice from challenge with heterologous virus: A/HK/1/68 (H3N2).

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Harp, J A; Wesley, R D

    2002-11-01

    Immunization with recombinant adenoviral vaccine that induces potent immunity has been applied to many infectious diseases. We report here developing a recombinant adenoviral vaccine encoding the HA gene from swine H3N2 influenza virus (SIV). Two replication-defective recombinant adenoviruses were generated: (1) rAd-HA: recombinant adenovirus encoding the HA gene from swine H3N2 influenza virus, and (2) rAd-vector: a control recombinant adenovirus containing adenovirus and transfer plasmids without a foreign HA gene. Mice given rAd-HA developed high titers of neutralizing and hemagglutination inhibition antibodies to SIV in comparison to mice inoculated with rAd-vector or PBS as early as 2 weeks after immunization, and these antibodies were substantially increased in the mice given rAd-HA within the next 3 weeks following the first dose. However, these antibodies were not able to neutralize the virus, A/HK/68 (H3N2), used for challenge. Nonetheless mice immunized with one or two doses of rAd-HA were protected from lethal challenge with heterologous virus, A/HK/1/68 (H3N2). A statistically significant ( P < 0.03) difference between survival rates of rAd-HA mice vs. rAd-vector or PBS mice was observed. PMID:12417948

  3. Coagulation Factor X Activates Innate Immunity to Human Species C Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Doronin, Konstantin; Flatt, Justin W.; Di Paolo, Nelson C.; Khare, Reeti; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Acchione, Mauro; Sumida, John P.; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; MacDonald, James W.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Farin, Frederico M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although coagulation factors play a role in host defense for “living fossils” such as horseshoe crabs, the role of the coagulation system in immunity in higher organisms remains unclear. We modeled the interface of human species C adenovirus (HAdv) interaction with coagulation factor X (FX) and introduced a mutation that abrogated formation of the HAdv-FX complex. In vivo genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that FX-binding–ablated virus failed to activate a distinct network of nuclear factor κB–dependent early-response genes that are activated by HAdv-FX complex downstream of TLR4/MyD88/TRIF/TRAF6 signaling. Our study implicates host factor “decoration” of the virus as a mechanism to trigger an innate immune sensor that responds to a misplacement of coagulation FX from the blood into intracellular macrophage compartments upon virus entry into the cell. PMID:23019612

  4. Coagulation factor X activates innate immunity to human species C adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Konstantin; Flatt, Justin W; Di Paolo, Nelson C; Khare, Reeti; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Acchione, Mauro; Sumida, John P; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; MacDonald, James W; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Frederico M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2012-11-01

    Although coagulation factors play a role in host defense for "living fossils" such as horseshoe crabs, the role of the coagulation system in immunity in higher organisms remains unclear. We modeled the interface of human species C adenovirus (HAdv) interaction with coagulation factor X (FX) and introduced a mutation that abrogated formation of the HAdv-FX complex. In vivo genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that FX-binding-ablated virus failed to activate a distinct network of nuclear factor κB-dependent early-response genes that are activated by HAdv-FX complex downstream of TLR4/MyD88/TRIF/TRAF6 signaling. Our study implicates host factor "decoration" of the virus as a mechanism to trigger an innate immune sensor that responds to a misplacement of coagulation FX from the blood into intracellular macrophage compartments upon virus entry into the cell. PMID:23019612

  5. Data on the expression of cellular lncRNAs in human adenovirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maoshan; Zhao, Hongxing; Lind, Sara Bergström; Pettersson, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Expression of cellular long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human primary lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) during the course of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) infection was studied by strand-specific whole transcriptome sequencing. In total, 645 cellular lncRNAs were expressed at a significant level and 398 of them were changed more than 2-fold. The changes in expression followed a distinct temporal pattern. Significantly, 80% of the changes occurred at the late phase and 80% of the de-regulated lncRNAs were up-regulated. The three largest groups of deregulated lncRNAs were 125 antisense RNAs, 111 pseudogenes and 85 long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). Lastly, more than 36% of lncRNAs have been shown to interact with RNA binding proteins. PMID:27547808

  6. Five genome sequences of subspecies B1 human adenoviruses associated with acute respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Liu, Elizabeth B; Seto, Jason; Torres, Sarah F; Hudson, Nolan R; Kajon, Adriana E; Metzgar, David; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S; Seto, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Five genomes of human subspecies B1 adenoviruses isolated from cases of acute respiratory disease have been sequenced and archived for reference. These include representatives of two prevalent genomic variants of HAdV-7, i.e., HAdV-7h and HAdV-7d2. The other three are HAdV-3/16, HAdV-16 strain E26, and HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi. All are recombinant genomes. Genomics and bioinformatics provide detailed views into the genetic makeup of these pathogens and insight into their molecular evolution. Retrospective characterization of particularly problematic older pathogens such as HAdV-7h (1987) and intriguing isolates such as HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi (1958) may provide clues to their phenotypes and serology and may suggest protocols for prevention and treatment. PMID:22158846

  7. Molecular Detection and Phylogenetic Characterization of Bat and Human Adenoviruses in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Yan; Qiu, Min; Chen, Hui-Fang; Chen, Shao-Wei; Xiao, Jian-Peng; Jiang, Li-Na; Huo, Shu-Ting; Shi, Ting-Li; Ma, Li-Zhen; Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Qiong-Hua; Li, Xing; Chen, Zhong; Wu, Yi; Li, Jin-Ming; Guan, Wei-Jie; Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ma, Shu-Juan; Zhong, Xue-Shan; Ge, Jing; Cen, Shu-Wen; Chen, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Several novel adenoviruses (AdVs) have recently been identified in humans and other animal species. In this study, we report the molecular detection of and phylogenetically characterize bat and human AdVs detected in fecal or rectal swab samples collected in southern China. To detect AdVs, a 252-261 bp fragment of the DNA polymerase (DPOL) gene was amplified using nested PCR. A total of 520 rectal swab samples were collected from eight bat species in four geographic regions of southern China (Guangzhou, Yunfu, Huizhou, and Haikou city). Thirty-six (6.9%) samples from the following species tested positive for AdVs: Myotis ricketti, Miniopterus schreibersii, Scotophilus kuhlii, Taphozous melanopogon, Rhinolophus blythi, and Cynopterus sphinx. Eight novel AdVs were detected in 13.3% of the samples from C. sphinx. Of 328 fecal samples from patients with diarrhea, 16 (4.9%) were positive for classical human AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis showed that human AdVs shared low similarity (57.1-69.3%) with bat AdVs in deduced amino acid sequences of the AdV DPOL region. Thus, our study indicated that bat AdVs and human AdVs are species specific. As such, there is no evidence of cross-species transmission of AdV between bats and humans based on current data. PMID:27057618

  8. Multiple Cross-Species Transmission Events of Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) during Hominine Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Hohmann, Gottfried; Fruth, Barbara; Karhemere, Stomy; Madinda, Nadège F.; Mugisha, Lawrence; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Todd, Angelique; Petrzelkova, Klara J.; Gray, Maryke; Robbins, Martha; Bergl, Richard A.; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe; Schubert, Grit; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV; species HAdV-A to -G) are highly prevalent in the human population, and represent an important cause of morbidity and, to a lesser extent, mortality. Recent studies have identified close relatives of these viruses in African great apes, suggesting that some HAdV may be of zoonotic origin. We analyzed more than 800 fecal samples from wild African great apes and humans to further investigate the evolutionary history and zoonotic potential of hominine HAdV. HAdV-B and -E were frequently detected in wild gorillas (55%) and chimpanzees (25%), respectively. Bayesian ancestral host reconstruction under discrete diffusion models supported a gorilla and chimpanzee origin for these viral species. Host switches were relatively rare along HAdV evolution, with about ten events recorded in 4.5 My. Despite presumably rare direct contact between sympatric populations of the two species, transmission events from gorillas to chimpanzees were observed, suggesting that habitat and dietary overlap may lead to fecal-oral cross-hominine transmission of HAdV. Finally, we determined that two independent HAdV-B transmission events to humans occurred more than 100,000 years ago. We conclude that HAdV-B circulating in humans are of zoonotic origin and have probably affected global human health for most of our species lifetime. PMID:25862141

  9. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models. PMID

  10. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Tollefson, Ann E.; Sagartz, John E.; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models. PMID

  11. Human Adenovirus Type 2 but Not Adenovirus Type 12 Is Mutagenic at the Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase Locus of Cloned Rat Liver Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paraskeva, Christos; Roberts, Carl; Biggs, Paul; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    1983-01-01

    Using resistance to the base analog 8-azaguanine as a genetic marker, we showed that adenovirus type 2, but not adenovirus type 12, is mutagenic at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of cloned diploid rat liver epithelial cells. Adenovirus type 2 increased the frequency of 8-azaguanine-resistant colonies by up to ninefold over the spontaneous frequency, depending on expression time and virus dose. PMID:6572280

  12. A novel mRNA and a low molecular weight polypeptide encoded in the transforming region of adenovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Katze, M G; Persson, H; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation was used to identify adenovirus type 2 (ad2) tumor antigens synthesized in vivo. The antisera, prepared from tumor-bearing animals, reacted with a wide spectrum of ad2 early proteins including a 11 000-dalton (11 K) polypeptide. The gene for this polypeptide was mapped to the transforming region of the viral genome by hybridization selection followed by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. Hybrid arrest translation revealed that the 11 K RNA was transcribed from the leftward reading strand (1-strand) in contrast to other mRNAs from this region. Sucrose gradient analysis of the selected 11 K mRNA revealed that the size of the mRNA was 20S corresponding to approximately 2000 nucleotides. Novel 1-strand transcripts of this length from the transforming region were identified by S1 endonuclease analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that both strands of the transforming region of ad2 DNA are actively transcribed into functional mRNA early after viral infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6985356

  13. Stepwise Loss of Fluorescent Core Protein V from Human Adenovirus during Entry into Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Puntener, Daniel; Engelke, Martin F.; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Strunze, Sten; Wilhelm, Corinne; Greber, Urs F.

    2011-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (Ads) replicate and assemble particles in the nucleus. They organize a linear double-strand DNA genome into a condensed core with about 180 nucleosomes, by the viral proteins VII (pVII), pX, and pV attaching the DNA to the capsid. Using reverse genetics, we generated a novel, nonconditionally replicating Ad reporter by inserting green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the amino terminus of pV. Purified Ad2-GFP-pV virions had an oversized complete genome and incorporated about 38 GFP-pV molecules per virion, which is about 25% of the pV levels in Ad2. GFP-pV cofractionated with the DNA core, like pV, and newly synthesized GFP-pV had a subcellular localization indistinguishable from that of pV, indicating that GFP-pV is a valid reporter for pV. Ad2-GFP-pV completed the replication cycle, although at lower yields than Ad2. Incoming GFP-pV (or pV) was not imported into the nucleus. Virions lost GFP-pV at two points during the infection process: at entry into the cytosol and at the nuclear pore complex, where capsids disassemble. Disassembled capsids, positive for the conformation-specific antihexon antibody R70, were devoid of GFP-pV. The loss of GFP-pV was reduced by the macrolide antibiotic leptomycin B (LMB), which blocks nuclear export and adenovirus attachment to the nuclear pore complex. LMB inhibited the appearance of R70 epitopes on Ad2 and Ad2-GFP-pV, indicating that the loss of GFP-pV from Ad2-GFP-pV is an authentic step in the adenovirus uncoating program. Ad2-GFP-pV is genetically complete and hence enables detailed analyses of infection and spreading dynamics in cells and model organisms or assessment of oncolytic adenoviral potential. PMID:21047958

  14. Interaction of the Human Adenovirus Proteinase with Its 11-Amino Acid Cofactor pVIc†

    PubMed Central

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; McGrath, William J.; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Li, Caroline; Toledo, Diana L.; Pellicena, Patricia; Barnard, Dale L.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Mangel, Walter F.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the human adenovirus proteinase (AVP) and AVP–NA complexes with the 11-amino acid cofactor pVIc was characterized. The equilibrium dissociation constant for the binding of pVIc to AVP was 4.4 μM. The binding of AVP to 12-mer single-stranded DNA decreased the Kd for the binding of pVIc to AVP to 0.09 μM. The pVIc–AVP complex hydrolyzed the substrate with a Michaelis constant (Km) of 3.7 μM and a catalytic rate constant (kcat) of 1.1 s−1 In the presence of DNA, the Km increased less than 2-fold, and the kcat increased 3-fold. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was performed to determine the contribution of individual pVIc side chains in the binding and stimulation of AVP. Two amino acid residues, Gly1′ and Phe11′, were the major determinants in the binding of pVIc to AVP, while Val2′ and Phe11′ were the major determinants in stimulating enzyme activity. Binding of AVP to DNA greatly suppressed the effects of the alanine substitutions on the binding of mutant pVIcs to AVP. Binding of either or both of the cofactors, pVIc or the viral DNA, to AVP did not dramatically alter its secondary structure as determined by vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism. pVIc, when added to Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus serotype 5, inhibited the synthesis of infectious virus, presumably by prematurely activating the proteinase so that it cleaved virion precursor proteins before virion assembly, thereby aborting the infection. PMID:11591154

  15. Human Adenovirus Serotype 3 Vector Packaged by a Rare Serotype 14 Hexon

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhou, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 3 (rAd3), which infects cells through the receptor desmoglein 2 (DSG2), has been investigated as a vector for gene therapy or vaccination. However, pre-existing anti-vector immunity may limit the practical application of rAd3. In this study, we investigated the seroprevalence and neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers to Ad3 and alternate serotypes in normal healthy adults in southern China. Sera samples had a high seroprevalence (80.00%) against Ad3 and Ad7 (85.83%), compared with Ad14 (22.50%). Furthermore, 19.17% and 25.83% of samples had high-titer neutralizing antibodies to Ad3 and Ad7, respectively, compared with 3.33% against Ad14. We constructed a chimeric adenovirus, rAd3H14, designed to evade anti-vector immunity by replacing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing hexon of the rAd3EGFP vector with a hexon from Ad14. The chimeric vector rAd3H14 was not neutralized in vitro efficiently by Ad3 NAbs using sera from mice and normal healthy human volunteers. Furthermore, in contrast to the unmodified vector rAd3EGFP, rAd3H14 induced robust antibody responses against EGFP in mice with high levels of pre-existing anti-Ad3 immunity. In conclusion, the chimeric vector rAd3H14 may be a useful alternative vector in adult populations with a high prevalence of Ad3 NAbs. PMID:27328032

  16. Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cGAS/STING DNA sensing complex has recently been established as a predominant pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) for DNA-directed type I interferon (IFN) innate immune activation. Using replication-defective adenovirus vectors and replication-competent wild-type adenovirus, we have modeled the influence of the cGAS/STING cascade in permissive human cell lines (A549, HeLa, ARPE19, and THP1). Wild-type adenovirus induced efficient early activation of the cGAS/STING cascade in a cell-specific manner. In all responsive cell lines, cGAS/STING short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown resulted in a loss of TBK1 and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) activation, a lack of beta interferon transcript induction, loss of interferon-dependent STAT1 activation, and diminished induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Adenoviruses that infect through the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad2 and Ad5) and the CD46 (Ad35) and desmoglein-2 (Ad7) viral receptors all induce the cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade. The magnitude of the IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response was strongly influenced by serotype, with Ad35>Ad7>Ad2. For each serotype, no enhancement of viral DNA replication or virus production occurred in cGAS or STING shRNA-targeted cell line pools. We found no replication advantage in permissive cell lines that do not trigger the cGAS/STING cascade following infection. The cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade was not a direct target of viral antihost strategies, and we found no evidence that Ad stimulation of the cGAS/STING DNA response had an impact on viral replication efficiency. IMPORTANCE This study shows for the first time that the cGAS DNA sensor directs a dominant IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response to adenovirus in human cell lines. Activation of cGAS occurs with viruses that infect through different high-affinity receptors (CAR, CD46, and desmoglein-2), and the magnitude of the cGAS/STING DNA response cascade is influenced by serotype-specific functions

  17. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  18. Effective detection of human adenovirus in hawaiian waters using enhanced pcr methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current criteria for recreational water quality evaluation are primarily based on measurements of fecal indicator bacteria growth. However, these criteria often fail to predict the presence of waterborne human pathogenic viruses. To explore the possibility of direct use of human enteric viruses as improved human fecal contamination indicators, human adenovirus (HAdV) was tested as a model in this study. Findings In order to establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective detection of HAdV in aquatic environments, sixteen published PCR primer sets were re-optimized and comparatively evaluated. Primer sets nehex3deg/nehex4deg, ADV-F/ADV-R, and nested PCR primer sets hex1deg/hex2deg and nehex3deg/nehex4deg were identified to be the most sensitive ones, with up to 1,000 fold higher detection sensitivity compared to other published assays. These three PCR protocols were successfully employed to detect HAdV in both treated and untreated urban wastewaters, and also in 6 of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Conclusions Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viruses for aquatic environmental monitoring, specifically for the essential routine monitoring of Hawaiian beach waters using the optimized PCR protocol to detect HAdV at certain water sites to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21303549

  19. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults.

    PubMed

    Ogwang, Caroline; Kimani, Domtila; Edwards, Nick J; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Ewer, Katie; Urban, Britta C; S Hill, Adrian V; Bejon, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016). PMID:25947165

  20. Efficacy of gene-therapy based on adenovirus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Cruz, Alejandro; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Ramos-Espinosa, Octavio; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Xing, Zhou; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), although a curable disease, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is necessary to develop a short-term therapy with reduced drug toxicity in order to improve adherence rate and control disease burden. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may be a key cytokine in the treatment of pulmonary TB since it primes the activation and differentiation of myeloid and non-myeloid precursor cells, inducing the release of protective Th1 cytokines. In this work, we administrated by intratracheal route recombinant adenoviruses encoding GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF). This treatment produced significant bacterial elimination when administered in a single dose at 60 days of infection with drug sensitive or drug resistant Mtb strains in a murine model of progressive disease. Moreover, AdGM-CSF combined with primary antibiotics produced more rapid elimination of pulmonary bacterial burdens than conventional chemotherapy suggesting that this form of treatment could shorten the conventional treatment. PMID:27553405

  1. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  2. A Novel Psittacine Adenovirus Identified During an Outbreak of Avian Chlamydiosis and Human Psittacosis: Zoonosis Associated with Virus-Bacterium Coinfection in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Chan, Andy S. F.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lo, Janice Y. C.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3′ end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3–54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6–70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1–74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should

  3. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:18205221

  4. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Arantes, Thalita; Caumo, Karin S; Rott, Marilise B; Spilki, Fernando R

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV) in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16) were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16) of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water. PMID:27142544

  5. Mapping a new gene that encodes an 11,600-molecular-weight protein in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2.

    PubMed Central

    Wold, W S; Cladaras, C; Magie, S C; Yacoub, N

    1984-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the early E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2 (Ad2) (J. Hérissé et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:2173-2192, 1980), indicates that an open reading frame exists between nucleotides 1860 and 2163 that could encode a protein of Mr 11,600 (11.6K). We have determined the DNA sequence of the corresponding region in Ad5 (closely related to Ad2) and have established that this putative gene is conserved in Ad5 (a 10.5K protein). To determine whether this protein is expressed, we prepared an antiserum in rabbits against a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 66 to 74 in the 11.6K protein of Ad2. The peptide antiserum immunoprecipitated a ca. 13K-14K protein doublet, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from [35S]methionine-labeled Ad2- or Ad5-early-infected KB cells. The antiserum also immunoprecipitated a 13K-14K protein doublet translated in vitro from Ad2 or Ad5 early E3-specific mRNA purified by hybridization to Ad2 EcoRI-D (nucleotides -236 to 2437). The synthetic peptide successfully competed with the 13K-14K protein doublet in immunoprecipitation experiments, thereby confirming the specificity of the antiserum. As deduced from the DNA sequence, the 11.6K protein (and the corresponding 10.5K Ad5 protein) has a conserved 22-amino-acid hydrophobic domain, suggesting that the protein may be associated with membranes. We conclude that a gene located at nucleotides 1860 to 2143 in the Ad2 E3 transcription unit (nucleotides 1924 to 2203) in the Ad5 E3 transcription unit) encodes an 11.6K protein (10.5K in Ad5). Images PMID:6492252

  6. Effect on transformation of mutations in the early region 1b-encoded 21- and 55-kilodalton proteins of adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Babiss, L E; Fisher, P B; Ginsberg, H S

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that the adenovirus 5 genes responsible for the initiation and maintenance of the transformed cell reside in the early region 1a and 1b genes, but it remains unclear how the polypeptides encoded in these genes mediate their functions. To probe the function of the early region 1b-encoded 55- and 21-kilodalton (kd) polypeptides during this process, a series of viral mutants was engineered so that they contained deletions or insertions at 5.4, 5.7, 7.9, or 9.6 map units. By means of either an overlap recombination procedure involving H5dl314 (delta 3.7 to 4.6 map units) cleaved with ClaI, or a marker rescue procedure involving H5dl312 (delta 1.2 to 3.8 map units), viral mutants were isolated by their ability to produce plaques on KB cell line 18 cells, which constitutively express only viral early region 1b functions. DNA sequence analysis confirmed that the series of mutants generated differed in their abilities to express the 21- or the 55-kd polypeptides, or both. Upon infection of cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells with viruses containing mutations affecting the 55-kd protein, the transformation frequency decreased as the size of the predicted truncated polypeptide decreased. Although all of the foci generated by the 55-kd protein mutants were indistinguishable from the foci induced by wild-type virus, they displayed an inefficient ability to grow in soft agar, again in relation to the size of the truncated polypeptide. In contrast, if cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells were transfected with viral DNA, the defectiveness in transformation observed after infection with virions was not as dramatic. However, all of the viruses containing 21-kd mutations were transformation defective, regardless of the mode by which the viral nucleic acid was introduced into the cell. Images PMID:6333514

  7. Development and assessment of human adenovirus type 11 as a gene transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel; Ni, Shaoheng; Li, Zong-Yi; Gaggar, Anuj; DiPaolo, Nelson; Feng, Qinghua; Sandig, Volker; Lieber, André

    2005-04-01

    Adenovirus vectors based on human serotype 5 (Ad5) have successfully been used as gene transfer vectors in many gene therapy-based approaches to treat disease. Despite their widespread application, many potential therapeutic applications are limited by the widespread prevalence of vector-neutralizing antibodies within the human population and the inability of Ad5-based vectors to transduce important therapeutic target cell types. In an attempt to circumvent these problems, we have developed Ad vectors based on human Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), since the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to Ad11 in humans is low. E1-deleted Ad11 vector genomes were generated by homologous recombination in 293 cells expressing the Ad11-E1B55K protein or by recombination in Escherichia coli. E1-deleted Ad11 genomes did not display transforming activity in rodent cells. Transduction of primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and immature dendritic cells was more efficient with Ad11 vectors than with Ad5 vectors. Thirty minutes after intravenous injection into mice that express one of the Ad11 receptors (CD46), we found, in a pattern and at a level comparable to what is found in humans, Ad11 vector genomes in all analyzed organs, with the highest amounts in liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. Neither Ad11 genomes nor Ad11 vector-mediated transgene expression were, however, detected at 72 h postinfusion. A large number of Ad11 particles were also found to be associated with circulating blood cells. We also discovered differences in in vitro transduction efficiencies and in vivo biodistributions between Ad11 vectors and chimeric Ad5 vectors possessing Ad11 fibers, indicating that Ad11 capsid proteins other than fibers influence viral infectivity and tropism. Overall, our study provides a basis for the application of Ad11 vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene transfer and for gaining an understanding of the factors that determine Ad tropism. PMID:15795294

  8. Prevalence, quantification, and typing of human adenoviruses detected in river water in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhon-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Kao, Po-Min; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of human adenoviruses (HAdV) in river waters was investigated in this study. Water samples were collected from 13 rivers in Taiwan, concentrated, and assessed for the presence of HAdVs using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Human AdV positive samples were then subjected to real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantify the viral genomes and further subjected to primer-based genotyping to identify the various serotypes present. For each water sample, several water quality parameters were evaluated, including heterotrophic plate count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, water temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen. Among the 13 rivers examined, four rivers (30.8 %) were found to contain HAdVs. The major genotype was F species HAdV serotype 41. The mean HAdVs concentrations ranged from 6.10 × 10(2) to 8.51 × 10(2) copies/L. No significant differences were observed between the presence of HAdVs, and all of the water quality parameters evaluated (heterotrophic plate count, total coliform, E. coli, water temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen). Given the potential health risks posed by the presence of enteric viruses in environmental waters, further assessment is desirable with respect to possible sources, virus transport, and survival of viruses in the aquatic environment. PMID:25537289

  9. In vitro assessments of the genetic stability of a live recombinant human adenovirus vaccine against rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Lutze-Wallace, C; Sapp, T; Sidhu, M; Wandeler, A

    1995-01-01

    The genetic stability of a live human adenovirus 5: rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine has been assessed upon 20 serial passages in a permissive cell line of human origin. Restriction endonuclease analysis and the polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the integrity of the expression cassette for the rabies glycoprotein and the viral vector at the site of insertion of the cassette. It was found that the restriction endonuclease profile was identical for each sample assayed. A more detailed analysis of the expression cassette following amplification by the polymerase chain reaction revealed no changes in the size and number of fragments originating from the coding sequence for the glycoprotein nor the signals controlling the expression of the protein product. The amplified product obtained from the 10th and 20th passages was subjected to nucleotide sequencing. Additionally, 20 plaques isolated from the 20th passage of the virus expressed the rabies glycoprotein as demonstrated by fluorescent antibody staining with glycoprotein specific monoclonal antibodies. These results suggest that the recombinant vaccine maintains the integrity of the heterologous sequences upon passage in tissue culture. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7648530

  10. Genomic and Bioinformatics Analysis of HAdV-4, a Human Adenovirus Causing Acute Respiratory Disease: Implications for Gene Therapy and Vaccine Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, Anjan; Ditty, Susan E.; Su, Jing; McGraw, John; Hadfield, Ted L.; Tibbetts, Clark; Seto, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 4 (HAdV-4) is a reemerging viral pathogenic agent implicated in epidemic outbreaks of acute respiratory disease (ARD). This report presents a genomic and bioinformatics analysis of the prototype 35,990-nucleotide genome (GenBank accession no. AY594253). Intriguingly, the genome analysis suggests a closer phylogenetic relationship with the chimpanzee adenoviruses (simian adenoviruses) rather than with other human adenoviruses, suggesting a recent origin of HAdV-4, and therefore species E, through a zoonotic event from chimpanzees to humans. Bioinformatics analysis also suggests a pre-zoonotic recombination event, as well, between species B-like and species C-like simian adenoviruses. These observations may have implications for the current interest in using chimpanzee adenoviruses in the development of vectors for human gene therapy and for DNA-based vaccines. Also, the reemergence, surveillance, and treatment of HAdV-4 as an ARD pathogen is an opportunity to demonstrate the use of genome determination as a tool for viral infectious disease characterization and epidemic outbreak surveillance: for example, rapid and accurate low-pass sequencing and analysis of the genome. In particular, this approach allows the rapid identification and development of unique probes for the differentiation of family, species, serotype, and strain (e.g., pathogen genome signatures) for monitoring epidemic outbreaks of ARD. PMID:15681456

  11. Genomic and bioinformatics analysis of HAdV-4, a human adenovirus causing acute respiratory disease: implications for gene therapy and vaccine vector development.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Anjan; Ditty, Susan E; Su, Jing; McGraw, John; Hadfield, Ted L; Tibbetts, Clark; Seto, Donald

    2005-02-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 4 (HAdV-4) is a reemerging viral pathogenic agent implicated in epidemic outbreaks of acute respiratory disease (ARD). This report presents a genomic and bioinformatics analysis of the prototype 35,990-nucleotide genome (GenBank accession no. AY594253). Intriguingly, the genome analysis suggests a closer phylogenetic relationship with the chimpanzee adenoviruses (simian adenoviruses) rather than with other human adenoviruses, suggesting a recent origin of HAdV-4, and therefore species E, through a zoonotic event from chimpanzees to humans. Bioinformatics analysis also suggests a pre-zoonotic recombination event, as well, between species B-like and species C-like simian adenoviruses. These observations may have implications for the current interest in using chimpanzee adenoviruses in the development of vectors for human gene therapy and for DNA-based vaccines. Also, the reemergence, surveillance, and treatment of HAdV-4 as an ARD pathogen is an opportunity to demonstrate the use of genome determination as a tool for viral infectious disease characterization and epidemic outbreak surveillance: for example, rapid and accurate low-pass sequencing and analysis of the genome. In particular, this approach allows the rapid identification and development of unique probes for the differentiation of family, species, serotype, and strain (e.g., pathogen genome signatures) for monitoring epidemic outbreaks of ARD. PMID:15681456

  12. The Human Adenovirus E4-ORF1 Protein Subverts Discs Large 1 to Mediate Membrane Recruitment and Dysregulation of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kathleen; Kumar, Manish; Taruishi, Midori; Javier, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses infect epithelial cells lining mucous membranes to cause acute diseases in people. They are also utilized as vectors for vaccination and for gene and cancer therapy, as well as tools to discover mechanisms of cancer due to their tumorigenic potential in experimental animals. The adenovirus E4-ORF1 gene encodes an oncoprotein that promotes viral replication, cell survival, and transformation by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). While the mechanism of activation is not understood, this function depends on a complex formed between E4-ORF1 and the membrane-associated cellular PDZ protein Discs Large 1 (Dlg1), a common viral target having both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions. Here, we report that in human epithelial cells, E4-ORF1 interacts with the regulatory and catalytic subunits of PI3K and elevates their levels. Like PI3K activation, PI3K protein elevation by E4-ORF1 requires Dlg1. We further show that Dlg1, E4-ORF1, and PI3K form a ternary complex at the plasma membrane. At this site, Dlg1 also co-localizes with the activated PI3K effector protein Akt, indicating that the ternary complex mediates PI3K signaling. Signifying the functional importance of the ternary complex, the capacity of E4-ORF1 to induce soft agar growth and focus formation in cells is ablated either by a mutation that prevents E4-ORF1 binding to Dlg1 or by a PI3K inhibitor drug. These results demonstrate that E4-ORF1 interacts with Dlg1 and PI3K to assemble a ternary complex where E4-ORF1 hijacks the Dlg1 oncogenic function to relocate cytoplasmic PI3K to the membrane for constitutive activation. This novel mechanism of Dlg1 subversion by adenovirus to dysregulate PI3K could be used by other pathogenic viruses, such as human papillomavirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, and influenza A virus, which also target Dlg1 and activate PI3K in cells. PMID:24788832

  13. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; et al

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  14. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  15. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, E.; Brandon, S.E.; Weber, L.A.; Lloyd, D.

    1989-06-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89/alpha/ and hspio/beta/) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89/alpha/, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product. The authors have isolated a human hsp89/alpha/ gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression n a /beta/-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89/alpha/ protein sequence differed from the human hsp89/beta/ sequence reported elsewhere in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89/alpha/ gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycles. hsp89/alpha/ mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells.

