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Sample records for adenovirus encoding human

  1. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  2. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  3. Identification and purification of a protein encoded by the human adenovirus type 2 transforming region.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Matsuo, T

    1982-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) transforming genes are located in early regions E1a (map position 1.3 to 4.5) and E1b (map position 4.6 to 11.2). We have identified and purified to near homogeneity a major 20,000-molecular-weight (20K) protein and have shown that it is coded by E1b. Using an Ad2-transformed cell antiserum which contained antibody to E1b-coded proteins, we immunoprecipitated 53K and 19K proteins from the nucleoplasm and 53K, 19K, and 20K proteins from the cytoplasmic S-100 fraction of Ad2 productively infected and Ad2-transformed cells. The 19K protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, whereas the 20K protein was found only in the cytoplasm. The 53K and 19K proteins are known Ad2 E1b-coded proteins. The 20K protein was purified to near homogeneity in 20 to 50% yields by sequential DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified 20K protein shares most of its methionine-labeled tryptic peptides with E1b-53K, as shown by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and therefore is closely related to the 53K protein. The 19K protein does not appear to share tryptic peptides with either 20K or 53K protein. To provide more direct evidence that 20K protein is virus-coded, we translated E1b-specific mRNA in vitro. Both immunoprecipitation analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the translated product identified a 20K protein that has the same tryptic peptides as the 20K protein isolated from infected and from transformed cells. These findings suggest that the Ad2 20K protein is a primary translation product of an Ad2 E1b mRNA. Images PMID:7045392

  4. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  5. Thrombopoietin (TPO) knockout phenotype induced by cross-reactive antibodies against TPO following injection of mice with recombinant adenovirus encoding human TPO.

    PubMed

    Abina, M A; Tulliez, M; Duffour, M T; Debili, N; Lacout, C; Villeval, J L; Wendling, F; Vainchenker, W; Haddada, H

    1998-05-01

    Adenovirus vectors have emerged as potent agents for gene transfer. Immune response against the vector and the encoded protein is one of the major factors in the transient expression following in vivo gene transfer. A single injection of an adenovirus encoding human thrombopoietin (TPO) into mice induced transient thrombocytosis, followed by a chronic immune thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenic mice had anti-human TPO Abs of the IgG2a and IgG1 isotypes. Thrombocytopenic mice sera neutralized more efficiently human than murine TPO, and exhibited no detectable anti-murine TPO Abs. Despite their low affinity for murine TPO, anti-TPO Abs induced a TPO knockout-like phenotype, i.e., low number of marrow megakaryocytes and of all kinds of hemopoietic progenitors. Hybridomas derived from a thrombocytopenic mouse revealed cross-reactivity of all of the secreted anti-TPO Ab isotypes. Mice subjected to myelosuppression after virus injection showed that anti-human TPO of IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes disappeared. Thus, sustained human TPO production was responsible for platelet elevation for at least 5 mo. Compelling results showed that elevated IgG2a/IgG2b ratios are always associated with thrombocytopenia, whereas low ratios are associated with tolerance or normal platelet counts. Finally, we hypothesize that in humans some chronic thrombocytopenia associated with a low TPO plasma level are due to anti-TPO Abs.

  6. Packaging of an AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase for gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type II with a modified hybrid adenovirus-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Xu, Fang; Hou, Yang-Xun; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-04-01

    We have developed an improved method for packaging adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors with a replication-defective adenovirus-AAV (Ad-AAV) hybrid virus. The AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) was cloned into an E1, polymerase/preterminal protein-deleted adenovirus, such that it is packaged as an Ad vector. Importantly, the Ad-AAV hybrid cannot replicate during AAV vector packaging in 293 cells, because of deletion of polymerase/preterminal protein. The residual Ad-AAV in the AAV vector stock was reduced to <1 infectious particle per 10(10) AAV vector particles. These modifications resulted in approximately 30-fold increased packaging of the AAV vector for the hybrid Ad-AAV vector method as compared with standard transfection-only methods. Similarly improved packaging was demonstrated for pseudotyping the AAV vector as AAV6, and for AAV vector packaging with a second Ad-AAV vector encoding canine glucose-6-phosphatase. Liver-targeted delivery of either the Ad-AAV hybrid or AAV vector particles in acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice revealed secretion of hGAA with the Ad-AAV vector, and sustained secretion of hGAA with an AAV vector in hGAA-tolerant GAA-KO mice. Further development of hybrid Ad-AAV vectors could offer distinct advantages for gene therapy in glycogen storage diseases.

  7. Region E3 of subgroup B human adenoviruses encodes a 16-kilodalton membrane protein that may be a distant analog of the E3-6.7K protein of subgroup C adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, L K; Wilson-Rawls, J; Wold, W S

    1995-01-01

    There is an open reading frame in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) and Ad7 that could encode a protein of 16 kDa (16K protein). Ad3 and Ad7 are members of subgroup B of human adenoviruses. Using a rabbit antipeptide antiserum, we show that the 16K protein is expressed in Ad3- and Ad7-infected cells at early and late stages of infection; it is not expressed in cells infected with an Ad7 mutant that deletes the 16K gene. The 16K protein was also transcribed and translated in vitro from DNA containing the open reading frame for the 16K protein. The 16K protein has two hydrophobic domains typical of integral membrane proteins; consistent with this, we detected 16K in the crude membrane but not the cytosol cellular fractions. Although 16K has two potential sites for Asn-linked glycosylation, the protein is not glycosylated. The 16K gene is located in the same position in region E3 as the gene for the 6.7K protein of subgroup C adenoviruses (Ad2 and Ad5). E3-6.7K is an Asn-linked integral membrane glycoprotein, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, whose function is unknown. The 16K protein has a putative transmembrane domain located in the same place in 16K as is the transmembrane domain in 6.7K, and the C-terminal portion of 16K is partially homologous to the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of 6.7K; we suggest that these domains in 16K and 6.7K may have a similar function. The N-terminal 102 residues in 16K are not found in 6.7K; these residues may have a function that is unique to the 16K protein. In common with all known E3 proteins, the 16K protein is dispensable for virus replication in cultured cells; this suggests that the 16K protein may function in virus-host interactions. PMID:7769690

  8. Adenovirus encoding human platelet-derived growth factor-B delivered to alveolar bone defects exhibits safety and biodistribution profiles favorable for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Chun; Cirelli, Joni A; Jin, Qiming; Seol, Yang-Jo; Sugai, James V; D'Silva, Nisha J; Danciu, Theodora E; Chandler, Lois A; Sosnowski, Barbara A; Giannobile, William V

    2009-05-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) gene therapy offers promise for tissue engineering of tooth-supporting alveolar bone defects. To date, limited information exists regarding the safety profile and systemic biodistribution of PDGF gene therapy vectors when delivered locally to periodontal osseous defects. The aim of this preclinical study was to determine the safety profile of adenovirus encoding the PDGF-B gene (AdPDGF-B) delivered in a collagen matrix to periodontal lesions. Standardized alveolar bone defects were created in rats, followed by delivery of matrix alone or containing AdPDGF-B at 5.5 x 10(8) or 5.5 x 10(9) plaque-forming units/ml. The regenerative response was confirmed histologically. Gross clinical observations, hematology, and blood chemistries were monitored to evaluate systemic involvement. Bioluminescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to assess vector biodistribution. No significant histopathological changes were noted during the investigation. Minor alterations in specific hematological and blood chemistries were seen; however, most parameters were within the normal range for all groups. Bioluminescence analysis revealed vector distribution at the axillary lymph nodes during the first 2 weeks with subsequent return to baseline levels. AdPDGF-B was well contained within the localized osseous defect area without viremia or distant organ involvement. These results indicate that AdPDGF-B delivered in a collagen matrix exhibits acceptable safety profiles for possible use in human clinical studies.

  9. Synthesis in Escherichia coli of human adenovirus type 12 transforming proteins encoded by early region 1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kimelman, D; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Ptashne, M; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad)-encoded early region 1A (E1A) tumor (T) antigens have been implicated in the positive regulation of viral early genes, the positive and negative regulation of some cellular genes, and cell immortalization and transformation. To further study the Ad E1A T antigens and to facilitate their purification, we have cloned cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA downstream of a hybrid Escherichia coli trp-lac (tac) promoter. Up to 8% of the protein synthesized in E. coli cells transformed by each of the two different Ad12 E1A cDNA constructs were immunoprecipitated as a Mr 47,000 protein by antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded in the Ad12 E1A DNA sequence. Both proteins produced in E. coli appear to be authentic and complete Ad12 E1A T antigens because they possess (i) the Ad12 E1A NH2-terminal amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence; (ii) the Ad12 E1A COOH-terminal sequence, as shown by immunoprecipitation with anti-peptide antibody; and (iii) a molecular weight and an acidic isoelectric point similar to that of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected and transformed mammalian cells. The T antigens were purified to near homogeneity in yields of 100-200 micrograms per g wet weight of transformed E. coli cells. Images PMID:6387701

  10. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  11. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  12. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  13. Adenovirus dodecahedron, a new vector for human gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Ruigrok, R W; Gout, E; Buffet, S; Chroboczek, J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus is one of most efficient delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, the initial enthusiasm for the use of recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy has been tempered by strong immune responses that develop to the virus and virus-infected cells. Even though recombinant adenoviruses are replication-defective, they introduce into the recipient cell, together with the gene of interest, viral genetes that might lead to fortuitous recombination if the recipient is infected by wild-type adenovirus. We propose the use of a dodecahedron made of adenovirus pentons or penton bases as an alternative vector for human gene therapy. The penton is a complex of two oligomeric proteins, a penton base and fiber, involved in the cell attachment, internalization, and liberation of virus into the cytoplasm. The dodecahedron retains many of the advantages of adenovirus for gene transfer such as efficiency of entry, efficient release of DNA from endosomes, and wide range of cell and tissue targets. Because it consists of only one or two adenovirus proteins instead of the 11 contained in an adenovirus virion and it does not contain the viral genome, it is potentially a safer alternative to recombinant adenovirus.

  14. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  15. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  16. Immune Protection of Nonhuman Primates Against Ebola Virus with Single Low-Dose Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Modified GPs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Immune Protection of Nonhuman Primates against Ebola Virus with Single Low-Dose Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Modified GPs Nancy J. Sullivan 1...Shedlock DJ, Xu L, et al. (2006) Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified...should be addressed. E-mail: gnabel@nih.gov [ These authors contributed equally to this work. A B S T R A C T Background Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic

  17. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  18. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran-Yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-Min; Li, Li-Xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-Xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  19. Mechanics of Viral Chromatin Reveals the Pressurization of Human Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Condezo, Gabriela N; Pérez-Berná, Ana J; Chillón, Miguel; Flint, S Jane; Reguera, David; San Martín, Carmen; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2015-11-24

    Tight confinement of naked genomes within some viruses results in high internal pressure that facilitates their translocation into the host. Adenovirus, however, encodes histone-like proteins that associate with its genome resulting in a confined DNA-protein condensate (core). Cleavage of these proteins during maturation decreases core condensation and primes the virion for proper uncoating via unidentified mechanisms. Here we open individual, mature and immature adenovirus cages to directly probe the mechanics of their chromatin-like cores. We find that immature cores are more rigid than the mature ones, unveiling a mechanical signature of their condensation level. Conversely, intact mature particles demonstrate more rigidity than immature or empty ones. DNA-condensing polyamines revert the mechanics of mature capsid and cores to near-immature values. The combination of these experiments reveals the pressurization of adenovirus particles induced by maturation. We estimate a pressure of ∼30 atm by continuous elasticity, which is corroborated by modeling the adenovirus mini-chromosome as a confined compact polymer. We propose this pressurization as a mechanism that facilitates initiating the stepwise disassembly of the mature particle, enabling its escape from the endosome and final genome release at the nuclear pore.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Adenoviruses Persistently Shed from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Grant, Rebecca; Calcedo, Roberto; Yuan, Xin; Keough, Martin; Sandhu, Arbans; Wang, Qiang; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Wilson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported) together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a) the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b) there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c) the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors. PMID:19578438

  1. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  2. Recombinant Human Adenovirus: Targeting to the Human Transferrin Receptor Improves Gene Transfer to Brain Microcapillary Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Haibin; Anderson, Brian; Mao, Qinwen; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2000-01-01

    Some inborn errors of metabolism due to deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes cause global neurodegenerative disease. Representative examples include the infantile and late infantile forms of the ceroid lipofuscinoses (CLN1 or CLN2 deficiency, respectively) and mucopolysaccharidoses type VII (MPS VII), a deficiency of β-glucuronidase. Treatment of the central nervous system component of these disorders will require widespread protein or enzyme replacement, either through dissemination of the protein or through dissemination of a gene encoding it. We hypothesize that transduction of brain microcapillary endothelium (BME) with recombinant viral vectors, with secretion of enzyme product basolaterally, could allow for widespread enzyme dissemination. To achieve this, viruses should be modified to target the BME. This requires (i) identification of a BME-resident target receptor, (ii) identification of motifs targeted to that molecule, (iii) the construction of modified viruses to allow for binding to the target receptor, and (iv) demonstrated transduction of receptor-expressing cells. In proof of principal experiments, we chose the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), a molecule found at high density on human BME. A nonamer phage display library was panned for motifs which could bind hTfR. Forty-three clones were sequenced, most of which contained an AKxxK/R, KxKxPK/R, or KxK motif. Ten peptides representative of the three motifs were cloned into the HI loop of adenovirus type 5 fiber. All motifs tested retained their ability to trimerize and bind transferrin receptor, and seven allowed for recombinant adenovirus production. Importantly, the fiber-modified viruses facilitated increased gene transfer (2- to 34-fold) to hTfR expressing cell lines and human brain microcapillary endothelia expressing high levels of endogenous receptor. Our data indicate that adenoviruses can be modified in the HI loop for expanded tropism to the hTfR. PMID:11070036

  3. Adenovirus-receptor interaction with human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentel, R; Döpping, G; Wegner, U; Seidel, W; Liebermann, H; Döhner, L

    1997-03-01

    Lymphocytes play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and are host cells for several viral and bacterial pathogens. Their importance in adenovirus (Ad) infections is not yet fully understood. The initial event, the attachment of Ad to lymphocytes and their subsets, was examined using flow cytometry. The study included analysis of stimulated T cells in binding assays with FITC-labeled Ad fiber. The results confirm that native peripheral lymphocytes express very small amounts of Ad receptors. Stimulation with PHA and interleukin 2 induced the expression. The presence of Ad DNA as a sign of internalization in stimulated cells was demonstrated using the polymerase chain reaction. The findings suggest that lymphocytes after stimulation can turn into target cells for Ad. This is particularly important if there are indications for persistence of Ad, and in the case of immunocompromised patients severe, life-threatening diseases can develop.

  4. Gene therapy of experimental malignant mesothelioma using adenovirus vectors encoding the HSVtk gene.

    PubMed

    Esandi, M C; van Someren, G D; Vincent, A J; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Bout, A; Noteboom, J L

    1997-04-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus vectors were generated in which the gene of interest (lacZ, luciferase or HSV-tk) is driven by the adenovirus major late promoter (MLP) or the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter/enhancer (CMV). In vitro experiments with rat (II-45) and human (MERO 25) mesothelioma cell lines revealed that the CMV promoter was stronger than the MLP promoter regarding levels of expression of the luciferase reporter gene and ganciclovir (GCV) killing efficiency after tk gene transfer. Following administration of IG.Ad.CMV.lacZ recombinant adenovirus (Introgene, IG) into the pleural cavity of Fischer rats with established mesothelioma, a widespread distribution of infectious virus particles through the thorax contents was demonstrated. However, a relatively small proportion of tumor cells were transduced. Nevertheless, a strong tumor growth inhibition was observed following treatment with IG.Ad.CMV.TK recombinant adenovirus and GCV. Separate groups of rats inoculated on day 0 with 10(5) II-45 cells in the pleural cavity, received 7 x 10(9) infectious particles of IG.Ad. CMV.TK on day 1, day 2, day 4 or day 8. One day after virus administration, 25 mg/kg GCV or PBS (controls) was injected i.p. (intraperitoneally) twice daily. On day 15, all animals were killed. Significant tumor regression, equivalent to 5 log cell kill, occurred in the treated rats suggesting an impressive bystander effect. In a survival study, animals were treated 9 days after inoculation of 10(5) tumor cells with IG.Ad.CMV.TK and a 14 days course of GCV. This treatment prolonged symptom-free survival time from 19 days in the controls to 33 days in the treated group. These responses can be best explained by assuming continued tk expression in or around the tumor tissue during GCV treatment. Our results confirm and extend earlier findings with the same model and demonstrate the potential of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene therapy as a local

  5. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran-yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-ling; Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Li, Li-xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  6. Effect of adenovirus infection on expression of human histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Flint, S J; Plumb, M A; Yang, U C; Stein, G S; Stein, J L

    1984-01-01

    The influence of adenovirus type 2 infection of HeLa cells upon expression of human histone genes was examined as a function of the period of infection. Histone RNA synthesis was assayed after run-off transcription in nuclei isolated from mock-infected cells and after various periods of adenovirus infection. Histone protein synthesis was measured by [3H]leucine labeling of intact cells and fluorography of electrophoretically fractionated nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. The cellular representation of RNA species complementary to more than 13 different human histone genes was determined by RNA blot analysis of total cellular, nuclear or cytoplasmic RNA by using a series of 32P-labeled cloned human histone genes as hybridization probes and also by analysis of 3H-labeled histone mRNA species synthesized in intact cells. By 18 h after infection, HeLa cell DNA synthesis and all parameters of histone gene expression, including transcription and the nuclear and cytoplasmic concentrations of core and H1 mRNA species, were reduced to less than 5 to 10% of the control values. By contrast, transcription and processing of other cellular mRNA sequences have been shown to continue throughout this period of infection. The early period of adenovirus infection was marked by an inhibition of transcription of histone genes that accompanied the reduction in rate of HeLa cell DNA synthesis. These results suggest that the adenovirus-induced inhibition of histone gene expression is mediated in part at the transcriptional level. However, the persistence of histone mRNA species at concentrations comparable to those of mock-infected control cells during the early phase of the infection, despite a reduction in histone gene transcription and histone protein synthesis, implies that histone gene expression is also regulated post-transcriptionally in adenovirus-infected cells. These results suggest that the tight coupling between histone mRNA concentrations and the rate of cellular DNA

  7. Ion etching of human adenovirus 2: structure of the core

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, W.W.; Boring, J.W.; Brown, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    The surface of human adenovirus 2 was etched by irradiating intact virions with low-energy (1-keV) Ar/sup +/ ions in a Technics Hummer V sputter coater. Viral structures exposed by the etching process were shadowed and then examined in the electron microscope. Periods of etching that were sufficient to reduce the viral diameter by 20 to 30 nm revealed distinct substructural elements in the virion core. Cores were found to consist of a cluster of 12 large, uniformly sized spheres which abutted one another in the intact virion. The spheres, for which we suggest the name adenosomes, had a diameter of 23.0 +/- 2.3 nm, and they were related to each other by two-, three-, and fivefold axes of rotational symmetry. The results support the view, originally suggested by Brown et al. that the adenovirus 2 core is composed of 12 large spheres packed tightly together in such a way that each is directed toward the vertex of an icosahedron. Such a structure, constructed of 23.0-nm-diameter spheres, would have an outside diameter (vertex-to-vertex distance) of 67.0 nm and a face-to-face distance of 58.2 nm. It could be accommodated inside the icosahedral adenovirus capsid if each large sphere were located beneath a capsid vertex.

  8. Prevalence of human adenoviruses in raw and treated water.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, J; Ehlers, M M; van Zyl, W B; Grabow, W O K

    2004-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAds), of which there are 51 antigenic types, are associated aetiologically with gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary tract and eye infections. The clinical importance of HAds and the potential health risks constituted by HAds in water environments are widely recognised. This study was conducted to assess the use of an optimised integrated cell culture molecular-based technique to determine the prevalence of HAds in raw and treated drinking-water supplies in South Africa. Selected supplies were monitored weekly for the presence of adenoviruses over a one-year period (July 2001 to June 2002). Drinking-water supplies were derived from acceptable quality surface water sources using treatment processes that conformed to international standards for the production of safe drinking water. Adenoviruses were detected by amplification in cell cultures, followed by amplifying the extracted nucleic acids using molecular techniques (nested PCR). HAds were detected in 29.8% (59/198) of the treated drinking water, 16% (8/50) of dam water and 44% (22/50) of river-water samples tested. The results of this study confirmed the presence of HAds in some raw and treated drinking water supplies in South Africa.

  9. Human papillomavirus E6E7-mediated adenovirus cell killing: selectivity of mutant adenovirus replication in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Balagué, C; Noya, F; Alemany, R; Chow, L T; Curiel, D T

    2001-08-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. Exclusive virus replication in cancer cells has been proposed as a safety trait to be considered in the design of oncolytic adenoviruses. From this perspective, we have investigated several adenovirus mutants for their potential to conditionally replicate and promote the killing of cells expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which are present in a high percentage of anogenital cancers. For this purpose, we have employed an organotypic model of human stratified squamous epithelium derived from primary keratinocytes that have been engineered to express HPV-18 oncoproteins stably. We show that, whereas wild-type adenovirus promotes a widespread cytopathic effect in all infected cells, E1A- and E1A/E1B-deleted adenoviruses cause no deleterious effect regardless of the coexpression of HPV18 E6E7. An adenovirus deleted in the CR2 domain of E1A, necessary for binding to the pRB family of pocket proteins, shows no selectivity of replication as it efficiently kills all normal and E6E7-expressing keratinocytes. Finally, an adenovirus mutant deleted in the CR1 and CR2 domains of E1A exhibits preferential replication and cell killing in HPV E6E7-expressing cultures. We conclude that the organotypic keratinocyte culture represents a distinct model to evaluate adenovirus selectivity and that, based on this model, further modifications of the adenovirus genome are required to restrict adenovirus replication to tumor cells.

  10. Human Papillomavirus E6E7-Mediated Adenovirus Cell Killing: Selectivity of Mutant Adenovirus Replication in Organotypic Cultures of Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balagué, Cristina; Noya, Francisco; Alemany, Ramon; Chow, Louise T.; Curiel, David T.