  16. Genetic analysis of a novel human adenovirus with a serologically unique hexon and a recombinant fiber gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Elizabeth B; Ferreyra, Leonardo; Fischer, Stephen L; Pavan, Jorge V; Nates, Silvia V; Hudson, Nolan Ryan; Tirado, Damaris; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S

    2011-01-01

    In February of 1996 a human adenovirus (formerly known as Ad-Cor-96-487) was isolated from the stool of an AIDS patient who presented with severe chronic diarrhea. To characterize this apparently novel pathogen of potential public health significance, the complete genome of this adenovirus was sequenced to elucidate its origin. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of this genome demonstrate that this virus, heretofore referred to as HAdV-D58, contains a novel hexon gene as well as a recombinant fiber gene. In addition, serological analysis demonstrated that HAdV-D58 has a different neutralization profile than all previously characterized HAdVs. Bootscan analysis of the HAdV-D58 fiber gene strongly suggests one recombination event. PMID:21915339

  17. Efficiency of Membrane Protein Expression Following Infection with Recombinant Adenovirus of Polarized Non-Transformed Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of exogenous proteins facilitates studies of molecular mechanisms and utility for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Here, we compared expression of the membrane protein β5 integrin-GFP (β5-GFP) in two recently established models of differentiated human RPE, adult RPE stem cell-derived RPE and primary fetal RPE, upon infection with recombinant adenovirus or transfection with DNA in liposomes. We varied viral titer and duration of virus incubation and examined β5-GFP and the tight junction marker ZO-1 in manipulated cells by confocal microscopy. Fewer than 5 % of cells expressed β5-GFP after liposome-mediated transfection. The percentage of cells with detectable β5-GFP exceeded 90 % after adenovirus infection for as little as 1 h. Decreasing virus titer two-fold did not alter the fraction of cells expressing β5-GFP but increased variability of β5-GFP level among cells. In cells with low expression levels, β5-GFP localized mostly to the apical plasma membrane like endogenous αvβ5 integrin. In cells with high expression levels, β5-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in addition to the apical surface suggesting accumulation in trafficking compartments. Altogether, adenovirus delivery yields efficient exogenous membrane protein expression of correct polarity in differentiated human RPE cells in culture. PMID:26427482

  18. Efficient Gene Transfer into Human CD34+ Cells by a Retargeted Adenovirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Lieber, André

    2000-01-01

    Efficient infection with adenovirus (Ad) vectors based on serotype 5 (Ad5) requires the presence of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptors (CAR) and αv integrins on cells. The paucity of these cellular receptors is thought to be a limiting factor for Ad gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells. In a systematic approach, we screened different Ad serotypes for interaction with noncycling human CD34+ cells and K562 cells on the level of virus attachment, internalization, and replication. From these studies, serotype 35 emerged as the variant with the highest tropism for CD34+ cells. A chimeric vector (Ad5GFP/F35) was generated which contained the short-shafted Ad35 fiber incorporated into an Ad5 capsid. This substitution was sufficient to transplant all infection properties from Ad35 to the chimeric vector. The retargeted, chimeric vector attached to a receptor different from CAR and entered cells by an αv integrin-independent pathway. In transduction studies, Ad5GFP/F35 expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 54% of CD34+ cells. In comparison, the standard Ad5GFP vector conferred GFP expression to only 25% of CD34+ cells. Importantly, Ad5GFP transduction, but not Ad5GFP/F35, was restricted to a specific subset of CD34+ cells expressing αv integrins. The actual transduction efficiency was even higher than 50% because Ad5GFP/F35 viral genomes were found in GFP-negative CD34+ cell fractions, indicating that the cytomegalovirus promoter used for transgene expression was not active in all transduced cells. The chimeric vector allowed for gene transfer into a broader spectrum of CD34+ cells, including subsets with potential stem cell capacity. Fifty-five percent of CD34+ c-Kit+ cells expressed GFP after infection with Ad5GFP/F35, whereas only 13% of CD34+ c-Kit+ cells were GFP positive after infection with Ad5GFP. These findings represent the basis for studies aimed toward stable gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:10684271

  19. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Yao, Dongqi; Walline, Joseph; Xu, Jun; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55) in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Methods We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15) detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI), respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively). The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant. Conclusions HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of

  20. Behaviour and recovery of human adenovirus from tropical sediment under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hugo Delleon; Pessoa-de-Souza, Marco Aurélio; Fongaro, Gislaine; Anunciação, Carlos E; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de P; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Garcia-Zapata, Marco Tulio Antonio

    2015-10-15

    This study assessed the contributions of pH and organic matter (OM) on the recovery of infectious human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) and genome copies (GCs) in waters that were artificially contaminated with tropical soil. The use of a mathematical equation was proposed based on the flocculation index of clay to assess the recovery of total GCs in these controlled assays. The results suggest that solids in the water reduced the viral genome copy loads per millilitre (GC · mL(-1)) and viral infectivity. OM did not influence the GC · mL(-1) recovery rate (p > 0.05) but led to a 99% (2 log10) reduction in plaque-forming unit counts per millilitre (PFU/mL), which indicates that infectivity and gene integrity were non-related parameters. Our findings also suggest that acidic pH levels hinder viral inactivation and that clay is the main factor responsible for the interactions of HAdV-5 with soil. These findings may be useful for future eco-epidemiological investigations and studies of viral inactivation or even as parameters for future research into water quality analysis and water treatment. PMID:26047866

  1. Genetic variability of human adenovirus type 8 causing epidemic and sporadic cases of keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Fedaoui, Nadia; Ayed, Narjess Ben; Yahia, Ahlem Ben; Hammami, Walid; Touzi, Henda; Triki, Henda

    2016-06-01

    Human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-8) is a main aetiological agent of keratoconjunctivitis. It has been reported from both epidemic and sporadic cases. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic characteristics and chronological pattern of HAdV-8 strains that have been circulating in Tunisia over a 14-year period. Fourteen HAdV-8 isolates from a keratoconjunctivitis outbreak that occurred in 2000 and from sporadic cases between 2001 and 2013 were studied. Nucleotide sequences from the hexon, fiber and penton base genes were determined, including hypervariable regions of the hexon (loops 1 and 2), the fiber (knob) and the penton base (HVR 1 and RGD loops). The sequences were compared to each other and to those of HAdV-8 strains. The Tunisian sequences were unique when compared to the previously published sequences. Also, despite a relatively low degree of genetic variation in the three genomic regions, phylogenetic analysis and alignment of amino acid sequences showed that the sequence from the year 2000 and two other sequences from the year 2013 were similar to each other and differed from the isolates that circulated in the intervening year by two main amino acid changes in the loop 1 hexon gene and the knob-fiber gene. Our results confirm the genetic variability of HAdV-8 and document the chronological changes of circulating genetic variants. PMID:26957298

  2. Genome variability of human adenovirus type 8 causing epidemic keratoconjunctivitis during 1986-2003 in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xue-Hai; Aoki, Koki; Ariga, Toshihide; Ishida, Susumu; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a contagious acute conjunctivitis associated with community-acquired infection. Human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-8) is one of the major serotypes isolated from patients with EKC. DNA restriction enzyme analyses were performed to investigate the genetic characteristics of the isolates and their chronological pattern. Methods Viral samples were taken from 11 strains isolated from sporadic cases of EKC and identified as HAdV-8 by the neutralization method with type-specific antiserum against HAdV-8 between 1986 and 2003 in Japan. DNA restriction enzyme analysis included six restriction enzymes: BamHI, HindIII, PstI, SacI, SalI, and SmaI. Results The restriction patterns revealed that the genome types were HAdV-8A and HAdV-8B in 1986, HAdV-8K in 1991, and HAdV-8E in 1996. HAdV-8K was a new genome type revealed with the enzyme SacI. Two strains isolated in 2003 exhibited identical restriction patterns as HAdV-54, which was described in 2008 and collected from Japanese patients in 2000. Conclusions Genetic changes might occur chronologically in HAdV-8. HAdV-8 displays considerable variability. The investigations of these variants might be helpful for defining the evolutionary tendency and to predict future outbreaks of HAdV infection. PMID:22171158

  3. Human Adenovirus Associated with Severe Respiratory Infection, Oregon, USA, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Chommanard, Christina; Lu, Xiaoyan; Appelgate, Dianna; Grenz, LaDonna; Schneider, Eileen; Gerber, Susan I.; Erdman, Dean D.; Thomas, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Several human adenoviruses (HAdVs) can cause respiratory infections, some severe. HAdV-B7, which can cause severe respiratory disease, has not been recently reported in the United States but is reemerging in Asia. During October 2013–July 2014, Oregon health authorities identified 198 persons with respiratory symptoms and an HAdV-positive respiratory tract specimen. Among 136 (69%) hospitalized persons, 31% were admitted to the intensive care unit and 18% required mechanical ventilation; 5 patients died. Molecular typing of 109 specimens showed that most (59%) were HAdV-B7, followed by HAdVs-C1, -C2, -C5 (26%); HAdVs-B3, -B21 (15%); and HAdV-E4 (1%). Molecular analysis of 7 HAdV-B7 isolates identified the virus as genome type d, a strain previously identified only among strains circulating in Asia. Patients with HAdV-B7 were significantly more likely than those without HAdV-B7 to be adults and to have longer hospital stays. HAdV-B7 might be reemerging in the United States, and clinicians should consider HAdV in persons with severe respiratory infection. PMID:27191834

  4. Recombinant influenza virus carrying human adenovirus epitopes elicits protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghui; Li, Tieling; Liu, Na; Gu, Hongjing; Han, Lina; Zhang, Peirui; Li, Zhiwei; Wang, Zhaohai; Zhang, Shaogeng; Wang, Xiliang

    2015-09-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are known to cause a broad spectrum of diseases in pediatric and adult patients. As this time, there is no specific therapy for HAdV infection. This study used reverse genetics (RG) to successfully rescue a recombinant influenza virus, termed rFLU/HAdV, with the HAdV hexon protein antigenic epitope sequence inserted in the influenza non-structural (NS1) protein gene. rFLU/HAdV morphological characteristics were observed using electron microscopy. Furthermore, BALB/c mice immunized twice intranasally (i.n.) with 10(4) TCID50 or 10(5) TCID50 rFLU/HAdV showed robust humoral, mucosal, and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. More importantly, these specific immune responses could protect against subsequent wild-type HAdV-3 (BJ809) or HAdV-7 (BJ1026) challenge, showing a significant reduction in viral load and a noticeable alleviation of histopathological changes in the challenged mouse lung in a dose-dependent manner. These findings highlighted that recombinant rFLU/HAdV warrants further investigation as a promising HAdV candidate vaccine and underscored that the immuno-protection should be confirmed in primate models. PMID:26112646

  5. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment in Occupational Settings Applied to the Airborne Human Adenovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Annalaura; Donzelli, Gabriele; Cioni, Lorenzo; Verani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) methodology, which has already been applied to drinking water and food safety, may also be applied to risk assessment and management at the workplace. The present study developed a preliminary QMRA model to assess microbial risk that is associated with inhaling bioaerosols that are contaminated with human adenovirus (HAdV). This model has been applied to air contamination data from different occupational settings, including wastewater systems, solid waste landfills, and toilets in healthcare settings and offices, with different exposure times. Virological monitoring showed the presence of HAdVs in all the evaluated settings, thus confirming that HAdV is widespread, but with different average concentrations of the virus. The QMRA results, based on these concentrations, showed that toilets had the highest probability of viral infection, followed by wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste landfills. Our QMRA approach in occupational settings is novel, and certain caveats should be considered. Nonetheless, we believe it is worthy of further discussions and investigations. PMID:27447658

  6. [Morphogenetic study of human adenovirus type 41 in 293TE cells].

    PubMed

    Song, Jing-Dong; Wang, Min; Zou, Xiao-Hui; Qu, Jian-Guo; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Hong, Tao

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the morphogenetic process of human adenovirus type 41 (HAdV-41), 293TE cells were infected with purified wild-type HAdV-41, and ultrathin sections of infected cells were prepared and observed under a transmission electron microscope. Results showed that HAdV-41 entered host cells mainly through three ways: non-clathrin-coated pit, clathrin-coated pit, and direct penetration of plasma membrane. In addition, cell microvilli might help HAdV-41 enter cells. After entering into cells, HAdV-41 virus particles could be found in vacuoles or lysosomes or be in a free state in cytoplasm. Only free virus particles could be found near nuclear pores (NP), suggesting that the virus needed to escape from lysosomes for effective infection and viral nucleoprotein entered the nucleus through NP. Progeny viruses were as-sembled in the nucleus. Three types of inclusion bodies, which were termed as fibrillous inclusion body, condense inclusion body, and stripped condense inclusion body, were involved in HAdV-41 morphogenesis. In the late phase of viral replication, the membrane integrity of the infected cells was lost and viral particles were released extracellularly. This study reveals the partial process of HAdV-41 morphogenesis and provides more biological information on HAdV-41. PMID:24923169

  7. Characterization of human adenovirus serotypes 5, 6, 11, and 35 as anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-11-25

    Human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been the most popular platform for the development of oncolytic Ads. Alternative Ad serotypes with low seroprevalence might allow for improved anticancer efficacy in Ad5-immune patients. We studied the safety and efficacy of rare serotypes Ad6, Ad11 and Ad35. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ads correlated with expression of CAR and CD46 in most but not all cell lines. Among CAR-binding viruses, Ad5 was often more active than Ad6, among CD46-binding viruses Ad35 was generally more cytotoxic than Ad11 in cell culture studies. Ad5, Ad6, and Ad11 demonstrated similar anticancer activity in vivo, whereas Ad35 was not efficacious. Hepatotoxicity developed only in Ad5-injected mice. Predosing with Ad11 and Ad35 did not increase infection of hepatocytes with Ad5-based vector demonstrating different interaction of these Ads with Kupffer cells. Data obtained in this study suggest developing Ad6 and Ad11 as alternative Ads for anticancer treatment.

  8. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment in Occupational Settings Applied to the Airborne Human Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carducci, Annalaura; Donzelli, Gabriele; Cioni, Lorenzo; Verani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) methodology, which has already been applied to drinking water and food safety, may also be applied to risk assessment and management at the workplace. The present study developed a preliminary QMRA model to assess microbial risk that is associated with inhaling bioaerosols that are contaminated with human adenovirus (HAdV). This model has been applied to air contamination data from different occupational settings, including wastewater systems, solid waste landfills, and toilets in healthcare settings and offices, with different exposure times. Virological monitoring showed the presence of HAdVs in all the evaluated settings, thus confirming that HAdV is widespread, but with different average concentrations of the virus. The QMRA results, based on these concentrations, showed that toilets had the highest probability of viral infection, followed by wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste landfills. Our QMRA approach in occupational settings is novel, and certain caveats should be considered. Nonetheless, we believe it is worthy of further discussions and investigations. PMID:27447658

  9. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration. PMID:26720514

  10. Human Adenovirus Associated with Severe Respiratory Infection, Oregon, USA, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Scott, Magdalena Kendall; Chommanard, Christina; Lu, Xiaoyan; Appelgate, Dianna; Grenz, LaDonna; Schneider, Eileen; Gerber, Susan I; Erdman, Dean D; Thomas, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Several human adenoviruses (HAdVs) can cause respiratory infections, some severe. HAdV-B7, which can cause severe respiratory disease, has not been recently reported in the United States but is reemerging in Asia. During October 2013-July 2014, Oregon health authorities identified 198 persons with respiratory symptoms and an HAdV-positive respiratory tract specimen. Among 136 (69%) hospitalized persons, 31% were admitted to the intensive care unit and 18% required mechanical ventilation; 5 patients died. Molecular typing of 109 specimens showed that most (59%) were HAdV-B7, followed by HAdVs-C1, -C2, -C5 (26%); HAdVs-B3, -B21 (15%); and HAdV-E4 (1%). Molecular analysis of 7 HAdV-B7 isolates identified the virus as genome type d, a strain previously identified only among strains circulating in Asia. Patients with HAdV-B7 were significantly more likely than those without HAdV-B7 to be adults and to have longer hospital stays. HAdV-B7 might be reemerging in the United States, and clinicians should consider HAdV in persons with severe respiratory infection. PMID:27191834

  11. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  12. A New Human DSG2-Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Tropism and Pathology of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Beyer, Ines; Persson, Jonas; Song, Hui; Li, ZongYi; Richter, Maximilian; Cao, Hua; van Rensburg, Ruan; Yao, Xiaoying; Hudkins, Kelly; Yumul, Roma; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yu, Mujun; Fender, Pascal; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that a group of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) uses desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Among these are the widely distributed serotypes HAdV-B3 and HAdV-B7, as well as a newly emerged strain derived from HAdV-B14. These serotypes do not infect rodent cells and could not up until now be studied in small-animal models. We therefore generated transgenic mice containing the human DSG2 locus. These mice expressed human DSG2 (hDSG2) at a level and in a pattern similar to those found for humans and nonhuman primates. As an initial application of hDSG2-transgenic mice, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HAdV-B3 vector (Ad3-GFP) and studied GFP transgene expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry subsequent to intranasal and intravenous virus application. After intranasal application, we found efficient transduction of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in hDSG2-transgenic mice. Intravenous Ad3-GFP injection into hDSG2-transgenic mice resulted in hDSG2-dependent transduction of epithelial cells in the intestinal and colon mucosa. Our findings give an explanation for clinical symptoms associated with infection by DSG2-interacting HAdVs and provide a rationale for using Ad3-derived vectors in gene therapy. PMID:22457526

  13. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Voice, Thomas C; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2013-06-15

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV) sorption, we performed a series of experiments to evaluate the role of soil organic carbon (SOC) and solution-phase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on sorption capacity and reversibility. In preliminary methodological studies, we found that as much as 99% of HAdV was lost from inorganic buffer suspensions in polypropylene (PP) laboratory containers, but little loss occurred when using suspensions with substantial amounts of DOC or with glass containers from either type of suspension. It was confirmed that this loss was due to sorption rather than inactivation by using lysis-based recovery techniques and qPCR measurements that do not depend on virus viability. In isotherm experiments, soils with 2% OC had ≈ four-fold greater sorption capacity for HAdV than 8% OC soils; moreover, the sorption capacity of 2% OC soils was reduced ≈ seven-fold with an aqueous solution containing 150 mg/L of humic acid. After sequential extractions, higher fractions of sorbed HAdV were released from 8% OC soils. The amounts of HAdV and OC released remained relatively constant throughout each extraction step, indicating that desorbed HAdV could be caused primarily by the detachment of SOC from soils. Overall, results from this study suggest that OC plays a critical role in the sorption and desorption of HAdV, and as a result, on its environmental fate and transport. PMID:23602036

  14. Occurrence of Human Adenoviruses at Two Recreational Beaches of the Great Lakes▿

    PubMed Central

    Xagoraraki, Irene; Kuo, David H.-W.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Mark; Rose, Joan B.

    2007-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters. However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater beaches has not been previously investigated. In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational beaches on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach) during the summer of 2004. Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method. The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver Beach samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park Beach samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples. The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 ± 0.7) × 101 to (3.4 ± 0.8) × 102 and from (7 ± 2) × 100 to (3.8 ± 0.3) × 103 virus particles/liter for Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach, respectively. F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 ± 0.8) × 101 to (4.6 ± 1.5) × 102 virus particles/liter. Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results. This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational beaches. Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region. PMID:17933924

  15. Phonetic Feature Encoding in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarani, Nima; Cheung, Connie; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    During speech perception, linguistic elements such as consonants and vowels are extracted from a complex acoustic speech signal. The superior temporal gyrus (STG) participates in high-order auditory processing of speech, but how it encodes phonetic information is poorly understood. We used high-density direct cortical surface recordings in humans while they listened to natural, continuous speech to reveal the STG representation of the entire English phonetic inventory. At single electrodes, we found response selectivity to distinct phonetic features. Encoding of acoustic properties was mediated by a distributed population response. Phonetic features could be directly related to tuning for spectrotemporal acoustic cues, some of which were encoded in a nonlinear fashion or by integration of multiple cues. These findings demonstrate the acoustic-phonetic representation of speech in human STG. PMID:24482117

  16. Macropinocytotic Uptake and Infection of Human Epithelial Cells with Species B2 Adenovirus Type 35▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kälin, Stefan; Amstutz, Beat; Gastaldelli, Michele; Wolfrum, Nina; Boucke, Karin; Havenga, Menzo; DiGennaro, Fabienne; Liska, Nicole; Hemmi, Silvio; Greber, Urs F.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 35 (HAdV-35; here referred to as Ad35) causes kidney and urinary tract infections and infects respiratory organs of immunocompromised individuals. Unlike other adenoviruses, Ad35 has a low seroprevalence, which makes Ad35-based vectors promising candidates for gene therapy. Ad35 utilizes CD46 and integrins as receptors for infection of epithelial and hematopoietic cells. Here we show that infectious entry of Ad35 into HeLa cells, human kidney HK-2 cells, and normal human lung fibroblasts strongly depended on CD46 and integrins but not heparan sulfate and variably required the large GTPase dynamin. Ad35 infections were independent of expression of the carboxy-terminal domain of AP180, which effectively blocks clathrin-mediated uptake. Ad35 infections were inhibited by small chemicals against serine/threonine kinase Pak1 (p21-activated kinase), protein kinase C (PKC), sodium-proton exchangers, actin, and acidic organelles. Remarkably, the F-actin inhibitor jasplakinolide, the Pak1 inhibitor IPA-3, or the sodium-proton exchange inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) blocked endocytic uptake of Ad35. Dominant-negative proteins or small interfering RNAs against factors driving macropinocytosis, including the small GTPase Rac1, Pak1, or the Pak1 effector C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1), potently inhibited Ad35 infection. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, electron microscopy, and live cell imaging showed that Ad35 colocalized with fluid-phase markers in large endocytic structures that were positive for CD46, αν integrins, and also CtBP1. Our results extend earlier observations with HAdV-3 (Ad3) and establish macropinocytosis as an infectious pathway for species B human adenoviruses in epithelial and hematopoietic cells. PMID:20237079

  17. The relative magnitude of transgene-specific adaptive immune responses induced by human and chimpanzee adenovirus vectors differs between laboratory animals and a target species.

    PubMed

    Dicks, Matthew D J; Guzman, Efrain; Spencer, Alexandra J; Gilbert, Sarah C; Charleston, Bryan; Hill, Adrian V S; Cottingham, Matthew G

    2015-02-25

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors generated from new viral serotypes are routinely screened in pre-clinical laboratory animal models to identify the most immunogenic and efficacious candidates for further evaluation in clinical human and veterinary settings. Here, we show that studies in a laboratory species do not necessarily predict the hierarchy of vector performance in other mammals. In mice, after intramuscular immunization, HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) based vectors elicited cellular and humoral adaptive responses of higher magnitudes compared to the chimpanzee adenovirus vectors ChAdOx1 and AdC68 from species Human adenovirus E. After HAdV-5 vaccination, transgene specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cell responses reached peak magnitude later than after ChAdOx1 and AdC68 vaccination, and exhibited a slower contraction to a memory phenotype. In cattle, cellular and humoral immune responses were at least equivalent, if not higher, in magnitude after ChAdOx1 vaccination compared to HAdV-5. Though we have not tested protective efficacy in a disease model, these findings have important implications for the selection of candidate vectors for further evaluation. We propose that vaccines based on ChAdOx1 or other Human adenovirus E serotypes could be at least as immunogenic as current licensed bovine vaccines based on HAdV-5. PMID:25629523

  18. The Human Brain Encodes Event Frequencies While Forming Subjective Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    d’Acremont, Mathieu; Schultz, Wolfram; Bossaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To make adaptive choices, humans need to estimate the probability of future events. Based on a Bayesian approach, it is assumed that probabilities are inferred by combining a priori, potentially subjective, knowledge with factual observations, but the precise neurobiological mechanism remains unknown. Here, we study whether neural encoding centers on subjective posterior probabilities, and data merely lead to updates of posteriors, or whether objective data are encoded separately alongside subjective knowledge. During fMRI, young adults acquired prior knowledge regarding uncertain events, repeatedly observed evidence in the form of stimuli, and estimated event probabilities. Participants combined prior knowledge with factual evidence using Bayesian principles. Expected reward inferred from prior knowledge was encoded in striatum. BOLD response in specific nodes of the default mode network (angular gyri, posterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex) encoded the actual frequency of stimuli, unaffected by prior knowledge. In this network, activity increased with frequencies and thus reflected the accumulation of evidence. In contrast, Bayesian posterior probabilities, computed from prior knowledge and stimulus frequencies, were encoded in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus. Here activity increased for improbable events and thus signaled the violation of Bayesian predictions. Thus, subjective beliefs and stimulus frequencies were encoded in separate cortical regions. The advantage of such a separation is that objective evidence can be recombined with newly acquired knowledge when a reinterpretation of the evidence is called for. Overall this study reveals the coexistence in the brain of an experience-based system of inference and a knowledge-based system of inference. PMID:23804108

  19. Human adenovirus spread, rainfalls, and the occurrence of gastroenteritis cases in a Brazilian basin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Henzel, Andréia; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; de Quevedo, Daniela Muller; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa; do Nascimento, Carlos Augusto; Spilki, Fernando Rosado

    2015-11-01

    Climate variables may interfere with the environmental persistence and spread of pathogenic microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of human adenovirus (HAdV) and total and thermotolerant coliforms in treated and untreated water and report gastroenteritis cases in seven cities located in the hydrographic basin of the Sinos River (HBSR), Southern Brazil. The data on water quality from samples collected at catchment areas of HBSR from March to December 2011 were compared with precipitation records, virus detection rates and viral loads, and information on enteric diseases among residents of the region. There was a marked increase in precipitation intensity in April, July, and August and a decrease in May and November. The number of HAdV genome copies (gc) in untreated water ranged from 2.1×10(8) gc/L in June to 7.8×10(1) gc/L in December, and in treated water, from 6.3×10(4) gc/L in September to 4.1×10(1) gc/L in November. The most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms ranged from 5×10(1) MPN/100 mL in December to 2.4×10(5) MPN/100 mL in July, and thermotolerant coliforms ranged from 1×10(1) MPN/100 mL in August to 6.9×10(4) MPN/100 mL in July. A total of 79 hospital admissions due to gastroenteritis were registered in the cities studied. The results for coliforms in untreated water demonstrate deficits in sanitation and wastewater treatment. These findings also indicate a possible relationship between the occurrence of rainfalls after dry periods and an increase in the number of gastroenteritis cases and in HAdV load quantified in surface water collected for conventional potabilization. PMID:26514803

  20. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Arbely, E; Zhang, J; Chou, C; Uprety, R; Chin, J W; Deiters, A

    2016-06-30

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  1. The Cell Adhesion Molecule “CAR” and Sialic Acid on Human Erythrocytes Influence Adenovirus In Vivo Biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Wodrich, Harald; Billet, Olivier; Perreau, Matthieu; Hippert, Claire; Mennechet, Franck; Schoehn, Guy; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Dreja, Hanna; Ibanes, Sandy; Kalatzis, Vasiliki; Wang, Jennifer P.; Finberg, Robert W.; Cusack, Stephen; Kremer, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been known for 50 years that adenoviruses (Ads) interact with erythrocytes ex vivo, the molecular and structural basis for this interaction, which has been serendipitously exploited for diagnostic tests, is unknown. In this study, we characterized the interaction between erythrocytes and unrelated Ad serotypes, human 5 (HAd5) and 37 (HAd37), and canine 2 (CAV-2). While these serotypes agglutinate human erythrocytes, they use different receptors, have different tropisms and/or infect different species. Using molecular, biochemical, structural and transgenic animal-based analyses, we found that the primary erythrocyte interaction domain for HAd37 is its sialic acid binding site, while CAV-2 binding depends on at least three factors: electrostatic interactions, sialic acid binding and, unexpectedly, binding to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on human erythrocytes. We show that the presence of CAR on erythrocytes leads to prolonged in vivo blood half-life and significantly reduced liver infection when a CAR-tropic Ad is injected intravenously. This study provides i) a molecular and structural rationale for Ad–erythrocyte interactions, ii) a basis to improve vector-mediated gene transfer and iii) a mechanism that may explain the biodistribution and pathogenic inconsistencies found between human and animal models. PMID:19119424

  2. Organization of early region 1B of human adenovirus type 2: identification of four differentially spliced mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U

    1985-01-01

    The mRNAs from early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 have been studied by Northern blot, S1 nuclease, and cDNA analysis. Two novel mRNAs, designated 14S and 14.5S, have been observed in addition to the previously identified 9S, 13S, and 22S mRNAs. They are 1.26 and 1.31 kilobases long and differ from the 13S and 22S mRNAs in being composed of three exons instead of two. Their two terminal exons are the same as those present in the 13S mRNA, whereas the middle exon is unique to each of the two novel mRNA species. The structures of the 14S and 14.5S mRNAs allow the prediction of their coding capacities: both mRNA species, like the 22S and 13S mRNAs, contain an uninterrupted translational reading frame encoding a 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide. The 14S mRNA can, in addition, encode a 16.5K polypeptide which shares N-terminal and C-terminal sequences with the 55K polypeptide, known to be encoded by the 22S mRNA. The 14.5S mRNA species encodes a hypothetical 9.2K polypeptide which has the same N terminus as the 55K polypeptide but a unique C terminus. The two mRNAs differ in their kinetics of appearance; the 14.5S mRNA is preferentially expressed late after infection in contrast to the 14S mRNA, which is present in approximately equal amounts early and late after infection. Taken together with previously published information the results suggest that early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 encodes five proteins in addition to virion polypeptide IX. These have predicted molecular weights of 55,000, 21,000, 16,500, 9,200, and 8,100. Images PMID:3989911

  3. Use of macrophages to target therapeutic adenovirus to human prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Giannoudis, Athina; Scott, Simon D; Fang, Hsin-Yu; Coffelt, Seth B; Morrow, Fiona J; Murdoch, Craig; Burton, Julian; Cross, Neil; Burke, Bernard; Mistry, Roshna; Hamdy, Freddie; Brown, Nicola J; Georgopoulos, Lindsay; Hoskin, Peter; Essand, Magnus; Lewis, Claire E; Maitland, Norman J

    2011-03-01

    New therapies are required to target hypoxic areas of tumors as these sites are highly resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Monocytes continuously extravasate from the bloodstream into tumors where they differentiate into macrophages and accumulate in hypoxic areas, thereby opening up the possibility of using these cells as vehicles to deliver gene therapy to these otherwise inaccessible sites. We describe a new cell-based method that selectively targets an oncolytic adenovirus to hypoxic areas of prostate tumors. In this approach, macrophages were cotransduced with a hypoxia-regulated E1A/B construct and an E1A-dependent oncolytic adenovirus, whose proliferation is restricted to prostate tumor cells using prostate-specific promoter elements from the TARP, PSA, and PMSA genes. When such cotransduced cells reach an area of extreme hypoxia, the E1A/B proteins are expressed, thereby activating replication of the adenovirus. The virus is subsequently released by the host macrophage and infects neighboring tumor cells. Following systemic injection into mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic prostate tumors, cotransduced macrophages migrated into hypoxic tumor areas, upregulated E1A protein, and released multiple copies of adenovirus. The virus then infected neighboring cells but only proliferated and was cytotoxic in prostate tumor cells, resulting in the marked inhibition of tumor growth and reduction of pulmonary metastases. This novel delivery system employs 3 levels of tumor specificity: the natural "homing" of macrophages to hypoxic tumor areas, hypoxia-induced proliferation of the therapeutic adenovirus in host macrophages, and targeted replication of oncolytic virus in prostate tumor cells. PMID:21233334

  4. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; et al

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  5. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  6. Apical localization of the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol modification is sufficient for adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through the apical surface of human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; van't Hof, W; Yi, S M; Schroth, M K; Zabner, J; Crystal, R G; Welsh, M J

    2001-08-01

    In well-differentiated human airway epithelia, the coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR) resides primarily on the basolateral membrane. This location may explain the observation that gene transfer is inefficient when adenovirus vectors are applied to the apical surface. To further test this hypothesis and to investigate requirements and barriers to apical gene transfer to differentiated human airway epithelia, we expressed CAR in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (GPI-CAR). As controls, we expressed wild-type CAR and CAR lacking the cytoplasmic domain (Tailless-CAR). All three constructs enhanced gene transfer with similar efficiencies in fibroblasts. In airway epithelia, GPI-CAR localized specifically to the apical membrane, where it bound adenovirus and enhanced gene transfer to levels obtained when vector was applied to the basolateral membrane. Moreover, GPI-CAR facilitated gene transfer of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, correcting the Cl(-) transport defect. In contrast, when we expressed wild-type CAR it localized to the basolateral membrane and failed to increase apical gene transfer. Only a small amount of Tailless-CAR resided in the apical membrane, and the effects on apical virus binding and gene transfer were minimal. These data indicate that binding of adenovirus to an apical membrane receptor is sufficient to mediate effective gene transfer to human airway epithelia and that the cytoplasmic domain of CAR is not required for this process. The results suggest that targeting apical receptors in differentiated airway epithelia may be sufficient for gene transfer in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. PMID:11462042

  7. Apical Localization of the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor by Glycosyl-Phosphatidylinositol Modification Is Sufficient for Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer through the Apical Surface of Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; van't Hof, Wouter; Yi, Su Min P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Zabner, Joseph; Crystal, Ronald G.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    In well-differentiated human airway epithelia, the coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR) resides primarily on the basolateral membrane. This location may explain the observation that gene transfer is inefficient when adenovirus vectors are applied to the apical surface. To further test this hypothesis and to investigate requirements and barriers to apical gene transfer to differentiated human airway epithelia, we expressed CAR in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (GPI-CAR). As controls, we expressed wild-type CAR and CAR lacking the cytoplasmic domain (Tailless-CAR). All three constructs enhanced gene transfer with similar efficiencies in fibroblasts. In airway epithelia, GPI-CAR localized specifically to the apical membrane, where it bound adenovirus and enhanced gene transfer to levels obtained when vector was applied to the basolateral membrane. Moreover, GPI-CAR facilitated gene transfer of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, correcting the Cl− transport defect. In contrast, when we expressed wild-type CAR it localized to the basolateral membrane and failed to increase apical gene transfer. Only a small amount of Tailless-CAR resided in the apical membrane, and the effects on apical virus binding and gene transfer were minimal. These data indicate that binding of adenovirus to an apical membrane receptor is sufficient to mediate effective gene transfer to human airway epithelia and that the cytoplasmic domain of CAR is not required for this process. The results suggest that targeting apical receptors in differentiated airway epithelia may be sufficient for gene transfer in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. PMID:11462042

  8. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  9. Detection of human adenoviruses in organic fresh produce using molecular and cell culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Marti, Elisabet; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of organic fresh produce has increased in recent years due to consumer demand for healthy foods without chemical additives. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has also increased. Contamination of food with enteric viruses is a major concern because the viruses have a low infectious dose and high persistence in the environment. Human adenovirus (HAdV) has been proposed as a good marker of faecal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the plaque assay (PA), real time PCR (qPCR) and integrated cell culture-RT-qPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) for the recovery of HAdV from artificially and naturally contaminated fresh produce. Organic lettuce, strawberries and green onions were selected because these fresh products are frequently associated with foodborne outbreaks. The virus extraction efficiencies from artificially contaminated samples varied from 2.8% to 32.8% depending on the food matrix and the quantification method used. Although the HAdV recoveries determined by qPCR were higher than those determined by PA and ICC-RT-qPCR, PA was defined as the most reproducible method. The qPCR assays were more sensitive than the PA and ICC-RT-qPCR assays; however, this technique alone did not provide information about the viability of the pathogen. ICC-RT-qPCR was more sensitive than PA for detecting infectious particles in fresh produce samples. HAdV genome copies were detected in 93.3% of the analysed naturally contaminated samples, attesting to the common faecal contamination of the fresh produce tested. However, only 33.3% of the total samples were positive for infectious HAdV particles based on ICC-RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this study reported that HAdV can be an efficient viral marker for fresh produce contamination. Good detection of infectious HAdV was obtained with the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays. Thus, we suggest that the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays should be considered when quantitative

  10. Premature termination by human RNA polymerase II occurs temporally in the adenovirus major late transcriptional unit.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, M; Maderious, A; Chen-Kiang, S

    1984-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated pausing and premature termination of transcription by eucaryotic RNA polymerase II at specific sites in the major late transcriptional unit of adenovirus type 2 in vivo and in vitro. In further developing this as a system for studying eucaryotic termination control, we found that prematurely terminated transcripts of 175 and 120 nucleotides also occur in adenovirus type 5-infected cells. In both cases, premature termination occurs temporally, being found only during late times of infection, not at early times before DNA replication or immediately after the onset of DNA replication when late gene expression has begun (intermediate times). To examine the phenomenon of premature termination further, a temperature-sensitive mutant virus, adenovirus type 5 ts107, was used to uncouple DNA replication and transcription. DNA replication is defective in this mutant at restrictive temperatures. We found that premature termination is inducible at intermediate times by shifting from a permissive temperature to a restrictive temperature, allowing continuous transcription in the absence of continuous DNA replication. No premature termination occurs when the temperature is shifted up at early times before DNA replication. Our data suggest that premature termination of transcription is dependent on both prior synthesis of new templates and cumulative late gene transcription but does not require continuous DNA replication. Images PMID:6209554

  11. Improving gene transfer in human renal carcinoma cells: Utilization of adenovirus vectors containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins

    PubMed Central

    ACHARYA, BISHNU; TERAO, SHUJI; SUZUKI, TORU; NAOE, MICHIO; HAMADA, KATSUYUKI; MIZUGUCHI, HIROYUKI; GOTOH, AKINOBU

    2010-01-01

    The transduction efficacy of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector in human renal carcinoma cells is generally low due to the down-regulated expression of Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in target cells. By contrast, the infectivity of adenovirus serotype 35 vectors depends on the binding rate to CD46 receptor, independent of CAR. In this study, we examined whether an adenovirus vector containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins (Ad5/F35) increases transduction efficiency compared to Ad5 vector in human renal carcinoma cells in vitro. The expression of CAR was much lower in the human renal carcinoma cells than in control HEK293 cells. By contrast, the expression of CD46 was similar and perhaps at a higher level in the human renal carcinoma cells than in the HEK293 cells. The transduction efficacy of Ad5/F35 vector was dramatically higher compared to that of Ad5 in human renal carcinoma cells, and was correlated to the expression of CD46. Thus, Ad5/35 vector may be useful for the development of novel gene therapy approaches to renal cell carcinoma. PMID:22993573

  12. Adenovirus preterminal protein synthesized in COS cells from cloned DNA is active in DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, S C; Horwitz, M S; Engler, J A

    1988-01-01

    Replication of the DNA genome of human adenovirus serotype 2 requires three virus-encoded proteins. Two of these proteins, the preterminal protein (pTP) and the adenovirus DNA polymerase, are transcribed from a single promoter at early times after virus infection. The mRNAs for these proteins share several exons, including one encoded near adenovirus genome coordinate 39. By using plasmids containing DNA fragments postulated to encode the various exons of pTP mRNA, the contributions of each exon to the synthesis of an active pTP have been measured. Only plasmids that contain both the open reading frame for pTP (genome coordinates 29.4 to 23.9) and the HindIII J fragment that contains the exon at genome coordinate 39 can express functional pTP. Images PMID:3336069

  13. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  14. Transfer of beta-amyloid precursor protein gene using adenovirus vector causes mitochondrial abnormalities in cultured normal human muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Askanas, V; McFerrin, J; Baqué, S; Alvarez, R B; Sarkozi, E; Engel, W K

    1996-01-01

    As in Alzheimer-disease (AD) brain, vacuolated muscle fibers of inclusion-body myositis (IBM) contain abnormally accumulated beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP), including its beta-amyloid protein epitope, and increased beta APP-751 mRNA. Other similarities between IBM muscle and AD brain phenotypes include paired helical filaments, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, apolipoprotein E, and mitochondrial abnormalities, including decreased cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity. The pathogenesis of these abnormalities in IBM muscle and AD brain is not known. We now report that direct transfer of the beta APP gene, using adenovirus vector, into cultured normal human muscle fibers causes structural abnormalities of mitochondria and decreased COX activity. In this adenovirus-mediated beta APP gene transfer, we demonstrated that beta APP overproduction can induce mitochondrial abnormalities. The data suggest that excessive beta APP may be responsible for mitochondrial and COX abnormalities in IBM muscle and perhaps AD brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8577761

  15. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a pr...

  16. Early detection and visualization of human adenovirus serotype 5-viral vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus or luciferase transgenes in cell lines and bovine tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vaccines containing capsid-coding regions from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been demonstrated to induce effective immune responses and provide homologous protective immunity against FMDV in cattle. However, basic mechanisms ...

  17. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    PubMed

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world. PMID:26152174

  18. Differential Encoding of Losses and Gains in the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Daw, Nathaniel; Dayan, Peter; Singer, Tania; Dolan, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Studies on human monetary prediction and decision making emphasize the role of the striatum in encoding prediction errors for financial reward. However, less is known about how the brain encodes financial loss. Using Pavlovian conditioning of visual cues to outcomes that simultaneously incorporate the chance of financial reward and loss, we show that striatal activation reflects positively signed prediction errors for both. Furthermore, we show functional segregation within the striatum, with more anterior regions showing relative selectivity for rewards and more posterior regions for losses. These findings mirror the anteroposterior valence-specific gradient reported in rodents and endorse the role of the striatum in aversive motivational learning about financial losses, illustrating functional and anatomical consistencies with primary aversive outcomes such as pain. PMID:17475790

  19. Dynamic Encoding of Speech Sequence Probability in Human Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Matthew K.; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Tang, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning. PMID:25948269

  20. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  1. Evaluation of fiber-modified adenovirus vector-vaccine against foot-and-mouth diseaes in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel vaccination approaches against foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD) include the use of a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 vector (Ad5) that contains the capsid encoding regions of FMD virus (FMDV). An Ad5.A24 has proven effective as a vaccine against FMD in swine and cattle. However, ther...

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  3. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  4. Approaches for genetic purity testing of live recombinant viral vaccines using a human adenovirus:rabies model.

    PubMed Central

    Lutze-Wallace, C; Sapp, T; Nadin-Davis, S A; Wandeler, A

    1992-01-01

    A two part purity testing regimen for genetically engineered live viral vaccines is described using a human adenovirus 5: rabies glycoprotein gene recombinant as a model vaccine. Initially, restriction endonuclease analysis of the recombinant viral genome verified the integrity of the recombinant construct and identified the vector genome. The second stage employed the polymerase chain reaction to facilitate a more detailed study of the target rabies glycoprotein cassette. The size of the target region was predicted from known nucleic acid sequence information and compared to that obtained after electrophoresis with molecular weight standards. Digestion of the polymerase chain reaction product with a second restriction endonuclease cleaved the target into a number of small fragments. Resolution of the fragments by gel electrophoresis allowed analysis of the target region alone, verifying its identity and integrity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1477804

  5. Epidemiology and transmission characteristics of human adenovirus type 7 caused acute respiratory disease outbreak in military trainees in East China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Qi, Xiaoping; Chen, Dawei; Xu, Xujian; Wang, Guozheng; Dai, Yuzhu; Cui, Dawei; Chen, Qingyong; Fan, Ping; Ni, Liuda; Liu, Miao; Zhu, Feiyan; Yang, Mei; Wang, Changjun; Li, Yuexi; Sun, Changgui; Wang, Zhongyong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human adenovirus type 7 (HAdV7) is globally attracting great concern as its high morbidity and severity in respiratory diseases, especially in Asia. Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdV7 infection outbreak in East China. Methods: The clinical samples were collected from the patients of an ARD outbreak in East Chinafor the detection of causative pathogens by multiplex PCR. The molecular type of human adenovirus isolates were identified by sequencing and homologous comparison based on their hexon genes. The spatiotemporal dynamics of global HAdV7 was investigated using the phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses. Total 67 referenced HAdV7 hexon sequences (>800 bp) from GenBank were selected for constructing the maximum likelihood tree by MEGA 5.1.0, grouped according to the tree topology for the further migration analysis by PAUP* 4.0 and MigraPhyla 1.0 b to understand the transmission patterns of HAdV7 in global epidemics. Results: The results showed HAdV7 as the causative pathogen in this outbreak, and the outbreak strains had the hexon sequences highly identical with the isolates in Shaanxi (2012). The origin of HAdV7 was inferred as California, meanwhile a total of 21 migration routes were acquired. HAdV7 in this outbreak was statistically proven dispersed from Shaanxi province (2012). Conclusions: The analyses of epidemiology and transmission pattern of HAdV7 would not only enrich the molecular biological basic database but also provide theoretical basis for HAdV7 prevention and control strategy. PMID:27347341

  6. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing. PMID:24374597

  7. A neural circuit encoding sexual preference in humans.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Langguth, Berthold; Rupprecht, Rainer; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    Sexual preference determines mate choice for reproduction and hence guarantees conservation of species in mammals. Despite this fundamental role in human behavior, current knowledge on its target-specific neurofunctional substrate is based on lesion studies and therefore limited. We used meta-analytic remodeling of neuroimaging data from 364 human subjects with diverse sexual interests during sexual stimulation to quantify neural regions associated with sexual preference manipulations. We found that sexual preference is encoded by four phylogenetically old, subcortical brain structures. More specifically, sexual preference is controlled by the anterior and preoptic area of the hypothalamus, the anterior and mediodorsal thalamus, the septal area, and the perirhinal parahippocampus including the dentate gyrus. In contrast, sexual non-preference is regulated by the substantia innominata. We anticipate the identification of a core neural circuit for sexual preferences to be a starting point for further sophisticated investigations into the neural principles of sexual behavior and particularly of its aberrations. PMID:27339689

  8. EGASP: the human ENCODE Genome Annotation Assessment Project

    PubMed Central

    Guigó, Roderic; Flicek, Paul; Abril, Josep F; Reymond, Alexandre; Lagarde, Julien; Denoeud, France; Antonarakis, Stylianos; Ashburner, Michael; Bajic, Vladimir B; Birney, Ewan; Castelo, Robert; Eyras, Eduardo; Ucla, Catherine; Gingeras, Thomas R; Harrow, Jennifer; Hubbard, Tim; Lewis, Suzanna E; Reese, Martin G

    2006-01-01

    Background We present the results of EGASP, a community experiment to assess the state-of-the-art in genome annotation within the ENCODE regions, which span 1% of the human genome sequence. The experiment had two major goals: the assessment of the accuracy of computational methods to predict protein coding genes; and the overall assessment of the completeness of the current human genome annotations as represented in the ENCODE regions. For the computational prediction assessment, eighteen groups contributed gene predictions. We evaluated these submissions against each other based on a 'reference set' of annotations generated as part of the GENCODE project. These annotations were not available to the prediction groups prior to the submission deadline, so that their predictions were blind and an external advisory committee could perform a fair assessment. Results The best methods had at least one gene transcript correctly predicted for close to 70% of the annotated genes. Nevertheless, the multiple transcript accuracy, taking into account alternative splicing, reached only approximately 40% to 50% accuracy. At the coding nucleotide level, the best programs reached an accuracy of 90% in both sensitivity and specificity. Programs relying on mRNA and protein sequences were the most accurate in reproducing the manually curated annotations. Experimental validation shows that only a very small percentage (3.2%) of the selected 221 computationally predicted exons outside of the existing annotation could be verified. Conclusion This is the first such experiment in human DNA, and we have followed the standards established in a similar experiment, GASP1, in Drosophila melanogaster. We believe the results presented here contribute to the value of ongoing large-scale annotation projects and should guide further experimental methods when being scaled up to the entire human genome sequence. PMID:16925836

  9. [Functional activity of lymphoblastoid cells infected by human adenovirus type 2 and Epstein-Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Povnitsa, O Iu; Diachenko, N S; Nosach, L N; Olevinskaia, Z M; Zhovnovataia, V L; Polishchuk, V N; Spivak, N Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the influence of the adenovirus (Ad) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on functional activity of lymphocytes, in particular, the production of alpha- and gamma-interferons, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in conditions of mono- or double infection of B- and T-phenotype (CEM) lymphoblastoid cells. It is shown, that Ad, EBV or both viruses induce high enough levels of interferon on both lines of cells and in control epithelial cells. The lymphoblastoid cells infected by viruses deep ability to synthesize alpha- and gamma-interferons under the influence of the corresponding inducers (Newcastle disease virus and hemagglutinine). Nevertheless, the levels of their formation are not high. Rather high parameters of activity of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were revealed during a day in the initial B95-8 cells and superinfected Ad after the effect of LPS of E. coli. Their activity in CEM cells also did not depend on the infection type. PMID:16018208

  10. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  11. Identification of human adenovirus early region 1 products by using antisera against synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted carboxy termini.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, S P; Rowe, D T; Tremblay, M L; McDermott, M; Branton, P E

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic peptides were prepared which corresponded to the carboxy termini of the human adenovirus type 5 early region 1B (E1B) 58,000-molecular-weight (58K) protein (Tyr-Ser-Asp-Glu-Asp-Thr-Asp) and of the E1A gene products (Tyr-Gly-Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Pro). Antisera raised against these peptides precipitated polypeptides from adenovirus type 5-infected KB cells; serum raised against the 58K carboxy terminus was active against the E1B 58K phosphoprotein, whereas serum raised against the E1A peptide immunoprecipitated four major and at least two minor polypeptides. These latter proteins migrated with apparent molecular weights of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, 45K, 37.5K, and 35K, and all were phosphoproteins. By using tryptic phosphopeptide analysis, the four major species (52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K) were found to be related, as would be expected if all were products of the E1A region. The ability of the antipeptide sera to precipitate these viral proteins thus confirmed that the previously proposed sequence of E1 DNA and mRNA and the reading frame of the mRNA are correct. Immunofluorescent-antibody staining with the antipeptide sera indicated that the 58K E1B protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, especially in the perinuclear region. The E1A-specific serum also stained both discrete patches in the nucleus and diffuse areas of the cytoplasm. These data suggest that both the 58K protein and the E1A proteins may function in or around the nucleus. These highly specific antipeptide sera should allow for a more complete identification and characterization of these important viral proteins. Images PMID:6343626

  12. Molecular Epidemiology and Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Adenovirus Caused an Outbreak in Taiwan during 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Cheng; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Chu, Pei-Yu; Wang, Chu-Feng; Lin, Jih-Hui; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of adenovirus has been surveyed in Taiwan in 2011. To better understand the evolution and epidemiology of adenovirus in Taiwan, full-length sequence of hexon and fiber coapsid protein was analyzed using series of phylogenetic and dynamic evolution tools. Six different serotypes were identified in this outbreak and the species B was predominant (HAdV-3, 71.50%; HAdV-7, 15.46%). The most frequent diagnosis was acute tonsillitis (54.59%) and bronchitis (47.83%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that hexon protein gene sequences were highly conserved for HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 circulation in Taiwan. However, comparison of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and phylogenetic trees of fiber gene in HAdV-7 clearly indicated that the predominant genotype in Taiwan has shifted from 7b to 7d. Several positive selection sites were observed in hexon protein. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of hexon protein of HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 were 0.234×10-3 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD: 0.387~0.095×10-3) and 1.107×10-3 (95% HPD: 0. 541~1.604) respectively; those of the fiber protein of HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 were 1.085×10-3 (95% HPD: 1.767~0.486) and 0.132×10-3 (95% HPD: 0.283~0.014) respectively. Phylodynamic analysis by Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) suggested that using individual gene to evaluate the effective population size might possibly cause miscalculation. In summary, the virus evolution is ongoing, and continuous surveillance of this virus evolution will contribute to the control of the epidemic. PMID:25992619

  13. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  14. Encoding of Sensory Prediction Errors in the Human Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Schlerf, John; Ivry, Richard B.; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of motor neuroscience is that the cerebellum learns from sensory prediction errors. Surprisingly, neuroimaging studies have not revealed definitive signatures of error processing in the cerebellum. Furthermore, neurophysiologic studies suggest an asymmetry, such that the cerebellum may encode errors arising from unexpected sensory events, but not errors reflecting the omission of expected stimuli. We conducted an imaging study to compare the cerebellar response to these two types of errors. Participants made fast out-and-back reaching movements, aiming either for an object that delivered a force pulse if intersected or for a gap between two objects, either of which delivered a force pulse if intersected. Errors (missing the target) could therefore be signaled either through the presence or absence of a force pulse. In an initial analysis, the cerebellar BOLD response was smaller on trials with errors compared with trials without errors. However, we also observed an error-related decrease in heart rate. After correcting for variation in heart rate, increased activation during error trials was observed in the hand area of lobules V and VI. This effect was similar for the two error types. The results provide evidence for the encoding of errors resulting from either the unexpected presence or unexpected absence of sensory stimulation in the human cerebellum. PMID:22492047

  15. Prefrontal Gamma Oscillations Encode Tonic Pain in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Enrico; May, Elisabeth S.; Postorino, Martina; Tiemann, Laura; Nickel, Moritz M.; Witkovsky, Viktor; Schmidt, Paul; Gross, Joachim; Ploner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, momentary pain serves vital protective functions. Ongoing pain in chronic pain states, on the other hand, is a pathological condition that causes widespread suffering and whose treatment remains unsatisfactory. The brain mechanisms of ongoing pain are largely unknown. In this study, we applied tonic painful heat stimuli of varying degree to healthy human subjects, obtained continuous pain ratings, and recorded electroencephalograms to relate ongoing pain to brain activity. Our results reveal that the subjective perception of tonic pain is selectively encoded by gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex. We further observed that the encoding of subjective pain intensity experienced by the participants differs fundamentally from that of objective stimulus intensity and from that of brief pain stimuli. These observations point to a role for gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex in ongoing, tonic pain and thereby extend current concepts of the brain mechanisms of pain to the clinically relevant state of ongoing pain. Furthermore, our approach might help to identify a brain marker of ongoing pain, which may prove useful for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pain. PMID:25754338

  16. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  17. Repression in vitro, by human adenovirus E1A protein domains, of basal or Tat-activated transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins can repress the expression of several viral and cellular genes. By using a cell-free transcription system, we demonstrated that the gene product of the E1A 12S mRNA, the 243-residue protein E1A243R, inhibits basal transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat greatly stimulates transcription from the viral promoter in vitro. However, E1A243R can repress Tat-activated transcription in vitro. Strong repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions requires only E1A N-terminal amino acid residues 1 to 80. Deletion analysis showed that E1A N-terminal amino acids 4 to 25 are essential for repression, whereas amino acid residues 30 to 49 and 70 to 80 are dispensable. Transcriptional repression by E1A in the cell-free transcription system is promoter specific, since under identical conditions, transcription of the adenovirus major late promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus LTR promoter was unaffected. The repression of transcription by small E1A peptides in vitro provides an assay for investigation of molecular mechanisms governing E1A-mediated repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. PMID:7707515

  18. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  19. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  20. Generation and screening of a large collection of novel simian Adenovirus allows the identification of vaccine vectors inducing potent cellular immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Ammendola, Virginia; Capone, Stefania; Cirillo, Agostino; Siani, Loredana; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ambrosio, Maria; Sparacino, Angela; Bartiromo, Marta; Meola, Annalisa; Smith, Kira; Kurioka, Ayako; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Ewer, Katie J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Traboni, Cinzia; Barnes, Eleanor; Klenerman, Paul; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Replication defective Adenovirus vectors based on the human serotype 5 (Ad5) have been shown to induce protective immune responses against diverse pathogens and cancer in animal models and to elicit robust and sustained cellular immunity in humans. However, most humans have anti-Ad5 neutralising antibodies that can impair the immunological potency of such vaccines. Here we show that most other human Adenoviruses from rare serotypes are far less potent as vaccine vectors than Ad5 in mice and non-human primates, casting doubt on their potential efficacy in humans. To identify novel vaccine carriers suitable for vaccine delivery in humans we isolated and sequenced over a thousand Adenovirus strains from chimpanzees (ChAd). Replication-defective vectors were generated from different ChAd serotypes and were screened for neutralization by human sera and for ability to grow in human cell lines already approved for clinical studies. Most importantly, we devised a screening strategy to rank the ChAd vectors by immunological potency in mice which predicts their immunogenicity in non-human primates and humans. The vectors studied varied by up to a thousand-fold in potency for CD8 T cell induction in mice. Two of the most potent ChAd vectors were selected for clinical studies as carriers for Malaria and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genetic vaccines. These ChAd vectors were found to be safe and immunologically potent in Phase I clinical trials thereby validating our screening approach. The ChAd vectors that we have developed represent a large collection of non cross-reactive, potent vectors that can be exploited for diverse vaccine strategies. PMID:22218691

  1. Auditory modulation of visual stimulus encoding in human retinotopic cortex

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Benjamin; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Urner, Maren; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Sounds can modulate visual perception as well as neural activity in retinotopic cortex. Most studies in this context investigated how sounds change neural amplitude and oscillatory phase reset in visual cortex. However, recent studies in macaque monkeys show that congruence of audio-visual stimuli also modulates the amount of stimulus information carried by spiking activity of primary auditory and visual neurons. Here, we used naturalistic video stimuli and recorded the spatial patterns of functional MRI signals in human retinotopic cortex to test whether the discriminability of such patterns varied with the presence and congruence of co-occurring sounds. We found that incongruent sounds significantly impaired stimulus decoding from area V2 and there was a similar trend for V3. This effect was associated with reduced inter-trial reliability of patterns (i.e. higher levels of noise), but was not accompanied by any detectable modulation of overall signal amplitude. We conclude that sounds modulate naturalistic stimulus encoding in early human retinotopic cortex without affecting overall signal amplitude. Subthreshold modulation, oscillatory phase reset and dynamic attentional modulation are candidate neural and cognitive mechanisms mediating these effects. PMID:23296187

  2. Protective CD8+ T-cell immunity to human malaria induced by chimpanzee adenovirus-MVA immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Ewer, Katie J.; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Collins, Katharine A.; Sheehy, Susanne H.; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Goodman, Anna L.; Edwards, Nick J.; Elias, Sean C.; Halstead, Fenella D.; Longley, Rhea J.; Rowland, Rosalind; Poulton, Ian D.; Draper, Simon J.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Williams, Nicola; Siani, Loredana; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Sinden, Robert E.; Lawrie, Alison M.; Cortese, Riccardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells offers the prospect of immunization against many infectious diseases, but no subunit vaccine has induced CD8+ T cells that correlate with efficacy in humans. Here we demonstrate that a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector followed by a modified vaccinia virus Ankara booster induces exceptionally high frequency T-cell responses (median >2400 SFC/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the liver-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria antigen ME-TRAP. It induces sterile protective efficacy against heterologous strain sporozoites in three vaccinees (3/14, 21%), and delays time to patency through substantial reduction of liver-stage parasite burden in five more (5/14, 36%), P=0.008 compared with controls. The frequency of monofunctional interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells, but not antibodies, correlates with sterile protection and delay in time to patency (Pcorrected=0.005). Vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells provide protection against human malaria, suggesting that a major limitation of previous vaccination approaches has been the insufficient magnitude of induced T cells. PMID:24284865

  3. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F) type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD) across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV) detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05), considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314). The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377); and in 76.60% (36/47) of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients) in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614). There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030) as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019). The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of seasonal

  4. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia; Kieweg, Lisa; Müncheberg, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Once transported to the replication sites, human adenoviruses (HAdVs) need to ensure decondensation and transcriptional activation of their viral genomes to synthesize viral proteins and initiate steps to reprogram the host cell for viral replication. These early stages during adenoviral infection are poorly characterized but represent a decisive moment in the establishment of a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin-associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of the host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which represents an essential step required for efficient viral replication. Conversely, we also observed during infection an HAdV-mediated decrease of KAP1 SUMO moieties, known to promote chromatin decondensation events. Based on our findings, we provide evidence that HAdV induces KAP1 deSUMOylation to minimize epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for human adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play key roles in HAdV transcriptional regulation. We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1-interacting factor KAP1 during productive HAdV growth. KAP1 binds to the viral E1B-55K protein, promoting its SUMO modification, therefore illustrating a crucial step for

  5. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  6. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  7. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for

  8. Human adenovirus 2 E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens: antipeptide antibodies targeted to the NH2 and COOH termini.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Kramer, T A

    1983-01-01

    The human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) transforming region is located in the left 11.1% of the viral genome and encodes two early transcription units, E1A and E1B. Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from the Ad2 E1B DNA sequence (Gingeras et al., J. Biol. Chem. 257:13475-13491, 1982), we have prepared antibodies against synthetic peptides, 8 to 16 amino acids in length, encoded at the NH2 and COOH termini of the major E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens. The antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated the targeted E1B-19K or E1B-53K tumor antigens from extracts of Ad2-infected cells. The specificity of the peptide competition studies. Antipeptide antibodies directed to the NH2 and COOH termini immunoprecipitated the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens from two Ad2-transformed rat cell lines, F17 and F4, providing evidence that identical tumor antigens are synthesized in Ad2-infected and Ad2-transformed cells. These results show that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K T antigens are not processed proteolytically at either the NH2 or COOH terminus. Our data provide strong evidence at the protein level that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens partially overlap in DNA sequence, with the E1B-19K initiating translation at the first ATG at nucleotide 1711 in translation reading frame 1 and the E1B-53K tumor antigen initiating translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 in reading frame 3. This confirms the results of others on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of E1B-19K and theoretical deductions based on the DNA sequence. Our findings prove that the large E1B-53K T antigen initiates translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 and not at equally plausible initiation codons located farther downstream at nucleotides 2202 and 2235. Thus, the E1B-53K T antigen is another example of a protein which initiates translation at an internal ATG rather than at the 5'-proximal ATG. Images PMID:6632083

  9. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins. PMID:26279084

  10. Evaluation of polymer shielding for adenovirus serotype 6 (Ad6) for systemic virotherapy against human prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien V; Heller, Greg J; Barry, Mary E; Crosby, Catherine M; Turner, Mallory A; Barry, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise as “self-amplifying” cancer therapies wherein a virally killed cell can produce thousands of new viral “drugs” that can kill more cancer cells. Adenoviruses (Ads) are one family of oncolytic viruses. Most human studies have used human Ad serotype 5 (Ad5). Unfortunately, most patients are already immune to Ad5 increasing the likelihood that the agent will be neutralized if used as a cancer therapy. In this work, lower seroprevalence Ad6 was tested as a systemic therapy for prostate cancer. Ad5 and Ad6 were injected intravenously a single time in nude mice bearing human prostate tumors, and toxicity and efficacy were assessed. Ad6 was chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to test if this would further improve its pharmacology. Ad6 produced 30-fold lower liver damage and less toxicity than Ad5. Ad6 significantly repressed the growth of androgen-resistant human DU145 prostate tumors and androgen-sensitive LNCaP tumors after single intravenous injection. PEGylation did not change virus distribution, but blunted liver damage and cytokine production by Ad6. PEGylated Ad6 eradicated LNCaP tumors and maintained body mass, but lost potency against the more challenging DU145 tumors. These and other data suggest that low seroprevalent Ad6 has better efficacy and safety than the benchmark oncolytic virus Ad5 for systemic therapy of prostate cancer. These data also indicate that PEGylation may improve Ad6 safety, but that this shielding may reduce oncolytic efficacy after intravenous treatment. PMID:26900598

  11. Frequent Detection of Human Adenovirus from the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Curlin, Marcel E.; Huang, Meei-Li; Lu, Xiaoyan; Celum, Connie L.; Sanchez, Jorge; Selke, Stacy; Baeten, Jared M.; Zuckerman, Richard A.; Erdman, Dean D.; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background The association between baseline seropositivity to human adenovirus (HAdV) type 5 and increased HIV acquisition in the Step HIV Vaccine Study has raised questions concerning frequency of acquired and/or persistent Adenovirus infections among adults at high risk of HIV-1 infection. Methodology To evaluate the frequency and pattern of HAdV shedding from the lower GI tract, we retrospectively tested rectal swabs for HAdVs in a cohort of 20 HSV-2 positive HIV-positive Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM) undergoing rectal swabbing three times/week for 18 consecutive weeks, in a prospective study of HSV-2 suppression in HIV infection. Viral DNA was extracted and amplified using a sensitive multiplex PCR assay that detects all currently recognized HAdV types. Molecular typing of viruses was performed on selected samples by hexon gene sequencing. Baseline neutralizing antibody titers to HAdVs −5, −26, −35 and −48 were also assessed. Principal Findings 15/20 individuals had HAdV detected during follow up. The median frequency of HAdV detection was 30% of samples (range 2.0% to 64.7%). HAdV shedding typically occurred on consecutive days in clustered episodes lasting a median of 4 days (range 1 to 9 days) separated by periods without shedding, suggesting frequent new infections or reactivation of latent infections over time. 8 of the 15 shedders had more than one type detected in follow-up. 20 HAdV types from species B, C, and D were identified, including HAdV-5, −26 and −48, HAdV types under development as potential vaccine candidates. 14/20 subjects were seropositive for HAdV-5; 15/20 for HAdV-26; 3/20 for HAdV-35; and 2/20 for HAdV-48. HAdV shedding did not correlate with CD4 count, plasma HIV-1 viral load, or titers to HAdV-5 or HAdV-35. The sole individual with HAdV-5 shedding was HAdV-5 seropositive. Conclusions HAdV shedding was highly prevalent and diverse, including types presently under consideration as HIV vaccine vectors. Subclinical

  12. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  13. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  14. Cell-Free Transmission of Human Adenovirus by Passive Mass Transfer in Cell Culture Simulated in a Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yakimovich, Artur; Gumpert, Heidi; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lütschg, Verena A.; Jurgeit, Andreas; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2012-01-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell transmissions. Both mechanisms enhance disease development, but it is difficult to distinguish between them. Here, we analyzed the transmission mode of human adenovirus (HAdV) in monolayers of epithelial cells by wet laboratory experimentation and a computer simulation. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy and replication-competent HAdV2 expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that the spread of infection invariably occurred after cell lysis. It was affected by convection and blocked by neutralizing antibodies but was independent of second-round infections. If cells were overlaid with agarose, convection was blocked and round plaques developed around lytic infected cells. Infected cells that did not lyse did not give rise to plaques, highlighting the importance of cell-free transmission. Key parameters for cell-free virus transmission were the time from infection to lysis, the dose of free viruses determining infection probability, and the diffusion of single HAdV particles in aqueous medium. With these parameters, we developed an in silico model using multiscale hybrid dynamics, cellular automata, and particle strength exchange. This so-called white box model is based on experimentally determined parameters and reproduces viral infection spreading as a function of the local concentration of free viruses. These analyses imply that the extent of lytic infections can be determined by either direct plaque assays or can be predicted by calculations of virus diffusion constants and modeling. PMID:22787215

  15. Acylation of the 176R (19-kilodalton) early region 1B protein of human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, C J; Tremblay, M L; Yee, S P; Ross, R; Branton, P E

    1987-01-01

    Antipeptide sera were prepared in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted amino and carboxy termini of the early region 1B 176R (19-kilodalton [kDa]) protein of human adenovirus type 5. Both antisera specifically immunoprecipitated the 19- and 18.5-kDa forms of the 176R protein observed previously with antitumor sera. These data suggested that both species are full-length molecules of 176 residues. To identify posttranslational modifications that could explain the formation of these multiple species and possibly their known association with membranes, studies were carried out to determine whether they are glycosylated or acylated. Neither the 19- nor the 18.5-kDa species appeared to be a glycoprotein, however, they were labeled with [3H]palmitate and [3H]myristate, indicating that both species are acylated. Thus, whereas acylation does not appear to be the cause of the multiple species, it could play a role in the membrane association of these viral proteins. The acylation of 176R was found to be unusual. The fatty acid linkage was resistant to treatment with hydroxylamine or methanol-KOH, suggesting that acylation was through an amide bond. In addition, both palmitate and myristate were present in 176R, suggesting either a lack of specificity in the acylation reaction or the existence of more than one acylation site. Images PMID:2957509

  16. Human herpesvirus 7 infection of lymphoid and myeloid cell lines transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, M; Inoue, Y; Ohminami, H; Sada, E; Miyake, K; Tohyama, T; Shimada, T; Fujita, S

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported recently that CD4 is a major component of the receptor for human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), which has been newly identified as a T-lymphotropic virus. To investigate further the role of CD4 in HHV-7 infection, we examined the susceptibility to HHV-7 infection of various CD4-negative or weakly positive cell lines into which the cDNA for CD4 was transferred using an adenovirus vector (Adex1CACD4). Of 13 cell lines transduced with Adex1CACD4, including T-lymphoid, B-lymphoid, monocytoid, and myeloid cell lines, one T-lymphoid cell line, one monocytoid cell line, and two cell lines established from the blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia showed high susceptibility to HHV-7 infection. Taken together with the results of previous studies, these data suggest strongly that CD4 is a major component of the binding receptor for HHV-7. This study also shows that HHV-7 may be able to infect CD4-positive hematopoietic precursor cells as well as T lymphocytes. PMID:8995705

  17. [The reproductive characteristics of human adenovirus type 2 in cultures of lymphoblastoid cells with B and T phenotypes].