    2001-01-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. Exclusive virus replication in cancer cells has been proposed as a safety trait to be considered in the design of oncolytic adenoviruses. From this perspective, we have investigated several adenovirus mutants for their potential to conditionally replicate and promote the killing of cells expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which are present in a high percentage of anogenital cancers. For this purpose, we have employed an organotypic model of human stratified squamous epithelium derived from primary keratinocytes that have been engineered to express HPV-18 oncoproteins stably. We show that, whereas wild-type adenovirus promotes a widespread cytopathic effect in all infected cells, E1A- and E1A/E1B-deleted adenoviruses cause no deleterious effect regardless of the coexpression of HPV18 E6E7. An adenovirus deleted in the CR2 domain of E1A, necessary for binding to the pRB family of pocket proteins, shows no selectivity of replication as it efficiently kills all normal and E6E7-expressing keratinocytes. Finally, an adenovirus mutant deleted in the CR1 and CR2 domains of E1A exhibits preferential replication and cell killing in HPV E6E7-expressing cultures. We conclude that the organotypic keratinocyte culture represents a distinct model to evaluate adenovirus selectivity and that, based on this model, further modifications of the adenovirus genome are required to restrict adenovirus replication to tumor cells. PMID:11462032

  11. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  12. Human adenoviruses in water: occurrence and health implications: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sunny C

    2006-12-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that are responsible for both enteric illnesses and respiratory and eye infections. Recently, these viruses have been found to be prevalent in rivers, coastal waters, swimming pool waters, and drinking water supplies worldwide. United Sates Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) listed adenovirus as one of nine microorganisms on the Contamination Candidate List for drinking water because their survival characteristic during water treatment is not yet fully understood. Adenoviruses have been found to be significantly more stable than fecal indicator bacteria and other enteric viruses during UV treatment. Adenovirus infection may be caused by consumption of contaminated water or inhalation of aerosolized droplets during water recreation. The goal of this review is to summarize the state of technology for adenovirus detection in natural and drinking waters and the human health risk imposed by this emerging pathogen. The occurrence of these viruses in natural and treated waters is summarized from worldwide reports.

  13. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  14. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  15. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  16. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  17. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph A; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C Richter; Gall, Jason G D

    2010-08-09

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results.

  18. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R.; Hackney, Jason A.; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J.; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T.; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E.; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus–host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus–host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  19. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  20. Ganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathogenicity in Permissive Immunosuppressed Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E.; Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R. Mark L.; Wold, William S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment. PMID:25224011

  1. Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R Mark L; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment.

  2. Interaction of human adenoviruses and coliphages with kaolinite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bellou, Maria I; Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Tselepi, Maria A; Kokkinos, Petros A; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros C; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses (hAdVs) are pathogenic viruses responsible for public health problems worldwide. They have also been used as viral indicators in environmental systems. Coliphages (e.g., MS2, ΦX174) have also been studied as indicators of viral pollution in fecally contaminated water. Our objective was to evaluate the distribution of three viral fecal indicators (hAdVs, MS2, and ΦΧ174), between two different phyllosilicate clays (kaolinite and bentonite) and the aqueous phase. A series of static and dynamic experiments were conducted under two different temperatures (4, 25°C) for a time period of seven days. HAdV adsorption was examined in DNase I reaction buffer (pH=7.6, and ionic strength (IS)=1.4mM), whereas coliphage adsorption in phosphate buffered saline solution (pH=7, IS=2mM). Moreover, the effect of IS on hAdV adsorption under static conditions was evaluated. The adsorption of hAdV was assessed by real-time PCR and its infectivity was tested by cultivation methods. The coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 were assayed by the double-layer overlay method. The experimental results have shown that coliphage adsorption onto both kaolinite and bentonite was higher for the dynamic than the static experiments; whereas hAdV adsorption was lower under dynamic conditions. The adsorption of hAdV increased with decreasing temperature, contrary to the results obtained for the coliphages. This study examines the combined effect of temperature, agitation, clay type, and IS on hAdV adsorption onto clays. The results provide useful new information on the effective removal of viral fecal indicators (MS2, ΦX174 and hAdV) from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption onto kaolinite and bentonite. Factors enabling enteric viruses to penetrate soils, groundwater and travel long distances within aquifers are important public health issues. Because the observed adsorption behavior of surrogate coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 is substantially different to that of hAdV, neither MS2 nor

  3. Viral Pollution in the Environment and in Shellfish: Human Adenovirus Detection by PCR as an Index of Human Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Sonia; Puig, Montserrat; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Joan; Girones, Rosina

    1998-01-01

    A study of the presence of human viruses (adenoviruses, enteroviruses, and hepatitis A viruses [HAVs]) in environmental and shellfish samples was carried out by applying DNA and cDNA amplification techniques by PCR. The detection of human adenoviruses by PCR was also examined as a potential molecular test to monitor viral pollution. The samples studied were urban and slaughterhouse sewage, river water, seawater, and shellfish. Enteroviruses were quantified by PFU in Buffalo green monkey kidney cells and fecal coliforms and phages of Bacteroides fragilis HSP40 were also evaluated in some of the samples. The amplification of viral DNA and cDNA has shown a high prevalence of human viruses that would not be detected by the use of classical techniques, such as the quantification of PFU in cell lines. The results of the analysis of slaughterhouse sewage samples together with the test of farm animal feces indicate that the adenoviruses and the HAVs detected in the environment are mostly of human origin. A significative correlation between the detection of human viruses by PCR and the values of bacteriophages of B. fragilis HSP40 in urban raw sewage was observed. Human adenoviruses were the viruses most frequently detected throughout the year, and all the samples that were positive for enteroviruses or HAVs were also positive for human adenoviruses. The results suggest that the detection of adenoviruses by PCR could be used as an index of the presence of human viruses in the environment where a molecular index is acceptable. PMID:9726885

  4. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a recombinant human alpha 1-antitrypsin cDNA to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lemarchand, P; Jaffe, H A; Danel, C; Cid, M C; Kleinman, H K; Stratford-Perricaudet, L D; Perricaudet, M; Pavirani, A; Lecocq, J P; Crystal, R G

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus to transfer human genes to the human endothelium, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected in vitro with adenovirus vectors containing the lacZ gene or a human alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) cDNA. After in vitro infection with the lacZ adenovirus vector, cultured endothelial cells expressed beta-galactosidase. In parallel studies with the alpha 1AT adenovirus vector, infected cells expressed human alpha 1AT transcripts, as evidenced by in situ hybridization and Northern analysis, and de novo synthesized and secreted glycosylated, functional alpha 1AT within 6 hr of infection, as shown by [35S]methionine labeling and immunoprecipitation. Quantification of the culture supernatants demonstrated 0.3-0.6 micrograms of human alpha 1AT secreted per 10(6) cells in 24 hr, for at least 14 days after adenovirus vector infection. To demonstrate the feasibility of direct transfer of genes into endothelial cells in human blood vessels, lacZ or alpha 1AT adenovirus vectors were placed in the lumen of intact human umbilical veins ex vivo. Histologic evaluation of the veins after 24 hr demonstrated transfer and expression of the lacZ gene specifically to the endothelium. alpha 1AT adenovirus infection resulted both in expression of alpha 1AT transcripts in the endothelium and in de novo synthesis and secretion of alpha 1AT. Quantification of alpha 1AT in the vein perfusates showed average levels of 13 micrograms/ml after 24 hr. These observations strongly support the feasibility of in vivo human gene transfer to the endothelium mediated by replication-deficient adenovirus vectors. Images PMID:1631146

  5. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  6. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  7. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  8. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  9. Introduction, stable integration, and controlled expression of a chimeric adenovirus gene whose product is toxic to the recipient human cell.

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, D F; Brough, D E; Cleghon, V

    1984-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenoviruses is a multifunctional polypeptide which plays a central role in regulating the expression of the viral genes. To gain a better understanding of the relationships between the various functions provided by DBP, an extensive collection of DBP mutants is essential. To this end we have constructed several permissive human cell lines which contain and express the DBP gene at high levels to allow propagation of otherwise lethal, nonrecoverable mutants of DBP. Because DBP is toxic to human cells, cell lines were constructed by using a vector in which the DBP gene is under the control of the dexamethasone-inducible promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus. The low basal levels of DBP synthesis in the absence of dexamethasone allows isolation and propagation of these cells. Addition of dexamethasone enhances DBP production 50- to 200-fold, and within 8 h its synthesis from the single integrated copy of the chimeric gene is 5 to 15% of that observed during peak DBP synthesis in infected human cells in which hundreds of copies of the DBP gene serve as templates. At the nonpermissive temperature, adenovirus mutants with ts lesions in the DBP gene replicate their DNAs, express their late genes, and form infectious viral particles in these DBP+ cell lines but not in the parental HeLa cells. Images PMID:6542172

  10. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV)...

  11. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, G A; Anderson, C W

    1981-01-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. Cells reconstructed from infected human karyoplasts and monkey cytoplasts expressed fiber, whereas cells reconstructed from infected monkey karyoplasts and human cytoplasts did not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide. Furthermore, they suggest that the translational apparatus of monkey cells is competent to translate functional fiber mRNA synthesized in human cells. Images PMID:7218436

  12. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  13. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  14. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  15. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  16. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  17. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of class I major histocompatibility complex genes following transformation with human adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, J; Rotem-Yehudar, R; Ehrlich, R

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of rodent cells by human adenoviruses is a well-established model system for studying the expression, regulation, and function of class I antigens. In this report, we demonstrate that the highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 operates at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in regulating the activity of major histocompatibility complex class I genes and products in transformed cells. Adenovirus type 12 suppresses the cell surface expression of class I antigens in most cell lines. Nevertheless, in a number of cell lines suppression is the result of reduction in the amount of stable specific mRNA, while in another group of cell lines suppression involves interference with processing of a posttranscriptional product. The two mechanisms operate both for the endogenous H-2 genes and for a miniature swine class I transgene that is expressed in the cells. Images PMID:1895404

  18. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  19. Relative transport of human adenovirus and MS2 in porous media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent enteric virus found in the water environment by numerous monitoring studies and MS2 is the most common surrogate used for previous virus transport studies. However, the current knowledge on the transport behavior of HAdV in porous med...

  20. Influence of Inorganic Ions and Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, influence of solution chemistries to the transport properties (aggregation and attachment behavior) of human adenovirus (HAdV) was investigated. Results showed isoelectric point (IEP) of HAdV in different salt conditions varied minimally, and it ranged from pH 3.5 ...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Adenovirus 7 Associated with Fatal Adult Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshina, Svetlana B; Ageeva, Margarita R; Deviatkin, Andrey A; Pimkina, Ekaterina V; Markelov, Mikhail L; Dedkov, Vladimir G; Safonova, Marina V; Shumilina, Elena Y; Lukashev, Alexander N; Shipulin, German A

    2016-10-27

    Human adenovirus 7 (hAdv7) 19BOVLB/Volgograd/Rus/2014 was isolated from the autopsy material from an adult with fatal pneumonia in Volgograd, Russia, in March 2014. Whole-genome sequencing of the virus isolate was performed.

  2. Inactivation of human adenovirus by sequential disinfection with an alternative ultraviolet technology and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gwy-Am; Lee, Jung-Keun

    2010-07-01

    In an effort to reduce human exposure to adenoviruses through drinking water, we determined the effectiveness of sequential disinfection with an alternative ultraviolet (UV) technology (medium-pressure (MP) UV) and monochloramine. The results of this study showed that MP UV was much more effective than traditional UV technology (low-pressure (LP) UV) against human adenovirus 2 (Ad2). Specifically, an inactivation of approximately 3 log10 was achieved by a dose of 40 mJ/cm2 of MP UV compared to ~1 log10 by the same dose of LP UV. However, because of the ineffective inactivation of Ad2 by monochloramine, a very high dose (40 mJ/cm2) of MP UV and a very large Ct99 value (approximately 1200 mg/L.min) was still needed to achieve a significant inactivation (e.g., 4 log10) of Ad2. Also, it appears that the inactivation of Ad2 by monochloramine is not enhanced by prior exposure to MP UV. Overall, the results of this study indicated that, in spite of the enhanced effectiveness of alternative UV technologies on human adenoviruses, sequential disinfection with an alternative UV technology (MP UV) and monochloramine still may not provide adequate inactivation of human adenoviruses - especially at high pH and low temperature - in drinking water treatment processes.

  3. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  4. Taxonomy proposal for Old World monkey adenoviruses: characterisation of several non-human, non-ape primate adenovirus lineages.

    PubMed

    Pantó, Laura; Podgorski, Iva I; Jánoska, Máté; Márkó, Orsolya; Harrach, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    A species classification regarding Old World monkey adenoviruses is proposed. We determined the nucleotide sequences of PCR-amplified fragments from the genes of the IVa2, DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, penton base, and hexon proteins from every simian adenovirus (SAdV) serotype that originated from Old World monkeys for which the full genome sequence had not yet been published. We confirmed that the majority of Old Word monkey SAdVs belong to two previously established species. Interestingly, one is the most recently established human AdV species, Human mastadenovirus G, which includes a single human virus, HAdV-52, as well as SAdV-1, -2, -7, -11, -12, and -15. The other approved species, Simian mastadenovirus A includes SAdV-3, -4, -6, -9, -10, -14, and -48. Several SAdVs (SAdV-5, -8, -49, -50) together with baboon AdV-1 and rhesus monkey AdV strains A1139, A1163, A1173, A1258, A1285, A1296, A1312, A1327 and A1335 have been proposed to be classified into an additional species, Simian mastadenovirus B. Another proposed species, Simian mastadenovirus C has been described for SAdV-19, baboon AdV-2/4 and -3. Our study revealed the existence of four additional AdV lineages. The corresponding new candidate species are Simian mastadenovirus D (for SAdV-13), Simian mastadenovirus E (for SAdV-16), Simian mastadenovirus F (for SAdV-17 and -18), and Simian mastadenovirus G (for SAdV-20). Several biological and genomic properties, such as the host origin, haemagglutination profile, number of fibre genes, and G+C content of the genome, strongly support this classification. Three SAdV strains originating from the American Type Culture Collection turned out to be mixtures of at least two virus types, either of the same species (SAdV-12 and -15 types from Human mastadenovirus G) or of two different species (SAdV-5 types from Simian mastadenovirus B and Human mastadenovirus G).

  5. (13) C-metabolic flux analysis of human adenovirus infection: Implications for viral vector production.

    PubMed

    Carinhas, Nuno; Koshkin, Alexey; Pais, Daniel A M; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2017-01-01

    Adenoviruses are human pathogens increasingly used as gene therapy and vaccination vectors. However, their impact on cell metabolism is poorly characterized. We performed carbon labeling experiments with [1,2-(13) C]glucose or [U-(13) C]glutamine to evaluate metabolic alterations in the amniocyte-derived, E1-transformed 1G3 cell line during production of a human adenovirus type 5 vector (AdV5). Nonstationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis revealed increased fluxes of glycolysis (17%) and markedly PPP (over fourfold) and cytosolic AcCoA formation (nearly twofold) following infection of growing cells. Interestingly, infection of growth-arrested cells increased overall carbon flow even more, including glutamine anaplerosis and TCA cycle activity (both over 1.5-fold), but was unable to stimulate the PPP and was associated with a steep drop in AdV5 replication (almost 80%). Our results underscore the importance of nucleic and fatty acid biosynthesis for adenovirus replication. Overall, we portray a metabolic blueprint of human adenovirus infection, highlighting similarities with other viruses and cancer, and suggest strategies to improve AdV5 production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 195-207. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Packaging capacity and stability of human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bett, A J; Prevec, L; Graham, F L

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are extensively used for high-level expression of proteins in mammalian cells and are receiving increasing attention for their potential use as live recombinant vaccines and as transducing viruses for use in gene therapy. Although it is commonly argued that one of the chief advantages of adenovirus vectors is their relative stability, this has not been thoroughly investigated. To examine the genetic stability of adenovirus type 5 vectors and in particular to examine the relationship between genetic stability and genome size, adenovirus vectors were constructed with inserts of 4.88 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), 4.10 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), or 3.82 (LacZ) kb combined with a 1.88-kb E3 deletion or with a newly generated 2.69-kb E3 deletion. The net excess of DNA over the wild-type (wt) genome size ranged from 1.13 to 3.00 kb or 3.1 to 8.3%. Analysis of these vectors during serial passage in tissue culture revealed that when the size exceeded 105% of the wt genome length by approximately 1.2 kb (4.88-kb insert combined with a 1.88-kb deletion), the resulting vector grew very poorly and underwent rapid rearrangement, resulting in loss of the insert after only a few passages. In contrast, vectors with inserts resulting in viral DNA close to or less than a net genome size of 105% of that of the wt grew well and were relatively stable. In general, viruses with genomes only slightly above 105% of that of the wt were unstable and the rapidity with which rearrangement occurred correlated with the size of the insert. These findings suggest that there is a relatively tight constraint on the amount of DNA which can be packaged into virions and that exceeding the limit results in a sharply decreased rate of virus growth. The resultant strong selection for variants which have undergone rearrangement, generating smaller genomes, is manifested as genetic instability of the virus population. Images PMID:8371349

  7. Human Adenovirus 36 Infection Increased the Risk of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei-Yan; Cao, Bing; Wang, Dong-Fang; Guo, Jing-Hui; Chen, Kai-Li; Shi, Mai; Yin, Jian; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human adenovirus 36 (HAdV-36), as the key pathogen, was supposed and discussed to be associated with obesity. We searched the references on the association between HAdV-36 infection and obesity with the different epidemiological methods, to explore the relationship with a larger sample size by meta-analysis and compare the differences of epidemiological methods and population subsets by the subgroup analyses. We conducted literature search on the association between HAdV-36 infections and obesity in English or Chinese published up to July 1, 2015. The primary outcome was the HAdV-36 infection rate in the obese and lean groups; the secondary outcomes were the BMI level and BMI z-score in the HAdV-36 positive and negative groups. The pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated for the primary outcome; the standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for the secondary and third outcomes. Prediction interval (PI) was graphically presented in the forest plot of the random effect meta-analyses. Metaregression analysis and subgroup analysis were performed. Finally 24 references with 10,191 study subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The obesity subjects were more likely to be infected with HAdV-36 compared to the lean controls (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.46, 2.74; PI: 0.59, 6.76; P < 0.001) with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 80.1%; P < 0.001) estimated by the random effect model. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled OR of HAdV-36 infection for obesity were 1.77 (95%CI: 1.19, 2.63; PI: 0.44, 7.03; P = 0.005) and 2.26 (95%CI: 1.67, 3.07; PI: 1.45, 3.54; P < 0.001) in the adults and children, respectively. Compared to the HAdV-36 negative subjects, the SMD of BMI was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.47; PI: −0.53, 1.08; P = 0.006) in the HAdV-36 positive subjects with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 86.5%; P < 0.001). The BMI z-score in the children with HAdV-36 infection was higher than those without HAdV-36 infection (SMD = 0

  8. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields.

  9. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  10. Protection of chickens against avian influenza with non-replicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding a H7 hemagglutinin gene from a low pathogenic North American isolate (AdChNY94.H7). Chickens vaccinate...

  11. Adenovirus type 5 early encoded proteins of the E1 and E4 regions induce oncogenic transformation of primary rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Peter; Täuber, Birgit; Spruss, Thilo; Dobner, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the molecular mechanisms of viral-mediated oncogenesis has contributed enormously to the understanding of the basic principles of normal/malignant cell growth. Transformation by human adenoviruses is a multi-step process involving the modulation of numerous cellular pathways, leading to inhibition of apoptosis and growth arrest. However, the molecular mechanism of how the adenovirus oncogenes facilitate transformation of rodent cells, while concurrently failing to do so for human cells, remains elusive. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that the transformation capabilities of adenovirus type 5 oncogenes are not restricted to rodent cells, but include cells of the related mammalian order Lagomorpha, inducing considerable morphological alterations, enhanced cell growth and tumour induction in vivo. Furthermore, the established cell lines may represent a suitable tool for further development to generate E4-mutated adenoviruses, which has so far been difficult as mutations within the E4 region often prove to be lethal without a helper-cell system.

  12. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings: The vaccine regimen...falciparum malaria vaccine, in healthy, malaria -nave adults’’, work unit number 62787A 870 F 1432. The funders had no role in study design, data...fused to hepatitis B surface protein. RTS,S provides 50% protection against controlled human malaria infection, mediated primarily by the induction of

  13. Identification of a Nonstructural DNA-Binding Protein (DBP) as an Antigen with Diagnostic Potential for Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35) - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ2 =  44.9, P<0.01) the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. Conclusions/Significance The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis. PMID:23516396

  14. Development of Multiplexed Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay for Detecting Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meei-Li; Nguy, Long; Ferrenberg, James; Boeckh, Michael; Cent, Anne; Corey, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdV) have been associated with a wide variety of human disease and are increasingly recognized as viral pathogens that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Early detection of AdV DNA in plasma and sterile fluids has been shown to be useful for identifying patients at risk for invasive AdV disease. Due to the large number of existing Adv types, few real-time quantitative AdV PCR assays published effectively cover all AdV types. We designed a series of AdV PCR primers and probes and empirically multiplexed them into two separate real-time PCR assays to quantitatively detect all 49 serotypes of human AdV (Types 1-49) available from ATCC. We then subsequently multiplexed all the primers and probes into one reaction. The sensitivity of these assays was determined to be less than 10 copies per reaction (500 copies/ml plasma). In a retrospective evaluation we detected all 84 clinical AdV isolates isolated in cell culture from patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between 1981 and 1987. Prospective analysis of 46 consecutive clinical samples submitted for adenovirus testing showed greater sensitivity and equal specificity of the AdV PCR than viral culture. This real time PCR assay allows rapid, sensitive and specific quantification of all currently defined adenoviruses into either two or one multiplex assay for clinical samples. PMID:18707838

  15. Comparison of human and monkey cells for the ability to attenuate transcripts that begin at the adenovirus major late promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Seiberg, M.; Aloni, Y. ); Levine, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Late transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter can terminate prematurely at a site 182 to 188 nucleotides downstream. Experiments have been designed, with run-on transcription in nuclei in vitro or riboprobe protection of RNA obtained both in vivo and in vitro, that demonstrate that the ratio of attenuator RNA to readthrough RNA is greater in monkey cells (CV-1) than in human cells (HeLa). This may explain, in part, why the human adenoviruses replicate more poorly in CV-1 cells than in HeLa cells. A mutant adenovirus that replicates better than wild-type virus in monkey cells produces less of the attenuator RNA than wild-type adenovirus does in monkey cells. Monkey cell extracts have been shown to contain a factor that, when added to human cell extracts transcribing adenovirus DNA in vitro, increases the production of attenuator RNA in these reactions. These observations help to explain a portion of the block to the production of infectious adenoviruses in monkey cells.

  16. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  17. MicroRNA-Mediated Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3′ untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver. PMID:23349911

  18. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  19. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  20. Identification and gene mapping of a 14,700-molecular-weight protein encoded by region E3 of group C adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Wold, W S

    1988-01-01

    Early region E3 of adenovirus type 5 should encode at least nine proteins as judged by the DNA sequence and the spliced structures of the known mRNAs. Only two E3 proteins have been proved to exist, a glycoprotein (gp19K) and an 11,600-molecular-weight protein (11.6K protein). Here we describe an abundant 14.7K protein coded by a gene in the extreme 3' portion of E3. To identify this 14.7K protein, we constructed a bacterial vector which synthesized a TrpE-14.7K fusion protein, then we prepared antiserum against the fusion protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated the 14.7K protein from cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 2, as well as with a variety of E3 deletion mutants. Synthesis of the 14.7K protein correlated precisely with the presence or absence of the 14.7K gene and with the synthesis of the mRNA (mRNA h) which encodes the 14.7K protein. The 14.7K protein appeared as a triplet on immunoprecipitation gels and Western blots (immunoblots). Images PMID:3275435

  1. Restriction of human adenovirus replication in Chinese hamster cell lines and their hybrids with human cells.

    PubMed

    Radna, R L; Foellmer, B; Feldman, L A; Francke, U; Ozer, H L

    1987-11-01

    We have found that the replication of human adenovirus (Ad2) is restricted in multiple Chinese hamster cell lines including CHO and V79. The major site of restriction involves differential accumulation of late viral proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without prior immunoprecipitation. Synthesis of fiber and penton base are markedly reduced, whereas others, such as the 100K polypeptide, are synthesized efficiently. This pattern of restriction is similar to that previously reported for Ad2 infection of several monkey cell lines; however, the restriction is more marked in the Chinese hamster cell lines. The restriction is most likely due to a deficient cellular function since stable cell hybrids between V79 or CHO and human cells are permissive for virus replication. By analysis of a series of hybrids with reduced numbers of human chromosomes, fiber synthesis was correlated with the presence of the short arm of human chromosome 3. More hybrids showed restoration of fiber synthesis than production of progeny virus, suggesting that more than one unlinked function is required for the latter.