    PubMed

    Povnitsa, O Iu; Diachenko, N S; Chernomaz, A A; Nosach, L N; Rybalko, S L; Gritsak, T F; Beregovenko, V N; Diadiun, S T

    1997-01-01

    A comparative characteristic of the reproduction process of type 2 human adenovirus in several lines of lymphoblastoid cells of B- and T-phenotype is presented. Formation of hexone and infectious virus in the cells of Jurkat, MT4, Raji lines was rather intensive and approached to that in the culture of the permissive epithelium cells Hep-2. These indices were much lower in the cultures of cells B 95-8 and MT4/BIII LBK which were chronically infected by VEB and HIV, accordingly and produced them that can evidence for the interference of Ad and VEB or Ad and HIV under superinfection of cells. Cells of SEM line possessing T-phenotype, were apparently semi-permissive for Ad h2, though the low almost unchanged content of hexone and infectious virus remains in them for a rather long time: about 15 days. Thus, obtained data within analyzed series of experiments expand the present ideas about lymphotropicity of Ad as their important property realized at the level of cell and infected macroorganism. PMID:9511371

  18. Triazole linker-based trivalent sialic acid inhibitors of adenovirus type 37 infection of human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Rémi; Saleeb, Michael; Bauer, Johannes; Liaci, A Manuel; Chandra, Naresh; Storm, Rickard J; Frängsmyr, Lars; Qian, Weixing; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas; Elofsson, Mikael

    2015-09-21

    Adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) is one of the principal agents responsible for epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), a severe ocular infection that remains without any available treatment. Recently, a trivalent sialic acid derivative (ME0322, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2011, 50, 6519) was shown to function as a highly potent inhibitor of Ad37, efficiently preventing the attachment of the virion to the host cells and subsequent infection. Here, new trivalent sialic acid derivatives were designed, synthesized and their inhibitory properties against Ad37 infection of the human corneal epithelial cells were investigated. In comparison to ME0322, the best compound (17a) was found to be over three orders of magnitude more potent in a cell-attachment assay (IC50 = 1.4 nM) and about 140 times more potent in a cell-infection assay (IC50 = 2.9 nM). X-ray crystallographic analysis demonstrated a trivalent binding mode of all compounds to the Ad37 fiber knob. For the most potent compound ophthalmic toxicity in rabbits was investigated and it was concluded that repeated eye administration did not cause any adverse effects. PMID:26177934

  19. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Salazar, Andres M; Grubman, Marvin J; de los Santos, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FMDV challenge by 7 days post-vaccination. However, since relatively large amounts of Ad5-CI-A24-2B are required to induce protection this strategy could be costly for livestock production. Poly ICLC is a synthetic double stranded RNA that activates multiple innate and adaptive immune pathways. In this study, we have tested for the first time, the adjuvant effect of poly ICLC in combination with Ad5-CI-A24-2B in swine. We found that the combination resulted in a reduction of the vaccine protective dose by 80-fold. Interestingly, the lowest dose of Ad5-CI-A24-2B plus 1mg of poly ICLC protected animals against challenge even in the absence of detectable FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies at the time of challenge. PMID:25216089

  20. Molecular Typing and Epidemiology Profiles of Human Adenovirus Infection among Paediatric Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yamin; Zhou, Weimin; Zhao, Yanjie; Wang, Yanqun; Xie, Zhengde; Lou, Yongliang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been recognised as pathogens that cause a broad spectrum of diseases. The studies on HAdV infection among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) are limited. Objective To investigate the prevalence, epidemiology, and genotype of HAdV among children with SARI in China. Study Design Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) or induced sputum (IS) was collected from hospitalised children with SARIs in Beijing (representing Northern China; n = 259) and Zhejiang Province (representing Eastern China; n = 293) from 2007 to 2010. The prevalence of HAdV was screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by sequence typing of PCR fragments that targeted the second half of the hexon gene. In addition, co-infection with other human respiratory viruses, related epidemiological profiles and clinical presentations were investigated. Results and Conclusions In total, 76 (13.8%) of 552 SARI patients were positive for HAdV, and the infection rates of HAdV in Northern and Eastern China were 20.1% (n = 52) and 8.2% (n = 24), respectively. HAdV co-infection with other respiratory viruses was frequent (infection rates: Northern China, 90.4%; Eastern China, 70.8%). The peak seasons for HAdV-B infection was winter and spring. Additionally, members of multiple species (Human mastadenovirus B, C, D and E) were circulating among paediatric patients with SARI, of which HAdV-B (34/52; 65.4%) and HAdV-C (20/24, 83.3%) were the most predominant in Northern and Eastern China, respectively. These findings provide a benchmark for future epidemiology and prevention strategies for HAdV. PMID:25856575

  1. Neural Stem Cell-based Cell Carriers Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of an Oncolytic Adenovirus in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Atique U; Thaci, Bart; Alexiades, Nikita G; Han, Yu; Qian, Shuo; Liu, Feifei; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya Y; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of oncolytic adenoviruses as anticancer agents is significantly hampered by the inability of the currently available viral vectors to effectively target micrometastatic tumor burden. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to function as cell carriers for targeted delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus because of their inherent tumor-tropic migratory ability. We have previously reported that in vivo delivery of CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, can enhance the survival of animals with experimental glioma. In this study, we show that intratumoral delivery of NSCs loaded with the CRAD-S-pk7 in an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioma is able to not only inhibit tumor growth but more importantly to increase median survival by ~50% versus animals treated with CRAd-S-pk7 alone (P = 0.0007). We also report that oncolytic virus infection upregulates different chemoattractant receptors and significantly enhances migratory capacity of NSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data further suggest that NSC-based carriers have the potential to improve the clinical efficacy of antiglioma virotherapy by not only protecting therapeutic virus from the host immune system, but also amplifying the therapeutic payload selectively at tumor sites. PMID:21629227

  2. Neural stem cell-based cell carriers enhance therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic adenovirus in an orthotopic mouse model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atique U; Thaci, Bart; Alexiades, Nikita G; Han, Yu; Qian, Shuo; Liu, Feifei; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya Y; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-09-01

    The potential utility of oncolytic adenoviruses as anticancer agents is significantly hampered by the inability of the currently available viral vectors to effectively target micrometastatic tumor burden. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to function as cell carriers for targeted delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus because of their inherent tumor-tropic migratory ability. We have previously reported that in vivo delivery of CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, can enhance the survival of animals with experimental glioma. In this study, we show that intratumoral delivery of NSCs loaded with the CRAD-S-pk7 in an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioma is able to not only inhibit tumor growth but more importantly to increase median survival by ~50% versus animals treated with CRAd-S-pk7 alone (P = 0.0007). We also report that oncolytic virus infection upregulates different chemoattractant receptors and significantly enhances migratory capacity of NSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data further suggest that NSC-based carriers have the potential to improve the clinical efficacy of antiglioma virotherapy by not only protecting therapeutic virus from the host immune system, but also amplifying the therapeutic payload selectively at tumor sites. PMID:21629227

  3. Intranasal vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus type 5 encoding influenza virus hemagglutinin elicits protective immunity to homologous challenge and partial protection to heterologous challenge in pigs.

    PubMed

    Braucher, Douglas R; Henningson, Jamie N; Loving, Crystal L; Vincent, Amy L; Kim, Eun; Steitz, Julia; Gambotto, Andrea A; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2012-11-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is widely circulating in the swine population and causes significant economic losses. To combat IAV infection, the swine industry utilizes adjuvanted whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines, using a prime-boost strategy. These vaccines can provide sterilizing immunity toward homologous virus but often have limited efficacy against a heterologous infection. There is a need for vaccine platforms that induce mucosal and cell-mediated immunity that is cross-reactive to heterologous viruses and can be produced in a short time frame. Nonreplicating adenovirus 5 vector (Ad5) vaccines are one option, as they can be produced rapidly and given intranasally to induce local immunity. Thus, we compared the immunogenicity and efficacy of a single intranasal dose of an Ad5-vectored hemagglutinin (Ad5-HA) vaccine to those of a traditional intramuscular administration of WIV vaccine. Ad5-HA vaccination induced a mucosal IgA response toward homologous IAV and primed an antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response against both challenge viruses. The Ad5-HA vaccine provided protective immunity to homologous challenge and partial protection against heterologous challenge, unlike the WIV vaccine. Nasal shedding was significantly reduced and virus was cleared from the lung by day 5 postinfection following heterologous challenge of Ad5-HA-vaccinated pigs. However, the WIV-vaccinated pigs displayed vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) following heterologous challenge, characterized by enhanced macroscopic lung lesions. This study demonstrates that a single intranasal vaccination with an Ad5-HA construct can provide complete protection from homologous challenge and partial protection from heterologous challenge, as opposed to VAERD, which can occur with adjuvanted WIV vaccines. PMID:22933397

  4. Low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor A-subunit deviates the antibody response toward that of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Pichurin, Pavel; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Aliesky, Holly; Nagayama, Yuji; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with adenovirus expressing the TSH receptor (TSHR) induces hyperthyroidism in 25-50% of mice. Even more effective is immunization with a TSHR A-subunit adenovirus (65-84% hyperthyroidism). Nevertheless, TSHR antibody characteristics in these mice do not mimic accurately those of autoantibodies in typical Graves' patients, with a marked TSH-blocking antibody response. We hypothesized that this suboptimal antibody response was consequent to the standard dose of TSHR-adenovirus providing too great an immune stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we compared BALB/c mice immunized with the usual number (10(11)) and with far fewer viral particles (10(9) and 10(7)). Regardless of viral dose, hyperthyroidism developed in a similar proportion (68-80%) of mice. We then examined the qualitative nature of TSHR antibodies in each group. Sera from all mice had TSH binding-inhibitory (TBI) activity after the second immunization, with TBI values in proportion to the viral dose. After the third injection, all groups had near-maximal TBI values. Remarkably, in confirmation of our hypothesis, immunization with progressively lower viral doses generated TSHR antibodies approaching the characteristics of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease as follows: 1) lower TSHR antibody titers on ELISA and 2) lower TSH-blocking antibody activity without decrease in thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. In summary, low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the free TSHR A-subunit provides an induced animal model with a high prevalence of hyperthyroidism as well as TSHR antibodies more closely resembling autoantibodies in Graves' disease. PMID:14576177

  5. Adenovirus-mediated ING4 expression reduces multidrug resistance of human gastric carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zong-Lei; He, Song-Bing; Sheng, Wei-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Ji-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the primary treatment for both resectable and advanced gastric carcinoma, yet multiple drug resistance (MDR) of gastric carcinoma remains a significant therapeutic obstacle. The development of novel strategies to reduce MDR in gastric carcinoma would yield a better outcome following chemotherapy. ING4, a member of the inhibitor of growth (ING) tumor-suppressor family, possesses antitumor and radiosensitization or chemosensitization effects in a variety of human cancers. The present study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of action of adenovirus-mediated ING4 (AdVING4) on the reversion of human gastric carcinoma cell MDR in vitro and in vivo in nude mouse xenografts. The data showed that the expression of ING4 mRNA and protein was dramatically downregulated (or lost) in gastric carcinoma SGC7901/CDDP cells after CDDP-induced MDR phenotype and in the parental SGC7901 cells. AdVING4‑induced ING4 expression reversed MDR and induced apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro and in vivo in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tumors. Furthermore, AdVING4 substantially downregulated the expression of MDR-related proteins P-gp and MRP1 and apoptosis‑related proteins Bcl-2 and survivin, but upregulated the expression of apoptosis-related protein Bax in the SGC7901/CDDP xenograft tissues. The reversion effects elicited by AdVING4 on gastric cancer cell MDR were closely associated with the downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and activation of apoptotic pathways. Thus, these findings suggest that AdVING4 may be a feasible modulator for the MDR phenotype of gastric carcinoma cells. PMID:23969950

  6. Experimental investigation of human adenovirus cotransport with clay colloids and TiO2 nanoparticles in water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Kokkinos, Petros; Tselepi, Maria A.; Kartoudis, Alexis; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2016-04-01

    Particles such as clay colloids (e.g. kaolinite and montmorillonite) and metal oxides (e.g. TiO2) have great potential for controlling the fate and transport of viruses in the subsurface. Although human adenoviruses (hAdVs) are used worldwide to indicate human fecal pollution in groundwater, their transport behavior in the subsurface environment is not fully understood. This study focuses on the effects of both clay colloids (kaolinite, KGa-1b and montmorillonite, STx-1b), and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), on hAdV transport and retention in porous media. Laboratory-scale cotransport experiments were conducted in columns packed with glass beads, at three pore water velocities (0.38, 0.74, and 1.21 cm/min). The experimental results suggested that the presence of KGa-1b, STx-1b, and TiO2 NPs increased the attachment and inactivation of hAdVs, mainly due to the contribution of additional attachment sites. Retention of hAdVs by the packed column was shown to be highest in the presence of TiO2 NPs and lowest in the presence of KGa-1b. Moreover, the mass recovery values of both clay colloids and TiO2 NPs were affected by the presence of hAdVs, under all of the experimental conditions examined in this study. However, no distinct relationship between mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the present experimental cotransport results.

  7. The 11,600-MW protein encoded by region E3 of adenovirus is expressed early but is greatly amplified at late stages of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Scaria, A; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1992-01-01

    We have reported that an 11,600-MW (11.6K) protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus. We have now prepared two new antipeptide antisera that have allowed us to characterize this protein further. The 11.6K protein migrates as multiple diffuse bands having apparent Mws of about 14,000, 21,000, and 31,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblotting as well as virus mutants with deletions in the 11.6K gene were used to show that the various gel bands represent forms of 11.6K. The 11.6K protein was synthesized in very low amounts during early stages of infection, from the scarce E3 mRNAs d and e which initiate from the E3 promoter. However, 11.6K was synthesized very abundantly at late stages of infection, approximately 400 times the rate at early stages, from new mRNAs termed d' and e'. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA blot experiments indicated that mRNAs d' and e' had the same body (the coding portion) and the same middle exon (the y leader) as early E3 mRNAs d and e, but mRNAs d' and e' were spliced at their 5' termini to the major late tripartite leader which is found in all mRNAs in the major late transcription unit. mRNAs d' and e' and the 11.6K protein were the only E3 mRNAs and protein that were scarce early and were greatly amplified at late stages of infection. This suggests that specific cis- or trans-acting sequences may function to enhance the splicing of mRNAs d' and e' at late stages of infection and perhaps to suppress the splicing of mRNAs d and e at early stages of infection. We propose that the 11.6K gene be considered not only a member of region E3 but also a member of the major late transcription unit. Images PMID:1316473

  8. Effective Apical Infection of Differentiated Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells and Induction of Proinflammatory Chemokines by the Highly Pneumotropic Human Adenovirus Type 14p1

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Elena; Ramke, Mirja; Warnecke, Gregor; Schrepfer, Sonja; Kopfnagel, Verena; Dobner, Thomas; Heim, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background Only a few pneumotropic types of the human adenoviruses (e.g. type B14p1) cause severe lower respiratory tract infections like pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) even in immunocompetent patients. By contrast, many other human adenovirus (HAdV) types (e.g. HAdV-C5) are associated mainly with upper respiratory tract infections. This is in accordance with a highly physiological cell culture system consisting of differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells which are little susceptible for apical HAdV-C5 infections. Objective and Methods We hypothesized that a pneumotropic and highly pathogenic HAdV type infects differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells efficiently from the apical surface and also induces proinflammatory cytokines in order to establish ARDS and pneumonia. Therefore, the apical infection of differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells with the pneumotropic and virulent type HAdV-B14p1 was investigated in comparison to the less pneumotropic HAdV-C5 as a control. Results Binding of HAdV-B14p1 to the apical surface of differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells and subsequent internalization of HAdV DNA was 10 fold higher (p<0.01) compared to the less-pneumotropic HAdV-C5 one hour after infection. Overall, the replication cycle of HAdV-B14p1 following apical infection and including apical release of infectious virus progeny was about 1000-fold more effective compared to the non-pneumotropic HAdV-C5 (p<0.001). HAdV-B14p1 infected cells expressed desmoglein 2 (DSG2), which has been described as potential receptor for HAdV-B14p1. Moreover, HAdV-B14p1 induced proinflammatory chemokines IP-10 and I-Tac as potential virulence factors. Interestingly, IP-10 has already been described as a marker for severe respiratory infections e.g. by influenza virus A H5N1. Conclusions The efficient "apical to apical" replication cycle of HAdV-B14p1 can promote endobronchial dissemination of the infection from the

  9. Woodchuck dendritic cells generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and transduced with recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Berraondo, Pedro; Crettaz, Julien; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Ruiz, Juan; Prieto, Jesús; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2007-05-01

    Woodchucks infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is the best available animal model for testing the immunotherapeutic effects of dendritic cells (DCs) in the setting of a chronic infection, as woodchucks develop a persistent infection resembling that seen in humans infected with the hepatitis B virus. In the present study, DCs were generated from woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (wDCs) in the presence of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) and human interleukin 4 (hIL-4). After 7 days of culture, cells with morphology similar to DCs were stained positively with a cross-reactive anti-human CD86 antibody. Functional analysis showed that uptake of FITC-dextran by wDCs was very efficient and was partially inhibited after LPS-induced maturation. Furthermore, wDCs stimulated allogenic lymphocytes and induced proliferation. Moreover, wDCs were transduced efficiently with a human adenovirus serotype 5 for the expression of beta-galactosidase. Following transduction and in vivo administration of such DCs into woodchucks, an antigen-specific cellular immune response was induced. These results demonstrate that wDCs can be generated from the peripheral blood. Following transfection with a recombinant adenovirus wDCs can be used as a feasible and effective tool for eliciting WHV-specific T-cell responses indicating their potential to serve as prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:17385694

  10. Adenovirus-induced alterations in host cell gene expression prior to the onset of viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Granberg, Fredrik; Svensson, Catharina; Pettersson, Ulf; Zhao, Hongxing

    2006-09-15

    In this report, we have studied gene expression profiles in human primary lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) during the very early phase of an adenovirus infection. Eight out of twelve genes with known functions encoded transcription factors linked to two major cellular processes; inhibition of cell growth (ATF3, ATF4, KLF4, KLF6 and ELK3) and immune response (NR4A1 and CEBPB), indicating that the earliest consequences of an adenovirus infection are growth arrest and induction of an immune response. A time course analysis showed that the induction of these immediate-early response genes was transient and suppressed after the onset of the adenovirus early gene expression. PMID:16860366

  11. Phylogenetic evidence for intratypic recombinant events in a novel human adenovirus C that causes severe acute respiratory infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanqun; Li, Yamin; Lu, Roujian; Zhao, Yanjie; Xie, Zhengde; Shen, Jun; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are prevalent in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Here, we report a unique recombinant HAdV strain (CBJ113) isolated from a HAdV-positive child with SARI. The whole-genome sequence was determined using Sanger sequencing and high-throughput sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome indicated that the CBJ113 strain shares a common origin with HAdV-C2, HAdV-C6, HAdV-C1, HAdV-C5, and HAdV-C57 and formed a novel subclade on the same branch as other HAdV-C subtypes. BootScan and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses showed that the CBJ113 genome has an intra-subtype recombinant structure and comprises gene regions mainly originating from two circulating viral strains: HAdV-1 and HAdV-2. The parental penton base, pVI, and DBP genes of the recombinant strain clustered with the HAdV-1 prototype strain, and the E1B, hexon, fiber, and 100 K genes of the recombinant clustered within the HAdV-2 subtype, meanwhile the E4orf1 and DNA polymerase genes of the recombinant shared the greatest similarity with those of HAdV-5 and HAdV-6, respectively. All of these findings provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics of the complexity of the HAdV-C epidemic. More extensive studies should address the pathogenicity and clinical characteristics of the novel recombinant. PMID:26960434

  12. Phylogenetic evidence for intratypic recombinant events in a novel human adenovirus C that causes severe acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqun; Li, Yamin; Lu, Roujian; Zhao, Yanjie; Xie, Zhengde; Shen, Jun; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are prevalent in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Here, we report a unique recombinant HAdV strain (CBJ113) isolated from a HAdV-positive child with SARI. The whole-genome sequence was determined using Sanger sequencing and high-throughput sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome indicated that the CBJ113 strain shares a common origin with HAdV-C2, HAdV-C6, HAdV-C1, HAdV-C5, and HAdV-C57 and formed a novel subclade on the same branch as other HAdV-C subtypes. BootScan and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses showed that the CBJ113 genome has an intra-subtype recombinant structure and comprises gene regions mainly originating from two circulating viral strains: HAdV-1 and HAdV-2. The parental penton base, pVI, and DBP genes of the recombinant strain clustered with the HAdV-1 prototype strain, and the E1B, hexon, fiber, and 100 K genes of the recombinant clustered within the HAdV-2 subtype, meanwhile the E4orf1 and DNA polymerase genes of the recombinant shared the greatest similarity with those of HAdV-5 and HAdV-6, respectively. All of these findings provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics of the complexity of the HAdV-C epidemic. More extensive studies should address the pathogenicity and clinical characteristics of the novel recombinant. PMID:26960434

  13. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley Fever vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that historically affects livestock production and human health in sub-Saharan Africa, though epizootics have also occurred in the Arabian Peninsula. Whilst an effective live-attenuated vaccine is available for livestock, there is currently no licensed human RVF vaccine. Replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus (ChAd) vectors are an ideal platform for development of a human RVF vaccine, given the low prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against them in the human population, and their excellent safety and immunogenicity profile in human clinical trials of vaccines against a wide range of pathogens. Methods Here, in BALB/c mice, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAdOx1, encoding the RVF virus envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which are targets of virus neutralizing antibodies. The ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine was assessed in comparison to a replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector encoding Gn and Gc (HAdV5-GnGc), a strategy previously shown to confer protective immunity against RVF in mice. Results A single immunization with either of the vaccines conferred protection against RVF virus challenge eight weeks post-immunization. Both vaccines elicited RVF virus neutralizing antibody and a robust CD8+ T cell response. Conclusions Together the results support further development of RVF vaccines based on replication-deficient adenovirus vectors, with ChAdOx1-GnGc being a potential candidate for use in future human clinical trials. PMID:24304565

  14. Dynamic change in natural killer cell type in the human ocular mucosa in situ as means of immune evasion by adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yawata, N; Selva, K J; Liu, Y-C; Tan, K P; Lee, A W L; Siak, J; Lan, W; Vania, M; Arundhati, A; Tong, L; Li, J; Mehta, J S; Yawata, M

    2016-01-01

    The most severe form of virus-induced inflammation at the ocular surface is epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), often caused by group D human adenoviruses (HAdVs). We investigated the dynamics and mechanisms of changes in natural killer (NK) cell types in the human ocular mucosal surface in situ over the course of infection. In the acute phase of infection, the mature CD56(dim)NK cells that comprise a major subpopulation in the normal human conjunctiva are replaced by CD56(bright)NK cells recruited to the ocular surface by chemokines produced by the infected epithelium, and NKG2A-expressing CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells become the major subpopulations in severe inflammation. These NK cells attracted to the mucosal surface are however incapable of mounting a strong antiviral response because of upregulation of the inhibitory ligand human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) on infected epithelium. Furthermore, group D HAdVs downregulate ligands for activating NK cell receptors, thus rendering even the mature NKG2A(-)NK cells unresponsive, an immune-escape mechanism distinct from other adenoviruses. Our findings imply that the EKC-causing group D HAdVs utilize these multiple pathways to inhibit antiviral NK cell responses in the initial stages of the infection. PMID:26080707

  15. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  16. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  17. Human and bovine adenoviruses for the detection of source-specific fecal pollution in coastal waters in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Goonetilleke, A; Gardner, T

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the host-specificity and -sensitivity of human- and bovine-specific adenoviruses (HS-AVs and BS-AVs) were evaluated by testing wastewater/fecal samples from various animal species in Southeast, Queensland, Australia. The overall specificity and sensitivity of the HS-AVs marker were 1.0 and 0.78, respectively. These figures for the BS-AVs were 1.0 and 0.73, respectively. Twenty environmental water samples were collected during wet conditions and 20 samples were colleted during dry conditions from the Maroochy Coastal River and tested for the presence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), host-specific viral markers, zoonotic bacterial and protozoan pathogens using PCR/qPCR. The concentrations of FIB in water samples collected after wet conditions were generally higher compared to dry conditions. HS-AVs was detected in 20% water samples collected during wet conditions and whereas BS-AVs was detected in both wet (i.e., 10%) and dry (i.e., 10%) conditions. Both Campylobacter jejuni mapA and Salmonella invA genes detected in 10% samples collected during dry conditions. The concentrations of Salmonella invA ranged between 3.5 × 10(2) and 4.3 × 10(2) genomic copies per 500 ml of water Giardia lamblia β-giardin gene was detected only in one sample (5%) collected during the dry conditions. Weak or significant correlations were observed between FIB with viral markers and zoonotic pathogens. However, during dry conditions, no significant correlations were observed between FIB concentrations with viral markers and zoonotic pathogens. The prevalence of HS-AVs in samples collected from the study river suggests that the quality of water is affected by human fecal pollution and as well as bovine fecal pollution. The results suggest that HS-AVs and BS-AVs detection using PCR could be a useful tool for the identification of human sourced fecal pollution in coastal waters. PMID:20891037

  18. The antitumor efficacy of a novel adenovirus-mediated anti-p21Ras single chain fragment variable antibody on human cancers in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju-Lun; Pan, Xin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Xing; Hu, Qi-Chan; Ding, Feng; Feng, Qiang; Li, Gui-Yun; Luo, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Activated ras genes are found in a large number of human tumors, and therefore are one of important targets for cancer therapy. This study investigated the antitumor effects of a novel single chain fragment variable antibody (scFv) against ras protein, p21Ras. The anti-p21Ras scFv gene was constructed by phage display library from hybridoma KGHR1, and then subcloned into replication-defective adenovirus vector to obtain recombinant adenovirus KGHV100. Human tumor cell lines with high expression of p21Ras SW480, MDA-MB‑231, OVCAR-3, BEL-7402, as well as tumor cell line with low expression of p21Ras, SKOV3, were employed to investigate antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that KGHV100 was able to express intracellularly anti-p21Ras scFv antibody in cultured tumor cells and in transplantation tumor cells. MTT, Transwell, colony formation, and flow cytometry analysis showed that KGHV100 led to significant growth arrest in tumor cells with high p21Ras expression, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in the studied tumor cell lines. In vivo, KGHV100 significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection, and the survival rates of the mice were higher than the control group. These results indicate that the adenovirus-mediated intracellular expression of the novel anti-p21Ras scFv exerted strong antitumoral effects, and may be a potential method for therapy of cancers with p21Ras overexpression. PMID:26780944

  19. Toward gene therapy of premature ovarian failure: intraovarian injection of adenovirus expressing human FSH receptor restores folliculogenesis in FSHR(−/−) FORKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghadami, M.; El-Demerdash, E.; Salama, S.A.; Binhazim, A.A.; Archibong, A.E.; Chen, X.; Ballard, B.R.; Sairam, M.R.; Al-Hendy, A.

    2010-01-01

    A homozygous missense mutation, C566T, in the follicle stimulation hormone receptor (FSHR) gene has been linked to premature ovarian failure. The disease leads to infertility in a normal karyotype female with an elevated follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and decreased serum estrogen level. Female mice carrying mutated FSHR gene, called follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO), display similar phenotype and are sterile because of a folliculogenesis block at a primary stage. We investigated the effects of bilateral intra-ovarian injection of an adenovirus expressing a normal copy of human FSHR on the reproductive system of 6–10 weeks female FORKO mice. Ad-LacZ was injected directly into each ovary of the control group. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-injection and tissues collected for evaluation. Treated mice showed estrogenic changes in daily vaginal smear whereas control animals remained fixated in the diestrus stage. Histological evaluation showed on average 26 ± 4 follicles/ovary in treated group with 8 ± 2 follicles at the antral stage compared with only 5 ± 2 with zero follicles at antral stage in Ad-LacZ control mice. There was no significant change in serum level of progesterone, however, estrogen level increased 2–3-fold (P < 0.02) and FSH decreased by up to 50% (P < 0.04) in treated animals. FSHR mRNA was detected in the ovaries of the treated group. In conclusion, intra-ovarian injection of an adenovirus expressing human FSHR gene is able to restore FSH responsiveness and reinitiate ovarian folliculogenesis as well as resume estrogen production in female FORKO mice. Ad-LacZ injections indicate the absence of systemic viral dissemination or germ line transmission of adenovirus DNA to offspring. PMID:20086006

  20. High Species C Human Adenovirus Genome Copy Numbers in the Treated Water Supply of a Neotropical Area of the Central-West Region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hugo D; Fongaro, Gislaine; Garcíazapata, Marco T A; Melo, Arthur T O; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P; de Faria, Karla M S; Anunciação, Carlos E

    2015-09-01

    There is little information about the presence of human adenovirus (HAdV) in drinking water in Neotropical regions. Thus, the present study sought to conduct quantification and molecular characterization of HAdVs detected in treated water samples from an area of the Cerrado ecoregion of Brazil. Between August and November 2012, samples were collected from four treated water reservoirs and their respective sites along the water distribution network of the city of Goiânia, for a total of 80 samples. All samples were concentrated and analyzed by qPCR, and selected samples were sequenced. Overall, 76.6 (10(0)-10(9) GC mL(-1)) and 37.5% (10(1)-10(8) GC mL(-1)) of samples drawn from reservoirs and their distribution sites, respectively, were positive for virus by qPCR. All samples selected for sequencing were characterized as species C human adenovirus. Such high HAdV counts have in treated water samples. This finding merits special attention, particularly from the sanitation authorities, because the high number of GC mL(-1) may be an indicative of risk to human health. PMID:25799963

  1. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  2. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  3. Genomic and bioinformatics analysis of HAdV-7, a human adenovirus of species B1 that causes acute respiratory disease: implications for vector development in human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Anjan; Su, Jing; Carlisle, Steve; Tibbetts, Clark; Seto, Donald

    2005-02-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 7 (HAdV-7) is a reemerging pathogen identified in acute respiratory disease (ARD), particularly in epidemics affecting basic military trainee populations of otherwise healthy young adults. The genome has been sequenced and annotated (GenBank accession no. ). Comparative genomics and bioinformatics analyses of the HAdV-7 genome sequence provide insight into its natural history and phylogenetic relationships. A putative origin of HAdV-7 from a chimpanzee host is observed. This has implications within the current biotechnological interest of using chimpanzee adenoviruses as vectors for human gene therapy and DNA vaccine delivery. Rapid genome sequencing and analyses of this species B1 member provide an example of exploiting accurate low-pass DNA sequencing technology in pathogen characterization and epidemic outbreak surveillance through the identification, validation, and application of unique pathogen genome signatures. PMID:15661145

  4. Chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine generates acute and durable protective immunity against ebolavirus challenge.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Daphne A; Honko, Anna N; Asiedu, Clement; Trefry, John C; Lau-Kilby, Annie W; Johnson, Joshua C; Hensley, Lisa; Ammendola, Virginia; Abbate, Adele; Grazioli, Fabiana; Foulds, Kathryn E; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Donaldson, Mitzi M; Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Roederer, Mario; Nabel, Gary J; Mascola, John; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    Ebolavirus disease causes high mortality, and the current outbreak has spread unabated through West Africa. Human adenovirus type 5 vectors (rAd5) encoding ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) generate protective immunity against acute lethal Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) challenge in macaques, but fail to protect animals immune to Ad5, suggesting natural Ad5 exposure may limit vaccine efficacy in humans. Here we show that a chimpanzee-derived replication-defective adenovirus (ChAd) vaccine also rapidly induced uniform protection against acute lethal EBOV challenge in macaques. Because protection waned over several months, we boosted ChAd3 with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and generated, for the first time, durable protection against lethal EBOV challenge. PMID:25194571

  5. Human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: establishment of a vaccine product profile through in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; McIlhaney, M; Miller, T; Christianson, K; Keene, A; Lohnas, G; Purcell, C; Neilan, J; Schutta, C; Barrera, J; Burrage, T; Brough, D E; Butman, B T

    2012-01-01

    Next generation, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) molecular vaccines based on replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 viral vectored delivery of FMD capsid genes (AdFMD) are being developed by the United States Dept. of Homeland Security and industry partners. The strategic goal of this program is to develop AdFMD licensed vaccines for the USA National Veterinary Stockpile for use, if needed, as emergency response tools during an FMD outbreak. This vaccine platform provides a unique opportunity to develop a set of in vitro analytical parameters to generate an AdFMD vaccine product profile to replace the current lot release test for traditional, inactivated FMD vaccines that requires FMDV challenge in livestock. The possibility of an indirect FMD vaccine potency test based on a serological alternative was initially investigated for a lead vaccine candidate, Adt.A24. Results show that serum virus neutralization (SVN) based serology testing for Adt.A24 vaccine lot release is not feasible, at least not in the context of vaccine potency assessment at one week post-vaccination. Thus, an in vitro infectious titer assay (tissue culture infectious dose 50, TCID50) which measures FMD infectious (protein expression) titer was established. Pre-validation results show acceptable assay variability and linearity and these data support further studies to validate the TCID50 assay as a potential potency release test. In addition, a quantitative physiochemical assay (HPLC) and three immunochemical assays (Fluorescent Focus-Forming Unit (FFU); tissue culture expression dose 50 (TCED50); Western blot) were developed for potential use as in vitro assays to monitor AdFMD vaccine lot-to-lot consistency and other potential applications. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a traditional modified-live vaccine virus infectivity assay in combination with a set of physiochemical and immunochemical tests to build a vaccine product profile that will ensure the each Ad

  6. Helper-dependent adenovirus achieve more efficient and persistent liver transgene expression in non-human primates under immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Unzu, C; Melero, I; Hervás-Stubbs, S; Sampedro, A; Mancheño, U; Morales-Kastresana, A; Serrano-Mendioroz, I; de Salamanca, R E; Benito, A; Fontanellas, A

    2015-11-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDA) vectors constitute excellent gene therapy tools for metabolic liver diseases. We have previously shown that an HDA vector encoding human porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) corrects acute intermittent porphyria mice. Now, six non-human primates were injected in the left hepatic lobe with the PBGD-encoding HDA vector to study levels and persistence of transgene expression. Intrahepatic administration of 5 × 10(12) viral particles kg(-1) (10(10) infective units kg(-1)) of HDA only resulted in transient (≈14 weeks) transgene expression in one out of three individuals. In contrast, a more prolonged 90-day immunosuppressive regimen (tacrolimus, mycophenolate, rituximab and steroids) extended meaningful transgene expression for over 76 weeks in two out of two cases. Transgene expression under immunosuppression (IS) reached maximum levels 6 weeks after HDA administration and gradually declined reaching a stable plateau within the therapeutic range for acute porphyria. The non-injected liver lobes also expressed the transgene because of vector circulation. IS controlled anticapsid T-cell responses and decreased the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Re-administration of HDA-hPBGD at week +78 achieved therapeutically meaningful transgene expression only in those animals receiving IS again at the time of this second vector exposure. Overall, immunity against adenoviral capsids poses serious hurdles for long-term HDA-mediated liver transduction, which can be partially circumvented by pharmacological IS. PMID:26125605