  2. The E1B 19,000-molecular-weight protein of group C adenoviruses prevents tumor necrosis factor cytolysis of human cells but not of mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, L R; Aquino, L; Duerksen-Hughes, P J; Day, D; Horton, T M; Yei, S P; Wold, W S

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a multifunctional immunoregulatory protein that is secreted by activated macrophages and is believed to have antiviral activities. We reported earlier that when mouse C3HA fibroblasts are infected with human adenoviruses, the 289R and 243R proteins encoded by region E1A render the cells susceptible to lysis by TNF, and a 14,700-molecular-weight protein (14.7K protein) encoded by region E3 protects the cells against lysis by TNF. We now report that the 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) (176R) protein encoded by the E1B transcription unit can protect human HEL-299 fibroblasts and human ME-180 cervical carcinoma cells against lysis by TNF. This was determined by infecting cells with adenovirus double mutants that lack region E3 and do or do not express the E1B-19K protein and by measuring cytolysis by using a short-term (18-h) 51Cr-release assay. Under these assay conditions, the 51Cr release was specific to TNF and was not a consequence of the cyt phenotype associated with E1B-19K protein-negative mutants. Also, by using virus double mutants that lack E3 in combination with other early regions, we found that E1A, the E1B-55K protein-encoding gene, E3, and E4 are not required to protect HEL-299 cells against TNF cytolysis. Three additional human cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT8, and RC29) and a simian virus 40-transformed WI38 cell line (VA-13) also required E1B for protection against TNF cytolysis, indicating that the E1B-19K protein is required to protect many if not all human cell types against lysis by TNF when infected by adenovirus. The E1B-19K protein was not able to protect six different adenovirus-infected mouse cell lines against TNF lysis, even though the protein was shown to be efficiently expressed in one of the cell lines. HEL-299 or ME-180 cells infected by a mutant that lacks the E1B-19K protein but retains region E3 were not lysed by TNF, indicating that one or more of the E3 proteins can protect these cells against TNF lysis

  3. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  4. HUMAN ADENOVIRUS TYPE 37 AND THE BALB/C MOUSE: PROGRESS TOWARD A RESTRICTED ADENOVIRUS KERATITIS MODEL (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Chodosh, James

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To establish a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis in order to study innate immune mechanisms in the adenovirus-infected cornea. Methods Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts were inoculated with human adenovirus (HAdV) serotypes 8, 19, or 37 and observed for cytopathic effect. Viral growth titers were performed, and apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay. Viral and host cytokine gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR in cultured Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts and in the corneas of virus-injected Balb/c mice. Western blot analysis was performed to detect cell signaling in the virus-infected cornea. Results Only HAdV37 induced cytopathic effect in mouse cells. Viral gene expression was limited, and viral replication was not detected. Apoptotic cell death in HAdV37-infected Balb/c cells was evident 48 and 72 hours postinfection (P < .01). MCP-1, IL-6, KC, and IP-10 mRNA levels were increased maximally by 8.4, 9.6, 10.5, and 20.0-fold, respectively, at 30 to 90 minutes after HAdV37 infection. Similar cytokine elevations were observed in the corneas of Balb/c mice 4 hours after stromal injection of HAdV37, when viral gene expression for the viral capsid protein IIIa was not detected. Western blot showed increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 4 and 24 hours after corneal infection. Conclusions Despite limited viral gene expression, HAdV37 infection of Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts results in increased proinflammatory gene expression. A similar pattern of cytokine expression in the corneas of HAdV37-infected Balb/c mice suggests the mouse adenoviral keratitis model may be useful for the study of early innate immune responses in the adenovirus-infected corneal stroma. PMID:17471351

  5. [Producing recombinant adenovirus encoding green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP) by suspension cultured HEK-293 N3S cells].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Bi, Jian-Jin; Wang, Lan; Zhu, Bao-Zhen; Geng, Yue; Wu, Zu-Ze

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus vectors are one of the most promising gene transfer systems. They are of great value for gene therapy because these vectors achieve temporal high-level transgene expression and high gene transfer efficiency. To meet increasing needs of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy programs, parallel development of efficient, scalable and reproducible production processes is required. Perfusion cultivation of 293 cells is one of the most commonly used methods to produce adenovirus vectors and it is suitable for industrialized production specially. Experimental studies had been carried out to produce recombinant adenovirus containing the green fluorescent protein gene (Ad-GFP) by perfusion cultivation of HEK-293 N3S cells in a 5L stirring bioreactors. Perfusion rate was 1-2 volume/day. To infect the 293 N3S cells with Ad-GFP at the density of (2-4) x 10(6) cells/ ml. The time of collecting cells was 48 hours post infection. After three rounds of freeze/thaw and centrifugation, the crude viral lysates were stored at--80 degrees C until use. Then to get the Ad-GFP products by 2 x CsCl-gradient purification. The purity of the products was determined by the A260/A280 ratio and a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The infective titer was determined by a TCID50 assay. The culture term was 10-12 days. The infectious titer, the number of virus particle and the ratio of infectious titer to virus particle for the product were 1.0 x 10(11) IU/mL, 1.68 x 10(12) VP/mL and 6.0% IU/VP respectively. The A260/A280 ratio was 1.33, and the purity determined by HPLC was 99.2%. The cell specific productivity was around 1000 IU/cell. By perfusion cultivation of 293 N3S cells in a 5L stirring bioreactors, we established the production process for Ad-GFP, which paves a way to produce other recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy.

  6. A human type 5 adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine induces robust T cell responses in humans despite preexisting anti-adenovirus immunity.

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Smieja, Marek; Medina, Maria Fe; Thanthrige-Don, Niroshan; Zganiacz, Anna; Yin, Cindy; Heriazon, Armando; Damjanovic, Daniela; Puri, Laura; Hamid, Jemila; Xie, Feng; Foley, Ronan; Bramson, Jonathan; Gauldie, Jack; Xing, Zhou

    2013-10-02

    There is an urgent need to develop new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines to safely and effectively boost Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-triggered T cell immunity in humans. AdHu5Ag85A is a recombinant human type 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine with demonstrated efficacy in a number of animal species, yet it remains to be translated to human applications. In this phase 1 study, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of AdHu5Ag85A in both BCG-naïve and previously BCG-immunized healthy adults. Intramuscular immunization of AdHu5Ag85A was safe and well tolerated in both trial volunteer groups. Moreover, although AdHu5Ag85A was immunogenic in both trial volunteer groups, it much more potently boosted polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immunity in previously BCG-vaccinated volunteers. Furthermore, despite prevalent preexisting anti-AdHu5 humoral immunity in most of the trial volunteers, we found little evidence that such preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity significantly dampened the potency of AdHu5Ag85A vaccine. This study supports further clinical investigations of the AdHu5Ag85A vaccine for human applications. It also suggests that the widely perceived negative effect of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity may not be universally applied to all AdHu5-based vaccines against different types of human pathogens.

  7. Comparative Studies on the Structure of Human Adenovirus Genomes 4, 7 and 21.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    PADMANABHAN UNCLASSIFIED 01 FEB 80 DAMD17-79-C-9102 F/G 6/1 NL IEI!ONhuEhhhEIIIIIIIIEEI EN 136 11111 I1.8 1(11(125 .4I’* (fi.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST ...the DNA was tested by labeling the protein moiety with [ I ] using chloramine T a t e oxidizing agent (11). This procedure labels the tyrosine residue...the DNA molecules from the human adenovirus serotypes so far tested possess this unique property as observed by EM. Our laboratory has been interested

  8. Expression of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor in Cultured Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Regulation in Response to Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Steven D.; Hobbs, Justin T.; Tracy, Steven M.; Chapman, Nora M.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (HCAR). Whereas HCAR expression in HeLa cells was constant with respect to cell density, HCAR expression in HUVEC increased with culture confluence. HCAR expression in HUVEC was not quantitatively altered by infection with coxsackievirus B. PMID:10400813

  9. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  10. Lack of evidence for the role of human adenovirus-36 in obesity in a European cohort.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Valère J; deJager, Steve A; Grauls, Gert E; Gielen, Marij; Vlietinck, Robert F; Derom, Catherine A; Loos, Ruth J F; Rensen, Sander S; Buurman, Wim A; Greve, Jan W; van Baak, Marleen A; Wolffs, Petra F; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Hoebe, Christian J P A

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has been shown to increase adiposity in chickens, mice, and nonhuman primates. Adenovirus type 36 (Ad-36) DNA was detected in adipose tissues in these animal trials. In the United States, Ad-36 significantly correlates with obesity as illustrated by an Ad-36 seroprevalence of 30% in obese individuals and 11% in nonobese individuals. We investigated the possibility of a similar correlation of Ad-36 in Dutch and Belgian persons. In total, 509 serum samples were analyzed for Ad-36 antibodies using a serum neutralization assay. In addition, PCR was used to detect adenoviral DNA in visceral adipose tissue of 31 severely obese surgical patients. Our results indicated an overall Ad-36 seroprevalence of 5.5% increasing with age. BMI of Ad-36 seropositive humans was not significantly different from seronegative humans. No adenoviral DNA could be found using PCR on visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, this first Ad-36 study in the Netherlands and in Belgium indicates that Ad-36 does not play a role as a direct cause of BMI increase and obesity in humans in Western Europe.

  11. A differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cell culture model for studying human adenovirus tropism and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Ramke, M; Groos, S; Warnecke, G; Heim, A

    2011-12-01

    The species specificity of human adenoviruses (HAdV) almost precludes studying virulence and tropism in animal models, e.g. rodent models, or derived tissue and cell culture models. However, replication of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) has been shown after intravenous injection in swine. In order to study adenovirus replication in airway tissue propagation of bronchial epithelial cells from porcine lungs was established. These primary cells proved to be fully permissive for HAdV-C5 infection in submerged culture, demonstrating efficient HAdV genome replication, infectious viral particle release (1.07×10(8) TCID(50)/ml±6.63×10(7)) and development of cytopathic effect (CPE). Differentiation of porcine bronchial epithelial cells was achieved at the air-liquid interface on collagen I coated 0.4μm polyester membranes. Morphology, expression of tubulin and occludin, the development of tight-junctions and cilia were similar to human bronchial epithelial cells. Infection with HAdV-C5 from the basolateral side resulted in release of infectious virus progeny (2.05×10(7) TCID(50)/ml±2.39×10(7)) to the apical surface as described recently in human bronchial epithelial cells, although complete CPE was not observed. Differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cells hold promise as a novel method for studying the virulence and pathophysiology of pneumonia associated HAdV types.

  12. Transforming Region of Group A, B, and C Adenoviruses: DNA Homology Studies with Twenty-Nine Human Adenovirus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Jesse K.; Wold, William S. M.; Rigden, Patricia; Green, Maurice

    1979-01-01

    The 31 human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes form five groups based upon DNA genome homologies: group A (Ad12, 18, 31), group B (Ad3, 7, 11, 14, 16, 21), group C (Ad1, 2, 5, 6), group D (Ad8, 9, 10, 13, 15, 17, 19, 20, 22-30), and group E (Ad4) (M. Green, J. Mackey, W. Wold, and P. Rigden, Virology, in press). Group A Ads are highly oncogenic in newborn hamsters, group B Ads are weakly oncogenic, and other Ads are nononcogenic. However, most or all Ads transform cultured cells. We have studied the homology of Ad5, Ad7, and Ad12 transforming restriction endonuclease DNA fragments with DNAs of 29 Ad types. Ad5 HindIII-G (map position 0-7.3), Ad7 XhoI-C (map position 0-10.8), and Ad12 (strain Huie) EcoRI-C (map position 0-16) and SalI-C (map position 0-10.6) fragments were purified, labeled in vitro (nick translation), and annealed with DNAs of Ad1 to Ad16, Ad18 to Ad24, and Ad26 to Ad31. Hybrids were assayed by using hydroxylapatite. Ad5 HindIII-G hybridized 98 to 100% with DNAs of group C Ads, but only 1 to 15% with DNAs of other types. Ad7 XhoI-C fragment hybridized 85 to 99% with DNAs of group B Ads, but only 6 to 21% with DNAs of other types. Ad12 (Huie) EcoRI-C hybridized 53 to 68% with DNAs of five other Ad12 strains, 53% with Ad18 DNA, 56% with Ad31 DNA, but only 3 to 13% with DNAs of other types. In vitro-labeled Ad12 (Huie) SalI-C hybridized 35 to 71% with DNAs of 6 other Ad12 strains, 44% with Ad18 DNA, 52% with Ad31 DNA, but only 2 to 7% with DNAs Ad7, Ad2, Ad26, or Ad4. When assayed using S-1 nuclease, SalI-C annealed 17 to 44% with DNAs of group A Ads. The melting temperatures of the hybrids of Ad5 HindIII-G with all group C Ad DNAs were 84°C in 0.12 M sodium phosphate (pH 6.8). The melting temperature of the Ad12 (Huie) EcoRI-C hybrid with Ad12 (Huie) DNA was 83°C, but was only 71 to 77°C with DNAs of other group A Ads. Thus, group C and group B Ads both have very homologous transforming regions that are not represented in DNAs of non-group C Ads or non

  13. Investigating the role of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in protecting Human Adenovirus from water disinfection treatment.

    PubMed

    Verani, Marco; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Tammaro, Carmine; Carducci, Annalaura

    2016-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical infections and are present in aquatic environments, including river, seawater, drinking-water and sewage. Free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba) in the same environments may internalize them and other microorganisms can act as a reservoir for the internalized viruses. In this study, we studied the interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Human Adenovirus type 5 (HAdV 5) to determine whether the amoeba played a role in protecting the internalized viruses from chemical disinfection. The efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfection against A. polyphaga and HAdV 5 either singly or in combination was assessed at three different concentrations. Individually, the amoeba were more resistant to chemical disinfection than HAdV 5 and remained alive after exposure to 5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. In contrast, HAdV 5 lost infectivity following exposure to 2.5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. When the amoeba and HAdV 5 were co-cultured, infectious virus was found in the cytoplasm of the amoeba at 5mg/l disinfectant concentration. These findings suggest that the A. polyphaga is providing protection for the HAdV 5.

  14. A quasi-atomic model of human adenovirus type 5 capsid

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, Céline M S; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Conway, James F; Zubieta, Chloé; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Schoehn, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates including humans. Their icosahedral capsids are composed of three major proteins: the trimeric hexon forms the facets and the penton, a noncovalent complex of the pentameric penton base and trimeric fibre proteins, is located at the 12 capsid vertices. Several proteins (IIIa, VI, VIII and IX) stabilise the capsid. We have obtained a 10 Å resolution map of the human adenovirus 5 by image analysis from cryo-electron micrographs (cryoEMs). This map, in combination with the X-ray structures of the penton base and hexon, was used to build a quasi-atomic model of the arrangement of the two major capsid components and to analyse the hexon–hexon and hexon–penton interactions. The secondary proteins, notably VIII, were located by comparing cryoEM maps of native and pIX deletion mutant virions. Minor proteins IX and IIIa are located on the outside of the capsid, whereas protein VIII is organised with a T=2 lattice on the inner face of the capsid. The capsid organisation is compared with the known X-ray structure of bacteriophage PRD1. PMID:15861131

  15. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  16. Evaluation of helper-dependent canine adenovirus vectors in a 3D human CNS model

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Fernandes, Paulo; Peddie, Christopher J.; Piersanti, Stefania; Collinson, Lucy M.; Salinas, Sara; Saggio, Isabella; Schiavo, Giampietro; Kremer, Eric J.; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach with enormous potential for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) present attractive features for gene delivery strategies in the human brain, by preferentially transducing neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent brain structures, have a 30-kb cloning capacity and have low innate and induced immunogenicity in pre-clinical tests. For clinical translation, in-depth pre-clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety in a human setting is primordial. Stem cell-derived human neural cells have a great potential as complementary tools by bridging the gap between animal models, which often diverge considerably from human phenotype, and clinical trials. Herein, we explore helper-dependent CAV-2 (hd-CAV-2) efficacy and safety for gene delivery in a human stem cell-derived 3D neural in vitro model. Assessment of hd-CAV-2 vector efficacy was performed at different multiplicities of infection, by evaluating transgene expression and impact on cell viability, ultrastructural cellular organization and neuronal gene expression. Under optimized conditions, hd-CAV-2 transduction led to stable long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity. hd-CAV-2 preferentially transduced neurons, while human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) showed increased tropism towards glial cells. This work demonstrates, in a physiologically relevant 3D model, that hd-CAV-2 vectors are efficient tools for gene delivery to human neurons, with stable long-term transgene expression and minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:26181626

  17. Molecular identification of adenovirus sequences: a rapid scheme for early typing of human adenoviruses in diagnostic samples of immunocompetent and immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Wölfel, Roman; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2006-09-01

    Precise typing of human adenoviruses (HAdV) is fundamental for epidemiology and the detection of infection chains. As only few of the 51 adenovirus types are associated with life- threatening disseminated diseases in immunodeficient patients, detection of one of these types may have prognostic value and lead to immediate therapeutic intervention. A recently published molecular typing scheme consisting of two steps (sequencing of a generic PCR product closely adjacent to loop 1 of the main neutralization determinant epsilon, and for species HAdV-B, -C, and -D the sequencing of loop 2 [Madisch et al., 2005]) was applied to 119 clinical samples. HAdV DNA was typed unequivocally even in cases of culture negative samples, for example in immunodeficient patients before HAdV causes high virus loads and disseminated disease. Direct typing results demonstrated the predominance of HAdV-1, -2, -5, and -31 in immunodeficient patients suggesting the significance of the persistence of these viruses for the pathogenesis of disseminated disease. In contrast, HAdV-3 predominated in immunocompetent patients and cocirculation of four subtypes was demonstrated. Typing of samples from a conjunctivitis outbreak in multiple military barracks demonstrated various HAdV types (2, 4, 8, 19) and not the suspected unique adenovirus etiology. This suggests that our molecular typing scheme will be also useful for epidemiological investigations. In conclusion, our two-step molecular typing system will permit the precise and rapid typing of clinical HAdV isolates and even of HAdV DNA in clinical samples without the need of time-consuming virus isolation prior to typing.

  18. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  19. Attachment and Detachment Behavior of Human Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Margaret E; Sommer, Regina; Lindner, Gerhard; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Toze, Simon; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Blaschke, Alfred P; Sidhu, Jatinder P S

    2015-09-01

    The transport of human adenovirus, nanoparticles, and PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages was tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, South Australia. Comparison of transport and removal of virus surrogates with the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Because experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow-through soil columns were used. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material but not under high ionic strength or high pH conditions. It was also found that straining due to size and the charge of the colloid were not dominant removal mechanisms in this system. Implications of this study indicate that a certain surrogate may not represent a specific pathogen solely based on similar size, morphology, and/or surface charge. Moreover, if a particular surrogate is representative of a pathogen in one aquifer system, it may not be the most appropriate surrogate in another porous media system. This was apparent in the inferior performance of MS2 as a surrogate, which is commonly used in virus transport studies.

  20. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  1. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FM...

  2. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  3. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively.

  4. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28362809

  5. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  6. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  7. Tracking Human Adenovirus Inactivation by Gamma Radiation under Different Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Andreia I.; Guerreiro, Duarte; Madureira, Joana; Margaça, Fernanda M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus is the most prevalent enteric virus in waters worldwide due to its environmental stability, which leads to public health concerns. Mitigation strategies are therefore required. The aim of this study was to assess the inactivation of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) by gamma radiation in aqueous environments. Various substrates with different organic loads, including domestic wastewater, were inoculated with HAdV-5 either individually or in a viral pool (with murine norovirus type 1 [MNV-1]) and were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 irradiator at several gamma radiation doses (0.9 to 10.8 kGy). The infectivity of viral particles, before and after irradiation, was tested by plaque assay using A549 cells. D10 values (dose required to inactivate 90% of a population or the dose of irradiation needed to produce a 1 log10 reduction in the population) were estimated for each substrate based on virus infectivity inactivation exponential kinetics. The capability of two detection methods, nested PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to track inactivated viral particles was also assessed. After irradiation at 3.5 kGy, a reduction of the HAdV-5 titer of 4 log PFU/ml on substrates with lower organic loads was obtained, but in highly organic matrixes, the virus titer reduction was only 1 log PFU/ml. The D10 values of HAdV-5 in high organic substrates were significantly higher than in water suspensions. The obtained results point out some discrepancies between nested PCR, ELISA, and plaque assay on the assessments of HAdV-5 inactivation. These results suggest that the inactivation of HAdV-5 by gamma radiation, in aqueous environments, is significantly affected by substrate composition. This study highlights the virucidal potential of gamma radiation that may be used as a disinfection treatment for sustainable water supplies. IMPORTANCE Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent of the enteric viruses in environmental waters worldwide. The purposes of

  8. A novel supervised trajectory segmentation algorithm identifies distinct types of human adenovirus motion in host cells.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, Jo A; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Greber, Urs F; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2007-09-01

    Biological trajectories can be characterized by transient patterns that may provide insight into the interactions of the moving object with its immediate environment. The accurate and automated identification of trajectory motifs is important for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this work, we develop a novel trajectory segmentation algorithm based on supervised support vector classification. The algorithm is validated on synthetic data and applied to the identification of trajectory fingerprints of fluorescently tagged human adenovirus particles in live cells. In virus trajectories on the cell surface, periods of confined motion, slow drift, and fast drift are efficiently detected. Additionally, directed motion is found for viruses in the cytoplasm. The algorithm enables the linking of microscopic observations to molecular phenomena that are critical in many biological processes, including infectious pathogen entry and signal transduction.

  9. A Stochastic Model for Microtubule Motors Describes the In Vivo Cytoplasmic Transport of Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Mattia; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Bayati, Basil; Engelke, Martin; Greber, Urs F.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors. PMID:20041204

  10. A stochastic model for microtubule motors describes the in vivo cytoplasmic transport of human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Mattia; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Bayati, Basil; Engelke, Martin; Greber, Urs F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-12-01

    Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors.

  11. Transformation of human diploid cells by adenovirus type 4 irradiated with ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Hozoc, M; Nastac, E; Suru, M; Stoian, M; Bercovici, S; Cajal, N

    1983-01-01

    Inoculation of ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) led to in vitro transformation of human diploid cells (HDC). Two transformed cell lines could be established: cell line H 1418, from HDC inoculated with the 10(-3) dilution of Ad4 UV-irradiated for 20 min at a distance of 20 cm, co-cultivated with uninfected HDC, and cell line H 1557, from HDC inoculated with the 10(-2) dilution of Ad4 irradiated at the same distance for 12 min. Both transformed cell lines were resistant to superinfection with homologous virus. Virus-specific antigen could be made evident by the indirect immunofluorescence technique in the nuclei of both H 1418 and H 1557 cells.

  12. Adipogenic cascade can be induced without adipogenic media by a human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Miloni A; Rogers, Pamela M; Vangipuram, Sharada D; McAllister, Emily J; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2009-04-01

    Several metabolic abnormalities are associated with relative excess or deficiency of adipose tissue. Identifying the regulators of adipogenic differentiation is critical for its successful manipulation. Ad36, a human adenovirus, is a novel factor that promotes adipogenesis. We exploited the adipogenic potential of Ad36 to reveal exogenous modifiers of adipogenesis in rodent preadipocyte cell line in the presence or absence of differentiation inducers methyl-isobutyl-xanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (M, D, and I; MDI). A nonadipogenic human adenovirus Ad2 was used as a negative control for viral infection. First, we confirmed that, Ad36, but not Ad2, increases lipid accumulation in the presence or absence of MDI. Time-course studies for expression of key genes of adipogenic cascade showed that it is Ad36, but not Ad2, which downregulated preadipocyte marker gene Wnt10b, and upregulated expression of early (C/EBPDelta and C/EBPbeta), intermediate (PPARgamma2), and late genes (aP2 and G3PDH) of adipogenic cascade even in the absence of MDI. In the presence of MDI, onset of expression of adipogenic genes coincided for Ad36 and control groups, but the expressions were significantly greater for the Ad36 group. Next, we observed that attenuation of Ad36 mRNA expression by an antiadenoviral agent reduced 3T3-L1 differentiation, indicating that viral mRNA expression is required for the process. Furthermore, with or without MDI or its components, Ad36 significantly increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Cell confluency at the time of Ad36 infection positively influenced lipid accumulation. The results reveal that Ad36 is an MDI-independent exogenous regulator of the adipogenic process. Elucidating the molecular pathways involved may reveal novel regulatory controls of adipogenesis.

  13. Effects of antimetabolites on adenovirus replication in sensitive and resistant human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Musk, P; Stowers, A; Parsons, P G

    1990-02-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) inhibited the replication of adenovirus (viral capacity) more in drug-sensitive than in resistant human melanoma cell lines. By comparison, inhibition of cellular DNA and RNA synthesis after short treatment periods (less than 48 hr) was not a good predictor of cellular sensitivity. MTX, an inhibitor of de novo nucleotide synthesis, was most effective when added to cells just before infection with virus and inhibited viral capacity at doses 10-1000-fold lower than those required to affect cell survival. The MTX-sensitive cell lines, members of a DNA repair deficient group sensitive also to killing by methylating agents (the Mer- phenotype), were not deficient in dihydrofolate reductase but exhibited DNA fragmentation after treatment with MTX for 48 hr. 6-TG and ara-C, inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine salvage, were most inhibitory to viral capacity when added greater than 36 hr before virus infection and were less effective than MTX (doses 5-7-fold and 4-24-fold higher than for cell survival respectively). No correlation was found between MTX sensitivity and sensitivity to 6-TG or ara-C. These results indicate that (i) inhibition of viral capacity is a more comprehensive test of antimetabolite cytotoxicity than inhibition of cellular DNA or RNA synthesis; (ii) the viral capacity assay correctly predicts cellular sensitivity to MTX, 6-TG and ara-C and therefore has potential for application to primary cultures of human tumours; and (iii) MTX-sensitive cell lines and adenovirus replication rely heavily on de novo nucleotide synthesis, which in Mer- cells appears to be linked to a DNA repair defect as yet undefined.

  14. Adenovirus replication as an in vitro probe for drug sensitivity in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Parsons, P G; Maynard, K R; Little, J H; McLeod, G R

    1986-04-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus 5 as an in vitro probe for chemosensitivity in short-term cultures of human tumors was evaluated using human melanoma cell lines and primary cultures of melanoma biopsies. A convenient immunoperoxidase method was developed for quantitating viral replication 2 days after infection. Two different approaches were explored: the host cell reactivation assay (HCR) using drug-treated virus; and the viral capacity assay using drug-treated cells. The HCR assay detected sensitivity to 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC) in Mer- (methyl excision repair deficient) cell lines as decreased ability of the cells to replicate MTIC-treated virus. This test should be applicable to DNA-damaging agents and repair-deficient tumors. Adenovirus replicated readily in nonproliferating primary cultures of melanoma biopsies; application of the HCR assays to this material identified one Mer- sample of 11 tested. Herpes viruses were not suitable for use in HCR because herpes simplex virus type 1 failed to distinguish Mer- from Mer+ melanoma cells; and nonproductive infection of MTIC-sensitive lymphoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus yielded an MTIC-resistant cell line. The second assay (viral capacity) involved determination of the inhibition of replication of untreated virus in treated cells. This approach correctly predicted sensitivity to hydroxyurea and deoxyadenosine in melanoma cell lines when compared with clonogenic survival assay. Viral capacity was also inhibited by cytosine arabinoside, fluorouracil, vincristine, adriamycin, 6-mercaptopurine and ionising radiation, and may therefore be useful for detecting sensitivity to a wide range of antitumor agents.

  15. Multiple Cross-Species Transmission Events of Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) during Hominine Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Hohmann, Gottfried; Fruth, Barbara; Karhemere, Stomy; Madinda, Nadège F.; Mugisha, Lawrence; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Todd, Angelique; Petrzelkova, Klara J.; Gray, Maryke; Robbins, Martha; Bergl, Richard A.; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe; Schubert, Grit; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV; species HAdV-A to -G) are highly prevalent in the human population, and represent an important cause of morbidity and, to a lesser extent, mortality. Recent studies have identified close relatives of these viruses in African great apes, suggesting that some HAdV may be of zoonotic origin. We analyzed more than 800 fecal samples from wild African great apes and humans to further investigate the evolutionary history and zoonotic potential of hominine HAdV. HAdV-B and -E were frequently detected in wild gorillas (55%) and chimpanzees (25%), respectively. Bayesian ancestral host reconstruction under discrete diffusion models supported a gorilla and chimpanzee origin for these viral species. Host switches were relatively rare along HAdV evolution, with about ten events recorded in 4.5 My. Despite presumably rare direct contact between sympatric populations of the two species, transmission events from gorillas to chimpanzees were observed, suggesting that habitat and dietary overlap may lead to fecal-oral cross-hominine transmission of HAdV. Finally, we determined that two independent HAdV-B transmission events to humans occurred more than 100,000 years ago. We conclude that HAdV-B circulating in humans are of zoonotic origin and have probably affected global human health for most of our species lifetime. PMID:25862141

  16. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  17. Structure of the dodecahedral penton particle from human adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed

    Fuschiotti, P; Schoehn, G; Fender, P; Fabry, C M S; Hewat, E A; Chroboczek, J; Ruigrok, R W H; Conway, J F

    2006-02-17

    The sub-viral dodecahedral particle of human adenovirus type 3, composed of the viral penton base and fiber proteins, shares an important characteristic of the entire virus: it can attach to cells and penetrate them. Structure determination of the fiberless dodecahedron by cryo-electron microscopy to 9 Angstroms resolution reveals tightly bound pentamer subunits, with only minimal interfaces between penton bases stabilizing the fragile dodecahedron. The internal cavity of the dodecahedron is approximately 80 Angstroms in diameter, and the interior surface is accessible to solvent through perforations of approximately 20 Angstroms diameter between the pentamer towers. We observe weak density beneath pentamers that we attribute to a penton base peptide including residues 38-48. The intact amino-terminal domain appears to interfere with pentamer-pentamer interactions and its absence by mutation or proteolysis is essential for dodecamer assembly. Differences between the 9 Angstroms dodecahedron structure and the adenovirus serotype 2 (Ad2) crystallographic model correlate closely with differences in sequence. The 3D structure of the dodecahedron including fibers at 16 Angstroms resolution reveals extra density on the top of the penton base that can be attributed to the fiber N terminus. The fiber itself exhibits striations that correlate with features of the atomic structure of the partial Ad2 fiber and that represent a repeat motif present in the amino acid sequence. These new observations offer important insights into particle assembly and stability, as well as the practicality of using the dodecahedron in targeted drug delivery. The structural work provides a sound basis for manipulating the properties of this particle and thereby enhancing its value for such therapeutic use.

  18. Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cGAS/STING DNA sensing complex has recently been established as a predominant pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) for DNA-directed type I interferon (IFN) innate immune activation. Using replication-defective adenovirus vectors and replication-competent wild-type adenovirus, we have modeled the influence of the cGAS/STING cascade in permissive human cell lines (A549, HeLa, ARPE19, and THP1). Wild-type adenovirus induced efficient early activation of the cGAS/STING cascade in a cell-specific manner. In all responsive cell lines, cGAS/STING short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown resulted in a loss of TBK1 and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) activation, a lack of beta interferon transcript induction, loss of interferon-dependent STAT1 activation, and diminished induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Adenoviruses that infect through the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad2 and Ad5) and the CD46 (Ad35) and desmoglein-2 (Ad7) viral receptors all induce the cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade. The magnitude of the IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response was strongly influenced by serotype, with Ad35>Ad7>Ad2. For each serotype, no enhancement of viral DNA replication or virus production occurred in cGAS or STING shRNA-targeted cell line pools. We found no replication advantage in permissive cell lines that do not trigger the cGAS/STING cascade following infection. The cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade was not a direct target of viral antihost strategies, and we found no evidence that Ad stimulation of the cGAS/STING DNA response had an impact on viral replication efficiency. IMPORTANCE This study shows for the first time that the cGAS DNA sensor directs a dominant IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response to adenovirus in human cell lines. Activation of cGAS occurs with viruses that infect through different high-affinity receptors (CAR, CD46, and desmoglein-2), and the magnitude of the cGAS/STING DNA response cascade is influenced by serotype-specific functions

  19. A novel molecular therapy using bioengineered adenovirus for human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Replication-selective tumor-specific viruses constitute a novel approach for treatment of neoplastic disease. These vectors are designed to induce virus-mediated lysis of tumor cells after selective viral propagation within the tumor. Human telomerase is highly active in more than 85オ of primary cancers, regardless of their tissue origins, and its activity correlates closely with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression. We constructed an attenuated adenovirus 5 vector (Telomelysin, OBP-301), in which the hTERT promoter element drives expression of E1 genes. Since only tumor cells that express telomerase activity would activate this promoter, the hTERT proximal promoter would allow for preferential expression of viral genes in tumor cells, leading to selective viral replication and oncolytic cell death. Lymphatic invasion is a major route for cancer cell dissemination, and adequate treatment of locoregional lymph nodes is required for curative treatment in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. We demonstrated that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin mediates effective in vivo purging of metastatic tumor cells from regional lymph nodes. Moreover, using noninvasive whole-body imaging, we found that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin followed by regional irradiation induces a substantial antitumor effect, resulting from tumor cell-specific radiosensitization, in an orthotopic human esophageal cancer xenograft model. These results illustrate the potential of oncolytic virotherapy as a promising strategy in the management of human gastrointestinal cancer.

  20. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nick J.; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Ewer, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio,0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016). PMID:25947165

  1. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Results Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Conclusion Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV. PMID:22995185

  2. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults.

    PubMed

    Ogwang, Caroline; Kimani, Domtila; Edwards, Nick J; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Ewer, Katie; Urban, Britta C; S Hill, Adrian V; Bejon, Philip

    2015-05-06

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016).

  3. A Novel Psittacine Adenovirus Identified During an Outbreak of Avian Chlamydiosis and Human Psittacosis: Zoonosis Associated with Virus-Bacterium Coinfection in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Chan, Andy S. F.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lo, Janice Y. C.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3′ end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3–54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6–70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1–74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should

  4. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  5. Transduction of skin-migrating dendritic cells by human adenovirus 5 occurs via an actin-dependent phagocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Efrain; Taylor, Geraldine; Hope, Jayne; Herbert, Rebecca; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are central to the initiation of immune responses, and various approaches have been used to target vaccines to DC in order to improve immunogenicity. Cannulation of lymphatic vessels allows for the collection of DC that migrate from the skin. These migrating DC are involved in antigen uptake and presentation following vaccination. Human replication-deficient adenovirus (AdV) 5 is a promising vaccine vector for delivery of recombinant antigens. Although the mechanism of AdV attachment and penetration has been extensively studied in permissive cell lines, few studies have addressed the interaction of AdV with DC. In this study, we investigated the interaction of bovine skin-migrating DC and replication-deficient AdV-based vaccine vectors. We found that, despite lack of expression of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known adenovirus receptors, AdV readily enters skin-draining DC via an actin-dependent endocytosis. Virus exit from endosomes was pH independent, and neutralizing antibodies did not prevent virus entry but did prevent virus translocation to the nucleus. We also show that combining adenovirus with adjuvant increases the absolute number of intracellular virus particles per DC but not the number of DC containing intracellular virus. This results in increased trans-gene expression and antigen presentation. We propose that, in the absence of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known receptors, AdV5-based vectors enter skin-migrating DC using actin-dependent endocytosis which occurs in skin-migrating DC, and its relevance to vaccination strategies and vaccine vector targeting is discussed.

  6. Human type 5 adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine: is the respiratory route of delivery the future?

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona; Xing, Zhou

    2014-08-01

    Despite progress in managing TB, there were 8.6 million new cases in 2012. To control TB will require a more effective vaccine than BCG, new drugs and better diagnostic tests. Recombinant replication-defective adenoviruses expressing foreign DNA have been studied as vaccines. We developed and evaluated a recombinant replication-deficient human Ad5 vector expressing Ag85A (Ad5Ag85A) as a TB vaccine in animal models and a Phase I human study. Animal models of Ad5Ag85A show markedly improved protection over BCG alone and immunization via the respiratory route provides the best type of protection. In humans, intramuscular vaccination was safe; Ad5Ag85A was immunogenic and stimulated polyfunctional T cell responses, more potently in previously BCG-vaccinated volunteers. Pre-existing Ad5 antibodies did not dampen the response. Given its potency, Ad5-based TB vaccines are well-positioned to be delivered to the respiratory tract, induce local lung immunity to control TB, and inform innovative approaches to new TB vaccination strategies.

  7. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Arantes, Thalita; Caumo, Karin S; Rott, Marilise B; Spilki, Fernando R

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV) in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16) were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16) of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water.

  8. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients.

  9. Impact of human adenovirus type 3 dodecahedron on host cells and its potential role in viral infection.

    PubMed

    Fender, Pascal; Hall, Kathryn; Schoehn, Guy; Blair, G Eric

    2012-05-01

    During human adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) infection, an excess of penton base and fiber proteins are produced which form dodecahedral particles composed of 12 pentamers of penton base and 12 trimers of fiber protein. No biological functions have yet been ascribed to Ad3 dodecahedra. Here, we show that dodecahedra compete with Ad3 virions for binding to the cell surface and trigger cell remodeling, giving new insights into possible biological functions of dodecahedra in the Ad3 infectious cycle.

  10. In vitro and in vivo genetic stability studies of a human adenovirus type 5 recombinant rabies glycoprotein vaccine (ONRAB).

    PubMed

    Knowles, M Kimberly; Roberts, Danielle; Craig, Sheona; Sheen, Mary; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Wandeler, Alexander I

    2009-05-05

    Investigation into the genetic stability of a replication-competent human adenovirus rabies glycoprotein recombinant (ONRAB) developed for use as an oral vaccine for wildlife rabies prevention is of major importance due to the vaccine's intended placement in the environment. Using a collection of murine monoclonal antibodies directed to six distinct antigenic sites on the rabies glycoprotein, preservation of all main immunogenic epitopes of the protein after virus growth in vitro was established. A competition experiment which involved the in vitro passaging of a mixture of ONRAB and wild-type human adenovirus type 5 demonstrated that the two viruses do not exhibit noticeably different fitness levels in this environment. Nucleotide sequencing of the expression cassette of multiple viral clones recovered after 20 serial passages in cell culture and 5 serial passages in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), a species susceptible to human adenovirus infection, indicated no changes in comparison to the original virus. These trials demonstrated the stability of the insert gene of ONRAB during in vivo and in vitro passaging.

  11. In vivo imaging of human cancer with telomerase-specific replication-selective adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-specific replication-competent viruses represent a novel approach for the treatment of neoplastic disease. These vectors can be used to directly label tumor cells in vivo, as they are designed to selectively replicate within such cells. To target cancer cells, there is a need for tissue- or cell-specific promoters that are expressed in diverse tumor types and are silent in normal cells. Telomerase activation is considered to be a critical step in carcinogenesis through the maintenance of telomeres, and its activity is closely correlated with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression. We constructed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing attenuated adenovirus-5 vector, in which the hTERT promoter regulates viral replication (TelomeScan, OBP-401). We used TelomeScan to establish a new approach for visualizing metastatic or disseminated human tumors in vivo. Visualization is achieved via illumination with an -excitation lamp under a three-chip color-cooled charged-coupled device camera following injection of TelomeScan into primary tumors or tumor-disseminated cavities. TelomeScan infection increases the -signal-to-background ratio as a tumor-specific probe, because the fluorescent signals are only amplified in tumor cells by viral replication. This technology is adaptable to detect tumor metastasis and/or dissemination in vivo as a preclinical model of surgical navigation.

  12. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; ...

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  13. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  14. Intranasal inoculation with an adenovirus vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 reduces AD-like pathology and cognitive impairment in Tg-APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Ma, Ying; Zong, Li-Xia; Xing, Xiao-Na; Guo, Rong; Jiang, Tong-Zi; Sha, Sha; Liu, Li; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2012-08-15

    To develop a safe and efficient vaccine for AD treatment, we constructed an adenovirus vector vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 and CpG motif as a molecular adjuvant. We demonstrated that therapeutic immunization with Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG elicits Aβ3-10 specific Th2-polarized immune response with high titers of anti-Aβ antibodies in APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice, which in turn reduced Aβ deposits in brains and cognitive impairment. In addition, Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG reduced astrocytosis without increasing the incidence of microhemorrhage. Our findings of this study raise the possibility that the adenovirus vaccine Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG would be a safe and effective alternative for AD immunotherapy.

  15. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration.

  16. Behaviour and recovery of human adenovirus from tropical sediment under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hugo Delleon; Pessoa-de-Souza, Marco Aurélio; Fongaro, Gislaine; Anunciação, Carlos E; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de P; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Garcia-Zapata, Marco Tulio Antonio

    2015-10-15

    This study assessed the contributions of pH and organic matter (OM) on the recovery of infectious human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) and genome copies (GCs) in waters that were artificially contaminated with tropical soil. The use of a mathematical equation was proposed based on the flocculation index of clay to assess the recovery of total GCs in these controlled assays. The results suggest that solids in the water reduced the viral genome copy loads per millilitre (GC · mL(-1)) and viral infectivity. OM did not influence the GC · mL(-1) recovery rate (p > 0.05) but led to a 99% (2 log10) reduction in plaque-forming unit counts per millilitre (PFU/mL), which indicates that infectivity and gene integrity were non-related parameters. Our findings also suggest that acidic pH levels hinder viral inactivation and that clay is the main factor responsible for the interactions of HAdV-5 with soil. These findings may be useful for future eco-epidemiological investigations and studies of viral inactivation or even as parameters for future research into water quality analysis and water treatment.

  17. Quantitative detection of human enteric adenoviruses in river water by microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Naohiro; Noda, Naohiro; Haramoto, Eiji; Kawaharasaki, Mamoru; Akiba, Michihiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    We describe an assay for simple and accurate quantification of human enteric adenoviruses (EAdVs) in water samples using a recently developed quantification method named microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR). The assay is based on automatic distribution of reaction mixture into a large number of nanolitre-volume reaction chambers and absolute copy number quantification from the number of chambers containing amplification products on the basis of Poisson statistics. This assay allows absolute quantification of target genes without the use of standard DNA. Concentrations of EAdVs in Japanese river water samples were successfully quantified by the developed dPCR assay. The EAdVs were detected in seven of the 10 samples (1 L each), and the concentration ranged from 420 to 2,700 copies/L. The quantified values closely resemble those by most probable number (MPN)-PCR and real-time PCR when standard DNA was validated by dPCR whereas they varied substantially when the standard was not validated. Accuracy and sensitivity of the dPCR was higher than those of real-time PCR and MPN-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has successfully quantified enteric viruses in river water using dPCR. This method will contribute to better understanding of existence of viruses in water.

  18. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment in Occupational Settings Applied to the Airborne Human Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carducci, Annalaura; Donzelli, Gabriele; Cioni, Lorenzo; Verani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) methodology, which has already been applied to drinking water and food safety, may also be applied to risk assessment and management at the workplace. The present study developed a preliminary QMRA model to assess microbial risk that is associated with inhaling bioaerosols that are contaminated with human adenovirus (HAdV). This model has been applied to air contamination data from different occupational settings, including wastewater systems, solid waste landfills, and toilets in healthcare settings and offices, with different exposure times. Virological monitoring showed the presence of HAdVs in all the evaluated settings, thus confirming that HAdV is widespread, but with different average concentrations of the virus. The QMRA results, based on these concentrations, showed that toilets had the highest probability of viral infection, followed by wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste landfills. Our QMRA approach in occupational settings is novel, and certain caveats should be considered. Nonetheless, we believe it is worthy of further discussions and investigations. PMID:27447658

  19. Characterization of human adenovirus serotypes 5, 6, 11, and 35 as anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-11-25

    Human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been the most popular platform for the development of oncolytic Ads. Alternative Ad serotypes with low seroprevalence might allow for improved anticancer efficacy in Ad5-immune patients. We studied the safety and efficacy of rare serotypes Ad6, Ad11 and Ad35. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ads correlated with expression of CAR and CD46 in most but not all cell lines. Among CAR-binding viruses, Ad5 was often more active than Ad6, among CD46-binding viruses Ad35 was generally more cytotoxic than Ad11 in cell culture studies. Ad5, Ad6, and Ad11 demonstrated similar anticancer activity in vivo, whereas Ad35 was not efficacious. Hepatotoxicity developed only in Ad5-injected mice. Predosing with Ad11 and Ad35 did not increase infection of hepatocytes with Ad5-based vector demonstrating different interaction of these Ads with Kupffer cells. Data obtained in this study suggest developing Ad6 and Ad11 as alternative Ads for anticancer treatment.

  20. Integrating quantitative PCR and Bayesian statistics in quantifying human adenoviruses in small volumes of source water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Gronewold, Andrew D; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    Rapid quantification of viral pathogens in drinking and recreational water can help reduce waterborne disease risks. For this purpose, samples in small volume (e.g. 1L) are favored because of the convenience of collection, transportation and processing. However, the results of viral analysis are often subject to uncertainty. To overcome this limitation, we propose an approach that integrates Bayesian statistics, efficient concentration methods, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) to quantify viral pathogens in water. Using this approach, we quantified human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in eighteen samples of source water collected from six drinking water treatment plants. HAdVs were found in seven samples. In the other eleven samples, HAdVs were not detected by qPCR, but might have existed based on Bayesian inference. Our integrated approach that quantifies uncertainty provides a better understanding than conventional assessments of potential risks to public health, particularly in cases when pathogens may present a threat but cannot be detected by traditional methods.