  7. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  8. Human xeroderma pigmentosum group G gene encodes a DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Habraken, Y; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers. Cell fusion studies have identified seven XP complementation groups, A to G. Previous studies have implicated the products of these seven XP genes in the recognition of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and in incision of the damage-containing DNA strand. Here, we express the XPG-encoded protein in Sf9 insect cells and purify it to homogeneity. We demonstrate that XPG is a single-strand specific DNA endonuclease, thus identifying the catalytic role of the protein in nucleotide excision repair. We suggest that XPG nuclease acts on the single-stranded region created as a result of the combined action of the XPB helicase and XPD helicase at the DNA damage site. Images PMID:8078765

  9. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  10. Adenovirus serotype 5 hexon mediates liver gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; McVey, John H; Bhella, David; Parker, Alan L; Barker, Kristeen; Atoda, Hideko; Pink, Rebecca; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Greig, Jenny A; Denby, Laura; Custers, Jerome; Morita, Takashi; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Barouch, Dan H; van Rooijen, Nico; Napoli, Claudio; Havenga, Menzo J E; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2008-02-01

    Adenoviruses are used extensively as gene transfer agents, both experimentally and clinically. However, targeting of liver cells by adenoviruses compromises their potential efficacy. In cell culture, the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber protein engages the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to bind cells. Paradoxically, following intravascular delivery, CAR is not used for liver transduction, implicating alternate pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that coagulation factor (F)X directly binds adenovirus leading to liver infection. Here, we show that FX binds to the Ad5 hexon, not fiber, via an interaction between the FX Gla domain and hypervariable regions of the hexon surface. Binding occurs in multiple human adenovirus serotypes. Liver infection by the FX-Ad5 complex is mediated through a heparin-binding exosite in the FX serine protease domain. This study reveals an unanticipated function for hexon in mediating liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:18267072

  11. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae . E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro |

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  12. Characterisation of the Equine adenovirus 2 genome.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Barton, Mary; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-09-30

    Equine adenovirus 2 (EAdV-2) is one of two serotypes of adenoviruses known to infect equines. Initial studies did not associate EAdV-2 infections with any specific clinical syndromes, although more recent evidence suggests that EAdV-2 may be associated with clinical and subclinical gastrointestinal infections of foals and adults respectively. In contrast, Equine adenovirus 1 is well recognised as a pathogen associated with upper respiratory tract infections of horses. In this study the complete genome sequence of EAdV-2 is reported. As expected, genes common to the adenoviruses were identified. Phylogenetic reconstructions using selected EAdV-2 genes confirmed the classification of this virus within the Mastadenovirus genus, and supported the hypothesis that EAdV-2 and EAdV-1 have evolved from separate lineages within the adenoviruses. One spliced open reading frame was identified that encoded for a polypeptide with high similarity to the pIX and E1b_55K adenovirus homologues and was designated pIX_E1b_55K. In addition to this fused version of E1b_55K, a separate E1b_55K encoding gene was also identified. These polypeptides do not appear to have evolved from a gene duplication event as the fused and unfused E1b_55K were most similar to E1b_55K homologues from the Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus genera respectively. The results of this study suggest that EAdV-2 has an unusual evolutionary history that warrants further investigation. PMID:26220513

  13. Characterization of the Enhanced Bone Regenerative Capacity of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Engineered to Express the Gene Encoding Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Im-Hee; Lee, Si-Ho; Jun, Choong-Man; Oh, Namsik

    2014-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) are considered an appropriate cell source for therapeutic strategies. The aims of this study were to investigate the sustainability of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) secretion and the bone regenerative capacity of hPDLSCs that had been genetically modified to express the gene encoding BMP2 (BMP2). hPDLSCs isolated from healthy third molars were transduced using replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding BMP2 (hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2), and the cellular characteristics and osteogenic potentials of hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 successfully secreted BMP2, formed colonies, and expressed immunophenotypes similar to their nontransduced counterparts. As to their osteogenic potential, hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 formed greater mineralized nodules and exhibited significantly higher levels of expression of BMP2 and the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase, and formed more and better quality bone than other hPDLSC-containing or recombinant human BMP2-treated groups, being localized at the initial site until 8 weeks. The findings of the present study demonstrate that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 effectively promote osteogenesis not only in vitro but also in vivo. The findings also suggest that hPDLSCs can efficiently carry and deliver BMP2, and that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 could be used in an attractive novel therapeutic approach for the regeneration of deteriorated bony defects. PMID:24494708

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Wen; Ghosh, Ruma; Finberg, Robert W; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2003-04-01

    We analyzed BAC genomic clones encoding the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (mCAR). The mCAR gene is situated on the distal portion of murine chromosome 16, and is composed of at least eight exons, with intron-exon boundaries similar to those reported for the human CAR gene. We previously described two cDNAs encoding mCAR isoforms: the extracellular and transmembrane portions of both are encoded by exons 1-6; the cytoplasmic domain of mCAR 1 is encoded by exon 7, whereas mCAR 2 results from an RNA splice linking the proximal portion of exon 7 to an alternative exon 8. RT-PCR analysis of the mCAR RNA 5'-terminus suggests that transcription may begin 141-161 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translational start site. PMID:12823902

  15. Treatment of melanoma with a serotype 5/3 chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF: Results in vitro, in rodents and in humans.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Veckman, Ville; Liikanen, Ilkka; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Matikainen, Sampsa; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Koski, Anniina; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is refractory to irradiation and chemotherapy, but amenable to immunological approaches such as immune-checkpoint-inhibiting antibodies or adoptive cell therapies. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules. Therefore, oncolytic immuno-virotherapy of malignant melanoma is an appealing approach, which was recently validated by a positive phase 3 trial. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a panel of melanoma cell lines and animal models, and summarized the melanoma-specific human data from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). The virus effectively eradicated human melanoma cells in vitro and subcutaneous SK-MEL-28 melanoma xenografts in nude mice when combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide. Furthermore, virally-expressed granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated the differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. In contrast to human cells, RPMI 1846 hamster melanoma cells exhibited no response to oncolytic viruses and the chimeric 5/3 fiber failed to increase the efficacy of transduction, suggesting limited utility of the hamster model in the context of viruses with this capsid. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Four out of nine melanoma patients treated were evaluable for possible therapy benefit with modified RECIST criteria: one patient had minor response, two had stable disease, and one had progressive disease. Two patients were alive at 559 and 2,149 days after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in melanoma patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:25821063

  16. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  17. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  18. Clinical Assessment of a Novel Recombinant Simian Adenovirus ChAdOx1 as a Vectored Vaccine Expressing Conserved Influenza A Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Antrobus, Richard D; Coughlan, Lynda; Berthoud, Tamara K; Dicks, Matthew D; Hill, Adrian VS; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are potent vectors for inducing and boosting cellular immunity to encoded recombinant antigens. However, the widespread seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies to common human adenovirus serotypes limits their use. Simian adenoviruses do not suffer from the same drawbacks. We have constructed a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine expressing the conserved influenza antigens, nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix protein 1 (M1). Here, we report safety and T-cell immunogenicity following vaccination with this novel recombinant simian adenovirus, ChAdOx1 NP+M1, in a first in human dose-escalation study using a 3+3 study design, followed by boosting with modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the same antigens in some volunteers. We demonstrate ChAdOx1 NP+M1 to be safe and immunogenic. ChAdOx1 is a promising vaccine vector that could be used to deliver vaccine antigens where strong cellular immune responses are required for protection. PMID:24374965

  19. Clinical assessment of a novel recombinant simian adenovirus ChAdOx1 as a vectored vaccine expressing conserved Influenza A antigens.

    PubMed

    Antrobus, Richard D; Coughlan, Lynda; Berthoud, Tamara K; Dicks, Matthew D; Hill, Adrian Vs; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2014-03-01

    Adenoviruses are potent vectors for inducing and boosting cellular immunity to encoded recombinant antigens. However, the widespread seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies to common human adenovirus serotypes limits their use. Simian adenoviruses do not suffer from the same drawbacks. We have constructed a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine expressing the conserved influenza antigens, nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix protein 1 (M1). Here, we report safety and T-cell immunogenicity following vaccination with this novel recombinant simian adenovirus, ChAdOx1 NP+M1, in a first in human dose-escalation study using a 3+3 study design, followed by boosting with modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the same antigens in some volunteers. We demonstrate ChAdOx1 NP+M1 to be safe and immunogenic. ChAdOx1 is a promising vaccine vector that could be used to deliver vaccine antigens where strong cellular immune responses are required for protection. PMID:24374965

  20. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein complements adenovirus type 5 E1A amino-terminus-dependent transactivation of adenovirus type 5 early genes and increases ATF and Oct-1 DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, H K; Ziff, E B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that conserved region 1 (CR1) of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1A protein synergizes with CR3 in the transactivation of Ad5 early genes (H.K. Wong and E. B. Ziff, J. Virol. 68:4910-4920, 1994). CR1 lies within the E1A amino terminus and binds host regulatory proteins such as the RB protein, p107, p130, and p300. Since simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 protein also bind host regulatory factors, we investigated whether these viral proteins can complement E1A mutants which are defective in early gene activation. We show that the HPV16 E7 protein but not SV40 T antigen can complement mutations in the Ad5 E1A CR1 in the transactivation of viral early promoters. The inability of SV40 T antigen to complement suggests that RB binding on its own is not sufficient for early promoter transactivation by the E1A amino terminus. Nuclear runoff assays show that complementation by HPV16 E7 restores the ability of the E1A mutants to stimulate early gene expression at the level of transcription. Furthermore, nuclear extracts from the E7-transformed cells show increased binding activity of ATF and Oct-1, factors that can recognize the elements of Ad5 early genes, consistent with gene activation by E1A and E7 at the transcriptional level. PMID:8523545

  1. SPRi-based adenovirus detection using a surrogate antibody method.

    PubMed

    Abadian, Pegah N; Yildirim, Nimet; Gu, April Z; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-12-15

    Adenovirus infection, which is a waterborne viral disease, is one of the most prevelant causes of human morbidity in the world. Thus, methods for rapid detection of this infectious virus in the environment are urgently needed for public health protection. In this study, we developed a rapid, real-time, sensitive, and label-free SPRi-based biosensor for rapid, sensitive and highly selective detection of adenoviruses. The sensing protocol consists of mixing the sample containing adenovirus with a predetermined concentration of adenovirus antibody. The mixture was filtered to remove the free antibodies from the sample. A secondary antibody, which was specific to the adenovirus antibody, was immobilized onto the SPRi chip surface covalently and the filtrate was flowed over the sensor surface. When the free adenovirus antibodies bound to the surface-immobilized secondary antibodies, we observed this binding via changes in reflectivity. In this approach, a higher amount of adenoviruses resulted in fewer free adenovirus antibodies and thus smaller reflectivity changes. A dose-response curve was generated, and the linear detection range was determined to be from 10 PFU/mL to 5000 PFU/mL with an R(2) value greater than 0.9. The results also showed that the developed biosensing system had a high specificity towards adenovirus (less than 20% signal change when tested in a sample matrix containing rotavirus and lentivirus). PMID:26232675

  2. 3D modeling of human cancer: A PEG-fibrin hydrogel system to study the role of tumor microenvironment and recapitulate the in vivo effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Del Bufalo, Francesca; Manzo, Teresa; Hoyos, Valentina; Yagyu, Shigeki; Caruana, Ignazio; Jacot, Jeffrey; Benavides, Omar; Rosen, Daniel; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between malignant and stromal cells and the 3D spatial architecture of the tumor both substantially modify tumor behavior, including the responses to small molecule drugs and biological therapies. Conventional 2D culture systems cannot replicate this complexity. To overcome these limitations and more accurately model solid tumors, we developed a highly versatile 3D PEG-fibrin hydrogel model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Our model relevantly recapitulates the effect of oncolytic adenovirus; tumor responses in this setting nearly reproduce those observed in vivo. We have also validated the use of this model for complex, long-term, 3D cultures of cancer cells and their stroma (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Both tumor proliferation and invasiveness were enhanced in the presence of stromal components. These results validate our 3D hydrogel model as a relevant platform to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments. PMID:26826297

  3. Encoding of Physics Concepts: Concreteness and Presentation Modality Reflected by Human Brain Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class. PMID:22848602

  4. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  5. Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Human Adenovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Tonsillar Lymphocytes Isolated from Patients Diagnosed with Tonsillar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Farzaneh; Sandström, Karl; Bondeson, Kåre; Laurell, Göran; Lidian, Adnan; Svensson, Catharina; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Surgically removed palatine tonsils provide a conveniently accessible source of T and B lymphocytes to study the interplay between foreign pathogens and the host immune system. In this study we have characterised the distribution of human adenovirus (HAdV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in purified tonsillar T and B cell-enriched fractions isolated from three patient age groups diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy and chronic/recurrent tonsillitis. HAdV DNA was detected in 93 out of 111 patients (84%), while EBV DNA was detected in 58 patients (52%). The most abundant adenovirus type was HAdV-5 (68%). None of the patients were positive for HCMV. Furthermore, 43 patients (39%) showed a co-infection of HAdV and EBV. The majority of young patients diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy were positive for HAdV, whereas all adult patients diagnosed with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis were positive for either HAdV or EBV. Most of the tonsils from patients diagnosed with either tonsillar hypertrophy or chronic/recurrent tonsillitis showed a higher HAdV DNA copy number in T compared to B cell-enriched fraction. Interestingly, in the majority of the tonsils from patients with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis HAdV DNA was detected in T cells only, whereas hypertrophic tonsils demonstrated HAdV DNA in both T and B cell-enriched fractions. In contrast, the majority of EBV positive tonsils revealed a preference for EBV DNA accumulation in the B cell-enriched fraction compared to T cell fraction irrespective of the patients' age. PMID:27136093

  6. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. PMID:27170642

  7. Intratumoral spread of wild-type adenovirus is limited after local injection of human xenograft tumors: virus persists and spreads systemically at late time points.

    PubMed

    Sauthoff, Harald; Hu, Jing; Maca, Cielo; Goldman, Michael; Heitner, Sheila; Yee, Herman; Pipiya, Teona; Rom, William N; Hay, John G

    2003-03-20

    Oncolytic replicating adenoviruses are a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer. Despite the assumed biologic advantage of continued viral replication and spread from infected to uninfected cancer cells, early clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of current vectors is limited. In xenograft tumor models using immune-incompetent mice, wild-type adenovirus is also rarely able to eradicate established tumors. This suggests that innate immune mechanisms may clear the virus or that barriers within the tumor prevent viral spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of viral distribution and spread after intratumoral injection of virus in a human tumor xenograft model. After intratumoral injection of wild-type virus, high levels of titratable virus persisted within the xenograft tumors for at least 8 weeks. Virus distribution within the tumors as determined by immunohistochemistry was patchy, and virus-infected cells appeared to be flanked by tumor necrosis and connective tissue. The close proximity of virus-infected cells to the tumor-supporting structure, which is of murine origin, was clearly demonstrated using a DNA probe that specifically hybridizes to the B1 murine DNA repeat. Importantly, although virus was cleared from the circulation 6 hr after intratumoral injection, after 4 weeks systemic spread of virus was detected. In addition, vessels of infected tumors were surrounded by necrosis and an advancing rim of virus-infected tumor cells, suggesting reinfection of the xenograft tumor through the vasculature. These data suggest that human adenoviral spread within tumor xenografts is impaired by murine tumor-supporting structures. In addition, there is evidence for continued viral replication within the tumor, with subsequent systemic dissemination and reinfection of tumors via the tumor vasculature. Despite the limitations of immune-incompetent models, an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the tumor

  8. Unique conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses-cancer terminator viruses (CTV): efficacious reagents for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Fisher, Paul B

    2006-07-01

    The frequent resistance of aggressive cancers to currently available therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, mandates development of targeted, nontoxic and more efficacious treatment protocols. Conditionally replication competent adenoviruses (CRCAs) that induce oncolysis by cancer-specific replication are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, a single modality approach may not be sufficient to completely eradicate cancer in a patient, because most cancers arise from abnormalities in multiple genetic and signal transduction pathways. The promoter region of rodent progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), cloned and characterized in our laboratory, embodies the unique property of increased activity in a broad range of tumor cells, both rodent and human, when compared to normal counterparts. Bipartite adenoviruses were engineered to express the E1A gene, necessary for viral replication, under control of the PEG-3 promoter (PEG-Prom) and simultaneously express a second transgene in the E3 region that encodes an apoptosis-inducing and immunomodulatory cytokine, either immune interferon (IFN-gamma) or melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24). These conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses, referred to as cancer terminator viruses (CTVs), facilitated cancer-selective adenovirus replication, robust transgene expression and apoptosis induction with complete eradication of both primary and distant (metastatic) human cancers xenotransplanted in athymic nude mice. These findings suggest that CTVs might prove efficacious for the therapy of primary and advanced neoplastic diseases. PMID:16861924

  9. GENCODE: The reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L.; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  10. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    PubMed

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  11. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  12. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  13. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  14. Can visual information encoded in cortical columns be decoded from magnetoencephalography data in humans?

    PubMed

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Ramirez, Fernando Mario; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    It is a principal open question whether noninvasive imaging methods in humans can decode information encoded at a spatial scale as fine as the basic functional unit of cortex: cortical columns. We addressed this question in five magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiments by investigating a columnar-level encoded visual feature: contrast edge orientation. We found that MEG signals contained orientation-specific information as early as approximately 50 ms after stimulus onset even when controlling for confounds, such as overrepresentation of particular orientations, stimulus edge interactions, and global form-related signals. Theoretical modeling confirmed the plausibility of this empirical result. An essential consequence of our results is that information encoded in the human brain at the level of cortical columns should in general be accessible by multivariate analysis of electrophysiological signals. PMID:26162550

  15. A Single Dose Respiratory Recombinant Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection for Non-Human Primates from Lethal Ebola Infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues and cases appear in the United States and other countries, the need for long-lasting vaccines to preserve global health is imminent. Here, we evaluate the long-term efficacy of a respiratory and sublingual (SL) adenovirus-based vaccine in non-human primates in two phases. In the first, a single respiratory dose of 1.4 × 109 infectious virus particles (ivp)/kg of Ad-CAGoptZGP induced strong Ebola glycoprotein (GP) specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and Ebola GP-specific antibodies in systemic and mucosal compartments and was partially (67%) protective from challenge 62 days after immunization. The same dose given by the SL route induced Ebola GP-specific CD8+ T cell responses similar to that of intramuscular (IM) injection, however, the Ebola GP-specific antibody response was low. All primates succumbed to infection. Three primates were then given the vaccine in a formulation that improved the immune response to Ebola in rodents. Three primates were immunized with 2.0 × 1010 ivp/kg of vaccine by the SL route. Diverse populations of polyfunctional Ebola GP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and significant anti-Ebola GP antibodies were present in samples collected 150 days after respiratory immunization. The formulated vaccine was fully protective against challenge 21 weeks after immunization. While diverse populations of Ebola GP-specific CD4+ T cells were produced after SL immunization, antibodies were not neutralizing and the vaccine was unprotective. To our knowledge, this is the first time that durable protection from a single dose respiratory adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine has been demonstrated in primates. PMID:25363619

  16. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  17. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell-specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3'-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  18. A Single Dose Respiratory Recombinant Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection for Non-Human Primates from Lethal Ebola Infection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Huk; Jonsson-Schmunk, Kristina; Qiu, Xiangguo; Shedlock, Devon J; Strong, Jim; Xu, Jason X; Michie, Kelly L; Audet, Jonathan; Fernando, Lisa; Myers, Mark J; Weiner, David; Bajrovic, Irnela; Tran, Lilian Q; Wong, Gary; Bello, Alexander; Kobinger, Gary P; Schafer, Stephen C; Croyle, Maria A

    2015-08-01

    As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues and cases appear in the United States and other countries, the need for long-lasting vaccines to preserve global health is imminent. Here, we evaluate the long-term efficacy of a respiratory and sublingual (SL) adenovirus-based vaccine in non-human primates in two phases. In the first, a single respiratory dose of 1.4×10(9) infectious virus particles (ivp)/kg of Ad-CAGoptZGP induced strong Ebola glycoprotein (GP) specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and Ebola GP-specific antibodies in systemic and mucosal compartments and was partially (67%) protective from challenge 62 days after immunization. The same dose given by the SL route induced Ebola GP-specific CD8+ T cell responses similar to that of intramuscular (IM) injection, however, the Ebola GP-specific antibody response was low. All primates succumbed to infection. Three primates were then given the vaccine in a formulation that improved the immune response to Ebola in rodents. Three primates were immunized with 2.0×10(10) ivp/kg of vaccine by the SL route. Diverse populations of polyfunctional Ebola GP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and significant anti-Ebola GP antibodies were present in samples collected 150 days after respiratory immunization. The formulated vaccine was fully protective against challenge 21 weeks after immunization. While diverse populations of Ebola GP-specific CD4+ T cells were produced after SL immunization, antibodies were not neutralizing and the vaccine was unprotective. To our knowledge, this is the first time that durable protection from a single dose respiratory adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine has been demonstrated in primates. PMID:25363619

  19. Typing of human adenoviruses in specimens from immunosuppressed patients by PCR-fragment length analysis and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Preuner, Sandra; Lion, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Currently, 51 human adenovirus (AdV) serotypes, which are divided into six species (A to F), are known. AdV infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed individuals, particularly in allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. Any AdV species may cause life-threatening disease, but little information is available on the clinical relevance of individual serotypes. The use of serological testing for serotype identification is limited due to the impaired immune response during the posttransplant period. A new molecular approach to serotype identification is presented here that exploits variable regions within the hexon gene. All serotypes belonging to the species A, B, C, E, and F can be determined by fragment length analysis of a single PCR product. For species C, which is the most prevalent in many geographic regions, an alternative technique based on serotype-specific real-time quantitative PCR was established. Of 135 consecutive pediatric patients screened for AdV infections after allogeneic SCT, 40 tested positive. Detailed analysis revealed the presence of 10 different serotypes; serotypes 1 and 2 from species C (C01 and C02) showed the highest prevalence, accounting for 77% of the AdV-positive cases. Representatives of other species were observed less commonly: serotype A12 in 6.5%; serotype A31 in 4.5%; and B03, B16, C05, C06, D19, and F41 in 2%. The approach to rapid molecular serotype analysis presented here provides a basis for detailed studies on adenovirus epidemiology and on the transmission of nosocomial infections. Moreover, in view of the increasing importance of tailored therapy approaches, serotype identification may in the future have implications for the selection of the most appropriate antiviral treatment. PMID:16891496

  20. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  1. Perceptual biases are inconsistent with Bayesian encoding of speed in the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Omar; Hammett, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    The notion that Bayesian processes are fundamental to brain function and sensory processing has recently received much support, and a number of Bayesian accounts of how the brain encodes the speed of moving objects have been proposed that challenge earlier mechanistic models. We measured the perceived speed of low contrast patterns at both low (2.5 cd m(-2)) and high (25 cd m(-2)) luminance in order to assess these competing models of how the human visual system encodes speed. At both luminance levels low contrast stimuli are perceptually biased such that they appear slower at slow (< 8 Hz) speeds but faster at higher (16 Hz) speeds. However, we find that the reversal of the perceptual bias from under- to overestimation occurred at slower speeds at low luminance. We also found that the bias was greater at slow speeds at high luminance but greater at fast speeds at low luminance. Moreover, discrimination thresholds were found to be similar at high and low luminance. These findings can be predicted by models in which speed is encoded by the relative activity within two broadly tuned temporal channels but are inconsistent with Bayesian models of speed encoding. We conclude that Bayesian processes cannot adequately account for speed encoding in the human visual system. PMID:25761348

  2. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  3. Generation of a panel of antibodies against proteins encoded on human chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of all or part of chromosome 21. To further understanding of DS we are working with a mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal mouse chromosome complement. This mouse is a model for human DS and recapitulates many of the features of the human syndrome such as specific heart defects, and cerebellar neuronal loss. The Tc1 mouse is mosaic for the human chromosome such that not all cells in the model carry it. Thus to help our investigations we aimed to develop a method to identify cells that carry human chromosome 21 in the Tc1 mouse. To this end, we have generated a panel of antibodies raised against proteins encoded by genes on human chromosome 21 that are known to be expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice Results We attempted to generate human specific antibodies against proteins encoded by human chromosome 21. We selected proteins that are expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice and contain regions of moderate/low homology with the mouse ortholog. We produced antibodies to seven human chromosome 21 encoded proteins. Of these, we successfully generated three antibodies that preferentially recognise human compared with mouse SOD1 and RRP1 proteins on western blots. However, these antibodies did not specifically label cells which carry a freely segregating copy of Hsa21 in the brains of our Tc1 mouse model of DS. Conclusions Although we have successfully isolated new antibodies to SOD1 and RRP1 for use on western blots, in our hands these antibodies have not been successfully used for immunohistochemistry studies. These antibodies are freely available to other researchers. Our data high-light the technical difficulty of producing species-specific antibodies for both western blotting and immunohistochemistry. PMID:20727138

  4. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions. PMID:24516464

  5. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  6. Effects of Acute Methamphetamine on Emotional Memory Formation in Humans: Encoding vs Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  7. Construction and radiolabeling of adenovirus variants that incorporate human metallothionein into protein IX for analysis of biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Rogers, Buck E; Aladyshkina, Natalia; Cheng, Bing; Lokitz, Stephen J; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors is a promising strategy for novel cancer treatments; however, current tracking approaches in vivo are limited. The C-terminus of the Ad minor capsid protein IX (pIX) can incorporate heterologous reporters to monitor biodistribution. We incorporated metallothionein (MT), a low-molecular-weight metal-binding protein, as a fusion to pIX. We previously demonstrated 99mTc binding in vitro to a pIX-MT fusion on the Ad capsid. We investigated different fusions of MT within pIX to optimize functional display. We identified a dimeric MT construct fused to pIX that showed significantly increased radiolabeling capacity. After Ad radiolabeling, we characterized metal binding in vitro. We explored biodistribution in vivo in control mice, mice pretreated with warfarin, mice preimmunized with wild-type Ad, and mice that received both warfarin pretreatment and Ad preimmunization. Localization of activity to liver and bladder was seen, with activity detected in spleen, intestine, and kidneys. Afterwards, the mice were euthanized and selected organs were dissected for further analysis. Similar to the imaging results, most of the radioactivity was found in the liver, spleen, kidneys, and bladder, with significant differences between the groups observed in the liver. These results demonstrate this platform application for following Ad dissemination in vivo. PMID:25060486

  8. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  9. Selective transduction of mature DC in human skin and lymph nodes by CD80/CD86-targeted fiber-modified Adenovirus-5/3

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Rosalia, Rodney A.; Murakami, Miho; Everts, Maaike; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo targeting of dendritic cells (DC) represents an attractive alternative to currently applied ex vivo DC-based genetic tumor vaccination protocols. Finding the optimal vector for in vivo targeting of DC is important for such strategies. We therefore tested a panel of subgroup C/B chimeric and fiber-modified adenoviruses (Ad) for their relative capacity to transduce human DC. We made use of in vitro generated Langerhans Cells (LC) as well as of ex vivo human skin and melanoma-draining lymph node (LN) derived DC. Of the tested viruses the C/B-chimeric Ad5/3 virus most efficiently transduced in vitro generated LC. In addition, Ad5/3 preferentially targeted mature myeloid DC from human skin and draining LN and transduced them at significantly higher frequencies than Ad5. In addition, Ad5/3 was more specific for mature human skin-derived CD1a+ CD83+ DC than the previously reported DC-transducing C/B-chimeric vector Ad5/35, infecting less bystander cells. It was previously reported that Ad5/3 transduced human monocyte-derived DC by binding to the B7 molecules CD80 and CD86. High-efficiency transduction of mature skin-derived DC was similarly shown to be mediated through binding to CD80/CD86 and not to interfere with subsequent T cell priming. We conclude that Ad5/3, in combination with DC-activating adjuvants, represents a promising therapeutic tool for the in vivo transduction of mature DC, and may be less likely to induce unwanted side effects such as immune tolerance through the infection of non-professional antigen-presenting cells. PMID:19816192

  10. Genomic organization of the human NSP gene, prototype of a novel gene family encoding reticulons

    SciTech Connect

    Roebroek, A.J.M.; Ayoubi, T.A.Y.; Velde, H.J.K. van de; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Pauli, I.G.L.; Van De Ven, W.J.M.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, cDNA cloning and expression of three mRNA variants of the human NSP gene were described. This neuroendocrine-specific gene encodes three NSP protein isoforms with unique amino-terminal parts, but common carboxy-terminal parts. The proteins, with yet unknown function, are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore are named NSP reticulons. Potentially, these proteins are neuroendocrine markers of a novel category in human lung cancer diagnosis. Here, the genomic organization of this gene was studied by analysis of genomic clones isolated from lambda phage and YAC libraries. The NSP exons were found to be dispersed over a genomic region of about 275 kb. The present elucidation of the genomic organization of the NSP gene explains the generation of NSP mRNA variants encoding NSP protein isoforms. Multiple promoters rather than alternative splicing of internal exons seem to be involved in this diversity. Furthermore, comparison of NSP genomic and cDNA sequences with databank nucleotide sequences resulted in the discovery of other human members of this novel family of reticulons encoding genes. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Kenneth T.; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; White, Jason P.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Montague, P. Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson’s disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson’s disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  12. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kenneth T; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; White, Jason P; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul E M; Montague, P Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson's disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson's disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  13. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  14. Adenovirus-specific T-cell Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood and After IFN-γ Immunomagnetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chongsheng; Wang, Yingying; Cai, Huili; Laroye, Caroline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Clement, Laurence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Decot, Véronique; Reppel, Loïc; Bensoussan, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive antiviral cellular immunotherapy by infusion of virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is becoming an alternative treatment for viral infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The T memory stem cell (TSCM) subset was recently described as exhibiting self-renewal and multipotency properties which are required for sustained efficacy in vivo. We wondered if such a crucial subset for immunotherapy was present in VSTs. We identified, by flow cytometry, TSCM in adenovirus (ADV)-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection, and analyzed the distribution of the main T-cell subsets in VSTs: naive T cells (TN), TSCM, T central memory cells (TCM), T effector memory cell (TEM), and effector T cells (TEFF). In this study all of the different T-cell subsets were observed in the blood sample from healthy donor ADV-VSTs, both before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection. As the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system sorts mainly the most differentiated T-cell subsets, we observed that TEM was always the major T-cell subset of ADV-specific T cells after immunomagnetic isolation and especially after expansion in vitro. Comparing T-cell subpopulation profiles before and after in vitro expansion, we observed that in vitro cell culture with interleukin-2 resulted in a significant expansion of TN-like, TCM, TEM, and TEFF subsets in CD4IFN-γ T cells and of TCM and TEM subsets only in CD8IFN-γ T cells. We demonstrated the presence of all T-cell subsets in IFN-γ VSTs including the TSCM subpopulation, although this was weakly selected by the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system. PMID:26641259

  15. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  16. Re-emergent human adenovirus genome type 7d caused an acute respiratory disease outbreak in Southern China after a twenty-one year absence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suhui; Wan, Chengsong; Ke, Changwen; Seto, Jason; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Zou, Lirong; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zetao; Jing, Shuping; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Wu, Xianbo; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2014-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), among other illnesses. Of the ARD genotypes, HAdV-7 presents with more severe morbidity and higher mortality than the others. We report the isolation and identification of a genome type HAdV-7d (DG01_2011) from a recent outbreak in Southern China. Genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) comparisons with past pathogens indicate HAdV-7d has re-emerged in Southern China after an absence of twenty-one years. Recombination analysis reveals this genome differs from the 1950s-era prototype and vaccine strains by a lateral gene transfer, substituting the coding region for the L1 52/55 kDa DNA packaging protein from HAdV-16. DG01_2011 descends from both a strain circulating in Southwestern China (2010) and a strain from Shaanxi causing a fatality and outbreak (Northwestern China; 2009). Due to the higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with HAdV-7, the surveillance, identification, and characterization of these strains in population-dense China by REA and/or whole genome sequencing are strongly indicated. With these accurate identifications of specific HAdV types and an epidemiological database of regional HAdV pathogens, along with the HAdV genome stability noted across time and space, the development, availability, and deployment of appropriate vaccines are needed. PMID:25482188

  17. High-level production of replication-defective human immunodeficiency type 1 virus vector particles using helper-dependent adenovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yani; O’Boyle, Kaitlin; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Sutton, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based upon human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) are widely used in bench research applications and increasingly in clinical investigations, both to introduce novel genes but also to reduce expression of unwanted genes of the host and pathogen. At present, the vast majority of HIV-based vector supernatants are produced in 293T cells by cotransfection of up to five DNA plasmids, which is subject to variability and difficult to scale. Here we report the development of a HIV-based vector production system that utilizes helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd). All necessary HIV vector components were inserted into one or more HDAds, which were then amplified to very high titers of ~1013 vp/ml. These were then used to transduce 293-based cells to produce HIV-based vector supernatants, and resultant VSV G-pseudotyped lentiviral vector (LV) titers and total IU were 10- to 30-fold higher, compared to plasmid transfection. Optimization of HIV-based vector production depended upon maximizing expression of all HIV vector components from HDAd. Supernatants contained trace amounts of HDAd but were free of replication-competent lentivirus. This production method should be applicable to other retroviral vector systems. Scalable production of HIV-based vectors using this two-step procedure should facilitate their clinical advancement. PMID:26029715

  18. Improved real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of all 54 known types of human adenoviruses in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Bil-Lula, Iwona; De Franceschi, Nicola; Pawlik, Krzysztof; WoŸniak, Mieczysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Detection and quantification of adenoviruses (AdVs) causing life-threatening complications are important abilities in recognition of infection and management of immunocompromised patients. Due to the rapid increase in the number of known AdV types, most commercial tests for detection and identification of AdVs are outdated. Material/Methods We designed an improved, easier and faster real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) method for detection and quantification of 54 types of human AdVs. A wide validation effort was undertaken to ensure confidence in highly sensitive and specific detection of AdVs in compromised patients. The validation process included evaluation of the method’s suitability and reliability for use in routine diagnostics. Results Due to high sensitivity (9.2×102 copies/ml) and broad dynamic range (7 log) we are able to detect specific viral DNA in large amounts of cell-free body fluids. The new assay is characterized by high precision and low variation within and between individual virus tests (CV=0.036%, CV=1.29%), low bias error (4%) and no cross-reactivity with other pathogens. Conclusions The implementation of this new assay in clinical and laboratory practice provides a rapid, reliable and less laborious method for detection and monitoring of AdV replication in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, it offers the ability to distinguish between active and latent infection and assess treatment efficiency. PMID:22648243

  19. Re-emergent Human Adenovirus Genome Type 7d Caused an Acute Respiratory Disease Outbreak in Southern China After a Twenty-one Year Absence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Suhui; Wan, Chengsong; Ke, Changwen; Seto, Jason; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Zou, Lirong; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zetao; Jing, Shuping; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Wu, Xianbo; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2014-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), among other illnesses. Of the ARD genotypes, HAdV-7 presents with more severe morbidity and higher mortality than the others. We report the isolation and identification of a genome type HAdV-7d (DG01_2011) from a recent outbreak in Southern China. Genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) comparisons with past pathogens indicate HAdV-7d has re-emerged in Southern China after an absence of twenty-one years. Recombination analysis reveals this genome differs from the 1950s-era prototype and vaccine strains by a lateral gene transfer, substituting the coding region for the L1 52/55 kDa DNA packaging protein from HAdV-16. DG01_2011 descends from both a strain circulating in Southwestern China (2010) and a strain from Shaanxi causing a fatality and outbreak (Northwestern China; 2009). Due to the higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with HAdV-7, the surveillance, identification, and characterization of these strains in population-dense China by REA and/or whole genome sequencing are strongly indicated. With these accurate identifications of specific HAdV types and an epidemiological database of regional HAdV pathogens, along with the HAdV genome stability noted across time and space, the development, availability, and deployment of appropriate vaccines are needed. PMID:25482188

  20. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Laura A; Rhodes, Eric R; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Ryu, Jongseong; Popovici, Jonathan; Hoelle, Jill M; Sivaganesan, Mano; Hayes, Samuel L; Rodgers, Mark R; Ryu, Hodon

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate for human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a propagation method that utilizes a commercially available medium to produce UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores with a consistent UV sensitivity. It is further demonstrated that the endospores of B. pumilus strain (ATCC 27142), produced using this protocol (half strength Columbia broth, 5 days incubation, with 0.1mM MnSO4), display a UV dose-response that is similar to that of HAdV. Endospore stocks could be stored in ethanol for up to two months at 4 °C without a significant change in UV sensitivity. Synergistic endospore damage was observed by pre-heat treatment of water samples followed by UV irradiation. UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores are a potential surrogate of HAdV for UV treatment performance tests in water utilities which do not have in-house research virology laboratories. PMID:26825005

  1. Structural organization of the human gene (LMNB1) encoding nuclear lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Worman, H.J.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have determined the structural organization of the human gene (LMNB1) that encodes nuclear lamin B1, an intermediate filament protein of the nuclear envelope. The transcription unit spans more than 45 kb and the transcription start site is 348 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. Lamin B1 is encoded by 11 exons. Exon 1 codes for the amino-terminal head domain and the first portion of the central rod domain, exons 2 through 6 the central rod domain, and exons 7 through 11 the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of this intermediate filament protein. Intron positions are conserved in other lamin genes from frogs, mice, and humans but different in lamin genes from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the region encoding the central rod domain, intron positions are also similar to those in the gene for an invertebrate nonneuronal cytoplasmic intermediate filament protein and the genes for most vertebrate cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins except neurofilaments and nestin. 51 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Novelty of Human Cancer/Testis Antigen Encoding Genes in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dobrynin, Pavel; Matyunina, Ekaterina; Malov, S. V.; Kozlov, A. P.

    2013-01-01

    In order to be inherited in progeny generations, novel genes should originate in germ cells. Here, we suggest that the testes may play a special “catalyst” role in the birth and evolution of new genes. Cancer/testis antigen encoding genes (CT genes) are predominantly expressed both in testes and in a variety of tumors. By the criteria of evolutionary novelty, the CT genes are, indeed, novel genes. We performed homology searches for sequences similar to human CT in various animals and established that most of the CT genes are either found in humans only or are relatively recent in their origin. A majority of all human CT genes originated during or after the origin of Eutheria. These results suggest relatively recent origin of human CT genes and align with the hypothesis of the special role of the testes in the evolution of the gene families. PMID:23691492

  4. Genetically encoded impairment of neuronal KCC2 cotransporter function in human idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Merner, Nancy D; Friedel, Perrine; Silayeva, Liliya; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun; Shang, Yuze; Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Bourassa, Cynthia; Levert, Annie; Dion, Patrick A; Walcott, Brian; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Hodgkinson, Alan; Awadalla, Philip; Nikbakht, Hamid; Majewski, Jacek; Cossette, Patrick; Deeb, Tarek Z; Moss, Stephen J; Medina, Igor; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    The KCC2 cotransporter establishes the low neuronal Cl− levels required for GABAA and glycine (Gly) receptor-mediated inhibition, and KCC2 deficiency in model organisms results in network hyperexcitability. However, no mutations in KCC2 have been documented in human disease. Here, we report two non-synonymous functional variants in human KCC2, R952H and R1049C, exhibiting clear statistical association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). These variants reside in conserved residues in the KCC2 cytoplasmic C-terminus, exhibit significantly impaired Cl−-extrusion capacities resulting in less hyperpolarized Gly equilibrium potentials (EGly), and impair KCC2 stimulatory phosphorylation at serine 940, a key regulatory site. These data describe a novel KCC2 variant significantly associated with a human disease and suggest genetically encoded impairment of KCC2 functional regulation may be a risk factor for the development of human IGE. PMID:24928908

  5. Discovery of Human sORF-Encoded Polypeptides (SEPs) in Cell Lines and Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of nonannotated protein-coding human short open reading frames (sORFs) has been revealed through the direct detection of their sORF-encoded polypeptide (SEP) products. The discovery of novel SEPs increases the size of the genome and the proteome and provides insights into the molecular biology of mammalian cells, such as the prevalent usage of non-AUG start codons. Through modifications of the existing SEP-discovery workflow, we discover an additional 195 SEPs in K562 cells and extend this methodology to identify novel human SEPs in additional cell lines and human tissue for a final tally of 237 new SEPs. These results continue to expand the human genome and proteome and demonstrate that SEPs are a ubiquitous class of nonannotated polypeptides that require further investigation. PMID:24490786

  6. Cloning and Large-Scale Production of High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors Based on the Human Adenovirus Type 5.

    PubMed

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Zhang, Wenli; Schiwon, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Liu, Jing; Boehme, Philip; Leitner, Theo; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral coding sequences represent one of the most advanced gene delivery vectors due to their high packaging capacity (up to 35 kb), low immunogenicity and low toxicity. However, for many laboratories the use of HCAdV is hampered by the complicated procedure for vector genome construction and virus production. Here, a detailed protocol for efficient cloning and production of HCAdV based on the plasmid pAdFTC containing the HCAdV genome is described. The construction of HCAdV genomes is based on a cloning vector system utilizing homing endonucleases (I-CeuI and PI-SceI). Any gene of interest of up to 14 kb can be subcloned into the shuttle vector pHM5, which contains a multiple cloning site flanked by I-CeuI and PI-SceI. After I-CeuI and PI-SceI-mediated release of the transgene from the shuttle vector the transgene can be inserted into the HCAdV cloning vector pAdFTC. Because of the large size of the pAdFTC plasmid and the long recognition sites of the used enzymes associated with strong DNA binding, careful handling of the cloning fragments is needed. For virus production, the HCAdV genome is released by NotI digest and transfected into a HEK293 based producer cell line stably expressing Cre recombinase. To provide all adenoviral genes for adenovirus amplification, co-infection with a helper virus containing a packing signal flanked by loxP sites is required. Pre-amplification of the vector is performed in producer cells grown on surfaces and large-scale amplification of the vector is conducted in spinner flasks with producer cells grown in suspension. For virus purification, two ultracentrifugation steps based on cesium chloride gradients are performed followed by dialysis. Here tips, tricks and shortcuts developed over the past years working with this HCAdV vector system are presented. PMID:26863087

  7. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puntel, Mariana; Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M.; Farrokhi, Catherine; VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; and others

    2013-05-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ► High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ► HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ► We performed a dose escalation study at

  8. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. PMID:26880543

  9. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Bovine adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine overcomes exceptionally high levels of pre-existing immunity against human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Pandey, Aseem; Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Mittal, Suresh K

    2008-05-01

    Because of the high prevalence of adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans, it is believed that pre-existing Ad-neutralizing antibodies (vector immunity) may negatively impact the immune response to vaccine antigens when delivered by human Ad (HAd) vectors. In order to evaluate whether bovine Ad subtype 3 (BAd3), a non-HAd vector, can effectively elude high levels of pre-existing vector immunity, naïve and HAd serotype 5 (HAd)-primed mice were immunized with BAd-H5HA [BAd3 vector expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 influenza virus]. Even in the presence of very high levels of HAd-specific neutralizing antibody, no significant reductions in HA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were observed in HAd-primed mice immunized with BAd-H5HA. In naïve mice immunized with HAd-H5HA (HAd5 vector expressing H5N1 HA) and boosted with BAd-H5HA, the humoral responses elicited were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than with either HAd-H5HA or BAd-H5HA alone, while the CMI responses were comparable in the groups. This finding underlines the importance of a heterologous prime-boost approach for achieving an enhanced immune response. The immunization of naïve or HAd-primed mice with BAd-H5HA bestowed full protection from morbidity and mortality following a potentially lethal challenge with A/Hong Kong/483/97. These results demonstrate the importance of BAd vectors as an alternate or supplement to HAd vectors for influenza pandemic preparedness. PMID:18301400

  11. Factors Influencing Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Transfer to Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells: Comparison with Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, S.; Bartlett, J. S.; McCarty, D.; Xiao, X.; Samulski, R. J.; Boucher, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  12. Factors influencing adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells: comparison with adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, S; Bartlett, J S; McCarty, D; Xiao, X; Samulski, R J; Boucher, R C

    1998-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  13. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Features of Human Adenoviruses Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections in Hospitalized Children in Southern China, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changbing; Zhao, Mingqi; Deng, Li; Zhong, Jiayu; Zhang, Yingying; Ye, Jun; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Guan, Yongxin; Ma, Yi; Sun, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the major worldwide health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Human adenovirus (HAdV) is one of the most common pathogens associated with viral ARI, and thus calls for specific diagnosis and better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics. Methods Total 4,130 children with ARI requiring hospitalization from 2012 to 2013 were retrospectively studied. Throat swab specimens were collected from each patient. Fluorescence Quantitative PCR was performed to detect adenovirus as well as other common ARI-related pathogens. The seven HAdV hypervariable regions (HVRs) of the hexon gene from fifty-seven HAdVs-positive samples collected in the seasonal peaks were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of HVRs was also conducted to confirm the molecular types and genetic variation. In addition, epidemiological features and co-infection with other human respiratory pathogens were investigated and analyzed. Results Of 4,130 hospitalized pediatric patients tested, the positive rates of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP), and HAdV were 13.7%, 13.2%, and 12.0%, respectively. The HAdV positive patients accounted for 7.9%, 17.2%, 17.5% and 10.7% in age groups <1, 1–3, 3–6 and 6–14 years, respectively. Eighty-four HAdV positive children were co-infected with other respiratory pathogens (84/495, 17.0%). The most common co-infection pathogens with HAdV were MP (57.1%) and Human Bocavirus (HBoV) (16.7%). The majority of HAdV infected patients were totally recovered (96.9%, 480/495); However, four (0.8%) patients, who were previously healthy and at the age of 2 years or younger died of pneumonia. Seasonal peaks of HAdV infection occurred in the summer season of 2012 and 2013; the predominant HAdV type was HAdV-3 (70%), followed by HAdV-7 (28%). These epidemiological features were different from those in Northern China. The HAdV-55 was identified and reported for the

  15. Promoter for the human ferritin heavy chain-encoding gene (FERH): structural and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, M A; Giordano, M; D'Agostino, P; Santoro, C; Cimino, F; Costanzo, F

    1992-02-15

    We conducted a functional analysis of the promoter for the human ferritin heavy chain-encoding gene (pFERH) in HepG2 and HeLa cells. The activity of pFERH is equivalent in both cell types, despite their different ferritin (Fer) isotypes. Transfections of a series of 5'-deletion mutants indicate that pFERH activity is essentially dependent on two motifs. One of them, accounting for about 50% of the total transcriptional activity, is recognized by the RNA polymerase II transcription factor, Sp1, and the other by a low-affinity factor present in both the cell types analyzed. PMID:1541403

  16. Epistatic interaction of genetic depression risk variants in the human subgenual cingulate cortex during memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schott, B H; Assmann, A; Schmierer, P; Soch, J; Erk, S; Garbusow, M; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Barman, A; Wüstenberg, T; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Witt, S; Richter, S; Klein, M; Schütze, H; Mühleisen, T W; Cichon, S; Rietschel, M; Noethen, M M; Tost, H; Gundelfinger, E D; Düzel, E; Heinz, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Seidenbecher, C I; Walter, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have pointed to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the neuronal calcium channel CaV1.2 (CACNA1C; rs1006737) and the presynaptic active zone protein Piccolo (PCLO; rs2522833) as risk factors for affective disorders, particularly major depression. Previous neuroimaging studies of depression-related endophenotypes have highlighted the role of the subgenual cingulate cortex (CG25) in negative mood and depressive psychopathology. Here, we aimed to assess how recently associated PCLO and CACNA1C depression risk alleles jointly affect memory-related CG25 activity as an intermediate phenotype in clinically healthy humans. To investigate the combined effects of rs1006737 and rs2522833 on the CG25 response, we conducted three functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of episodic memory formation in three independent cohorts (N=79, 300, 113). An epistatic interaction of PCLO and CACNA1C risk alleles in CG25 during memory encoding was observed in all groups, with carriers of no risk allele and of both risk alleles showing higher CG25 activation during encoding when compared with carriers of only one risk allele. Moreover, PCLO risk allele carriers showed lower memory performance and reduced encoding-related hippocampal activation. In summary, our results point to region-specific epistatic effects of PCLO and CACNA1C risk variants in CG25, potentially related to episodic memory. Our data further suggest that genetic risk factors on the SNP level do not necessarily have additive effects but may show complex interactions. Such epistatic interactions might contribute to the ‘missing heritability' of complex phenotypes. PMID:24643163

  17. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  19. Elaboration of optical immunosensors based on the surface plasmon resonance for detecting specific antibodies and antigens of Epstein-Barr virus and human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, N V; Nosach, L M; Zagorodnya, S D; Povnitsa, O Y; Boltovets, P M; Baranova, G V; Golovan, A V

    2008-01-01

    The study of antigen-antibody interaction on the model of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and second type adenovirus (Ad2) based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was carried out. Kinetic and concentration dependences between virus antigens and specific antisera to them at different pH were determined. Experimental samples of biosensors for the detection by SPR method of virus (EBV and Ad2) antigens using monospecific antibodies, immobilized on the surface of gold, and also for detection of specific antibodies in the blood sera of patients with EBV or adenovirus infection were elaborated PMID:19351051

  20. Identification of Human Adenovirus in Respiratory Samples with Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel Fast V2 Assay and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Zampiero, Alberto; Fossali, Emilio; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the last version of the Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast assay for human Adenovirus (hAdv) detection with a specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which is considered the gold standard for hAdv detection, nasopharyngeal samples collected from 309 children (age range, four months to eight years) with respiratory tract infection were tested using the RVP Fast v2 assay (Luminex Molecular Diagnostics, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada) and a specific TaqMan qPCR to identify hAdv DNA. The RVP Fast v2 assay detected 30/61 (49.2%) hAdv infections that had been identified by real-time qPCR, demonstrating a significantly lower detection rate (p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the RVP Fast v2 assay in comparison to qPCR was lower in younger children (42.9% vs. 57.7%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.53); in samples with co-infections (40.0% vs. 56.7%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.52); and in samples with hAdv type C (45.9% vs. 57.1%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.60). Samples with lower viral loads were associated with a significantly lower sensitivity of the RVP Fast v2 assay (35.1% vs. 68.2%, p = 0.01; Cohen's kappa coefficients, 0.49). The RVP Fast v2 assay has important limitations for the detection of hAdv and cannot be used to evaluate whether hAdvs are the main etiologic agent responsible for an outbreak or when epidemiological studies are performed. PMID:26927078

  1. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIE; CHEN, KE-DA; GAO, MENG; CHEN, GANG; JIN, SU-FENG; ZHUANG, FANG-CHENG; WU, XIAO-HONG; JIANG, YUN-SHUI; LI, JIAN-BO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×109 IU/ml and 3.0×109 IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 109 IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ2MSB=20.00 and χ2WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development. PMID:25780403

  2. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness. PMID:27352268

  3. The complete DNA sequence and genomic organization of the avian adenovirus CELO.

    PubMed Central

    Chiocca, S; Kurzbauer, R; Schaffner, G; Baker, A; Mautner, V; Cotten, M

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the avian adenovirus chicken embryo lethal orphan (CELO) virus (FAV-1) is reported here. The genome was found to be 43,804 bp in length, approximately 8 kb longer than those of the human subgenus C adenoviruses (Ad2 and Ad5). This length is supported by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of genomes isolated from several related FAV-1 isolates (Indiana C and OTE). The genes for major viral structural proteins (Illa, penton base, hexon, pVI, and pVIII), as well as the 52,000-molecular-weight (52K) and 100K proteins and the early-region 2 genes and IVa2, are present in the expected locations in the genome. CELO virus encodes two fiber proteins and a different set of the DNA-packaging core proteins, which may be important in condensing the longer CELO virus genome. No pV or pIX genes are present. Most surprisingly, CELO virus possesses no identifiable E1, E3, and E4 regions. There is 5 kb at the left end of the CELO virus genome and 15 kb at the right end with no homology to Ad2. The sequences are rich in open reading frames, and it is likely that these encode functions that replace the missing El, E3, and E4 functions. PMID:8627769

  4. Interaction between the human cytomegalovirus‑encoded UL142 and cellular Snapin proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Qi, Ying; Ma, Yanping; He, Rong; Sun, Zhengrong; Huang, Yujing; Ji, Yaohua; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illness in immunocompromised and immunodeficient individuals. As a novel HCMV‑encoded major histocompatibility complex class I‑related molecule, the UL142‑encoded protein (pUL142) is capable of suppressing natural killer (NK) cell recognition in the course of infection. However, no host factors that directly interact with HCMV pUL142 have been reported so far. In order to understand the interactions between HCMV pUL142 and host proteins, the current study used yeast two‑hybrid screening, a GST pull‑down assay and an immunofluorescence assay. A host protein, the SNARE‑associated protein Snapin, was identified to directly interact and colocalize with HCMV pUL142 in transfected human embryonic kidney‑293 cells. Snapin is abundantly expressed in the majority of cells and mediates the release of neurotransmitters through vesicular transport in the nervous system and vesicle fusion in non‑neuronal cells. It is hypothesized that HCMV pUL142 may have an impact on the neurotransmitter release process and viral dissemination via interaction with Snapin. PMID:25369979

  5. Yeast RAD14 and human xeroderma pigmentosum group A DNA-repair genes encode homologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Bankmann, M; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a human autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight and high incidence of skin cancers. XP cells are defective in the incision step of excision repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Cell fusion studies have defined seven XP complementation groups, XP-A to XP-G. Similar genetic complexity of excision repair is observed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in any one of five yeast genes, RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4, and RAD10, cause a total defect in incision and an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Here we report the characterization of the yeast RAD14 gene. The available rad14 point mutant is only moderately ultraviolet-sensitive, and it performs a substantial amount of incision of damaged DNA. Our studies with the rad14 deletion (delta) mutation indicate an absolute requirement of RAD14 in incision. RAD14 encodes a highly hydrophilic protein of 247 amino acids containing zinc-finger motifs, and it is similar to the protein encoded by the human XPAC gene that complements XP group A cell lines. PMID:1741034

  6. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  7. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J.; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans. PMID:25071182

  8. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; García Pérez, José Luis; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  9. Role of Broca's area in encoding sequential human actions: a virtual lesion study.

    PubMed

    Clerget, Emeline; Winderickx, Aline; Fadiga, Luciano; Olivier, Etienne

    2009-10-28

    The exact contribution of Broca's area to motor cognition is still controversial. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (5 Hz, five pulses) to interfere transiently with the function of left BA44 in 13 healthy individuals; the task consisted of reordering human actions or nonbiological events based on three pictures presented on a computer screen and extracted from a video showing the entire sequence beforehand. We found that a virtual lesion of left BA44 impairs individual performance only for biological actions, and more specifically for object-oriented syntactic actions. Our finding provides evidence that Broca's area plays a crucial role in encoding complex human movements, a process which may be crucial for understanding and/or programming actions. PMID:19809371

  10. Human antisera detect a Plasmodium falciparum genomic clone encoding a nonapeptide repeat.

    PubMed

    Koenen, M; Scherf, A; Mercereau, O; Langsley, G; Sibilli, L; Dubois, P; Pereira da Silva, L; Müller-Hill, B

    Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria infections in its human host. Its wide distribution in tropical countries is a major world health problem. Before a vaccine can be produced, the identification and characterization of parasite antigens is necessary. This can be achieved by the cloning and subsequent analysis of genes coding for parasite antigens. Recently established cDNA banks allow the expression of cDNA derived from the simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum in Escherichia coli. Recombinants encoding parasite antigens have been identified by immunodetection in both banks. Two of them contain repetitive units of 11 (ref. 7) or 12 (ref. 5) amino acids. We describe here the construction of an expression bank made directly from randomly generated fragments of P. falciparum genomic DNA. We detect several clones which react strongly with human African immune sera. One clone expresses an antigenic determinant composed of occasionally degenerated repeats of a peptide nonamer. PMID:6090935

  11. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus. PMID:26189043

  12. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  13. Detection of Regulatory SNPs in Human Genome Using ChIP-seq ENCODE Data

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Marina Yu.; Shilov, Alexander G.; Kashina, Elena V.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2013-01-01

    A vast amount of SNPs derived from genome-wide association studies are represented by non-coding ones, therefore exacerbating the need for effective identification of regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) among them. However, this task remains challenging since the regulatory part of the human genome is annotated much poorly as opposed to coding regions. Here we describe an approach aggregating the whole set of ENCODE ChIP-seq data in order to search for rSNPs, and provide the experimental evidence of its efficiency. Its algorithm is based on the assumption that the enrichment of a genomic region with transcription factor binding loci (ChIP-seq peaks) indicates its regulatory function, and thereby SNPs located in this region are more likely to influence transcription regulation. To ensure that the approach preferably selects functionally meaningful SNPs, we performed enrichment analysis of several human SNP datasets associated with phenotypic manifestations. It was shown that all samples are significantly enriched with SNPs falling into the regions of multiple ChIP-seq peaks as compared with the randomly selected SNPs. For experimental verification, 40 SNPs falling into overlapping regions of at least 7 TF binding loci were selected from OMIM. The effect of SNPs on the binding of the DNA fragments containing them to the nuclear proteins from four human cell lines (HepG2, HeLaS3, HCT-116, and K562) has been tested by EMSA. A radical change in the binding pattern has been observed for 29 SNPs, besides, 6 more SNPs also demonstrated less pronounced changes. Taken together, the results demonstrate the effective way to search for potential rSNPs with the aid of ChIP-seq data provided by ENCODE project. PMID:24205329

  14. Adenovirus infection of the large bowel in HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, A.; Francis, N.; Moss, J.; Blanshard, C.; Gazzard, B.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the microscopic appearance of adenovirus infection in the large bowel of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with diarrhoea. METHODS: Large bowel biopsy specimens from 10 HIV positive patients, eight of whom were also infected with other gastrointestinal pathogens, with diarrhoea were examined, together with six small bowel biopsy specimens from the same group of patients. Eight of the patients had AIDS. The biopsy specimens were examined by light microscopy performed on haematoxylin and eosin stained and immunoperoxidase preparations, the latter using a commercially available antibody (Serotec MCA 489). Confirmation was obtained with electron microscopy. RESULTS: The morphological appearance of cells infected with adenovirus showed characteristic nuclear and cellular changes, although the inflammatory reaction was non-specific. Immunoperoxidase staining for adenovirus was sensitive and specific, and the presence of viral inclusions consistent with adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The light microscopic features of adenovirus infection are distinctive and immunocytochemistry with a commercially available antibody is a sensitive and specific means of confirming the diagnosis. Further studies of the role of adenovirus in causing diarrhoea in these patients are indicated. Images PMID:1401177

  15. Assessment of the risks for human health of adenoviruses, hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams in the Eastern Cape.

    PubMed

    Chigor, Vincent N; Sibanda, Timothy; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-06-01

    Buffalo River is an important water resource in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The potential risks of infection constituted by exposure to human enteric viruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams along its course were assessed using mean values and static quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The daily risks of infection determined by the exponential model [for human adenovirus (HAdV) and enterovirus (EnV)] and the beta-Poisson model (for hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotavirus (RoV)) varied with sites and exposure scenario. The estimated daily risks of infection values at the sites where the respective viruses were detected, ranged from 7.31 × 10(-3) to 1 (for HAdV), 4.23 × 10(-2) to 6.54 × 10(-1) (RoV), 2.32 × 10(-4) to 1.73 × 10(-1) (HAV) and 1.32 × 10(-4) to 5.70 × 10(-2) (EnV). The yearly risks of infection in individuals exposed to the river/dam water via drinking, recreational, domestic or irrigational activities were unacceptably high, exceeding the acceptable risk of 0.01% (10(-4) infection/person/year), and the guideline value used as by several nations for drinking water. The risks of illness and death from infection ranged from 6.58 × 10(-5) to 5.0 × 10(-1) and 6.58 × 10(-9) to 5.0 × 10(-5), respectively. The threats here are heightened by the high mortality rates for HAV, and its endemicity in South Africa. Therefore, we conclude that the Buffalo River and its source water dams are a public health hazard. The QMRA presented here is the first of its kinds in the Eastern Cape Province and provides the building block for a quantitatively oriented local guideline for water quality management in the Province. PMID:24676673

  16. Segregated encoding of reward-identity and stimulus-reward associations in human orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Klein-Flügge, Miriam Cornelia; Barron, Helen Catharine; Brodersen, Kay Henning; Dolan, Raymond J; Behrens, Timothy Edward John

    2013-02-13

    A dominant focus in studies of learning and decision-making is the neural coding of scalar reward value. This emphasis ignores the fact that choices are strongly shaped by a rich representation of potential rewards. Here, using fMRI adaptation, we demonstrate that responses in the human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) encode a representation of the specific type of food reward predicted by a visual cue. By controlling for value across rewards and by linking each reward with two distinct stimuli, we could test for representations of reward-identity that were independent of associative information. Our results show reward-identity representations in a medial-caudal region of OFC, independent of the associated predictive stimulus. This contrasts with a more rostro-lateral OFC region encoding reward-identity representations tied to the predicate stimulus. This demonstration of adaptation in OFC to reward specific representations opens an avenue for investigation of more complex decision mechanisms that are not immediately accessible in standard analyses, which focus on correlates of average activity. PMID:23407973

  17. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.; Norman, D.K.; Beckmann, R.J.; Long, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is approx. = 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA revealed a major mRNA approx. = 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of approx. = 3.1 and approx. = 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid leader peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each approx. = 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function.

  18. Human anterior prefrontal cortex encodes the 'what' and 'when' of future intentions.

    PubMed

    Momennejad, Ida; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-05-15

    On a daily basis we form numerous intentions to perform specific actions. However, we often have to delay the execution of intended actions while engaging in other demanding activities. Previous research has shown that patterns of activity in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) can reveal our current intentions. However, two fundamental questions have remained unresolved: (a) how does the PFC encode information about future tasks while we are busy engaging in other activities, and (b) how does the PFC enable us to commence a stored task at the intended time? Here we investigate how the brain stores and retrieves future intentions during occupied delays, i.e. while a person is busy performing a different task. For this purpose, we conducted a neuroimaging study with a time-based prospective memory paradigm. Using multivariate pattern classification and fMRI we show that during an occupied delay, activity patterns in the anterior PFC encode the content of 'what' subjects intend to do next, and 'when' they intend to do it. Importantly, distinct anterior PFC regions store the 'what' and 'when' components of future intentions during occupied maintenance and self-initiated retrieval. These results show a role for anterior PFC activity patterns in storing future action plans and ensuring their timely retrieval. PMID:22418393

  19. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13420.001 PMID:26880543

  20. Four phosphoproteins with common amino termini are encoded by human cytomegalovirus AD169

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Staprans, S.I.; Spector, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the authors identify the proteins encoded by the 2.2-kilobase class of early transcripts arising from a region of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus genome (map units 0.682 to 0.713) which contains cell-related sequences. These transcripts, encoded by adjacent EcoRI fragments R and d, have a complex spliced structure with 5' and 3' coterminal ends. Antiserum directed against a synthetic 11-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the predicted amino terminus of the proteins was generated and found to immunoprecipitate four-infected-cell proteins of 84, 50, 43, and 34 kilodaltons. These proteins were phosphorylated and were associated predominantly with the nuclei of infected cells. The 43-kilodalton protein was the most abundant of the four proteins, and its level of expression remained relatively constant throughout the infection. Expression of the other proteins increased as the infection progressed. Pulse-chase analysis failed to show a precursor-product relationship between any of the proteins. A comparison of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled tryptic peptide maps of the four proteins from infected cells and an in vitro-generated polypeptide derived from the putative first exon showed that all four infected-cell proteins were of viral origin and contained a common amino-terminal region.

  1. The relationship between transcript expression levels of nuclear encoded (TFAM, NRF1) and mitochondrial encoded (MT-CO1) genes in single human oocytes during oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Novin, M Ghaffari; Allahveisi, A; Noruzinia, M; Farhadifar, F; Yousefian, E; Fard, A Dehghani; Salimi, M

    2015-01-01

    In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII) stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1) and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21–35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial-related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes (p = 0.62). On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI) and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002). A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation. PMID:26929904

  2. PiggyBac transposon vectors: the tools of the human gene encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuang; Jiang, Enze; Chen, Shuangshuang; Gu, Yuan; Shangguan, Anna Junjie; Lv, Tangfeng

    2016-01-01

    A transposon is a DNA segment, which is able to change its relative position within the entire genome of a cell. The piggyBac (PB) transposon is a movable genetic element that efficiently transposes between vectors and chromosomes through a “cut-and-paste” mechanism. During transposition, the PB transposase recognizes transposon-specific inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequences located on both ends of the transposon vector and eight efficiently moves the contents from its original positions and efficiently integrates them into TTAA chromosomal sites. PB has drawn much attention because of its transposition efficiency, safety and stability. Due to its priorities, PB can be used as a new genetic vehicle, a new tool for oncogene screening and a new method for gene therapy. PB has created a new outlook for human gene encoding. PMID:26958506

  3. Human chromosome 16 encodes a factor involved in induction of class II major histocompatibility antigens by interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Bono, M R; Alcaïde-Loridan, C; Couillin, P; Letouzé, B; Grisard, M C; Jouin, H; Fellous, M

    1991-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induces expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigens in immunocompetent cells. To gain further insight into the mechanism of this induction, we prepared somatic cell hybrids between different human cell lines and a murine cell line, RAG, that does not express murine class II MHC antigens before or after treatment with murine IFN-gamma. Some of the resulting cell hybrids express murine class II MHC antigens when treated with murine IFN-gamma. This inducible phenotype is correlated with the presence of human chromosome 16. It has been shown previously that the induction of class I MHC antigens by human IFN-gamma in human-rodent hybrids requires the presence of species-specific factors encoded by chromosome 6, which bears the gene for the human IFN-gamma receptor, and chromosome 21, whose product(s) is necessary for the transduction of human IFN-gamma signals. In this report, we show that the induction of murine class II MHC antigens by human IFN-gamma in the human-RAG cell hybrids requires, likewise, the presence of human chromosomes 6 and 21, in addition to chromosome 16. In some of these hybrids, when all three of these human chromosomes were present, induction of cell-surface HLA-DR antigens was also observed. Our results demonstrate that human chromosome 16 encodes a non-species-specific factor involved in the induction of class II MHC antigens by IFN-gamma. Images PMID:1906174

  4. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  5. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines. PMID:25479556

  6. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramunas, John; Yakubov, Eduard; Brady, Jennifer J.; Corbel, Stéphane Y.; Holbrook, Colin; Brandt, Moritz; Stein, Jonathan; Santiago, Juan G.; Cooke, John P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere extension has been proposed as a means to improve cell culture and tissue engineering and to treat disease. However, telomere extension by nonviral, nonintegrating methods remains inefficient. Here we report that delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT to human fibroblasts and myoblasts increases telomerase activity transiently (24–48 h) and rapidly extends telomeres, after which telomeres resume shortening. Three successive transfections over a 4 d period extended telomeres up to 0.9 kb in a cell type-specific manner in fibroblasts and myoblasts and conferred an additional 28 ± 1.5 and 3.4 ± 0.4 population doublings (PDs), respectively. Proliferative capacity increased in a dose-dependent manner. The second and third transfections had less effect on proliferative capacity than the first, revealing a refractory period. However, the refractory period was transient as a later fourth transfection increased fibroblast proliferative capacity by an additional 15.2 ± 1.1 PDs, similar to the first transfection. Overall, these treatments led to an increase in absolute cell number of more than 1012-fold. Notably, unlike immortalized cells, all treated cell populations eventually stopped increasing in number and expressed senescence markers to the same extent as untreated cells. This rapid method of extending telomeres and increasing cell proliferative capacity without risk of insertional mutagenesis should have broad utility in disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.—Ramunas, J., Yakubov, E., Brady, J. J., Corbel, S. Y., Holbrook, C., Brandt, M., Stein, J., Santiago, J. G., Cooke, J. P., Blau, H. M. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells. PMID:25614443

  7. Adenovirus type 12 E1A protein expressed in Escherichia coli is functional upon transfer by microinjection or protoplast fusion into mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krippl, B; Andrisani, O; Jones, N; Westphal, H; Rosenberg, M; Ferguson, B

    1986-01-01

    We efficiently expressed, in Escherichia coli, and purified the protein product encoded by the human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S mRNA. The functional properties of the E1A protein were analyzed by introducing the protein by microinjection or protoplast fusion into living mammalian cells. We showed that the E. coli-expressed E1A protein induces gene expression of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1A deletion mutant Ad5dl312. The purified E1A protein rapidly and quantitatively localized to the cell nucleus after microinjection into the cytoplasm. In addition, we raised high-titered monospecific antibodies to the purified Ad12 E1A protein. Using deleted forms of an adenovirus type 2 and Ad5 hybrid (Ad2/5) E1A protein, we showed that all of the epitopes conserved between Ad2/5 E1A and Ad12 E1A protein that are recognized by the Ad12 E1A-specific antiserum map to within the first exon-encoded amino-terminal half of the protein. Images PMID:2942704

  8. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Phosphoproteome of Human Glioblastoma Initiating Cells Reveals Novel Signaling Regulators Encoded by the Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Ao-Kondo, Hiroko; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Although various studies have been performed so far, there are not effective treatments for patients with glioblastoma. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to systematically elucidate the aberrant signaling machinery activated in this malignant brain tumor, we investigated phosphoproteome dynamics of glioblastoma initiating cells using high-resolution nanoflow LC-MS/MS system in combination with SILAC technology. Through phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide beads, a total of 6,073 phosphopeptides from 2,282 phosphorylated proteins were identified based on the two peptide fragmentation methodologies of collision induced dissociation and higher-energy C-trap dissociation. The SILAC-based quantification described 516 up-regulated and 275 down-regulated phosphorylation sites upon epidermal growth factor stimulation, including the comprehensive status of the phosphorylation sites on stem cell markers such as nestin. Very intriguingly, our in-depth phosphoproteome analysis led to identification of novel phosphorylated molecules encoded by the undefined sequence regions of the human transcripts, one of which was regulated upon external stimulation in human glioblastoma initiating cells. Conclusions/Significance Our result unveils an expanded diversity of the regulatory phosphoproteome defined by the human transcriptome. PMID:22912867

  10. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, M; Chen, C S; Yoshida, A

    1991-01-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. We isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5' region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role. Images PMID:1881901

  11. Explicit Encoding of Multimodal Percepts by Single Neurons in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Summary Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol’s famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the “ventral pathway,” via both single-cell recordings in monkeys [1, 2] and functional imaging in humans [3, 4]. Interestingly, in humans, the same “concept” of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices [5, 6] and visual word forms [7, 8]. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities. PMID:19631538

  12. Explicit encoding of multimodal percepts by single neurons in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-08-11

    Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol's famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the "ventral pathway," via both single-cell recordings in monkeys and functional imaging in humans. Interestingly, in humans, the same "concept" of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices and visual word forms. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities. PMID:19631538

  13. Cell entry and trafficking of human adenovirus bound to blood factor X is determined by the fiber serotype and not hexon:heparan sulfate interaction.