  1. Face Encoding and Recognition in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxby, James V.; Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Horwitz, Barry; Maisog, Jose Ma.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Grady, Cheryl L.

    1996-01-01

    A dissociation between human neural systems that participate in the encoding and later recognition of new memories for faces was demonstrated by measuring memory task-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow with positron emission tomography. There was almost no overlap between the brain structures associated with these memory functions. A region in the right hippocampus and adjacent cortex was activated during memory encoding but not during recognition. The most striking finding in neocortex was the lateralization of prefrontal participation. Encoding activated left prefrontal cortex, whereas recognition activated right prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that the hippocampus and adjacent cortex participate in memory function primarily at the time of new memory encoding. Moreover, face recognition is not mediated simply by recapitulation of operations performed at the time of encoding but, rather, involves anatomically dissociable operations.

  2. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  3. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  4. Host cell reactivation of gene expression for an adenovirus-encoded reporter gene reflects the repair of UVC-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and methylene blue plus visible light-induced 8-oxoguanine.

    PubMed

    Leach, Derrik M; Zacal, Natalie J; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    Previously, we have reported the use of a recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-based host cell reactivation (HCR) assay to examine nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UVC-induced DNA lesions in several mammalian cell types. The recombinant non-replicating Ad expresses the Escherichia coli β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter gene under control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer region. We have also used methylene blue plus visible light (MB + VL) to induce the major oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) in the recombinant Ad-encoded reporter gene in order to study base excision repair (BER). The reported variability regarding 8-oxoG's potential to block transcription by RNA polymerase II and data demonstrating that a number of factors play a role in transcriptional bypass of the lesion led us to examine the repair of 8-oxoG in the Ad reporter and its relationship to HCR for expression of the reporter gene. We have used Southern blotting to examine removal of UVC- and MB + VL-induced DNA damage by loss of endonuclease-sensitive sites from the Ad-encoded β-gal reporter gene in human and rodent cells. We show that repair of MB + VL-induced 8-oxoG via BER and UVC-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) via NER is substantially greater in human SV40-transformed GM637F skin fibroblasts compared to hamster CHO-AA8 cells. We also show that HCR for expression of the MB + VL-damaged and the UVC-damaged reporter gene is substantially greater in human SV40-transformed GM637F skin fibroblasts compared to hamster CHO-AA8 cells. The difference between the human and rodent cells in the removal of both 8-oxoG and CPDs from the damaged reporter gene was comparable to the difference in HCR for expression of the damaged reporter gene. These results suggest that the major factor for HCR of the MB + VL-treated reporter gene in mammalian cells is DNA repair in the Ad rather than lesion bypass.

  5. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences. Images PMID:6965103

  6. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences.

  7. Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes.

    PubMed

    Xagoraraki, Irene; Kuo, David H-W; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Mark; Rose, Joan B

    2007-12-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters. However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater beaches has not been previously investigated. In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational beaches on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach) during the summer of 2004. Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method. The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver Beach samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park Beach samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples. The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(1) to (3.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(2) and from (7 +/- 2) x 10(0) to (3.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) virus particles/liter for Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach, respectively. F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(1) to (4.6 +/- 1.5) x 10(2) virus particles/liter. Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results. This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational beaches. Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region.

  8. A New Human DSG2-Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Tropism and Pathology of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Beyer, Ines; Persson, Jonas; Song, Hui; Li, ZongYi; Richter, Maximilian; Cao, Hua; van Rensburg, Ruan; Yao, Xiaoying; Hudkins, Kelly; Yumul, Roma; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yu, Mujun; Fender, Pascal; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that a group of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) uses desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Among these are the widely distributed serotypes HAdV-B3 and HAdV-B7, as well as a newly emerged strain derived from HAdV-B14. These serotypes do not infect rodent cells and could not up until now be studied in small-animal models. We therefore generated transgenic mice containing the human DSG2 locus. These mice expressed human DSG2 (hDSG2) at a level and in a pattern similar to those found for humans and nonhuman primates. As an initial application of hDSG2-transgenic mice, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HAdV-B3 vector (Ad3-GFP) and studied GFP transgene expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry subsequent to intranasal and intravenous virus application. After intranasal application, we found efficient transduction of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in hDSG2-transgenic mice. Intravenous Ad3-GFP injection into hDSG2-transgenic mice resulted in hDSG2-dependent transduction of epithelial cells in the intestinal and colon mucosa. Our findings give an explanation for clinical symptoms associated with infection by DSG2-interacting HAdVs and provide a rationale for using Ad3-derived vectors in gene therapy. PMID:22457526

  9. Human Genomic Signatures of Brain Oscillations During Memory Encoding.

    PubMed

    Berto, Stefano; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Germi, James; Lega, Bradley C; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-04-05

    Memory encoding is an essential step for all learning. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human memory encoding remain poorly understood, and how this molecular framework permits the emergence of specific patterns of brain oscillations observed during mnemonic processing is unknown. Here, we directly compare intracranial electroencephalography recordings from the neocortex in individuals performing an episodic memory task with human gene expression from the same areas. We identify genes correlated with oscillatory memory effects across 6 frequency bands. These genes are enriched for autism-related genes and have preferential expression in neurons, in particular genes encoding synaptic proteins and ion channels, supporting the idea that the genes regulating voltage gradients are involved in the modulation of oscillatory patterns during successful memory encoding across brain areas. Memory-related genes are distinct from those correlated with other forms of cognitive processing and resting state fMRI. These data are the first to identify correlations between gene expression and active human brain states as well as provide a molecular window into memory encoding oscillations in the human brain.

  10. Chapter eight--Oncolytic adenoviruses for cancer immunotherapy: data from mice, hamsters, and humans.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Koski, Anniina; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and two products have already been approved for treatment of cancer in China (Gendicine(R) and Oncorine(R)). An intriguing aspect of oncolytic adenoviruses is that by their very nature they potently stimulate multiple arms of the immune system. Thus, combined tumor killing via oncolysis and inherent immunostimulatory properties in fact make these viruses in situ tumor vaccines. When further engineered to express cytokines, chemokines, tumor-associated antigens, or other immunomodulatory elements, they have been shown in various preclinical models to induce antigen-specific effector and memory responses, resulting both in full therapeutic cures and even induction of life-long tumor immunity. Here, we review the state of the art of oncolytic adenovirus, in the context of their capability to stimulate innate and adaptive arms of the immune system and finally how we can modify these viruses to direct the immune response toward cancer.

  11. Antitumor effects of recombinant human adenovirus-p53 against human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanchao; He, Wei; Wang, Rupeng; Yang, Libin; Zhou, Chunli; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to identify the anti-tumor effects of rAd/p53, which is a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus, in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Mouse models of human cSCC were constructed by injecting human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cells into both flanks of nude mice. Subsequently, the 75 nude mice with cSCC xenograft tumors were randomly divided into recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus (rAd)/p53, rAd/p53 + 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and 5-Fu groups. One side of the tumors was administered the therapeutic agents as the therapeutic group, whereas the remaining side was treated with medical saline as the control. At 24, 48, 72, 120 and 168 h post-intratumoral injection, alterations in tumor volume, tumor necrosis and the expression of several tumor-associated genes, including Smad4, Brca1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2), were analyzed. Compared with its control group, the rAd/P53 group exhibited a significantly increased tumor necrosis ratio. In addition, Smad4 and Brca1 expression levels increased significantly at various time points (P<0.05), and MMP-2 expression decreased significantly (P<0.05). In the rAd/p53 + 5-Fu group, the tumor necrosis ratio, and Smad4 and Brca1 expression levels also significantly increased at various time points (P<0.05). MMP-2 gene transcription gradually decreased, high expression of Smad4 was prolonged, and high expression of Brca1 was observed in the early period following treatment compared with the rAd/P53 group. In addition, p53 expression exhibited a positive correlation with the tumor necrosis ratio and Smad4 expression, and showed a negative correlation with MMP-2 gene transcription (P<0.05). These findings indicate that rAd/p53 has a potent anti-tumor effect in cSCC via the promotion of tumor necrosis and regulating the expression of various tumor-associated genes. PMID:28105142

  12. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells with adenoviral vectors: differences of infectability between lines and correlation of infectability with expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Brokhman, Irina; Pomp, Oz; Fishman, Lital; Tennenbaum, Tamar; Amit, Michal; Itzkovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    Adenovirus is an efficient vector for expression of transgenes in dividing and nondividing cells. However, very few studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have utilized adenoviral vectors. We examine here the ability of adenovirus to infect naive hESCs and the differentiated derivatives of multiple hESC lines. We found a striking variation in adenovirus infection rates between lines. The variability in infection rates was positively correlated with the expression of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, but not that of alpha(nu)-integrin. Adenoviral infection did not interfere with the expression of pluripotency markers, even after passaging. In addition, infection did not affect differentiation of hESC-derived neural precursors in vitro. We also found that green fluorescent protein expression mediated by adenovirus can be a useful marker for tracking hESC in xenografts. We conclude that adenovirus is a practical vector for genetic modification of naive hESC from most, but not all lines, but may be more generally useful for gene transfer into differentiated derivatives of hESC lines.

  13. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  14. Valganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathology in Permissive Immunosuppressed Female and Male Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Karoly; Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E.; Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Balakrishnan, Lata; Sagartz, John E.; Buller, Robert Mark L.; Wold, William S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients can develop into serious and often deadly multi-organ disease. There are no drugs approved for adenovirus infections. Cidofovir (an analog of 2-deoxycytidine monophosphate) is used at times but it can be nephrotoxic and its efficacy has not been proven in clinical trials. Brincidofovir, a promising lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, is in clinical trials. Ganciclovir, an analog of 2-deoxyguanosine, has been employed occasionally but with unknown efficacy in the clinic. In this study, we evaluated valganciclovir against disseminated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) infection in our permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. We administered valganciclovir prophylactically, beginning 12 h pre-infection or therapeutically starting at Day 1, 2, 3, or 4 post-infection. Valganciclovir significantly increased survival, reduced viral replication in the liver, and mitigated the pathology associated with Ad5 infection. In cultured cells, valganciclovir inhibited Ad5 DNA replication and blocked the transition from early to late stage of infection. Valganciclovir directly inhibited Ad5 DNA polymerase in vitro, which may explain, at least in part, its mechanism of action. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are approved to treat infections by certain herpesviruses. Our results support the use of valganciclovir to treat disseminated adenovirus infections in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:25807051

  15. Valganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathology in permissive immunosuppressed female and male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Sagartz, John E; Buller, Robert Mark L; Wold, William S M

    2015-03-23

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients can develop into serious and often deadly multi-organ disease. There are no drugs approved for adenovirus infections. Cidofovir (an analog of 2-deoxycytidine monophosphate) is used at times but it can be nephrotoxic and its efficacy has not been proven in clinical trials. Brincidofovir, a promising lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, is in clinical trials. Ganciclovir, an analog of 2-deoxyguanosine, has been employed occasionally but with unknown efficacy in the clinic. In this study, we evaluated valganciclovir against disseminated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) infection in our permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. We administered valganciclovir prophylactically, beginning 12 h pre-infection or therapeutically starting at Day 1, 2, 3, or 4 post-infection. Valganciclovir significantly increased survival, reduced viral replication in the liver, and mitigated the pathology associated with Ad5 infection. In cultured cells, valganciclovir inhibited Ad5 DNA replication and blocked the transition from early to late stage of infection. Valganciclovir directly inhibited Ad5 DNA polymerase in vitro, which may explain, at least in part, its mechanism of action. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are approved to treat infections by certain herpesviruses. Our results support the use of valganciclovir to treat disseminated adenovirus infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  16. Acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia due to co-infection of human herpesvirus-6 and adenovirus mimicking myositis.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Aldo; Pala, Giovanna; Cresta, Federico; Finetti, Martina; Biancheri, Roberta; Renna, Salvatore

    2014-11-26

    Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is a relatively common neurological disease in children. Most common types of ACA are acute post-infectious (APCA) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Less common but important causes include opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and acute cerebellitis. Cerebellar neoplasms and acute hydrocephalus are additional causes of paediatric ataxia. APCA is the most common cause of ACA in children, comprising about 30-50% of total cases. This is a report about an immunocompetent 4-yrs-old male affected by APCA, due to co-infection by human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and adenovirus, with symptoms mimicking myositis.

  17. Use of macrophages to target therapeutic adenovirus to human prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Giannoudis, Athina; Scott, Simon D; Fang, Hsin-Yu; Coffelt, Seth B; Morrow, Fiona J; Murdoch, Craig; Burton, Julian; Cross, Neil; Burke, Bernard; Mistry, Roshna; Hamdy, Freddie; Brown, Nicola J; Georgopoulos, Lindsay; Hoskin, Peter; Essand, Magnus; Lewis, Claire E; Maitland, Norman J

    2011-03-01

    New therapies are required to target hypoxic areas of tumors as these sites are highly resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Monocytes continuously extravasate from the bloodstream into tumors where they differentiate into macrophages and accumulate in hypoxic areas, thereby opening up the possibility of using these cells as vehicles to deliver gene therapy to these otherwise inaccessible sites. We describe a new cell-based method that selectively targets an oncolytic adenovirus to hypoxic areas of prostate tumors. In this approach, macrophages were cotransduced with a hypoxia-regulated E1A/B construct and an E1A-dependent oncolytic adenovirus, whose proliferation is restricted to prostate tumor cells using prostate-specific promoter elements from the TARP, PSA, and PMSA genes. When such cotransduced cells reach an area of extreme hypoxia, the E1A/B proteins are expressed, thereby activating replication of the adenovirus. The virus is subsequently released by the host macrophage and infects neighboring tumor cells. Following systemic injection into mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic prostate tumors, cotransduced macrophages migrated into hypoxic tumor areas, upregulated E1A protein, and released multiple copies of adenovirus. The virus then infected neighboring cells but only proliferated and was cytotoxic in prostate tumor cells, resulting in the marked inhibition of tumor growth and reduction of pulmonary metastases. This novel delivery system employs 3 levels of tumor specificity: the natural "homing" of macrophages to hypoxic tumor areas, hypoxia-induced proliferation of the therapeutic adenovirus in host macrophages, and targeted replication of oncolytic virus in prostate tumor cells.

  18. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  19. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; ...

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  20. Respiratory viruses in patients with influenza-like illness in Senegal: Focus on human respiratory adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Mbayame Ndiaye; Diop, Ndeye Sokhna; Fall, Amary; Kiori, Davy E.; Sarr, Fatoumata Diene; Sy, Sara; Goudiaby, Déborah; Barry, Mamadou Aliou; Fall, Malick; Dia, Ndongo

    2017-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens that are associated with a wide spectrum of human illnesses involving the respiratory tract. In the present study, we investigate the epidemiologic and viral molecular features of HAdVs circulating in Senegal after 4 consecutive years of sentinel surveillance of influenza-like Illness cases. Methodology and results From January 2012 to December 2015 swabs were collected from consenting ILI outpatients. Adenoviral detection is performed by rRT-PCR with the Anyplex™ II RV16 Detection kit (Seegene) and molecular characterization was performed using a partial hexon gene sequence. 6381 samples were collected. More than half of patients (51.7%; 3297/6381) were children of ≤ 5 years. 1967 (30.8%) were positive for HAdV with 1561 (79.4%) found in co-infection with at least one another respiratory virus. The most common co-detections were with influenza viruses (53.1%; 1045/1967), rhinoviruses (30%; 591/1967), enteroviruses (18.5%; 364/1967) and RSV (13.5%; 266/1967). Children under 5 were the most infected group (62.2%; 1224/1967; p <0.05). We noted that HAdV was detected throughout the year at a high level with detection peaks of different amplitudes without any clear seasonality. Phylogenetic analysis revealed species HAdV-C in majority, species HAdV-B and one HAdV- 4 genome type. The 9 HAdV-B species like strains from Senegal grouped with genome types HAdV-7, HAdV-55 and HAdV-11 as shown by a phylogenetic branch with a high bootstrap value of (88%). Conclusion In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest strong year-round HAdV activity in Senegal, especially in children up to 5 years of age. Molecular studies revealed that the dominant species in circulation in patients with ILI appears to be HAdV-C and HAdV-B species. The circulation of though HAdV-7 and HAdV-55 genome types is of note as these serotypes are recognized causes of more severe and even fatal acute respiratory infections

  1. SPOC1-Mediated Antiviral Host Cell Response Is Antagonized Early in Human Adenovirus Type 5 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Kinkley, Sarah; Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Wimmer, Peter; Schubert, Tobias; Groitl, Peter; Will, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad) serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24–48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx) are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV) also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms eradicating incoming

  2. Robust encoding of scene anticipation during human spatial navigation

    PubMed Central

    Shikauchi, Yumi; Ishii, Shin

    2016-01-01

    In a familiar city, people can recall scene views (e.g., a particular street corner scene) they could encounter again in the future. Complex objects with multiple features are represented by multiple neural units (channels) in the brain, but when anticipating a scene view, the kind of feature that is assigned to a specific channel is unknown. Here, we studied neural encoding of scene view anticipation during spatial navigation, using a novel data-driven analysis to evaluate encoding channels. Our encoding models, based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity, provided channel error correction via redundant channel assignments that reflected the navigation environment. We also found that our encoding models strongly reflected brain activity in the inferior parietal gyrus and precuneus, and that details of future scenes were locally represented in the superior prefrontal gyrus and temporal pole. Furthermore, a decoder associated with the encoding models accurately predicted future scene views in both passive and active navigation. These results suggest that the human brain uses scene anticipation, mediated especially by parietal and medial prefrontal cortical areas, as a robust and effective navigation processing. PMID:27874089

  3. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  4. Effects of recombinant human adenovirus-p53 on the regression of hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yehong; Yang, Puye; Chen, Na; Lin, Shumei; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a scarring process that may progress to hepatic cirrhosis and even hepatic carcinoma if left untreated. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play essential roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a transcription factor that is involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA repair. Recombinant human adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53) has been demonstrated to act as a promising antitumor gene therapy in various types of cancer. However, there is limited infomration regarding the therapeutic effect of Ad-p53 on the regression of hepatic fibrosis. In order to examine the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the effects of Ad-p53 on HSCs, a rat model of hepatic fibrosis was established and HSC-T6 cells were cultured under different conditions. The expression of p53, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), which is a marker of activated HSCs, was detected by immunohistochemical assays and RT-qPCR. In vitro, five different concentrations (1×106, 5×106, 1×107, 2×107 and 5×107 PFU/ml) of Ad-p53 were selected for use in the MTT assay to analyze the proliferation of HSCs at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. Flow cytometric analysis was applied to determine the effect of three different concentrations of Ad-p53 (5×106, 1×107 and 2×107 PFU/ml) on the cell cycle and the apoptosis of HSC-T6 cells at 24 and 48 h. The results of immunohistochemical studies and RT-qPCR showed that Ad-p53 upregulated the expression of p53, and downregulated the expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA. The MTT assay revealed that when treated with various doses of Ad-p53, the proliferation of HSCs was inhibited within a certain range of concentrations and time periods. Analysis of flow cytometric data showed that Ad-p53 arrested the cell cycle in G1 phase and significantly induced apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that Ad-p53 promotes apoptosis and inhibits the proliferation of HSCs in

  5. Recombination analysis of intermediate human adenovirus type 53 in Japan by complete genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Aoki, Koki; Ishida, Susumu; Ohno, Shigeaki; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Masako; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Watanabe, Hidemi; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2011-06-01

    Human adenovirus type 53 (HAdV-53) has commonly been detected in samples from epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) patients in Japan since 1996. HAdV-53 is an intermediate virus, containing hexon-chimeric, penton base and fiber structures similar to HAdV-22 and -37, HAdV-37 and HAdV-8, respectively. HAdV-53-like intermediate strains were first isolated from EKC samples in Japan in the 1980s. Here, the complete genome sequences of three such HAdV-53-like intermediate strains (870006C, 880249C and 890357C) and four HAdV-53 strains were determined, and their relationships were analysed. The seven HAdV strains were classified into three groups, 870006C/880249C, 890357C and the four HAdV-53 strains, on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of the partial and complete genome sequences. HAdV strains within the same group showed the highest nucleotide identities (99.87-100.00 %). Like HAdV-53, the hexon loop 1 and 2 regions of 870006C, 880249C and 890357C showed the highest identity with HAdV-22. However, these strains did not show a hexon-chimeric structure similar to HAdV-22 and -37, or a penton base similar to HAdV-37. The fiber genes of 870006C and 880249C were identical to that of HAdV-37, but not HAdV-8. Thus, the three intermediate HAdVs isolated in the 1980s were similar to each other but not to HAdV-53. The recombination breakpoints were inferred by the Recombination Detection Program (rdp) using whole-genome sequences of these seven HAdV and of 12 HAdV-D strains from GenBank. HAdV-53 may have evolved from intermediate HAdVs circulating in the 1980s, and from HAdV-8, -22 and -37, by recombination of sections cut at the putative breakpoints.

  6. Detection of human adenoviruses in organic fresh produce using molecular and cell culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Marti, Elisabet; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2016-08-02

    The consumption of organic fresh produce has increased in recent years due to consumer demand for healthy foods without chemical additives. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has also increased. Contamination of food with enteric viruses is a major concern because the viruses have a low infectious dose and high persistence in the environment. Human adenovirus (HAdV) has been proposed as a good marker of faecal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the plaque assay (PA), real time PCR (qPCR) and integrated cell culture-RT-qPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) for the recovery of HAdV from artificially and naturally contaminated fresh produce. Organic lettuce, strawberries and green onions were selected because these fresh products are frequently associated with foodborne outbreaks. The virus extraction efficiencies from artificially contaminated samples varied from 2.8% to 32.8% depending on the food matrix and the quantification method used. Although the HAdV recoveries determined by qPCR were higher than those determined by PA and ICC-RT-qPCR, PA was defined as the most reproducible method. The qPCR assays were more sensitive than the PA and ICC-RT-qPCR assays; however, this technique alone did not provide information about the viability of the pathogen. ICC-RT-qPCR was more sensitive than PA for detecting infectious particles in fresh produce samples. HAdV genome copies were detected in 93.3% of the analysed naturally contaminated samples, attesting to the common faecal contamination of the fresh produce tested. However, only 33.3% of the total samples were positive for infectious HAdV particles based on ICC-RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this study reported that HAdV can be an efficient viral marker for fresh produce contamination. Good detection of infectious HAdV was obtained with the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays. Thus, we suggest that the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays should be considered when quantitative

  7. Adenovirus Vectors Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus–1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages by Inhibition of the Long Terminal Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Robert J.; Santiago, Francisco; Rahaghi, Franck; Michaels, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Heterologous viruses may transactivate or suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–1 replication. An adenovirus type 5 gene transfer vector (Ad5) HIV-1 vaccine was recently evaluated in a clinical trial, without efficacy. In this context, it is relevant to ask what effect Ad vectors have on HIV-1 replication, particularly in cells that are part of the innate immune system. Infection of HIV-1–infected human alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from HIV-1+ individuals with an Ad vector containing no transgene (AdNull) resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of endogenous HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 replication in normal AMs infected with HIV-1 in vitro was inhibited by AdNull with a similar dose response. Ad reduced AM HIV-1 replication up to 14 days after HIV-1 infection. Fully HIV-1–infected AMs were treated with 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine, after which Ad infection still inhibited HIV-1 replication, suggesting a postentry step was affected. Substantial HIV-1 DNA was still produced after Ad infection, as quantified by TaqMan real-time PCR, suggesting that the replication block occurred after reverse transcription. AdNull blocked HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription, as assessed by an vesicular stomatitis virus G protein pseudotyped HIV-1 LTR luciferase construct. The formation of HIV-1 DNA integrated into the host chromosome was not inhibited by Ad, as quantified by a two-step TaqMan real-time PCR assay, implying a postintegration block to HIV-1 replication. These data indicate that Ad vectors are inhibitory to HIV-1 replication in human AMs based, in part, on their ability to inhibit LTR-driven transcription. PMID:19805482

  8. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  9. Improving gene transfer in human renal carcinoma cells: Utilization of adenovirus vectors containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins

    PubMed Central

    ACHARYA, BISHNU; TERAO, SHUJI; SUZUKI, TORU; NAOE, MICHIO; HAMADA, KATSUYUKI; MIZUGUCHI, HIROYUKI; GOTOH, AKINOBU

    2010-01-01

    The transduction efficacy of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector in human renal carcinoma cells is generally low due to the down-regulated expression of Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in target cells. By contrast, the infectivity of adenovirus serotype 35 vectors depends on the binding rate to CD46 receptor, independent of CAR. In this study, we examined whether an adenovirus vector containing chimeric type 5 and type 35 fiber proteins (Ad5/F35) increases transduction efficiency compared to Ad5 vector in human renal carcinoma cells in vitro. The expression of CAR was much lower in the human renal carcinoma cells than in control HEK293 cells. By contrast, the expression of CD46 was similar and perhaps at a higher level in the human renal carcinoma cells than in the HEK293 cells. The transduction efficacy of Ad5/F35 vector was dramatically higher compared to that of Ad5 in human renal carcinoma cells, and was correlated to the expression of CD46. Thus, Ad5/35 vector may be useful for the development of novel gene therapy approaches to renal cell carcinoma. PMID:22993573

  10. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a pr...

  11. Early detection and visualization of human adenovirus serotype 5-viral vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus or luciferase transgenes in cell lines and bovine tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vaccines containing capsid-coding regions from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been demonstrated to induce effective immune responses and provide homologous protective immunity against FMDV in cattle. However, basic mechanisms ...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Associated with Acute Respiratory Disease, Isolated from a Military Base in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Se Hun; Song, Dong Hyun; Lee, Daesang; Huh, Kyungmin; Yoo, Hongseok; Oh, Hong Sang; Jung, Jaehun; Woo, Koung In; Kim, Mirang; Seog, Woong; Hwang, Il-Ung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (HAdV) (genus Mastadenovirus; family Adenoviridae) serotype 55 is a reemerging pathogen associated with acute respiratory disease. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HAdV-55 strain AFMC 16-0011, isolated from a military recruit, using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:28280019

  13. Decay kinetics of microbial source tracking (MST) markers and human adenovirus under the effects of sunlight and salinity.

    PubMed

    L, Liang; S G, Goh; K Y H, Gin

    2017-01-01

    Artificial seawater and freshwater microcosms inoculated with raw sewage were set up to compare the persistence of microbial source tracking (MST) markers (i.e. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta), Methanobrevibacter smithii (M. smithii), human polyomaviruses JC and BK (HPyVs)) and human adenoviruses under different sunlight intensity and salinity. PMA pretreatment successfully eliminated the false-positive detection of dead bacterial cells in the model-development experiment. The results were then validated using real environmental matrices in microcosms inoculated with raw sewage. The genome concentrations of the targets followed a first-order decay pattern with 90% reduction of the initial amounts in <5days for both artificial and natural surface waters. Decay rate constant (k1) were developed microorganisms in artificial water matrices. Due to the different water environment conditions, improved decay rates (k2) incorporated with sunlight, TSS and TOC adjustment coefficients were used for validation of the natural water matrices. Based on the predictive squared correlation coefficient (Q(2)F) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) validation criteria, the improved k2 were able to provide better prediction on the survival of target microorganisms in environmental surface waters (Q(2)F>0.6 and RMSE ranged from 0.05 to 1.81). For microbial source tracking purposes, HPyVs are suggested to be better MST markers in freshwater, while B. theta is recommended for seawater based on the decay models developed in this study. The targeted DNA of M. smithii should only be used to indicate recent human faecal pollution in surface waters due to their faster decay than human adenoviruses.

  14. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  15. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    PubMed

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world.

  16. Analysis of the DNA-terminal protein from different serotypes of human adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rekosh, D

    1981-01-01

    The DNA-terminal proteins from adenovirus type 12, type 3, and type 5 were analyzed after labeling in vitro with 125I by the chloramine T method, and were shown to be serotype specific. We also studied the kinetics of cleavage by alkali of the terminal protein-DNA linkage and showed that the half-time of cleavage with either 0.1 M NaOH or 0.5 M piperidine at 37 degree C is about 15 to 30 min. The substitution of the volatile base piperidine for NaOH in this procedure provided a useful tool for rapid analysis of the labeled protein. Images PMID:6895236

  17. Differential Encoding of Losses and Gains in the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Daw, Nathaniel; Dayan, Peter; Singer, Tania; Dolan, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Studies on human monetary prediction and decision making emphasize the role of the striatum in encoding prediction errors for financial reward. However, less is known about how the brain encodes financial loss. Using Pavlovian conditioning of visual cues to outcomes that simultaneously incorporate the chance of financial reward and loss, we show that striatal activation reflects positively signed prediction errors for both. Furthermore, we show functional segregation within the striatum, with more anterior regions showing relative selectivity for rewards and more posterior regions for losses. These findings mirror the anteroposterior valence-specific gradient reported in rodents and endorse the role of the striatum in aversive motivational learning about financial losses, illustrating functional and anatomical consistencies with primary aversive outcomes such as pain. PMID:17475790

  18. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  19. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  20. Targeted cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus coding for a fully human monoclonal antibody specific for CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Dias, J D; Hemminki, O; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Bonetti, A; Guse, K; Escutenaire, S; Kanerva, A; Pesonen, S; Löskog, A; Cerullo, V; Hemminki, A

    2012-10-01

    Promising clinical results have been achieved with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as ipilimumab and tremelimumab that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, CD152). However, systemic administration of these agents also has the potential for severe immune-related adverse events. Thus, local production might allow higher concentrations at the target while reducing systemic side effects. We generated a transductionally and transcriptionally targeted oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 expressing complete human mAb specific for CTLA-4 and tested it in vitro, in vivo and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal donors and patients with advanced solid tumors. mAb expression was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Biological functionality was determined in a T-cell line and in PBMCs from cancer patients. T cells of patients, but not those of healthy donors, were activated by an anti-CTLA4mAb produced by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4. In addition to immunological effects, a direct anti-CTLA-4-mediated pro-apoptotic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Local production resulted in 43-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor versus plasma anti-CTLA4mAb concentration. Plasma levels in mice remained below what has been reported safe in humans. Replication-competent Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 resulted in 81-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor mAb levels as compared with a replication-deficient control. This is the first report of an oncolytic adenovirus producing a full-length human mAb. High mAb concentrations were seen at tumors with lower systemic levels. Stimulation of T cells of cancer patients by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 suggests feasibility of testing the approach in clinical trials.

  1. Development of a novel recombinant adenovirus containing gfp-zeocin fusion expression cassette for conditional replication in p53-deficient human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoli; Joshua, Mallam Nock; Dong, Changyuan; Qi, Yipeng

    2004-05-01

    Two obstacles limiting the efficacy of nearly all cancer gene therapy trails are low gene transduction efficiency and the lack of tumor specificity. Fortunately, a replication-competent, E1B-deficient adenovirus (dl1520) was developed that could overcome these limitations, because it was capable of efficiently and selectively destroying tumor cells lacking functional p53. In an attempt to appraise the efficiency and safety of this approach, a novel recombinant adenovirus, r3/Ad, containing a gfp-zeocin expression cassette was constructed in this work. The study in vitro demonstrated that r3/Ad has the ability to replicate in and lyse only the p53-deficient human tumor cells such as the human glioblastoma cells (U251) and human bladder cells (EJ) but not in the human fibroblast cells (MRC-5) with functional p53. Importantly, this gfp-zeocin fusion gene driven by the bipromoter (CMV and EM-7) could be used as an effective selective marker and reporter in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and also zeocin as a selective marker could minimize contamination of the recombinant virus by the wt-Ad5. Additionally, it was found that the r3/Ad could be useful for studying the selective replication of E1B-deficient adenovirus in vivo, it could be used as a "guide" to study the ability of the recombinant adenovirus to spread and to infect distant tumor cells in any tumor bearing animal model by GFP as a reporter. This may help determine the safety of using any E1B-deficient adenovirus in cancer gene therapy.

  2. Dynamic Encoding of Speech Sequence Probability in Human Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Matthew K.; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Tang, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning. PMID:25948269

  3. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-06

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning.

  4. Adenovirus structure.

    PubMed

    Rux, John J; Burnett, Roger M

    2004-12-01

    Structural studies continue to play an essential role as the focus of adenovirus research shifts in emphasis from basic biology to adenovirus-based vector technologies. A crucial step in developing novel therapeutics for gene replacement, cancer, and vaccines is often to modify the virion. Such engineered changes are designed to retarget the virus, or to reduce the immunological responses to infection. These efforts are far more effective when they are based on detailed structural knowledge. This minireview provides a brief summary of the wealth of information that has been obtained from the combined application of X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This knowledge now includes a good working model for the architectural organization of the virion, and atomic resolution molecular structures for all the major capsid proteins, hexon, penton, and fiber. We highlight new developments, which include the structure of the penton base and the discovery that adenovirus has several relatives. We sketch how the structural information can be used to engineer novel virions and conclude with the prospects for future progress.

  5. Evaluation of fiber-modified adenovirus vector-vaccine against foot-and-mouth diseaes in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel vaccination approaches against foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD) include the use of a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 vector (Ad5) that contains the capsid encoding regions of FMD virus (FMDV). An Ad5.A24 has proven effective as a vaccine against FMD in swine and cattle. However, ther...

  6. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  7. Adenovirus-Vectored Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Directed Against gp120 Prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquisition in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Jackson, Andrew; Beloor, Jagadish; Kumar, Priti; Sutton, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite nearly three decades of research, a safe and effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has yet to be achieved. More recently, the discovery of highly potent anti-gp160 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has garnered renewed interest in using antibody-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. Here, we encoded bNAbs in first-generation adenoviral (ADV) vectors, which have the distinctive features of a large coding capacity and ease of propagation. A single intramuscular injection of ADV-vectorized bNAbs in humanized mice generated high serum levels of bNAbs that provided protection against multiple repeated challenges with a high dose of HIV-1, prevented depletion of peripheral CD4+ T cells, and reduced plasma viral loads to below detection limits. Our results suggest that ADV vectors may be a viable option for the prophylactic and perhaps therapeutic use of bNAbs in humans. PMID:25953321

  8. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  9. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment.

  10. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  11. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  12. Ipsilateral directional encoding of joystick movements in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Gaona, Charles; Roland, Jarod; Anderson, Nick; Freudenberg, Zachary; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The majority of Brain Computer Interfaces have relied on signals related to primary motor cortex and the operation of the contralateral limb. Recently, the physiology associated with same-sided (ipsilateral) motor movements has been found to have a unique cortical physiology. This study sets out to assess whether more complex motor movements can be discerned utilizing ipsilateral cortical signals. In this study, three invasively monitored human subjects were recorded while performing a center out joystick task with the hand ipsilateral to the hemispheric subdural grid array. It was found that directional tuning was present in ipsilateral cortex. This information was encoded in both distinct anatomic populations and spectral distributions. These findings support the notion that ipsilateral signals may provide added information for BCI operation in the future.

  13. Identification of Novel Inverted Terminal Repeat (ITR) Deletions of Human Adenovirus (AD) From Infected Host: Virulent Ads Containing Mixed Populations of Genomic Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute respiratory disease ( ARD ) in military personnel is the most significant cause of morbidity, hospitalizations, and work-time loss...vaccination program in 1990s, recurrent epidemic outbreaks of human adenovirus-associated acute respiratory diseases ( ARD ) caused mainly by the new Ad4...type 4 acute respiratory disease in military trainees:report of an outbreak during a lapse in vaccination. J. Infect Dis 179:1531-1533. 3. Berge, T.O

  14. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan mediates the selective attachment and internalization of serotype 3 human adenovirus dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Vivès, Romain R; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Fender, Pascal

    2004-04-10

    During adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) infection cycle, the penton (Pt) of the viral capsid, a noncovalent complex of fiber and penton base proteins, is produced in large excess and self-assembles to form a highly organized dodecahedral structure, termed dodecahedron (Dd). The physiological role of these particles is poorly understood, but we have recently reported that they can penetrate cells with high efficiency and thus may constitute an attractive tool for gene or protein delivery approaches. Surprisingly, Dd displayed the ability to enter cells non-permissive to Ad3, suggesting the existence of additional internalization modes. In this study, we show that Ad3 Dd binds to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) through high affinity interaction with the penton base. Furthermore, binding to HS was found to be the prerequisite for a novel and Dd specific entry pathway that could not be used by Ad3. Overall, these data provide new insights in the possible role of Dd during viral infection and potential therapeutic applications.

  15. The adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces growth arrest and mitotic catastrophe in H1299 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Szymborski, A; Miron, M-J; Marcellus, R; Binda, O; Lavoie, J N; Branton, P E

    2009-01-22

    The human adenovirus E4orf4 protein, when expressed alone, induces p53-independent death in a wide range of cancer cells. Earlier studies by our groups suggested that although in some cases cell death can be associated with some hallmarks of apoptosis, it is not always affected by caspase inhibitors. Thus it is unlikely that E4orf4-induced cell death occurs uniquely through apoptosis. In the present studies using H1299 human lung carcinoma cells as a model system we found that death is induced in the absence of activation of any of the caspases tested, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, or release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. E4orf4 caused a substantial change in cell morphology, including vigorous membrane blebbing, multiple nuclei in many cells and increased cell volume. Most of these characteristics are not typical of apoptosis, but they are of necrosis. FACS analysis and western blotting for cell cycle markers showed that E4orf4-expressing cells became arrested in G(2)/M and also accumulated high levels of cyclin E. The presence of significant numbers of tetraploid and polyploid cells and some cells with micronuclei suggested that E4orf4 appears to induce death in these cells through a process resulting from mitotic catastrophe.

  16. Evaluation of HA negatively charged membranes in the recovery of human adenoviruses and hepatitis A virus in different water matrices.

    PubMed

    Rigotto, C; Kolesnikovas, C K; Moresco, V; Simões, C M O; Barardi, C R M

    2009-11-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are shed in the faeces and consequently may be present in environmental waters, resulting in an increase in pathogen concentration that can affect water quality and human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate an adsorption-elution method which utilizes negatively charged membrane HA to determine the efficient recovery of HAdV and HAV from different water matrices and to combine this procedure with a qualitative molecular method (nested RT-PCR and nested PCR). The best efficiency recovery was achieved in distilled water and treated wastewater effluent (100%) for both viruses and in recreational lagoon water for HAV (100%). The efficiency recovery was 10% for HAdV and HAV in seawater and 10% for HAdV in lagoon water. The viral detection limit by nested PCR for HAV in water samples ranged between 20-0.2 FFU/mL and 250 and 25 TCID50/mL for HAdV. In conclusion, these results suggest that the HA negatively charged membranes vary their efficiency for recovery of viral concentration depending upon the types of both enteric viruses and water matrices.

  17. The antiviral restriction factors IFITM1, 2 and 3 do not inhibit infection of human papillomavirus, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Warren, Cody J; Griffin, Laura M; Little, Alexander S; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Pyeon, Dohun

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-α and β) induce dynamic host defense mechanisms to inhibit viral infections. It has been recently recognized that the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITM) 1, 2 and 3 can block entry of a broad spectrum of RNA viruses. However, no study to date has focused on the role of IFITM proteins in DNA virus restriction. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-α or -β treatment of keratinocytes substantially decreases human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) infection while robustly inducing IFITM1, 2 and 3 expression. However, IFITM1, 2 and 3 overexpression did not inhibit HPV16 infection; rather, IFITM1 and IFITM3 modestly enhanced HPV16 infection in various cell types including primary keratinocytes. Moreover, IFITM1, 2 and 3 did not inhibit infection by two other DNA viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Taken together, we reveal that the entry of several DNA viruses, including HPV, HCMV, and Ad5 is not affected by IFITM1, 2 and 3 expression. These results imply that HPV, and other DNA viruses, may bypass IFITM restriction during intracellular trafficking.

  18. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia; Kieweg, Lisa; Müncheberg, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Once transported to the replication sites, human adenoviruses (HAdVs) need to ensure decondensation and transcriptional activation of their viral genomes to synthesize viral proteins and initiate steps to reprogram the host cell for viral replication. These early stages during adenoviral infection are poorly characterized but represent a decisive moment in the establishment of a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin-associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of the host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which represents an essential step required for efficient viral replication. Conversely, we also observed during infection an HAdV-mediated decrease of KAP1 SUMO moieties, known to promote chromatin decondensation events. Based on our findings, we provide evidence that HAdV induces KAP1 deSUMOylation to minimize epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for human adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play key roles in HAdV transcriptional regulation. We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1-interacting factor KAP1 during productive HAdV growth. KAP1 binds to the viral E1B-55K protein, promoting its SUMO modification, therefore illustrating a crucial step for

  19. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F) type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD) across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV) detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05), considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314). The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377); and in 76.60% (36/47) of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients) in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614). There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030) as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019). The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of seasonal

  20. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  1. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  2. Adenovirus vector-mediated FAM176A overexpression induces cell death in human H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Hu, Jia; Pan, Huan; Lou, Yaxin; Lv, Ping; Chen, Yingyu

    2014-02-01

    FAM176A (family with sequence similarity 176 member A) is a novel molecule related to programmed cell death. A decreased expression of FAM176A has been found in several types of human tumors in including lung cancers. In the present study, we investigated the biological activities of FAM176A on the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus 5-FAM176A vector (Ad5-FAM176A) and evaluated the expression and anti-tumor activities in vitro. Cell viability analysis revealed that the adenovirus-mediated increase of FAM176A inhibited the growth of the tumor cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis that involved caspase activation. In addition, cell cycle analysis suggested that Ad5-FAM176A could induce cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, all of which suggested that adenovirus-mediated FAM176A gene transfer might present a new therapeutic approach for lung cancer treatment.

  3. Radioisotopic imaging allows optimization of adenovirus lung deposition for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lerondel, S; Le Pape, A; Sené, C; Faure, L; Bernard, S; Diot, P; Nicolis, E; Mehtali, M; Lusky, M; Cabrini, G; Pavirani, A

    2001-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common, heriditary disease resulting from mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Airway transfer of the CFTR gene is a potential strategy to treat or prevent the lung pathology that is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Among the vectors used for gene therapy, adenoviruses have shown their ability to transfer the CFTR gene to respiratory epithelial cells, using either instillation or nebulization. Our objective was to characterize the lung deposition of aerosolized adenovirus by quantitative radioisotopic imaging, the only noninvasive technique allowing in vivo quantitation of inhaled drugs. We first labeled an adenovirus expressing human CFTR with the gamma-emitting radioisotope, technetium 99m (99mTc), and determined the best labeling conditions to allow preservation of virus bioactivity. We then administered the radioaerosol to baboons, determined lung regional deposition of 99mTc-labeled adenovirus, and compared the expression of CFTR transcripts 3 and 21 days after inhalation. The expression of vector-encoded mRNA ranged from 4 to 22% with respect to the endogenous CFTR mRNA depending on the lung segments. Moreover, we have developed a model using 99mTc-DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), which can be used, as an alternative to adenovirus, to determine the profile of lung deposition of the vector. This study demonstrates that scintigraphy is a useful technique to achieve optimization of gene administration to the airways.

  4. Cell-free transmission of human adenovirus by passive mass transfer in cell culture simulated in a computer model.

    PubMed

    Yakimovich, Artur; Gumpert, Heidi; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Lütschg, Verena A; Jurgeit, Andreas; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Greber, Urs F

    2012-09-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell transmissions. Both mechanisms enhance disease development, but it is difficult to distinguish between them. Here, we analyzed the transmission mode of human adenovirus (HAdV) in monolayers of epithelial cells by wet laboratory experimentation and a computer simulation. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy and replication-competent HAdV2 expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that the spread of infection invariably occurred after cell lysis. It was affected by convection and blocked by neutralizing antibodies but was independent of second-round infections. If cells were overlaid with agarose, convection was blocked and round plaques developed around lytic infected cells. Infected cells that did not lyse did not give rise to plaques, highlighting the importance of cell-free transmission. Key parameters for cell-free virus transmission were the time from infection to lysis, the dose of free viruses determining infection probability, and the diffusion of single HAdV particles in aqueous medium. With these parameters, we developed an in silico model using multiscale hybrid dynamics, cellular automata, and particle strength exchange. This so-called white box model is based on experimentally determined parameters and reproduces viral infection spreading as a function of the local concentration of free viruses. These analyses imply that the extent of lytic infections can be determined by either direct plaque assays or can be predicted by calculations of virus diffusion constants and modeling.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of a novel human adenovirus type 8 strain causing a prolonged, multi-state keratoconjunctivitis epidemic in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Elias; Espelage, Werner; Eckmanns, Tim; Lamson, Daryl M.; Pantó, Laura; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Heim, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The German infectious disease surveillance system revealed an increase of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) from an average of 320 cases/year (2001 to 2010) up to 2146 and 1986 cases in 2012 and 2013, respectively. From November 2011 until December 2013 (epidemic period) 85% of typed isolates were human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-D8), whereas only low level circulation (19%) of HAdV-D8 was observed outside the epidemic period. In order to investigate whether a novel monophyletic HAdV-D8 strain prevailed during the epidemic period, complete genomic sequences of 23 HAdV-D8 isolates were generated by deep sequencing and analyzed phylogenetically. For comparison, eight HAdV-D8 isolates from outside the epidemic period were sequenced. HAdV-D8 isolates of the epidemic period had a very high sequence identity of at least 99.9% and formed a monophyletic cluster with two subclusters. A single outlier was closely related to HAdV-D8 strains isolated prior to the epidemic period. Circulation of the epidemic strain was detected as early as 2010 but not after the epidemic period in 2014. In conclusion, molecular phylogeny of complete genomic sequences proved a monophyletic HAdV-D8 epidemic. However, co-circulation of other HAdV types as well as better reporting may have contributed to the huge increase of reported cases. PMID:28084428

  6. Human herpesvirus 7 infection of lymphoid and myeloid cell lines transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, M; Inoue, Y; Ohminami, H; Sada, E; Miyake, K; Tohyama, T; Shimada, T; Fujita, S

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported recently that CD4 is a major component of the receptor for human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), which has been newly identified as a T-lymphotropic virus. To investigate further the role of CD4 in HHV-7 infection, we examined the susceptibility to HHV-7 infection of various CD4-negative or weakly positive cell lines into which the cDNA for CD4 was transferred using an adenovirus vector (Adex1CACD4). Of 13 cell lines transduced with Adex1CACD4, including T-lymphoid, B-lymphoid, monocytoid, and myeloid cell lines, one T-lymphoid cell line, one monocytoid cell line, and two cell lines established from the blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia showed high susceptibility to HHV-7 infection. Taken together with the results of previous studies, these data suggest strongly that CD4 is a major component of the binding receptor for HHV-7. This study also shows that HHV-7 may be able to infect CD4-positive hematopoietic precursor cells as well as T lymphocytes. PMID:8995705

  7. A serological survey of human adenovirus serotype 2 and 5 circulating pediatric populations in Changchun, China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficacy of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vaccine vectors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogens have been shown to be limited by high titers of pre-existing Ad5 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in the developing world. Results Using a secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) neutralization assay, 50% serum neutralization titers against rAd2 and rAd5 vectors were measured in samples from 274 infants and young children in northeast China. The pediatric population was found to be 59.6% and 43.3% seropositive for rAd2 and rAd5, respectively. Of all participants, 44.9% had moderate and high (> 200) and 25.6% had high (>1000) Ad2 NAb titers, compared with the corresponding rates of 26.6% and 9.3% against Ad5. Marked age-dependent increases in NAb titers to both Ad serotypes were observed across five age groups, with the exception of infants in the 0-6-month group commonly having relatively high titers due to pre-existing maternal antibodies. Conclusions Our data suggest that Ad-based therapies may be suitible for children in the 7-12-month age range in this region. PMID:23176136

  8. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Salazar, Andres M; Grubman, Marvin J; de los Santos, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FMDV challenge by 7 days post-vaccination. However, since relatively large amounts of Ad5-CI-A24-2B are required to induce protection this strategy could be costly for livestock production. Poly ICLC is a synthetic double stranded RNA that activates multiple innate and adaptive immune pathways. In this study, we have tested for the first time, the adjuvant effect of poly ICLC in combination with Ad5-CI-A24-2B in swine. We found that the combination resulted in a reduction of the vaccine protective dose by 80-fold. Interestingly, the lowest dose of Ad5-CI-A24-2B plus 1mg of poly ICLC protected animals against challenge even in the absence of detectable FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies at the time of challenge.