    PubMed

    Corjon, Stéphanie; Gonzalez, Gaëlle; Henning, Petra; Grichine, Alexei; Lindholm, Leif; Boulanger, Pierre; Fender, Pascal; Hong, Saw-See

    2011-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5)-based vectors administered intravenously accumulate in the liver as the result of their direct binding to blood coagulation factor X (FX) and subsequent interaction of the FX-HAdV5 complex with heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) at the surface of liver cells. Intriguingly, the serotype 35 fiber-pseudotyped vector HAdV5F35 has liver transduction efficiencies 4-logs lower than HAdV5, even though both vectors carry the same hexon capsomeres. In order to reconcile this apparent paradox, we investigated the possible role of other viral capsid proteins on the FX/HSPG-mediated cellular uptake of HAdV5-based vectors. Using CAR- and CD46-negative CHO cells varying in HSPG expression, we confirmed that FX bound to serotype 5 hexon protein and to HAdV5 and HAdV5F35 virions via its Gla-domain, and enhanced the binding of both vectors to surface-immobilized hypersulfated heparin and cellular HSPG. Using penton mutants, we found that the positive effect of FX on HAdV5 binding to HSPG and cell transduction did not depend on the penton base RGD and fiber shaft KKTK motifs. However, we found that FX had no enhancing effect on the HAdV5F35-mediated cell transduction, but a negative effect which did not involve the cell attachment or endocytic step, but the intracellular trafficking and nuclear import of the FX-HAdV5F35 complex. By cellular imaging, HAdV5F35 particles were observed to accumulate in the late endosomal compartment, and were released in significant amounts into the extracellular medium via exocytosis. We showed that the stability of serotype 5 hexon:FX interaction was higher at low pH compared to neutral pH, which could account for the retention of FX-HAdV5F35 complexes in the late endosomes. Our results suggested that, despite the high affinity interaction of hexon capsomeres to FX and cell surface HSPG, the adenoviral fiber acted as the dominant determinant of the internalization and trafficking pathway of HAdV5-based vectors. PMID

  14. Cell Entry and Trafficking of Human Adenovirus Bound to Blood Factor X Is Determined by the Fiber Serotype and Not Hexon:Heparan Sulfate Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Petra; Grichine, Alexei; Lindholm, Leif; Boulanger, Pierre; Fender, Pascal; Hong, Saw-See

    2011-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5)-based vectors administered intravenously accumulate in the liver as the result of their direct binding to blood coagulation factor X (FX) and subsequent interaction of the FX-HAdV5 complex with heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) at the surface of liver cells. Intriguingly, the serotype 35 fiber-pseudotyped vector HAdV5F35 has liver transduction efficiencies 4-logs lower than HAdV5, even though both vectors carry the same hexon capsomeres. In order to reconcile this apparent paradox, we investigated the possible role of other viral capsid proteins on the FX/HSPG-mediated cellular uptake of HAdV5-based vectors. Using CAR- and CD46-negative CHO cells varying in HSPG expression, we confirmed that FX bound to serotype 5 hexon protein and to HAdV5 and HAdV5F35 virions via its Gla-domain, and enhanced the binding of both vectors to surface-immobilized hypersulfated heparin and cellular HSPG. Using penton mutants, we found that the positive effect of FX on HAdV5 binding to HSPG and cell transduction did not depend on the penton base RGD and fiber shaft KKTK motifs. However, we found that FX had no enhancing effect on the HAdV5F35-mediated cell transduction, but a negative effect which did not involve the cell attachment or endocytic step, but the intracellular trafficking and nuclear import of the FX-HAdV5F35 complex. By cellular imaging, HAdV5F35 particles were observed to accumulate in the late endosomal compartment, and were released in significant amounts into the extracellular medium via exocytosis. We showed that the stability of serotype 5 hexon∶FX interaction was higher at low pH compared to neutral pH, which could account for the retention of FX-HAdV5F35 complexes in the late endosomes. Our results suggested that, despite the high affinity interaction of hexon capsomeres to FX and cell surface HSPG, the adenoviral fiber acted as the dominant determinant of the internalization and trafficking pathway of HAdV5-based vectors

  15. Transfection of Human Keratinocytes with Nucleoside-Modified mRNA Encoding CPD-Photolyase to Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Boros, Gábor; Karikó, Katalin; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Miko, Edit; Emri, Eszter; Hegedűs, Csaba; Emri, Gabriella; Remenyik, Éva

    2016-01-01

    In vitro-synthesized mRNA containing nucleoside modifications has great therapeutical potential to transiently express proteins with physiological importance. One such protein is photolyase which rapidly removes UV-induced DNA damages, but this enzyme is absent in humans. Here, we apply a novel mRNA-based platform to achieve functional nonhuman photolyase production in cultured human keratinocytes. Transfection of nucleoside-modified mRNA encoding photolyase leads to accelerated repair of DNA photolesions in human keratinocytes. PMID:27236802

  16. Immune response to recombinant adenovirus in humans: capsid components from viral input are targets for vector-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Molinier-Frenkel, V; Gahery-Segard, H; Mehtali, M; Le Boulaire, C; Ribault, S; Boulanger, P; Tursz, T; Guillet, J G; Farace, F

    2000-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 10(9) PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218-2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8(+) CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  17. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8+ CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  18. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  19. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  20. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  1. Novel human growth hormone like protein HGH-V encoded in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Seeburg, P.H.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes the human growth hormone protein, HGH-V, having the amino acid sequence: phe pro thr ile pro leu ser arg leu phe asp asn ala met leu arg ala arg arg leu tyr gln leu ala tyr asp thr tyr gln glu phe glu glu ala tyr ile leu lys glu gln lys tyr ser phe leu gln asn pro gln thr ser leu cys phe ser glu ser ile pro thr pro ser asn arg val lys thr gln gln lys ser asn leu glu leu leu arg ile ser leu leu leu ile gln ser trp leu glu pro val gln leu leu arg ser val phe ala asn ser leu val tyr gly ala ser asp ser asn val tyr arg his leu lys asp leu glu glu gly ile gln thr leu met trp arg leu glu asp gly ser pro arg thr gly gln ile phe asn-glycosylation site gln ser tyr ser lys phe asp thr lys ser his asn asp asp ala leu leu lys asn tyr gly leu leu tyr cys Phe arg lys asp met asp lys val glu thr phe leu arg ile val gln cys arg ser val glu gly ser cys gly phe.

  2. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene (BDKRB2) encoding human bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Xing Ma; Dan-Zhao Wang; Limei Chen

    1994-09-15

    The bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor (BDKRB2) has high affinity for the intact kinins, which mediate a wide spectrum of biological effects, including pain, inflammation, vasodilation, and smooth muscle contraction and relaxation. In the present study, the authors have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding human bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor from a human genomic library. The B{sub 2} receptor gene contains three exons separated by two introns. The first and second exons are noncoding, while the third exon contains the full-length coding region, which encodes a protein of 364 amino acids forming 7 transmembrane domains. The human B{sub 2} gene shares high sequence identity with rat and mouse B{sub 2} receptor genes and significant similarity with the gene encoding the angiotensin II type I receptor in the nucleotide sequence and exon-intron arrangement. In the 5` flanking region, a consensus TATA box and several putative transcription factor-binding sites have been identified. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that the B{sub 2} receptor is encoded by a single-copy gene that was localized to chromosome 14q32 by in situ hybridization. In a Southern blot analysis following reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction, the human B{sub 2} receptor was found to be expressed in most human tissues. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Perforin and Gamma Interferon Expression Are Required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Protective Immunity against a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, Elicited by Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Haolla, Filipe A.; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8+ T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-γ or IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-γ in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-γ-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-γ in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  4. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  5. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  6. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  7. A low-frequency oscillatory neural signal in humans encodes a developing decision variable.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, Jan; Snyder, Lawrence H; Brunton, Bingni W; Brody, Carlos D; Schalk, Gerwin

    2013-12-01

    We often make decisions based on sensory evidence that is accumulated over a period of time. How the evidence for such decisions is represented in the brain and how such a neural representation is used to guide a subsequent action are questions of considerable interest to decision sciences. The neural correlates of developing perceptual decisions have been thoroughly investigated in the oculomotor system of macaques who communicated their decisions using an eye movement. It has been found that the evidence informing a decision to make an eye movement is in part accumulated within the same oculomotor circuits that signal the upcoming eye movement. Recent evidence suggests that the somatomotor system may exhibit an analogous property for choices made using a hand movement. To investigate this possibility, we engaged humans in a decision task in which they integrated discrete quanta of sensory information over a period of time and signaled their decision using a hand movement or an eye movement. The discrete form of the sensory evidence allowed us to infer the decision variable on which subjects base their decision on each trial and to assess the neural processes related to each quantum of the incoming decision evidence. We found that a low-frequency electrophysiological signal recorded over centroparietal regions strongly encodes the decision variable inferred in this task, and that it does so specifically for hand movement choices. The signal ramps up with a rate that is proportional to the decision variable, remains graded by the decision variable throughout the delay period, reaches a common peak shortly before a hand movement, and falls off shortly after the hand movement. Furthermore, the signal encodes the polarity of each evidence quantum, with a short latency, and retains the response level over time. Thus, this neural signal shows properties of evidence accumulation. These findings suggest that the decision-related effects observed in the oculomotor system

  8. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  9. Studies on the expression and processing of human proinsulin derivatives encoded by different DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Farheen; Gardner, Qurra-tul Ann Afza; Zain, Hina; Nadeem, Muhammad Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Rashid, Naeem; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human proinsulin, containing Escherichia coli preferred codons, with an additional N-terminal methionine, was used for the expression, of M-proinsulin and construction of nine derivatives. No improvement in expression was noted, relative to that of M-proinsulin, when the 5'- of the gene was appended to codons for seven amino acids of a well expressed E. coli protein (threonine dehydrogenase), or the constructs contained multiple copies of the proinsulin gene. That in the latter constructs only the gene adjacent to the prometer sequence is expressed, was shown by a construct containing a proinsulin gene followed by that for interferon α-2b. With the latter construct, the proinsulin was, predominantly, expressed. The availability of data on the constructs prompted, subjecting these to analysis by two models designed to predict the expression of proteins from the sequences, of putative mRNA, around the start of translation but no significant relationship was noted. In all cases the proteins were expressed as inclusion bodies, which were refolded to give products of desired masses and successfully converted into insulin derivatives. Of all the constructs containing a trypsin sensitive site before phenylalanine (F), the N-terminal sequence, MKR↓F, was most efficiently processed, by a cocktail of trypsin and buffalo carboxypeptidase B, to give insulin with the removal of the N-terminus linker as well as the C-peptide in a single step, without cleaving the trypsin sensitive K(29)T(30) peptide bond. PMID:23872484

  10. Human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 may act as a tumor promoter in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhen-Zhai; Xu, Jian-Gang; Zhou, Yu-Hui; Zheng, Ji-Hang; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Zheng, Shu-Zhi; Ye, Meng-Si; He, Yun; Liu, Chang-Bao; Xue, Zhan-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 gene function in colorectal cancer (CRC) pathogenesis. METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine US28 expression in 103 CRC patient samples and 98 corresponding adjacent noncancerous samples. Patient data were compared by age, sex, tumor location, histological grade, Dukes’ stage, and overall mean survival time. In addition, the US28 gene was transiently transfected into the CRC LOVO cell line, and cell proliferation was assessed using a cell counting kit-8 assay. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and a cell invasion transwell assay were also carried out. RESULTS: US28 levels were clearly higher in CRC tissues (38.8%) than in adjacent noncancerous samples (7.1%) (P = 0.000). Interestingly, elevated US28 amounts in CRC tissues were significantly associated with histological grade, metastasis, Dukes’ stage, and overall survival (all P < 0.05); meanwhile, US28 expression was not significantly correlated with age, sex or tumor location. In addition, multivariate Cox regression data revealed US28 level as an independent CRC prognostic marker (P = 0.000). LOVO cells successfully transfected with the US28 gene exhibited higher viability, greater chemotherapy resistance, accelerated cell cycle progression, and increased invasion ability. CONCLUSION: US28 expression is predictive of poor prognosis and may promote CRC. PMID:26973417

  11. Genetic mapping of a major site of phosphorylation in adenovirus type 2 E1A proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamotot, A.S.; Ponticelli, A.; Berk, A.J.; Gaynor, R.B.

    1986-07-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) encodes two acidic phosphoproteins which are required for transactivation of viral transcription, efficient viral DNA replication in phase G/sub 0/-arrested human cells, and oncogenic transformation of rodent cells. Biochemical analysis of in vivo /sup 32/P-labeled adenovirus type 2 E1A proteins purified with monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that these proteins were phosphorylated at multiple serine residues. Two-dimensional phosphotryptic peptide maps of wild-type and mutant E1A proteins were used to locate a major site of E1A protein phosphorylation at serine-219 of the large E1A protein. Although this serine fell within a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases, experiments with mutant CHO cells defective in these enzymes indicated that it was not. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute an alanine for serine-219. This mutation prevented phosphorylation at this site. Nonetheless, the mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type for early gene transactivation, replication on G/sub 0/-arrested WI-38 cells, and transformation of cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells.

  12. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. Methodology/Principal Findings As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4). This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers. PMID:23383334

  13. Specific binding of the adenovirus terminal protein precursor-DNA polymerase complex to the origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Rijnders, A W; van Bergen, B G; van der Vliet, P C; Sussenbach, J S

    1983-01-01

    Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication is dependent on a complex of the precursor of the terminal protein and the adenovirus-coded DNA polymerase (pTP-pol complex). This complex catalyzes the formation of a covalent linkage between dCMP and pTP in the presence of a functional origin of DNA replication residing in the terminal nucleotide sequence of adenovirus DNA. We have purified the pTP-pol complex of adenovirus type 5 and studied its binding to double-stranded DNA. Using DNA-cellulose chromatography it could be shown that the pTP-pol complex has a higher affinity for adenovirus DNA than for calf thymus or pBR322 DNA. From the differential binding of the pTP-pol complex to plasmids containing adenovirus terminal sequences with different deletions, it has been concluded that a sequence of 14 nucleotide pairs at positions 9-22 plays a crucial role in the binding of pTP-pol to adenovirus DNA. This region is conserved in the DNA's of all human adenovirus serotypes and is obviously an important structural element of the adenovirus origin of DNA replication. Comparative binding studies with adenovirus DNA polymerase and pTP-pol indicated that pTP is responsible for the binding. The nature of the binding of pTP-pol to the conserved sequence will be discussed. Images PMID:6672772

  14. Direction of Movement Is Encoded in the Human Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1. PMID:22110768

  15. Fabry disease: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding human alpha-galactosidase A.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Bishop, D F; Bernstein, H S; Quinn, M; Hantzopoulos, P; Desnick, R J

    1985-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inborn error of metabolism resulting from the deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A; alpha-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.22). To investigate the structure, organization, and expression of alpha-Gal A, as well as the nature of mutations in Fabry disease, a clone encoding human alpha-Gal A was isolated from a lambda gt11 human liver cDNA expression library. To facilitate screening, an improved affinity purification procedure was used to obtain sufficient homogeneous enzyme for production of monospecific antibodies and for amino-terminal and peptide microsequencing. On the basis of an amino-terminal sequence of 24 residues, two sets of oligonucleotide mixtures were synthesized corresponding to adjacent, but not overlapping, amino acid sequences. In addition, an oligonucleotide mixture was synthesized based on a sequence derived from an alpha-Gal A internal tryptic peptide isolated by reversed-phase HPLC. Four positive clones were initially identified by antibody screening of 1.4 X 10(7) plaques. Of these, only one clone (designated lambda AG18) demonstrated both antibody binding specificity by competition studies using homogeneous enzyme and specific hybridization to synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures corresponding to amino-terminal and internal amino acid sequences. Nucleotide sequencing of the 5' end of the 1250-base-pair EcoRI insert of clone lambda AG18 revealed an exact correspondence between the predicted and known amino-terminal amino acid sequence. The insert of clone lambda AG18 appears to contain the full-length coding region of the processed, enzymatically active alpha-Gal A, as well as sequences coding for five amino acids of the amino-terminal propeptide, which is posttranslationally cleaved during enzyme maturation. Images PMID:2997789

  16. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-11-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  17. Functional Analysis of the env Open Reading Frame in Human Endogenous Retrovirus IDDMK1,222 Encoding Superantigen Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lapatschek, Matthias; Dürr, Susanne; Löwer, Roswitha; Magin, Christine; Wagner, Hermann; Miethke, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Mice harbor a family of endogenous retroviruses, the mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV), which encode superantigens. These superantigens are responsible for the deletion of T cells expressing certain Vβ chains of the T-cell receptor in the thymus. Human T cells are able to recognize MMTV-encoded superantigens presented by human major histocompatibility complex class II-positive cells. Owing to this and to the similarity of the human and murine immune systems, it was speculated that human endogenous retroviruses might also code for superantigens. Recently, it was reported that a proviral clone (IDDMK1,222) of the human endogenous retrovirus family HTDV/HERV-K encodes a superantigen. The putative superantigen gene was located within the env region of the virus. Stimulated by these findings, we amplified by PCR and cloned into eucaryotic expression vectors open reading frames (ORFs) which were identical or very similar to IDDMK1,222. When we transfected these vectors into A20 cells, a murine B-cell lymphoma, we were able to demonstrate mRNA expression and protein production. However, we did not find any evidence that the ORF stimulated human or murine T cells in a Vβ-specific fashion, the most prominent feature of superantigens. PMID:10864649

  18. [Adenovirus-delivered BMI-1 shRNA].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Li; Zhen, Jie

    2009-10-01

    Recently, some plasmid vectors that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs have been developed, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors possess certain advantages over synthesized siRNA, many disadvantages exist, including low and variable transfection efficiency. This study was aimed to establish an adenoviral siRNA delivery system without above-mentioned disadvantages on the basis of commercially available vectors. A vector was designed to target the human polycomb gene BMI-1. The pAd-BMI-1shRNA-CMV-GFP vector was produced by cloning a 300 bp U6-BMI-1 cassette from the pGE1BMI-1shRNA plasmid and a CMV-GFP cassette from pAdTrack CMV in pShutter vector. The adenovirus was produced from the 293A packaging cell line and then infected K562 cells. The mRNA and protein levels of Bmi-1 were detected by real time-PCR and Western blot respectively. The results showed that the adenovirus carrying the BMI-1shRNA was successfully produced. After being transfected with the adenovirus, the K562 cells dramatically down-regulated BMI-1 expression, whereas the adenoviruses carrying control shRNA had no effect on BMI-1 expression. It is concluded that the adenoviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and may become a candidate vector carrying siRNA drugs for gene therapy. PMID:19840467

  19. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation. PMID:26708004

  20. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  1. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F.; Sroka, Thomas C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E.; Mount, David W.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  2. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F; Sroka, Thomas C; Demetriou, Manolis C; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E; Mount, David W; Miesfeld, Roger L

    2003-10-17

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  3. Structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of human RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Acker, J; Wintzerith, M; Vigneron, M; Kedinger, C

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of the human RNA polymerase II (or B) has been elucidated. The gene consists of six exons, ranging from 52 to over 101 bp, interspaced with five introns ranging from 84 to 246 bp. It is transcribed into three major RNA species, present at low abundance in exponentially growing HeLa cells. The corresponding messenger RNAs contain the same open reading frame encoding a 125 amino acid residue protein, with a calculated molecular weight of 14,523 Da. This protein (named hRPB14.5) shares strong homologies with the homologous polymerase subunits encoded by the Drosophila (RpII15) and yeast (RPB9) genes. Cysteines characteristic of two zinc fingers are conserved in all three corresponding sequences and, like the yeast protein, the hRPB14.5 subunit exhibits zinc-binding activity. Images PMID:8265347

  4. Encoding/retrieval dissociation in working memory for human body forms.

    PubMed

    Bauser, Denise A Soria; Mayer, Kerstin; Daum, Irene; Suchan, Boris

    2011-06-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of working memory (WM) load on body processing mechanisms by using event-related potentials (ERPs). It is well known that WM load modulates the P3b (amplitude decreases as WM load increases). Additionally, WM load for faces modulates earlier ERPs like the N170. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of WM load for bodies on the P3b which is associated with WM. Additionally, we explored the effect of WM load on the N170, which is thought to be associated with configural processing, and P1, which has been observed in body as well as in face processing. Effects were analyzed during the encoding and retrieval phases. WM load was modulated by presenting one to four unfamiliar bodies simultaneously for memory encoding. The present study showed that early encoding processes (reflected by the P1 and N170) might not be modulated by WM load, whereas during the retrieval phase, early processes associated with structural encoding (N170) were affected by WM load. A possible explanation of the encoding/retrieval differences might be that subjects used distinct processing strategies in both phases. Parallel encoding of the simultaneously presented bodies might play an important role during the encoding phase where one to four bodies have to be stored, whereas serial matching might be used to compare the probe with the stored pictures during the retrieval phase. Additionally, WM load modulations were observed in later processing steps, which might be associated with stimulus identification and matching processes (reflected by the early P3b) during the encoding but not during the retrieval phase. The current findings further showed for both the encoding and the retrieval phase that the late P3b amplitude decreased as WM load for body images increased indicating that the late P3b is involved in WM processes which do not appear to be category-specific. PMID:21277335

  5. The Intracellular Domain of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Differentially Influences Adenovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Loustalot, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule used as a docking molecule by some adenoviruses (AdVs) and group B coxsackieviruses. We previously proposed that the preferential transduction of neurons by canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) is due to CAR-mediated internalization. Our proposed pathway of CAV-2 entry is in contrast to that of human AdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) in nonneuronal cells, where internalization is mediated by auxiliary receptors such as integrins. We therefore asked if in fibroblast-like cells the intracellular domain (ICD) of CAR plays a role in the internalization of the CAV-2 fiber knob (FKCAV), CAV-2, or HAdV-C5 when the capsid cannot engage integrins. Here, we show that in fibroblast-like cells, the CAR ICD is needed for FKCAV entry and efficient CAV-2 transduction but dispensable for HAdV-C5 and an HAdV-C5 capsid lacking the RGD sequence (an integrin-interacting motif) in the penton. Moreover, the deletion of the CAR ICD further impacts CAV-2 intracellular trafficking, highlighting the crucial role of CAR in CAV-2 intracellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that the CAR ICD contains sequences important for the recruitment of the endocytic machinery that differentially influences AdV cell entry. IMPORTANCE Understanding how viruses interact with the host cell surface and reach the intracellular space is of crucial importance for applied and fundamental virology. Here, we compare the role of a cell adhesion molecule (CAR) in the internalization of adenoviruses that naturally infect humans and Canidae. We show that the intracellular domain of CAR differentially regulates AdV entry and trafficking. Our study highlights the mechanistic differences that a receptor can have for two viruses from the same family. PMID:26136571

  6. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  11. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  12. Psychophysical and EEG responses to repeated experimental muscle pain in humans: pain intensity encodes EEG activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Fei; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Chen, Andrew C N

    2003-02-15

    Clinical pain is often characterized by repetitive and persistent occurrence in deep structures, but few studies investigated repetitive tonic pain in humans. To determine cerebral responses to repetitive tonic pain, psychophysical responses, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activation to five trials of repeated tonic muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline were examined and analyzed in 13 male subjects. The study was composed of two experimental sessions performed in separate days. Five sequential injections of hypertonic saline (5.8%) were used to induce repeated muscle pain in the left forearm, and five sequential injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) acted as control. Visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain intensity and 32-channels EEG activities were recorded simultaneously. Five trials of relatively stable muscle pain were induced by intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline, but no evident pain was induced by the injections of isotonic saline. Significant decreases in alpha-1 and -2 activities in posterior part of the head were found during repeated muscle pain in comparison with non-pain. In comparison with baseline, alpha-1 and -2 activities reduced significantly during the first two trials, and gradually resumed in the following three trials of muscle pain. However, beta-2 activity increased consistently throughout the five trials of muscle pain compared to baseline. Alpha-1 activity was negatively, but beta-2 activity was positively correlated to the pain intensity and pain area on the skin. Throughout five injections, the reduction of alpha-1 activity was contrary to the changes of pain intensity. These results indicates that pain-related EEG activities were encoded by the pain intensity. The thalamo-cortical system and descending inhibitory neuronal networks may be involved in the regulation of pain intensity. PMID:12576151

  13. Isolation and sequence of complementary DNA encoding human extracellular superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarsson, K.; Marklund, S.L.; Engstroem, A.; Edlund, T.

    1987-09-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) clone from a human placenta cDNA library encoding extracellular superoxide dismutase has been isolated and the nucleotide sequence determined. The cDNA has a very high G + C content. EC-SOD is synthesized with a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, preceding the 222 amino acids in the mature enzyme, indicating that the enzyme is a secretory protein. The first 95 amino acids of the mature enzyme show no sequence homology with other sequenced proteins and there is one possible N-glycosylation site (Asn-89). The amino acid sequence from residues 96-193 shows strong homology (approx. 50%) with the final two-thirds of the sequences of all know eukaryotic CuZn SODs, whereas the homology with the P. leiognathi CuZn SOD is clearly lower. The ligands to Cu and Zn, the cysteines forming the intrasubunit disulfide bridge in the CuZn SODs, and the arginine found in all CuZn SODs in the entrance to the active site can all be identified in EC-SOD. A comparison with bovine CuZn SOD, the three-dimensional structure of which is known, reveals that the homologies occur in the active site and the divergencies are in the part constituting the subunit contact area in CuZn SOD. Amino acid sequence 194-222 in the carboxyl-terminal end of EC-SOD is strongly hydrophilic and contains nine amino acids with a positive charge. This sequence probably confers the affinity of EC-SOD for heparin and heparan sulfate. An analysis of the amino acid sequence homologies with CuZn SODs from various species indicates that the EC-SODs may have evolved form the CuZn SODs before the evolution of fungi and plants.

  14. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development. PMID:20682060

  15. The dual effect of adenovirus type 5 E1A 13S protein on NF-kappaB activation is antagonized by E1B 19K.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M L; Indorf, A; Limbourg, F P; Städtler, H; Traenckner, E B; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of human adenoviruses encode several regulatory proteins, including the two differentially spliced gene products E1A and E1B. Here, we show that the 13S but not the 12S splice variant of E1A of adenovirus type 5 can activate the human transcription factor NF-kappaB in a bimodal fashion. One mode is the activation of NF-kappaB containing the p65 subunit from the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB-IkappaB complex. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates and the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at serines 32 and 36, followed by IkappaBalpha degradation and the nuclear uptake of NF-kappaB. In addition, 13S E1A stimulated the transcriptional activity of the C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 at a core promoter with either a TATA box or an initiator (INR) element. The C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 were found to associate with E1A in vitro. The activation of NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene transcription by E1A was potently suppressed upon coexpression of the E1B 19-kDa protein (19K). E1B 19K prevented both the activation of NF-kappaB and the E1A-mediated transcriptional enhancement of p65. These inhibitory effects were not found for the 55-kDa splice variant of the E1B protein. We suggest that the inductive effect of E1A 13S on the host factor NF-kappaB, whose activation is important for the transcription of various adenovirus genes, must be counteracted by the suppressive effect of E1B 19K so that the adenovirus-infected cell can escape the immune-stimulatory and apoptotic effects of NF-kappaB. PMID:8754803

  16. Human proviral mRNAs down regulated in choriocarcinoma encode a zinc finger protein related to Krüppel.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Shimotohno, K; VanLeeuwen, D; Cohen, M

    1990-01-01

    RNA transcripts of the HERV-R (ERV3) human provirus that are abundant in placenta but absent in choriocarcinoma contain nonproviral genomic sequences at their 3' ends. We report here the isolation of cDNA clones of these genomic sequences. The transcripts encode a Krüppel-related zinc finger protein consisting of a unique leader region and more than 12 28-amino-acid finger motifs. Images PMID:2115127

  17. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gedge, L.J.E.; Morrison, E.E.; Blair, G.E.; Walker, J.H. . E-mail: J.H.Walker@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  18. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  19. Spatial auditory regularity encoding and prediction: Human middle-latency and long-latency auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Cornella, M; Bendixen, A; Grimm, S; Leung, S; Schröger, E; Escera, C

    2015-11-11

    By encoding acoustic regularities present in the environment, the human brain can generate predictions of what is likely to occur next. Recent studies suggest that deviations from encoded regularities are detected within 10-50ms after stimulus onset, as indicated by electrophysiological effects in the middle latency response (MLR) range. This is upstream of previously known long-latency (LLR) signatures of deviance detection such as the mismatch negativity (MMN) component. In the present study, we created predictable and unpredictable contexts to investigate MLR and LLR signatures of the encoding of spatial auditory regularities and the generation of predictions from these regularities. Chirps were monaurally delivered in an either regular (predictable: left-right-left-right) or a random (unpredictable left/right alternation or repetition) manner. Occasional stimulus omissions occurred in both types of sequences. Results showed that the Na component (peaking at 34ms after stimulus onset) was attenuated for regular relative to random chirps, albeit no differences were observed for stimulus omission responses in the same latency range. In the LLR range, larger chirp-and omission-evoked responses were elicited for the regular than for the random condition, and predictability effects were more prominent over the right hemisphere. We discuss our findings in the framework of a hierarchical organization of spatial regularity encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25912975

  20. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  1. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  2. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  3. Prolegomena to a neurocomputational architecture for human grammatical encoding and decoding.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    This study develops a neurocomputational architecture for grammatical processing in language production and language comprehension (grammatical encoding and decoding, respectively). It seeks to answer two questions. First, how is online syntactic structure formation of the complexity required by natural-language grammars possible in a fixed, preexisting neural network without the need for online creation of new connections or associations? Second, is it realistic to assume that the seemingly disparate instantiations of syntactic structure formation in grammatical encoding and grammatical decoding can run on the same neural infrastructure? This issue is prompted by accumulating experimental evidence for the hypothesis that the mechanisms for grammatical decoding overlap with those for grammatical encoding to a considerable extent, thus inviting the hypothesis of a single "grammatical coder." The paper answers both questions by providing the blueprint for a syntactic structure formation mechanism that is entirely based on prewired circuitry (except for referential processing, which relies on the rapid learning capacity of the hippocampal complex), and can subserve decoding as well as encoding tasks. The model builds on the "Unification Space" model of syntactic parsing developed by Vosse and Kempen (Cognition 75:105-143, 2000; Cognitive Neurodynamics 3:331-346, 2009a). The design includes a neurocomputational mechanism for the treatment of an important class of grammatical movement phenomena. PMID:23872869

  4. pap-2-encoded fimbriae adhere to the P blood group-related glycosphingolipid stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 in the human kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Karr, J F; Nowicki, B J; Truong, L D; Hull, R A; Moulds, J J; Hull, S I

    1990-01-01

    A subtype of P fimbriae, encoded by the pap-2 gene cluster, has been analyzed for agglutination of erythrocytes and for binding to cryostat sections of the human kidney. We have demonstrated that pap-2-encoded fimbriae are capable of binding to erythrocytes from some animal species and to human erythrocytes which express globoside and the LKE (stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 [SSEA-4]) antigen. The pap-2 fimbriae bind to Bowman's capsule in the human kidney. Monoclonal antibodies directed against glycosphingolipids were used for the detection of specific P blood group-related antigens in the human kidney and on erythrocytes. Preincubation of kidney sections with monoclonal antibody MC813-70, which binds to the SSEA-4 antigen, inhibited adherence of purified pap-2-encoded fimbriae to Bowman's capsule. We suggest that one receptor for pap-2-encoded fimbriae is the antigen known as LKE (Luke) on human erythrocytes or SSEA-4 in the tissues. Images PMID:1979319

  5. Mechanism by which calcium phosphate coprecipitation enhances adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Walters, R; Welsh, M

    1999-11-01

    Delivery of a normal copy of CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia may provide a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis lung disease. Unfortunately, current vectors are inefficient because of limited binding to the apical surface of airway epithelia. We recently reported that incorporation of adenovirus in a calcium phosphate coprecipitate (Ad:CaPi) improves adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia in vitro and in vivo. To understand better how coprecipitation improves gene transfer, we tested the hypothesis that incorporation in a CaPi coprecipitate increases the binding of adenovirus to the apical surface of differentiated human airway epithelia. When a Cy3-labelled adenovirus was delivered in a coprecipitate, binding increased 54-fold as compared with adenovirus alone. Moreover, infection by Ad:CaPi was independent of fiber knob-CAR and penton base-integrin interactions. After binding to the cell surface, the virus must enter the cell in order to infect. We hypothesized that Ad:CaPi may stimulate fluid phase endocytosis, thereby facilitating entry. However, we found that neither adenovirus nor Ad:CaPi coprecipitates altered fluid phase endocytosis. Nevertheless, Ad:CaPi preferentially infected cells showing endocytosis. Thus, CaPi coprecipitation improves adenovirus-mediated gene transfer by coating the epithelial surface with a layer of virus which enters cells during the normal process of endocytosis. PMID:10602380

  6. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells.