  9. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk.

  10. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  11. Etiology of acute conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 variant, human adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and Chlamydia in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Yongsheng; Lin, Changying; Li, Weihong; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Jia, Lei; Li, Xitai; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Acute conjunctivitis is a common disease associated with high morbidity and economic burden. To clarify the etiological characteristics of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing, surveillance of acute conjunctivitis was conducted from July to October during 2007-2012 by collecting eye swabs from patients treated at surveillance hospitals affiliated with a surveillance program of 18 districts Center for Disease Prevention and Control in Beijing. Coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v), enterovirus 70 (EV70), human adenovirus (HAdV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chlamydia were identified by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 region of CA24v was conducted. Comparisons of proportions and statistical significance were performed using the chi-square test. HAdV was found to be the most prevalent pathogen, followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV. Significant differences in the symptoms of ocular pain, photophobia, and epiphora were identified among the 4 agents. The prevalence of HAdV- and CA24v-mediated conjunctivitis peaked in July or August and September or October, respectively. Nucleotide sequences of the VP1 regions among the isolated CA24v strains shared 92.8%-100% homology. In conclusion, HAdV followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV were the most common causative agents of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing. Comprehensive, continuous surveillance and advanced laboratory techniques are needed for further studies.

  12. Encoding of marginal utility across time in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Alex; Seymour, Ben; Roiser, Jonathan P; Bossaerts, Peter; Friston, Karl J.; Curran, H. Valerie; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Marginal utility theory prescribes the relationship between the objective property of the magnitude of rewards and their subjective value. Despite its pervasive influence, however, there is remarkably little direct empirical evidence for such a theory of value, let alone of its neurobiological basis. We show that human preferences in an inter-temporal choice task are best described by a model that integrates marginally diminishing utility with temporal discounting. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that activity in the dorsal striatum encodes both the marginal utility of rewards, over and above that which can be described by their magnitude alone, and the discounting associated with increasing time. In addition, our data show that dorsal striatum may be involved in integrating subjective valuation systems inherent to time and magnitude, thereby providing an overall metric of value used to guide choice behaviour. Furthermore, during choice we show that anterior cingulate activity correlates with the degree of difficulty associated with dissonance between value and time. Our data support an integrative architecture for decision-making, revealing the neural representation of distinct subcomponents of value that may contribute to impulsivity and decisiveness. PMID:19641120

  13. Distribution of human polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and hepatitis E virus in the environment and in a drinking-water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Albinana-Gimenez, Nestor; Clemente-Casares, Pilar; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Ribas, Ferran; Girones, Rosina

    2006-12-01

    Large numbers of viruses are excreted in human feces and urine, which even at low concentrations may cause illness when ingested. Some of these viruses have not been traditionally monitored in terms of waterborne diseases and are considered emergent viruses, such as hepatitis E virus (HEV) and JC and BK polyomavirus (JCPyV and BKPyV). The high prevalence of human adenoviruses (HAdV) and polyomaviruses, which both show DNA genomes, in sewage from widely divergent areas has suggested the relevance of evaluating these viruses as possible indicators of viral contamination. The concentration of these viruses was analyzed in sewage and river water and after treatment in a drinking-water treatment plant including chlorination, flocculation, ozonation, and granulate active carbon (GAC) filtration. Samples of GAC-filtered water were collected before a second chlorination treatment. The river used as a source of fresh water presented an average concentration of 2.6 x 10(1) JCPyV and 4 x 10(2) HAdV GC (genome copies)/L. A removal of 2 logarithms (99%) of HAdV and JCPyV was observed in the drinking-water treatment plant. All the GAC-filtered water samples studied contained HAdV, with a mean value of 4.3 HAdV GC/L. HEV strains belonging to genotype 3 were frequently detected in low concentrations in urban sewage and in biosolids or sewage containing swine feces but not in the river water samples studied. The detection of viruses by molecular techniques is useful for genetically describe emergent viruses in community wastewaters and water supplies. Quantification of JCPyV and HAdV using quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) may be useful for evaluating virus removal efficiency in water treatment plants and as an index of the virological quality of water and of the potential presence of human viruses.

  14. The 10,400- and 14,500-dalton proteins encoded by region E3 of adenovirus function together to protect many but not all mouse cell lines against lysis by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, L R; Ranheim, T S; Tollefson, A E; Aquino, L; Duerksen-Hughes, P; Horton, T M; Wold, W S

    1991-01-01

    We have reported that the E3 14,700-dalton protein (E3 14.7K protein) protects adenovirus-infected mouse C3HA fibroblasts against lysis by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (L. R. Gooding, L. W. Elmore, A. E. Tollefson, H. A. Brady, and W. S. M. Wold, Cell 53:341-346, 1988). We have also observed that the E1B 19K protein protects adenovirus-infected human but not mouse cells against TNF lysis (L. R. Gooding, L. Aquino, P. J. Duerksen-Hughes, D. Day, T. M. Horton, S. Yei, and W. S. M. Wold, J. Virol. 65:3083-3094, 1991). We now report that, in the absence of E3 14.7K, the E3 10.4K and E3 14.5K proteins are both required to protect C127 as well as several other mouse cell lines against TNF lysis. The 14.7K protein can also protect these cells from TNF in the absence of the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins. This protection by the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins was not observed in the C3HA cell line. These conclusions are based on 51Cr release assays of cells infected with virus E3 mutants that express the 14.7K protein alone, that express both the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins, and that delete the 14.7K in combination with either the 10.4K or 14.5K protein. The 10.4K protein was efficiently coimmunoprecipitated together with the 14.5K protein by using an antiserum to the 14.5K protein, suggesting that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins exist as a complex in the infected mouse cells and consistent with the notion that they function in concert. Considering that three sets of proteins (E3 14.7K, E1B 19K, and E3 10.4K/14.5K proteins) exist in adenovirus to prevent TNF cytolysis of different cell types, it would appear that TNF is a major antiadenovirus defense of the host. Images PMID:1830111

  15. Evaluation and validation of a real-time PCR assay for detection and quantitation of human adenovirus 14 from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Metzgar, David; Skochko, Greg; Gibbins, Carl; Hudson, Nolan; Lott, Lisa; Jones, Morris S

    2009-09-17

    In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that Human adenovirus type 14 (HAdV-14) infected 106 military personnel and was responsible for the death of one U.S. soldier at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Identification of the responsible adenovirus, which had not previously been seen in North America and for which rapid diagnostic tools were unavailable, required retrospective analysis at reference laboratories. Initial quarantine measures were also reliant on relatively slow traditional PCR analysis at other locations. To address this problem, we developed a real-time PCR assay that detects a 225 base pair sequence in the HAdV-14a hexon gene. Fifty-one oropharyngeal swab specimens from the Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, CA and Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory, Lackland AFB, TX were used to validate the new assay. The described assay detected eight of eight and 19 of 19 confirmed HAdV-14a clinical isolates in two separate cohorts from respiratory disease outbreaks. The real-time PCR assay had a wide dynamic range, detecting from 10(2) to 10(7) copies of genomic DNA per reaction. The assay did not cross-react with other adenoviruses, influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, or common respiratory tract bacteria. The described assay is easy to use, sensitive and specific for HAdV-14a in clinical throat swab specimens, and very rapid since turnaround time is less than four hours to obtain an answer.

  16. E1A-engineered human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells as carriers and amplifiers for adenovirus suppress hepatocarcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Ye, Zhou; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Qing; Fan, Dongmei; Zhang, Yanjun; Luo, Hongbo R.; Yuan, Xiangfei; Li, Zongfang; Xiong, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Nevertheless, efficient transgene delivery remains a challenge. In this study, we explored a new targeted system based on human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), which were engineered to deliver adenovirus to tumor sites, and to replicate and assemble into new adenovirus against HCC. Our results showed that HUMSCs infected by Ad-hTERTp-IL24 followed by LentiR.E1A infection could specifically migrate to HepG2 tumor cells and support adenoviral replication in vitro and in vivo 36 h after LentiR.E1A infection. Ad-hTERTp-IL24 specifically inhibited HepG2 cells growth, and this inhibitory effect was enhanced by low doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), because the expression levels of coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin ανβ3 on tumor cells were significantly increased, causing higher viral uptake. Compared with the no treatment groups, Ad-hTERTp-IL24 and LentiR.E1A co-loaded HUMSCs exhibited significant anti-tumor activity in vivo, particularly in combination with low doses of 5-Fu. In summary, this study provides a promising targeted gene therapeutic strategy dependent on the tumor tropism of HUMSCs, to improve the outcome of virotherapy for tumor patients especially those with metastatic diseases. PMID:27322080

  17. The 11,600-MW protein encoded by region E3 of adenovirus is expressed early but is greatly amplified at late stages of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Scaria, A; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1992-01-01

    We have reported that an 11,600-MW (11.6K) protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus. We have now prepared two new antipeptide antisera that have allowed us to characterize this protein further. The 11.6K protein migrates as multiple diffuse bands having apparent Mws of about 14,000, 21,000, and 31,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblotting as well as virus mutants with deletions in the 11.6K gene were used to show that the various gel bands represent forms of 11.6K. The 11.6K protein was synthesized in very low amounts during early stages of infection, from the scarce E3 mRNAs d and e which initiate from the E3 promoter. However, 11.6K was synthesized very abundantly at late stages of infection, approximately 400 times the rate at early stages, from new mRNAs termed d' and e'. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA blot experiments indicated that mRNAs d' and e' had the same body (the coding portion) and the same middle exon (the y leader) as early E3 mRNAs d and e, but mRNAs d' and e' were spliced at their 5' termini to the major late tripartite leader which is found in all mRNAs in the major late transcription unit. mRNAs d' and e' and the 11.6K protein were the only E3 mRNAs and protein that were scarce early and were greatly amplified at late stages of infection. This suggests that specific cis- or trans-acting sequences may function to enhance the splicing of mRNAs d' and e' at late stages of infection and perhaps to suppress the splicing of mRNAs d and e at early stages of infection. We propose that the 11.6K gene be considered not only a member of region E3 but also a member of the major late transcription unit. Images PMID:1316473

  18. Experimental investigation of human adenovirus cotransport with clay colloids and TiO2 nanoparticles in water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Kokkinos, Petros; Tselepi, Maria A.; Kartoudis, Alexis; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2016-04-01

    Particles such as clay colloids (e.g. kaolinite and montmorillonite) and metal oxides (e.g. TiO2) have great potential for controlling the fate and transport of viruses in the subsurface. Although human adenoviruses (hAdVs) are used worldwide to indicate human fecal pollution in groundwater, their transport behavior in the subsurface environment is not fully understood. This study focuses on the effects of both clay colloids (kaolinite, KGa-1b and montmorillonite, STx-1b), and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), on hAdV transport and retention in porous media. Laboratory-scale cotransport experiments were conducted in columns packed with glass beads, at three pore water velocities (0.38, 0.74, and 1.21 cm/min). The experimental results suggested that the presence of KGa-1b, STx-1b, and TiO2 NPs increased the attachment and inactivation of hAdVs, mainly due to the contribution of additional attachment sites. Retention of hAdVs by the packed column was shown to be highest in the presence of TiO2 NPs and lowest in the presence of KGa-1b. Moreover, the mass recovery values of both clay colloids and TiO2 NPs were affected by the presence of hAdVs, under all of the experimental conditions examined in this study. However, no distinct relationship between mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the present experimental cotransport results.

  19. Construction of human BMP2-IRES-HIF1αmu adenovirus expression vector and its expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danping; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Quan Ying; Wang, Guoxian

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to construct a novel recombinant adenovirus expression vector Ad-BMP2-IRES-HIF1αmu that expresses human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) and mutant hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, and investigated its effects in promoting neogenesis of bone and angiogenesis. The recombinant adenovirus BMP2, HIF1αmu and pIRES2-EGFP expression vectors were constructed and transfected into HEK293A cells. The groups were divided into group A, transfection with Ad-BMP2-IRES-HIF1αmu; group B, transfection with Ad-HIF1αmu-IRES-hrGFP-1; group C, transfection with Ad-BMP2-IRES-hrGFP-1; group D, transfection with Ad-IRES-hrGFP-1; group E, not transfected. Adenovirus liquid was transferred into rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) pretreated with dexamethasone at the best multiplicity of infection (MOI). The mRNA and protein expression of BMP2 and HIF1α were detected by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Adenovirus was successfully packaged. The expression level of HIF1α mRNA in group A and B was markedly higher than that in groups C, D and E, showing a significant difference (P<0.01). There was a significant difference in the expression level of BMP2 mRNA between group A and C (P<0.05) and this was markedly higher than that in groups B, D and E (P<0.01). The protein expression level of HIF1α in group A and B was markedly higher than that in groups C, D and E (P<0.01). The protein expression level of BMP2 in group A and C was markedly higher than that in groups B, D and E (P<0.01). The human BMP2-IRES-HIF1αmu adenovirus expression vector was successfully constructed and the experimental groups formed bone and blood vessels prior to the positive and negative control groups.

  20. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf4 Protein Targets Two Phosphatase Regulators of the Hippo Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mui, Melissa Z.; Zhou, Yiwang; Blanchette, Paola; Chughtai, Naila; Knight, Jennifer F.; Gruosso, Tina; Papadakis, Andreas I.; Huang, Sidong; Park, Morag; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT When expressed alone at high levels, the human adenovirus E4orf4 protein exhibits tumor cell-specific p53-independent toxicity. A major E4orf4 target is the B55 class of PP2A regulatory subunits, and we have shown recently that binding of E4orf4 inhibits PP2AB55 phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent fashion by preventing access of substrates (M. Z. Mui et al., PLoS Pathog 9:e1003742, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1003742). While interaction with B55 subunits is essential for toxicity, E4orf4 mutants exist that, despite binding B55 at high levels, are defective in cell killing, suggesting that other essential targets exist. In an attempt to identify additional targets, we undertook a proteomics approach to characterize E4orf4-interacting proteins. Our findings indicated that, in addition to PP2AB55 subunits, ASPP-PP1 complex subunits were found among the major E4orf4-binding species. Both the PP2A and ASPP-PP1 phosphatases are known to positively regulate effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, which controls the expression of cell growth/survival genes by dephosphorylating the YAP transcriptional coactivator. We find here that expression of E4orf4 results in hyperphosphorylation of YAP, suggesting that Hippo signaling is affected by E4orf4 interactions with PP2AB55 and/or ASPP-PP1 phosphatases. Furthermore, knockdown of YAP1 expression was seen to enhance E4orf4 killing, again consistent with a link between E4orf4 toxicity and inhibition of the Hippo pathway. This effect may in fact contribute to the cancer cell specificity of E4orf4 toxicity, as many human cancer cells rely heavily on the Hippo pathway for their enhanced proliferation. IMPORTANCE The human adenovirus E4orf4 protein has been known for some time to induce tumor cell-specific death when expressed at high levels; thus, knowledge of its mode of action could be of importance for development of new cancer therapies. Although the B55 form of the phosphatase PP2A has long been

  1. Effect of CD4 gene expression on adenovirus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, J; Shi, L; Ginsberg, H S

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding the CD4 receptor was introduced into KB cells to establish the KBT4 cell line, a cell line susceptible to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Adenovirus replication was found to be significantly less in these cells than in the parental KB cells. Similar decreased adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication occurred in HeLaT4 cells compared with the original HeLa cells. The presence of CD4 did not alter the cell surface population of KB cell adenovirus receptors, since viral adsorption was similar in the two cell lines. Moreover, addition of soluble CD4 did not reduce viral replication in either KB or KBT4 infected cells. Uncoating of viral DNA was also unchanged in KBT4 cells compared with the parental KB cells. In contrast, migration to or entrance of viral DNA into nuclei and synthesis of early viral RNAs was delayed and reduced in KBT4 cells. These effects were more pronounced for Ad7 than for Ad5. The yields of infectious viruses were the same in both cell lines, however, after transfection of naked viral DNAs to initiate infection. These results imply that the expression of the CD4 gene in KBT4 cells interfered with passage of uncoated virus across endosomal vesicles and/or transfer of uncoated core viral DNA into the nucleus. Images PMID:7933112

  2. Effect of CD4 gene expression on adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Hotta, J; Shi, L; Ginsberg, H S

    1994-11-01

    The gene encoding the CD4 receptor was introduced into KB cells to establish the KBT4 cell line, a cell line susceptible to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Adenovirus replication was found to be significantly less in these cells than in the parental KB cells. Similar decreased adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication occurred in HeLaT4 cells compared with the original HeLa cells. The presence of CD4 did not alter the cell surface population of KB cell adenovirus receptors, since viral adsorption was similar in the two cell lines. Moreover, addition of soluble CD4 did not reduce viral replication in either KB or KBT4 infected cells. Uncoating of viral DNA was also unchanged in KBT4 cells compared with the parental KB cells. In contrast, migration to or entrance of viral DNA into nuclei and synthesis of early viral RNAs was delayed and reduced in KBT4 cells. These effects were more pronounced for Ad7 than for Ad5. The yields of infectious viruses were the same in both cell lines, however, after transfection of naked viral DNAs to initiate infection. These results imply that the expression of the CD4 gene in KBT4 cells interfered with passage of uncoated virus across endosomal vesicles and/or transfer of uncoated core viral DNA into the nucleus.

  3. Template requirements for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Challberg, M D; Rawlins, D R

    1984-01-01

    The first step in the replication of the adenovirus genome is the covalent attachment of the 5'-terminal nucleotide, dCMP, to the virus-encoded terminal protein precursor (pTP). This reaction can be observed in vitro and has been previously shown to be dependent upon either viral DNA or linearized plasmid DNA containing viral terminal sequences. Plasmids containing deletions or point mutations within the viral terminal sequence were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. In the case of linear double-stranded templates, pTP-dCMP formation required sequences located within the first 18 base pairs of the viral genome. This sequence contains a segment of 10 base pairs that is conserved in all human adenovirus serotypes. Point mutations within the conserved segment greatly reduced the efficiency of initiation, while a point mutation at a nonconserved position within the first 18 base pairs had little effect. Single-stranded DNAs can also support pTP-dCMP formation in vitro. In contrast to the results obtained with duplex templates, experiments with a variety of single-stranded templates, including phage M13-adenovirus recombinants, denatured plasmids, and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, failed to reveal any requirements for specific nucleotide sequences. With single-stranded templates containing no dG residues, the specific deoxynucleoside triphosphate requirements of the initiation reaction were altered. Images PMID:6320160

  4. Adenovirus infection elevates levels of cellular topoisomerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, K C; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a specific, sensitive, and quantitative assay for topoisomerase I, which is based on the formation of a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. Our assay measures the quantitative transfer of 32P radioactivity from 32P-labeled DNA to topoisomerase I. Since 32P-labeled topoisomerase molecules are resolved by NaDodSO4/PAGE, HeLa topoisomerase I (100 kDa) and calf thymus topoisomerase I (82 kDa) can be quantitatively assayed in the same reaction mixture. The assay can detect at least 0.3 ng (3 fmol) of topoisomerase I. We have used our assay to measure the levels of topoisomerase I activity in crude extracts of nuclei prepared from uninfected, adenovirus-infected, and adenovirus-transformed human cells. The evidence suggests that an adenovirus early gene product, presumably a protein encoded in early region 1A (E1A), increases cellular topoisomerase I activity at least 10-fold. Immunoblotting analysis with antiserum against calf thymus topoisomerase I shows that the increase in activity is due to an increase in the amount of enzyme. Images PMID:2986107

  5. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  6. Encoding of configural regularity in the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2014-08-13

    The visual system is very efficient in encoding stimulus properties by utilizing available regularities in the inputs. To explore the underlying encoding strategies during visual information processing, we presented participants with two-line configurations that varied in the amount of configural regularity (or degrees of freedom in the relative positioning of the two lines) in a fMRI experiment. Configural regularity ranged from a generic configuration to stimuli resembling an "L" (i.e., a right-angle L-junction), a "T" (i.e., a right-angle midpoint T-junction), or a "+",-the latter being the most regular stimulus. We found that the response strength in the shape-selective lateral occipital area was consistently lower for a higher degree of regularity in the stimuli. In the second experiment, using multivoxel pattern analysis, we further show that regularity is encoded in terms of the fMRI signal strength but not in the distributed pattern of responses. Finally, we found that the results of these experiments could not be accounted for by low-level stimulus properties and are distinct from norm-based encoding. Our results suggest that regularity plays an important role in stimulus encoding in the ventral visual processing stream.