  7. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  8. In vitro transcription of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Fire, A; Baker, C C; Manley, J L; Ziff, E B; Sharp, P A

    1981-01-01

    A series of recombinants of adenovirus DNA fragments and pBR322 was used to test the transcriptional activity of the nine known adenovirus promoters in a cell-free extract. Specific initiation was seen at all five early promoters as well as at the major late promotor and at the intermediate promoter for polypeptide IX. The system failed to recognize the two other adenovirus promoters, which were prominent in vivo only at intermediate and late stages in infection. Microheterogeneity of 5' termini at several adenovirus promoters, previously shown in vivo, was reproduced in the in vitro reaction and indeed appeared to result from heterogeneous initiation rather than 5' processing. To test for the presence of soluble factors involved in regulation of nRNA synthesis, the activity of extracts prepared from early and late stages of infection was compared on an assortment of viral promoter sites. Although mock and early extracts showed identical transcription patterns, extracts prepared from late stages gave 5- to 10-fold relative enhancement of the late and polypeptide IX promoters as compared with early promoters. Images PMID:7321101

  9. Neurons in the human amygdala encode face identity, but not gaze direction.

    PubMed

    Mormann, Florian; Niediek, Johannes; Tudusciuc, Oana; Quesada, Carlos M; Coenen, Volker A; Elger, Christian E; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The amygdala is important for face processing, and direction of eye gaze is one of the most socially salient facial signals. Recording from over 200 neurons in the amygdala of neurosurgical patients, we found robust encoding of the identity of neutral-expression faces, but not of their direction of gaze. Processing of gaze direction may rely on a predominantly cortical network rather than the amygdala. PMID:26479589

  10. Neurons in the human amygdala encode face identity but not gaze direction

    PubMed Central

    Mormann, Florian; Niediek, Johannes; Tudusciuc, Oana; Quesada, Carlos M.; Coenen, Volker; Elger, Christian; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The amygdala is a key structure in face processing, and direction of eye gaze is one of the most socially salient facial signals. Recording from over 200 neurons in the amygdala of neurosurgical patients, we here find robust encoding of the identity of neutral-expression faces, but not to their direction of gaze. Processing of gaze direction may rely on a predominantly cortical network rather than the amygdala. PMID:26479589

  11. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  12. Distinguishing informational from value-related encoding of rewarding and punishing outcomes in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Ryan K; O'Doherty, John P

    2014-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence implicating a set of key brain regions in encoding rewarding and punishing outcomes, including the orbitofrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, anterior insula, and anterior cingulate. However, it has proved challenging to reach consensus concerning the extent to which different brain areas are involved in differentially encoding rewarding and punishing outcomes. Here, we show that many of the brain areas involved in outcome processing represent multiple outcome components: encoding the value of outcomes (whether rewarding or punishing) and informational coding, i.e. signaling whether a given outcome is rewarding or punishing, ignoring magnitude or experienced utility. In particular, we report informational signals in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and anterior insular cortex that respond to both rewarding and punishing feedback, even though value-related signals in these areas appear to be selectively driven by punishing feedback. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account features of outcomes other than value when characterising the contributions of different brain regions in outcome processing. PMID:24863104

  13. Mechanism of adenovirus-mediated endosome lysis: role of the intact adenovirus capsid structure.

    PubMed

    Seth, P

    1994-12-15

    Adenoviruses have been previously shown to enhance the delivery of many ligands including proteins and plasmid DNAs to the cells. The key biochemical step during this process is the ability of adenovirus to disrupt (lyse) the endosome membrane releasing the co-internalized virus and the other ligands into the cytosol (Seth et al, 1986, In: Adenovirus attachment and entry into cells, pp 191-195, American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C.). To understand the role of the adenovirus proteins involved in the endosome lysis, it is further shown here that empty capsids of adenovirus also possess this membrane vesicle lytic activity; though the activity is about 5-times lower than the adenovirus. Incubation of adenovirus with low concentration of ionic detergent or brief exposure to 45 degrees C destroyed this lytic activity without affecting the adenovirus binding to cell surface receptor, suggesting the lytic activity of adenovirus to be of enzymatic nature. However, exposing adenovirus to conditions that can disrupt adenovirus capsid structure such as heating at 65 degrees C, treating with 0.5% SDS, treating with different proteases, dialyzing against no glycerol buffer, treating with 6 M urea or with 10% pyridine, and sonication destroyed the adenovirus-associated lytic activity. Results suggest the requirement of an intact capsid structure for adenovirus-mediated lysis of the endosome. PMID:7802664

  14. Conserved Sequences at the Origin of Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Bruce W.; Topp, William C.; Engler, Jeffrey A.

    1982-01-01

    The origin of adenovirus DNA replication lies within an inverted sequence repetition at either end of the linear, double-stranded viral DNA. Initiation of DNA replication is primed by a deoxynucleoside that is covalently linked to a protein, which remains bound to the newly synthesized DNA. We demonstrate that virion-derived DNA-protein complexes from five human adenovirus serological subgroups (A to E) can act as a template for both the initiation and the elongation of DNA replication in vitro, using nuclear extracts from adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-infected HeLa cells. The heterologous template DNA-protein complexes were not as active as the homologous Ad2 DNA, most probably due to inefficient initiation by Ad2 replication factors. In an attempt to identify common features which may permit this replication, we have also sequenced the inverted terminal repeated DNA from human adenovirus serotypes Ad4 (group E), Ad9 and Ad10 (group D), and Ad31 (group A), and we have compared these to previously determined sequences from Ad2 and Ad5 (group C), Ad7 (group B), and Ad12 and Ad18 (group A) DNA. In all cases, the sequence around the origin of DNA replication can be divided into two structural domains: a proximal A · T-rich region which is partially conserved among these serotypes, and a distal G · C-rich region which is less well conserved. The G · C-rich region contains sequences similar to sequences present in papovavirus replication origins. The two domains may reflect a dual mechanism for initiation of DNA replication: adenovirus-specific protein priming of replication, and subsequent utilization of this primer by host replication factors for completion of DNA synthesis. Images PMID:7143575

  15. Low seroprevalent species D adenovirus vectors as influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A; Barry, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza remains a constant threat. While standard influenza vaccines have great utility, the need for improved vaccine technologies have been brought to light by the 2009 swine flu pandemic, highly pathogenic avian influenza infections, and the most recent early and widespread influenza activity. Species C adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (AD5) are potent vehicles for gene-based vaccination. While potent, most humans are already immune to this virus. In this study, low seroprevalent species D adenoviruses Ad26, 28, and 48 were cloned and modified to express the influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin gene for vaccine studies. When studied in vivo, these species D Ad vectors performed quite differently as compared to species C Ad vectors depending on the route of immunization. By intramuscular injection, species D vaccines were markedly weaker than species C vaccines. In contrast, the species D vaccines were equally efficient as species C when delivered mucosally by the intranasal route. Intranasal adenovirus vaccine doses as low as 10(8) virus particles per mouse induced complete protection against a stringent lethal challenge dose of influenza. These data support translation of species D adenoviruses as mucosal vaccines and highlight the fundamental effects of differences in virus tropism on vaccine applications. PMID:23991187

  16. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence of a cDNA clone encoding part of human transketolase.

    PubMed

    Abedinia, M; Layfield, R; Jones, S M; Nixon, P F; Mattick, J S

    1992-03-31

    Transketolase is a key enzyme in the pentose-phosphate pathway which has been implicated in the latent human genetic disease, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Here we report the cloning and partial characterisation of the coding sequences encoding human transketolase from a human brain cDNA library. The library was screened with oligonucleotide probes based on the amino acid sequence of proteolytic fragments of the purified protein. Northern blots showed that the transketolase mRNA is approximately 2.2 kb, close to the minimum expected, of which approximately 60% was represented in the largest cDNA clone. Sequence analysis of the transketolase coding sequences reveals a number of homologies with related enzymes from other species. PMID:1567394

  17. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 short fibre

    SciTech Connect

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. Schoehn, Guy

    2008-08-15

    There are more than 100 known adenovirus serotypes, including 50 human serotypes. They can infect all 5 major vertebrate classes but only Aviadenovirus infecting birds and Mastadenovirus infecting mammals have been well studied. CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan) adenovirus is responsible for mild respiratory pathologies in birds. Most studies on CELO virus have focussed on its genome sequence and organisation whereas the structural work on CELO proteins has only recently started. Contrary to most adenoviruses, the vertices of CELO virus reveal pentons with two fibres of different lengths. The distal parts (or head) of those fibres are involved in cellular receptor binding. Here we have determined the atomic structure of the short-fibre head of CELO (amino acids 201-410) at 2.0 A resolution. Despite low sequence identity, this structure is conserved compared to the other adenovirus fibre heads. We have used the existing CELO long-fibre head structure and the one we show here for a structure-based alignment of 11 known adenovirus fibre heads which was subsequently used for the construction of an evolutionary tree. Both the fibre head sequence and structural alignments suggest that enteric human group F adenovirus 41 (short fibre) is closer to the CELO fibre heads than the canine CAdV-2 fibre head, that lies closer to the human virus fibre heads.

  18. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  19. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  20. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  1. YY1 and Sp1 activate transcription of the human NDUFS8 gene encoding the mitochondrial complex I TYKY subunit.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Martinez, Pascal; Lunardi, Joël

    2002-03-19

    Complex I is the most complicated of the multimeric enzymes that constitute the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It is encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. We have previously characterized the human NDUFS8 gene that encodes the TYKY subunit. This essential subunit is thought to participate in the electron transfer and proton pumping activities of complex I. Here, we have analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the NDUFS8 gene. Using primer extension assays, we have identified two transcription start sites. The basal promoter was mapped to a 247 bp sequence upstream from the main transcription start site by reporter gene analysis in HeLa cells and in differentiated or non-differentiated C2C12 cells. Three Sp1 sites and one YY1 site were identified in this minimal promoter. Through gel shift analysis, all sites were shown to bind to their cognate transcription factors. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the YY1 site and two upstream adjacent Sp1 sites drive most of the promoter activity. This work represents the first promoter analysis for a complex I gene. Together with previous studies, our results indicate that YY1 and Sp1 control the expression of genes encoding proteins that are involved in almost all steps of the oxidative phosphorylation metabolism. PMID:11955626

  2. Integrating Memories in the Human Brain: Hippocampal–Midbrain Encoding of Overlapping Events

    PubMed Central

    Shohamy, Daphna; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Decisions are often guided by generalizing from past experiences. Fundamental questions remain regarding the cognitive and neural mechanisms by which generalization takes place. Prior data suggest that generalization may stem from inference-based processes that occur at the time of generalization. By contrast, it has been hypothesized that generalization may emerge from mnemonic processes that occur while premise events are being encoded. Here, participants engaged in a two-phase learning and generalization task, wherein they initially learned a series of overlapping associations, and were subsequently probed to generalize what they learned to novel stimulus combinations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that subsequent generalization performance was associated with coupled changes in learning-phase activity in the hippocampus and midbrain (ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra). These findings provide novel evidence for generalization based on integrative encoding, whereby overlapping past events are integrated into a linked mnemonic representation. Hippocampal–midbrain interactions support the dynamic integration of experiences, providing a powerful mechanism for building a rich associative history that extends beyond individually experienced events. PMID:18957228

  3. Adenovirus type 2 terminal protein: purification and comparison of tryptic peptides with known adenovirus-coded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, M L; Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1979-01-01

    The protein covalently bound to the 5' termini of adenovirus type 2 DNA has been purified from virus labeled with [35S]methionine, using exclusion chromatography of disrupted virions to isolate the DNA-protein complex, which is then digested with DNase. The terminal protein isolated from mature virus is most effectively labeled if the cells are exposed to [35S]methionine during the "intermediate" period of 13 to 21 h postinfection, suggesting that the protein is synthesized during this interval. The tryptic peptides of the terminal protein were compared with those of several known adenovirus-coded proteins and found to be unrelated. In particular, the terminal protein is not related to the 38-50K early proteins encoded by the leftmost 4.4% of the adenovirus genome, one region essential for the transforming activity of the virus. Neither is it related to the 72K single-strand-specific DNA binding protein, the minor virion component IVa2, or the major capsid component hexon. Images PMID:513195

  4. Interactions of minute virus of mice and adenovirus with host nucleoli.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, T H; Moen, P T; Fox, E; Bodnar, J W

    1989-01-01

    Biochemical evidence is presented that both minute virus of mice (MVM) and adenovirus interact with the nucleolus during lytic growth and that MVM can also target specific changes involving nucleolar components in adenovirus-infected cells. These virus-nucleolus interactions were studied by analysis of intranuclear compartmentalization of both viral DNAs and host nucleolar proteins: (i) MVM in mouse cells (its normal host) replicates its DNA in the host nucleoli; (ii) specific nucleolar proteins as well as small nuclear ribonucleoprotein antigens are recompartmentalized to multiple intranuclear foci in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells; and (iii) when adenovirus helps MVM DNA replication in a nonpermissive human cell (HeLa), the MVM DNA is also recompartmentalized for synthesis. The data suggest mechanisms for disruption of nucleolar function common to oncogenic or oncolytic virus lytic growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:2760977

  5. Host range, prevalence, and genetic diversity of adenoviruses in bats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ge, Xingyi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhou, Peng; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yunzhi; Yuan, Junfa; Wang, Lin-Fa; Shi, Zhengli

    2010-04-01

    Bats are the second largest group of mammals on earth and act as reservoirs of many emerging viruses. In this study, a novel bat adenovirus (AdV) (BtAdV-TJM) was isolated from bat fecal samples by using a bat primary kidney cell line. Infection studies indicated that most animal and human cell lines are susceptible to BtAdV-TJM, suggesting a possible wide host range. Genome analysis revealed 30 putative genes encoding proteins homologous to their counterparts in most known AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis placed BtAdV-TJM within the genus Mastadenovirus, most closely related to tree shrew and canine AdVs. PCR analysis of 350 bat fecal samples, collected from 19 species in five Chinese provinces during 2007 and 2008, indicated that 28 (or 8%) samples were positive for AdVs. The samples were from five bat species, Hipposideros armiger, Myotis horsfieldii, M. ricketti, Myotis spp., and Scotophilus kuhlii. The prevalence ranged from 6.25% (H. armiger in 2007) to 40% (M. ricketti in 2007). Comparison studies based on available partial sequences of the pol gene demonstrated a great genetic diversity among bat AdVs infecting different bat species as well as those infecting the same bat species. This is the first report of a genetically diverse group of DNA viruses in bats. Our results support the notion, derived from previous studies based on RNA viruses (especially coronaviruses and astroviruses), that bats seem to have the unusual ability to harbor a large number of genetically diverse viruses within a geographic location and/or within a taxonomic group. PMID:20089640

  6. GANP protein encoded on human chromosome 21/mouse chromosome 10 is associated with resistance to mammary tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Phimsen, Suchada; Gondo, Naomi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji; Saya, Hideyuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Matsuo, Keitaro; Takeya, Motohiro; Iwase, Hirotaka; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Human chromosome 21 is known to be associated with the high risk of hematological malignancy but with resistance to breast cancer in the study of Down syndrome. In human cancers, we previously observed the significant alterations of the protein expression encoded by the ganp/MCM3AP gene on human chromosome 21q22.3. Here, we investigated GANP protein alterations in human breast cancer samples (416 cases) at various stages by immunohistochemical analysis. This cohort study clearly showed that expression of GANP is significantly decreased in human breast cancer cases with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor (relapse-free survival, hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.42, P = 0.007 [univariate analysis]; hazard ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.42-5.13, P = 0.002 [multivariate analysis]). To investigate whether the altered GANP expression is associated with mammary tumorigenesis, we created mutant mice that were conditionally deficient in the ganp/MCM3AP gene using wap-cre recombinase transgenic mice. Mammary gland tumors occurred at a very high incidence in female mammary gland-specific GANP-deficient mice after severe impairment of mammary gland development during pregnancy. Moreover, tumor development also occurred in female post parous GANP-heterodeficient mice. GANP has a significant role in the suppression of DNA damage caused by estrogen in human breast cancer cell lines. These results indicated that the GANP protein is associated with breast cancer resistance. PMID:26749495

  7. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten. PMID:23431001

  8. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3

    PubMed Central

    Goettel, Jeremy A.; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S.; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S.; McCann, Katelyn J.; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A.; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific “humanized” mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:25833964

  9. Basolateral localization of fiber receptors limits adenovirus infection from the apical surface of airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; Grunst, T; Bergelson, J M; Finberg, R W; Welsh, M J; Zabner, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent identification of two receptors for the adenovirus fiber protein, coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR), and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I alpha-2 domain allows the molecular basis of adenoviral infection to be investigated. Earlier work has shown that human airway epithelia are resistant to infection by adenovirus. Therefore, we examined the expression and localization of CAR and MHC Class I in an in vitro model of well differentiated, ciliated human airway epithelia. We found that airway epithelia express CAR and MHC Class I. However, neither receptor was present in the apical membrane; instead, both were polarized to the basolateral membrane. These findings explain the relative resistance to adenovirus infection from the apical surface. In contrast, when the virus was applied to the basolateral surface, gene transfer was much more efficient because of an interaction of adenovirus fiber with its receptors. In addition, when the integrity of the tight junctions was transiently disrupted, apically applied adenovirus gained access to the basolateral surface and enhanced gene transfer. These data suggest that the receptors required for efficient infection are not available on the apical surface, and interventions that allow access to the basolateral space where fiber receptors are located increase gene transfer efficiency. PMID:10187807

  10. Conservation of structure in the human gene encoding argininosuccinate synthetase and the argG genes of the archaebacteria Methanosarcina barkeri MS and Methanococcus vannielii

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.J.; Reeve, J.N.

    1988-07-01

    The DNA sequences of the argG genes of Methanosarcina barkeri MS and Methanococcus vannielii were determined. The polypeptide products of these methanogen genes have amino acid sequences which are 50% identical to each other and 38% identical to the amino acid sequence encoded by the exons of the human argininosuccinate synthetase gene. Introns in the human chromosomal gene separate regions which encode amino acids conserved in both the archaebacterial and human gene products. An open reading frame immediately upstream of argG in Methanosarcina barkeri MS codes for an amino acid sequence which is 45 and 31% identical to the sequences of the large subunits of carbamyl phosphate synthetase in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. If this gene encodes carbamyl phosphate synthetase in Methanosarcina barkeri, this is the first example, in an archaebacterium, of physical linkage of genes that encode enzymes which catalyze reactions in the same amino acid biosynthetic pathway.

  11. Adenoviruses of canine and human origins in stool samples from free-living pampas foxes (Lycalopex gymnocercus) and crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) in São Francisco de Paula, Rio dos Sinos basin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, G S; Fleck, J D; Kluge, M; Rech, N K; Soliman, M C; Staggemeier, R; Rodrigues, M T; Barros, M P; Heinzelmann, L S; Spilki, F R

    2015-05-01

    The spread of enteric viruses of domestic animals and human beings to wild species can be facilitated by the resistance of these viruses on the environment and their ability to be transmitted by water and contaminated food. The health status of the populations of pampas foxes Lycalopex gymnocercus) and crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) is largely unknown and the landscapes occupied by these animals in southern Brazil have been threatened by human occupation and expansion of agriculture. In this work, the search of genomes of human and canine adenoviruses in feces from these wild carnivores was used to track the dissemination of domestic animals and human pathogens to the free-living populations in a wildlife reserve located in southern Brazil. This was performed by virus-specific differential real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) on stool specimens, avoiding capture and additional stress to the animals. Genus-specific conventional reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was complementarily performed aiming the detection of enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV) on these same samples. HAdV genomes were found on 14 out of the 17 (82.35%) stool samples analysed, whereas CAV was found co-infecting 5 of these samples. RV genomes were detected on 7 of the 17 samples (41.18%) and all samples were negative for EV. The results point to the dispersion of HAdV and RV at a high rate to these species of South American wild carnivores, which can be an effect of growing anthropisation of the habitat of these animals. PMID:26270208

  12. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Shinnawi, Rami; Huber, Irit; Maizels, Leonid; Shaheen, Naim; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Tijsen, Anke J.; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Summary The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be developed for high-resolution, large-scale, long-term, and serial functional cellular phenotyping of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). To achieve this goal, we combined the hiPSC technology with genetically encoded voltage (ArcLight) and calcium (GCaMP5G) fluorescent indicators. Expression of ArcLight and GCaMP5G in hiPSC-CMs permitted to reliably follow changes in transmembrane potential and intracellular calcium levels, respectively. This allowed monitoring short- and long-term changes in action-potential and calcium-handling properties and the development of arrhythmias in response to several pharmaceutical agents and in hiPSC-CMs derived from patients with different inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes. Combining genetically encoded fluorescent reporters with hiPSC-CMs may bring a unique value to the study of inherited disorders, developmental biology, and drug development and testing. PMID:26372632

  13. Safety and Tolerability of Conserved Region Vaccines Vectored by Plasmid DNA, Simian Adenovirus and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Administered to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Uninfected Adults in a Randomized, Single-Blind Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hayton, Emma-Jo; Rose, Annie; Ibrahimsa, Umar; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Capone, Stefania; Crook, Alison; Black, Antony P.; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Trial Design HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors. To tackle HIV-1 variation, we designed a unique T-cell immunogen HIVconsv from functionally conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which were presented to the immune system using a heterologous prime-boost combination of plasmid DNA, a non-replicating simian (chimpanzee) adenovirus ChAdV-63 and a non-replicating poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. A block-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled phase I trial HIV-CORE 002 administered for the first time candidate HIV-1- vaccines or placebo to 32 healthy HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, UK and elicited high frequencies of HIV-1-specific T cells capable of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in vitro. Here, detail safety and tolerability of these vaccines are reported. Methods Local and systemic reactogenicity data were collected using structured interviews and study-specific diary cards. Data on all other adverse events were collected using open questions. Serum neutralizing antibody titres to ChAdV-63 were determined before and after vaccination. Results Two volunteers withdrew for vaccine-unrelated reasons. No vaccine-related serious adverse events or reactions occurred during 190 person-months of follow-up. Local and systemic events after vaccination occurred in 27/32 individuals and most were mild (severity grade 1) and predominantly transient (<48 hours). Myalgia and flu-like symptoms were more strongly associated with MVA than ChAdV63 or DNA vectors and more common in vaccine recipients than in placebo. There were no intercurrent HIV-1 infections during follow-up. 2/24 volunteers had low ChAdV-63-neutralizing titres at baseline and 7 increased their titres to over 200 with a median (range) of 633 (231-1533) post-vaccination, which is of no safety concern. Conclusions These data demonstrate safety and good

  14. Transgenic Expression of the Chemokine Receptor Encoded by Human Herpesvirus 8 Induces an Angioproliferative Disease Resembling Kaposi's Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tong-Yuan; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Leach, Michael W.; Manfra, Denise; Homey, Bernhard; Wiekowski, Maria; Sullivan, Lee; Jenh, Chung-Her; Narula, Satwant K.; Chensue, Stephen W.; Lira, Sergio A.

    2000-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8, also known as Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) has been implicated as an etiologic agent for KS, an angiogenic tumor composed of endothelial, inflammatory, and spindle cells. Here, we report that transgenic mice expressing the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor (viral G protein–coupled receptor) within hematopoietic cells develop angioproliferative lesions in multiple organs that morphologically resemble KS lesions. These lesions are characterized by a spectrum of changes ranging from erythematous maculae to vascular tumors, by the presence of spindle and inflammatory cells, and by expression of vGPCR, CD34, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We conclude that vGPCR contributes to the development of the angioproliferative lesions observed in these mice and suggest that this chemokine receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis of KS in humans. PMID:10662790

  15. Transgenic expression of the chemokine receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8 induces an angioproliferative disease resembling Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, T Y; Chen, S C; Leach, M W; Manfra, D; Homey, B; Wiekowski, M; Sullivan, L; Jenh, C H; Narula, S K; Chensue, S W; Lira, S A

    2000-02-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8, also known as Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) has been implicated as an etiologic agent for KS, an angiogenic tumor composed of endothelial, inflammatory, and spindle cells. Here, we report that transgenic mice expressing the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor (viral G protein-coupled receptor) within hematopoietic cells develop angioproliferative lesions in multiple organs that morphologically resemble KS lesions. These lesions are characterized by a spectrum of changes ranging from erythematous maculae to vascular tumors, by the presence of spindle and inflammatory cells, and by expression of vGPCR, CD34, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We conclude that vGPCR contributes to the development of the angioproliferative lesions observed in these mice and suggest that this chemokine receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis of KS in humans. PMID:10662790

  16. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S.; Mills, Robert W.; Macri, Vincenzo S.; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Milan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  17. Rapid cellular phenotyping of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S; Mills, Robert W; Macri, Vincenzo S; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N; Ellinor, Patrick T; Milan, David J

    2014-02-11

    In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  18. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Assignment of the gene encoding human galanin receptor (GALNR) to 18q23 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Shine, J.

    1995-12-10

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammalian, avian, reptilian, and fish species and has a broad range of physiological and behavioral effects. Human galanin is a 30-amino-acid non-C-terminally amidated peptide that potently stimulates growth hormone secretion, inhibits cardiac vagal slowing of heart rate, abolishes sinus arrhythmia, and inhibits postprandial gastrointestinal motility. The actions of galanin are mediated through interaction with specific membrane receptors that are members of the seven transmembrane family of G-protein-coupled receptors. A functional human galanin receptor has recently been cloned, and we report here the localization of the gene encoding this receptor (GALNR) to chromosome 18q23. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. ChromNet: Learning the human chromatin network from all ENCODE ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Scott M; Tu, William B; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z; Hoffman, Michael M; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    A cell's epigenome arises from interactions among regulatory factors-transcription factors and histone modifications-co-localized at particular genomic regions. We developed a novel statistical method, ChromNet, to infer a network of these interactions, the chromatin network, by inferring conditional-dependence relationships among a large number of ChIP-seq data sets. We applied ChromNet to all available 1451 ChIP-seq data sets from the ENCODE Project, and showed that ChromNet revealed previously known physical interactions better than alternative approaches. We experimentally validated one of the previously unreported interactions, MYC-HCFC1. An interactive visualization tool is available at http://chromnet.cs.washington.edu. PMID:27139377

  1. Rapid Encoding of New Memories by Individual Neurons in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Matias J.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Summary The creation of memories about real-life episodes requires rapid neuronal changes that may appear after a single occurrence of an event. How is such demand met by neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which plays a fundamental role in episodic memory formation? We recorded the activity of MTL neurons in neurosurgical patients while they learned new associations. Pairs of unrelated pictures, one of a person and another of a place, were used to construct a meaningful association modeling the episodic memory of meeting a person in a particular place. We found that a large proportion of responsive MTL neurons expanded their selectivity to encode these specific associations within a few trials: cells initially responsive to one picture started firing to the associated one but not to others. Our results provide a plausible neural substrate for the inception of associations, which are crucial for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:26139375

  2. Food and human gut as reservoirs of transferable antibiotic resistance encoding genes

    PubMed Central

    Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    The increase and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) over the past decade in human pathogens has become a worldwide health concern. Recent genomic and metagenomic studies in humans, animals, in food and in the environment have led to the discovery of a huge reservoir of AR genes called the resistome that could be mobilized and transferred from these sources to human pathogens. AR is a natural phenomenon developed by bacteria to protect antibiotic-producing bacteria from their own products and also to increase their survival in highly competitive microbial environments. Although antibiotics are used extensively in humans and animals, there is also considerable usage of antibiotics in agriculture, especially in animal feeds and aquaculture. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the sources of AR and the use of antibiotics in these reservoirs as selectors for emergence of AR bacteria in humans via the food chain. PMID:23805136

  3. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael A; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  4. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  5. Regulation of p53-dependent apoptosis, transcriptional repression, and cell transformation by phosphorylation of the 55-kilodalton E1B protein of human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    The adenovirus type 5 55-kDa E1B protein (E1B-55kDa) cooperates with E1A gene products to induce cell transformation. E1A proteins stimulate DNA synthesis and cell proliferation; however, they also cause rapid cell death by p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis. It is believed that the role of the E1B-55kDa protein in transformation is to protect against p53-dependent apoptosis by binding to and inactivating p53. It has been shown previously that the 55-kDa polypeptide abrogates p53-mediated transactivation and that mutants defective in p53 binding are unable to cooperate with E1A in transformation. We have previously mapped phosphorylation sites near the carboxy terminus of the E1B-55kDa protein at Ser-490 and Ser-491, which lie within casein kinase II consensus sequences. Conversion of these sites to alanine residues greatly reduced transforming activity, and although the mutant 55-kDa protein was found to interact with p53 at normal levels, it was somewhat defective for suppression of p53 transactivation activity. We now report that a nearby residue, Thr-495, also appears to be phosphorylated. We demonstrate directly that the wild-type 55-kDa protein is able to block E1A-induced p53-dependent apoptosis, whereas cells infected by mutant pm490/1/5A, which contains alanine residues at all three phosphorylation sites, exhibited extensive DNA fragmentation and classic apoptotic cell death. The E1B-55kDa product has been shown to exhibit intrinsic transcriptional repression activity when localized to promoters, such as by fusion with the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, even in the absence of p53. Such repression activity was totally absent with mutant pm490/1/5A. These data suggested that inhibition of p53-dependent apoptosis may depend on the transcriptional repression function of the 55-kDa protein, which appears to be regulated be phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus. PMID:9094635

  6. The human GARS-AIRS-GART gene encodes two proteins which are differentially expressed during human brain development and temporally overexpressed in cerebellum of individuals with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, G; Barnes, T; Bleskan, J; Becker, L; Cox, M; Patterson, D

    1997-11-01

    Purines are critical for energy metabolism, cell signalling and cell reproduction. Nevertheless, little is known about the regulation of this essential biochemical pathway during mammalian development. In humans, the second, third and fifth steps of de novo purine biosynthesis are catalyzed by a trifunctional protein with glycinamide ribonucleotide synthetase (GARS), aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (AIRS) and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GART) enzymatic activities. The gene encoding this trifunctional protein is located on chromosome 21. The enzyme catalyzing the intervening fourth step of de novo purine biosynthesis, phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT), is encoded by a separate gene on chromosome 17. To investigate the regulation of these proteins, we have generated monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies specific to each of these enzymatic domains. Using these antibodies on western blots of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the human GARS-AIRS-GART gene, we show that this gene encodes not only the trifunctional protein of 110 kDa, but also a monofunctional GARS protein of 50 kDa. This carboxy-truncated human GARS protein is produced by alternative splicing resulting in the use of a polyadenylation site in the intron between the terminal GARS and the first AIRS exons. The expression of both the GARS and GARS-AIRS-GART proteins are regulated during development of the human cerebellum, while the expression of FGARAT appears to be constitutive. All three proteins are expressed at high levels during normal prenatal cerebellum development while the GARS and GARS-AIRS-GART proteins become undetectable in this tissue shortly after birth. In contrast, the GARS and GARS-AIRS-GART proteins continue to be expressed during the postnatal development of the cerebellum in individuals with Down syndrome. PMID:9328467

  7. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  8. Plasmid-encoding vasostatin inhibited the growth and metastasis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing-Chen; Wang, Ming; Chen, Xu-Xia; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Gui-Hua; Liao, Hong-Li

    2014-10-01

    The growth and metastasis of solid tumors depends on angiogenesis. Anti-angiogenesis therapy may represent a promising therapeutic option. Vasostatin, the N-terminal domain of calreticulin, is a very potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether plasmid-encoding vasostatin complexed with cationic liposome could suppress the growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo and discover its possible mechanism of action. Apoptosis induction of pSecTag2B-vasostatin plasmid on murine endothelial cells (MS1) was examined by flow cytometric analysis in vitro. Nude mice bearing HCCLM3 tumor received pSecTag2B-vaso