  7. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored Rift Valley Fever vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that historically affects livestock production and human health in sub-Saharan Africa, though epizootics have also occurred in the Arabian Peninsula. Whilst an effective live-attenuated vaccine is available for livestock, there is currently no licensed human RVF vaccine. Replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus (ChAd) vectors are an ideal platform for development of a human RVF vaccine, given the low prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against them in the human population, and their excellent safety and immunogenicity profile in human clinical trials of vaccines against a wide range of pathogens. Methods Here, in BALB/c mice, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAdOx1, encoding the RVF virus envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which are targets of virus neutralizing antibodies. The ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine was assessed in comparison to a replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector encoding Gn and Gc (HAdV5-GnGc), a strategy previously shown to confer protective immunity against RVF in mice. Results A single immunization with either of the vaccines conferred protection against RVF virus challenge eight weeks post-immunization. Both vaccines elicited RVF virus neutralizing antibody and a robust CD8+ T cell response. Conclusions Together the results support further development of RVF vaccines based on replication-deficient adenovirus vectors, with ChAdOx1-GnGc being a potential candidate for use in future human clinical trials. PMID:24304565

  8. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  9. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever.

    PubMed

    Warimwe, George M; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K; Al-dubaib, Musaad A; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-02-05

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A 'One Health' vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs.

  10. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  11. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. )

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  12. Occurrence of water-borne enteric viruses in two settlements based in Eastern Chad: analysis of hepatitis E virus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in water sources.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Latorre, Laura; Carratala, Anna; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Calgua, Byron; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of water-borne acute hepatitis in areas with poor sanitation. In 2004 an outbreak of HEV infection affected around 2,000 people in Eastern Chad (Dar Sila). This paper describes the decrease in the incidence of acute jaundice syndrome (AJS) from 2004 until 2009 when a mean incidence of 0.48 cases/1,000 people/year was recorded in the region. Outbreaks of AJS were identified in some of the camps in 2007 and 2008. Moreover, water samples from drinking water sources were screened for human adenoviruses considered as viral indicators and for hepatitis A virus and HEV. Screening of faecal samples from donkeys for HEV gave negative results. Some of the samples were also analysed for faecal coliforms showing values before disinfection treatment between 3 and >50 colony forming units per 100 mL. All water samples tested were negative for HEV and HAV; however, the presence of low levels of human adenoviruses in 4 out of 16 samples analysed indicates possible human faecal contamination of groundwater. Consequently, breakdowns in the treatment of drinking water and/or increased excretion of hepatitis viruses, which could be related to the arrival of a new population, could spread future outbreaks through drinking water.

  13. Persistent and High-Level Expression of Human Liver Prolidase in Vivo in Mice Using Adenovirus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    prolidase group, the 4 sur- viving mice demonstrated signs of nerve agent poisoning , includ- ing piloerection, salivation, and splayed hind limbs, etc...help with the animal experiments. References [1] B.P. Doctor, A. Saxena, Bioscavengers for the protection of humans against organophosphate toxicity...h after the 2nd DFP challenge without any signs of DFP poisoning . 194 V. Aleti et al. / Chemico-Biological Interactions 203 (2013) 191–195 [12] M

  14. Lac-regulated system for generating adenovirus 5 vaccine vectors expressing cytolytic human immunodeficiency virus 1 genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunxia; Crews, Charles Jefferson; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Blackwell, Jerry L

    2009-09-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors have been developed as human immunodeficiency-1 (HIV-1) vaccine vectors because they consistently induce immune responses in preclinical animal models and human trials. Strong promoters and codon-optimization are often used to enhance vaccine-induced HIV-1 gene expression and immunogenicity. However, if the transgene is inherently cytotoxic in the cell line used to produce the vector, and is expressed at high levels, it is difficult to rescue a stable Ad HIV-1 vaccine vector. Therefore we hypothesized that generation of Ad vaccine vectors expressing cytotoxic genes, such as HIV-1 env, would be more efficient if expression of the transgene was down-regulated during Ad rescue. To test this hypothesis, a Lac repressor-operator system was applied to regulate expression of reporter luciferase and HIV-1 env transgenes during Ad rescue. The results demonstrate that during Ad rescue, constitutive expression of the Lac repressor in 293 cells reduced transgene expression levels to approximately 5% of that observed in the absence of regulation. Furthermore, Lac-regulation translated into more efficient Ad rescue compared to traditional 293 cells. Importantly, Ad vectors rescued with this system showed high levels of transgene expression when transduced into cells that lack the Lac repressor protein. The Lac-regulated system also facilitated the rescue of modified Ad vectors that have non-native receptor tropism. These tropism-modified Ad vectors infect a broader range of cell types than the unmodified Ad, which could increase their effectiveness as a vaccine vector. Overall, the Lac-regulated system described here (i) is backwards compatible with Ad vector methods that employ bacterial-mediated homologous recombination, (ii) is adaptable for the engineering of tropism-modified Ad vectors, and (iii) does not require co-expression of regulatory genes from the vector or the addition of exogenous chemicals to induce or repress transgene expression. This

  15. Construction and characterization of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sreenivasa, B. P.; Tamilselvan, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Generation of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein genes along with full-length 2B, 3B and 3Cpro and its characterization. Materials and Methods: FMD viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to synthesize expression cassettes (P1-2AB3BCwt and P1-2AB3BCm) followed by cloning in pShuttle-CMV vector. Chemically competent BJ5183-AD-1 cells were transformed with the recombinant pShuttle-CMV to produce recombinant adenoviral plasmids. HEK-293 cells were transfected with the recombinant adenoviral plasmids to generate recombinant adenoviruses (hAd5/P1-2AB3BCwt and hAd5/P1-2AB3BCm). Expression of the target proteins was analyzed by sandwich ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The recombinant adenoviruses were purified and concentrated by CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation. Growth kinetics and thermostability of the recombinant adenoviruses were compared with that of non-recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (dAd5). Results: The recombinant adenoviruses containing capsid protein genes of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were generated and amplified in HEK-293 cells. The titer of the recombinant adenoviruses was approximately 108, 109.5 and 1011 TCID50/ml in supernatant media, cell lysate and CsCl purified preparation, respectively. Expression of the FMDV capsid protein was detectable in sandwich ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. Growth kinetics of the recombinant adenoviruses did not reveal a significant difference when compared with that of dAd5. A decrement of up to 10-fold at 4°C and 21-fold at 37°C was recorded in the virus titers during 60 h incubation period and found to be statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing capsid proteins of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were constructed and produced in high titers. In vitro expression of the target proteins in the adenovirus vector system was detected by

  16. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  17. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  18. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof.

  19. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  20. Adenovirus vector-based incorporation of a photo-cross-linkable amino acid into proteins in human primary cells and cancerous cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Ayami; Hino, Nobumasa; Higashi, Sakiko; Hirota, Kohji; Narumi, Ryohei; Adachi, Jun; Takafuji, Kazuaki; Ishimoto, Kenji; Okada, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Takashima, Seiji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takefumi

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of cross-linkable designer amino acids into proteins is useful for covalently bonding protein complexes upon exposure to light. This technology can be used to study networks of protein-protein interactions in living cells; however, to date it has only been applicable for use with a narrow range of cell types, due to the limited availability of plasmid-based transfection protocols. In the present study, we achieved adenovirus-based expression of a variant of an archaeal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase and UAG-recognising tRNA pair, which was used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins at sites defined by in-frame UAG codons within genes. As such, the site-specific photo-cross-linking method is now applicable to a wide variety of mammalian cells. In addition, we repositioned the reactive substituent of a useful photo-cross-linker, Nε-(para-trifluoromethyl-diazirinyl-benzyloxycarbonyl)-l-lysine (pTmdZLys), to the meta position, which improved its availability at low concentration. Finally, we successfully applied this system to analyse the formation of a protein complex in response to a growth signal in human cancerous cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This adenovirus-based system, together with the newly designed cross-linkable amino acid, will facilitate studies on molecular interactions in various cell lines of medical interest. PMID:27833131

  1. Human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: establishment of a vaccine product profile through in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; McIlhaney, M; Miller, T; Christianson, K; Keene, A; Lohnas, G; Purcell, C; Neilan, J; Schutta, C; Barrera, J; Burrage, T; Brough, D E; Butman, B T

    2012-01-01

    Next generation, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) molecular vaccines based on replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 viral vectored delivery of FMD capsid genes (AdFMD) are being developed by the United States Dept. of Homeland Security and industry partners. The strategic goal of this program is to develop AdFMD licensed vaccines for the USA National Veterinary Stockpile for use, if needed, as emergency response tools during an FMD outbreak. This vaccine platform provides a unique opportunity to develop a set of in vitro analytical parameters to generate an AdFMD vaccine product profile to replace the current lot release test for traditional, inactivated FMD vaccines that requires FMDV challenge in livestock. The possibility of an indirect FMD vaccine potency test based on a serological alternative was initially investigated for a lead vaccine candidate, Adt.A24. Results show that serum virus neutralization (SVN) based serology testing for Adt.A24 vaccine lot release is not feasible, at least not in the context of vaccine potency assessment at one week post-vaccination. Thus, an in vitro infectious titer assay (tissue culture infectious dose 50, TCID50) which measures FMD infectious (protein expression) titer was established. Pre-validation results show acceptable assay variability and linearity and these data support further studies to validate the TCID50 assay as a potential potency release test. In addition, a quantitative physiochemical assay (HPLC) and three immunochemical assays (Fluorescent Focus-Forming Unit (FFU); tissue culture expression dose 50 (TCED50); Western blot) were developed for potential use as in vitro assays to monitor AdFMD vaccine lot-to-lot consistency and other potential applications. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a traditional modified-live vaccine virus infectivity assay in combination with a set of physiochemical and immunochemical tests to build a vaccine product profile that will ensure the each Ad

  2. Truncated Active Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Delivered by a Chimeric Adenovirus-Hepatitis B Virus Vector Ameliorates Rat Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zihua; Li, Dong; Kang, Fubiao; Li, Haijun; Li, Baosheng; Cao, Zhichen; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2013-01-01

    Background Liver cirrhosis is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by progressive displacement of functional hepatocytes by fibrous tissue. The underlying fibrosis is often driven by chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Matrix metalloproteinases including MMP-8 are crucial for excess collagen degradation. In a rat model of liver cirrhosis, MMP-8 delivery by an adenovirus (Ad) vector achieved significant amelioration of fibrosis but application of Ad vectors in humans is subject to various issues, including a lack of intrinsic liver specificity. Methods HBV is highly liver-specific and its principal suitability as liver-specific gene transfer vector is established. HBV vectors have a limited insertion capacity and are replication-defective. Conversely, in an HBV infected cell vector replication may be rescued in trans by the resident virus, allowing conditional vector amplification and spreading. Capitalizing on a resident pathogen to help in its elimination and/or in treating its pathogenic consequences would provide a novel strategy. However, resident HBV may also reduce susceptibility to HBV vector superinfection. Thus a size-compatible truncated MMP-8 (tMMP8) gene was cloned into an HBV vector which was then used to generate a chimeric Ad-HBV shuttle vector that is not subject to superinfection exclusion. Rats with thioacetamide-induced liver cirrhosis were injected with the chimera to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Results Our data demonstrate that infectious HBV vector particles can be obtained via trans-complementation by wild-type virus, and that the tMMP8 HBV vector can efficiently be shuttled by an Ad vector into cirrhotic rat livers. There it exerted a comparable beneficial effect on fibrosis and hepatocyte proliferation markers as a conventional full-length MMP-8Ad vector. Conclusions Though the rat cirrhosis model does not allow assessing in vivo HBV vector amplification these results advocate the further development of Ad

  3. Relationships between resistance to cross-linking agents and glutathione metabolism, aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes and adenovirus replication in human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Parsons, P G; Lean, J; Kable, E P; Favier, D; Khoo, S K; Hurst, T; Holmes, R S; Bellet, A J

    1990-12-15

    In a panel of 10 human tumour cell lines with no prior exposure to drugs in vitro, resistance to cisplatin correlated with resistance to the nitrogen mustard derivatives Asta Z-7557 (mafosfamide, an activated form of cyclophosphamide), melphalan and chlorambucil. Simultaneous treatment with DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine did not enhance the toxicity of cisplatin or Asta Z-7557, and no correlation was found between drug resistance and cellular levels of metallothioneins (as judged by sensitivity to cadmium chloride), glutathione (GSH), GSH reductase, GSH transferase, or gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. The two cell lines most resistant to Asta Z-7557 expressed aldehyde dehydrogenase cytosolic isozyme 1, found also in normal ovary, but not isozyme 3. Treatment of resistant cells with cisplatin or Asta Z-7557 inhibited cellular DNA synthesis and replication of adenovirus 5 to a lesser extent than in sensitive cells. The virus could be directly inactivated by both drugs prior to infection, subsequent replication being inhibited to the same extent in sensitive and resistant cells. In contrast to Asta Z-7557 and other DNA damaging agents, cisplatin was much more toxic to adenovirus (D37 0.022-0.048 microM) than to cells (D37 0.25-2.5 microM). The adenovirus 5 mutant Ad5ts125 having a G----A substitution was even more sensitive to cisplatin (D37 7-8 nM) than wild type virus and another mutant. Cisplatin was detoxified less by sonicated resistant resistant cells than sensitive cells, as judged by inactivation of Ad5ts125 added to the reaction mixture. It can be inferred that (i) the major differences in cellular resistance to cisplatin and Asta Z-7557 in the present material did not involve enhanced DNA repair or protection by metallothioneins or GSH, but were associated with the ability to continue cellular and viral DNA synthesis during treatment, (ii) resistance was not associated with less template damage, and (iii) the adenovirus genome may be a suitable probe for

  4. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  5. Selective transduction of mature DC in human skin and lymph nodes by CD80/CD86-targeted fiber-modified adenovirus-5/3.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; Rosalia, Rodney A; Murakami, Miho; Everts, Maaike; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Curiel, David T

    2009-01-01

    In vivo targeting of dendritic cells (DC) represents an attractive alternative to currently apply ex vivo DC-based genetic tumor vaccination protocols. Finding the optimal vector for in vivo targeting of DC is important for such strategies. We, therefore, tested a panel of subgroup C/B chimeric and fiber-modified adenoviruses (Ads) for their relative capacity to transduce human DC. We made use of in vitro generated Langerhans cells, and of ex vivo human skin and melanoma-draining lymph node derived DC. Of the tested viruses the C/B-chimeric adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/3 virus most efficiently transduced in vitro generated Langerhans cells. In addition, Ad5/3 preferentially targeted mature myeloid DC from human skin and draining lymph node and transduced them at significantly higher frequencies than Ad5. In addition, Ad5/3 was more specific for mature human skin-derived CD1a+ CD83+ DC than the previously reported DC-transducing C/B-chimeric vector Ad5/35, infecting less bystander cells. It was previously reported that Ad5/3 transduced human monocyte-derived DC by binding to the B7 molecules CD80 and CD86. High-efficiency transduction of mature skin-derived DC was similarly shown to be mediated through binding to CD80/CD86 and not to interfere with subsequent T-cell priming. We conclude that Ad5/3, in combination with DC-activating adjuvants, represents a promising therapeutic tool for the in vivo transduction of mature DC, and may be less likely to induce unwanted side effects such as immune tolerance through the infection of nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  7. Vaccine-Induced Immunity in Baboons by Using DNA and Replication-Incompetent Adenovirus Type 5 Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Freed, Daniel C.; Hurni, William; Aste-Amezaga, Jose M.; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Nawrocki, Denise K.; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert D.; Isopi, Lynne A.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rice, Karen; Wilson, Keith A.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The cellular immunogenicity of formulated plasmid DNA and replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors expressing a codon-optimized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene was examined in baboons. The Ad5 vaccine was capable of inducing consistently strong, long-lived CD8+-biased T-cell responses and in vitro cytotoxic activities. The DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses were weaker than those elicited by the Ad5 vaccine and highly variable; formulation with chemical adjuvants led to moderate increases in the levels of Gag-specific T cells. Increasing the DNA-primed responses with booster doses of either Ad5 or modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines suggests a difference in the relative levels of cytotoxic and helper responses. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:12805466

  8. Insights into Adenovirus Uncoating from Interactions with Integrins and Mediators of Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are large (150 MDa) nonenveloped double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses that cause acute respiratory, gastrointestinal and ocular infections. Despite these disease associations, adenovirus has aided basic and clinical research efforts through studies of its association with cells and as a target of host antiviral responses. This review highlights the knowledge of adenovirus disassembly and nuclear transport gleaned from structural, biophysical and functional analyses of adenovirus interactions with soluble and membrane-associated host molecules. PMID:28009821

  9. Association of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein with RNA Both in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghon, Vaughn G.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1986-12-01

    The multifunctional DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenovirus binds RNA. The association of purified DBP with RNA in vitro was demonstrated by using either a gel filtration or a filter binding assay. This association is sensitive to ionic strength and exhibits no apparent sequence specificity. DBP also interacts with RNA in vivo; it can be crosslinked to polyadenylylated RNA by UV-irradiation of intact cells during the late phase of adenovirus infections. The 46-kDa carboxyl-terminal domain of DBP binds RNA in vitro and was found to be associated with polyadenylylated RNA in vivo. This is the same domain that interacts with DNA. However, the differences in sensitivity of DBP to trypsin when bound to RNA versus DNA suggest that RNA and DNA either bind at different sites within this domain or induce different conformational changes within the protein.

  10. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  11. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  12. Elution Is a Critical Step for Recovering Human Adenovirus 40 from Tap Water and Surface Water by Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hang; Xagoraraki, Irene; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper examines the recovery of the enteric adenovirus human adenovirus 40 (HAdV 40) by cross-flow ultrafiltration and interprets recovery values in terms of physicochemical interactions of virions during sample concentration. Prior to ultrafiltration, membranes were either blocked by exposure to calf serum (CS) or coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). HAdV 40 is a hydrophobic virus with a point of zero charge between pH 4.0 and pH 4.3. In accordance with predictions from the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, the preelution recovery of HAdV (rpre) from deionized water was higher with PEM-coated membranes (rprePEM = 74.8% ± 9.7%) than with CS-blocked membranes (rpreCS = 54.1% ± 6.2%). With either membrane type, the total virion recovery after elution (rpost) was high for both deionized water (rpostPEM = 99.5% ± 6.6% and rpostCS = 98.8% ± 7.7%) and tap water (rpostPEM = 89% ± 15% and rpostCS = 93.7% ± 6.9%). The nearly 100% recoveries suggest that the polyanion (sodium polyphosphate) and surfactant (Tween 80) in the eluent disrupt electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the virion and the membrane. Addition of EDTA to the eluent greatly improved the elution efficacy (rpostCS = 88.6% ± 4.3% and rpostPEM = 87.0% ± 6.9%) with surface water, even when the organic carbon concentration in the water was high (9.4 ± 0.1 mg/liter). EDTA likely disrupts cation bridging between virions and particles in the feed water matrix or the fouling layer on the membrane surface. For complex water matrices, the eluent composition is the most important factor for achieving high virion recovery. IMPORTANCE Herein we present the results of a comprehensive physicochemical characterization of HAdV 40, an important human pathogen. The data on HAdV 40 surface properties enabled rigorous modeling to gain an understanding of the energetics of virion-virion and virion-filter interactions. Cross-flow filtration for concentration and recovery

  13. Anti-cancer effect of adenovirus p53 on human cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ahn, W S; Bae, S M; Lee, J M; Namkoong, S E; Yoo, J Y; Seo, Y-S; Nam, S L; Cho, Y-L; Nam, K H; Kim, C K; Kim, Y-W

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate anti-tumor effects of recombinant adenovirus p53, time-course p53, E6 expression, and cell growth inhibition were investigated in vitro and in vivo using cervical cancer cell lines such as CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, HeLaS3, C33A, and HT3. The cell growth inhibition was studied via cell count assay, MTT assay and neutral red assay. After transfecting AdCMVp53 into SiHa cells-xenografted nude mice, the transduction efficiency and anti-tumor effect were investigated for a month. The results showed that adenoviral p53 expression induced significant growth suppression on the cancer cells, in which E6 transcript was strongly repressed, and that the expression of p53 and E6 were remarkably dependent on each cell type. The transduction efficiency was highly maintained in vivo as well as in vitro, and the size of tumor was remarkably decreased in comparison with AdCMVLacZ control. The results suggest that the adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfection was done very effectively in vitro and in vivo experiment, and the cell growth was suppressed via p53-dependent apoptotic cell death, and that the anti-tumor effect could be related to E6 and p53 expression pattern.

  14. Fluorescence-guided surgery of a highly-metastatic variant of human triple-negative breast cancer targeted with a cancer-specific GFP adenovirus prevents recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously developed a genetically-engineered GFP-expressing telomerase-dependent adenovirus, OBP-401, which can selectively illuminate cancer cells. In the present report, we demonstrate that targeting a triple-negative high-invasive human breast cancer, orthotopically-growing in nude mice, with OBP-401 enables curative fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). OBP-401 enabled complete resection and prevented local recurrence and greatly inhibited lymph-node metastasis due to the ability of the virus to selectively label and subsequently kill cancer cells. In contrast, residual breast cancer cells become more aggressive after bright (white)-light surgery (BLS). OBP-401-based FGS also improved the overall survival compared with conventional BLS. Thus, metastasis from a highly-aggressive triple-negative breast cancer can be prevented by FGS in a clinically-relevant mouse model. PMID:27689331

  15. 3D modeling of human cancer: A PEG-fibrin hydrogel system to study the role of tumor microenvironment and recapitulate the in vivo effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Del Bufalo, Francesca; Manzo, Teresa; Hoyos, Valentina; Yagyu, Shigeki; Caruana, Ignazio; Jacot, Jeffrey; Benavides, Omar; Rosen, Daniel; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between malignant and stromal cells and the 3D spatial architecture of the tumor both substantially modify tumor behavior, including the responses to small molecule drugs and biological therapies. Conventional 2D culture systems cannot replicate this complexity. To overcome these limitations and more accurately model solid tumors, we developed a highly versatile 3D PEG-fibrin hydrogel model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Our model relevantly recapitulates the effect of oncolytic adenovirus; tumor responses in this setting nearly reproduce those observed in vivo. We have also validated the use of this model for complex, long-term, 3D cultures of cancer cells and their stroma (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Both tumor proliferation and invasiveness were enhanced in the presence of stromal components. These results validate our 3D hydrogel model as a relevant platform to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments.

  16. Gene encoding human Ro-associated autoantigen Y5 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Maraia, R; Sakulich, A L; Brinkmann, E; Green, E D

    1996-01-01

    Ro ribonucleoproteins are composed of Y RNAs and the Ro 60 kDa protein. While the Ro 60 kDa protein is implicated in an RNA discard pathway that recognizes 3'-extended 5S rRNAs, the function of Y RNAs remains unknown [O'Brien,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1995) Genes Dev. 8,2891-2903]. Y5 RNA occupies a large fraction of Ro 60 kDa protein in human Ro RNPs, contains an atypical 3'-extension not found on other Y RNAs, and constitutes an RNA antigen in certain autoimmune patients [Boulanger et al. (1995) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 99, 29-36]. An overabundance of Y RNA retroposed pseudogenes has previously complicated the isolation of mammalian Y RNA genes. The source gene for Y5 RNA was isolated from human DNA as well as from Galago senegalis DNA. Authenticity of the hY5 RNA gene was demonstrated in vivo and its activity was compared with the hY4 RNA gene that also uses a type 3 promoter for RNA polymerase III. The hY5 RNA gene was subsequently found to reside within a few hundred thousand base pairs of other Y RNA genes and the linear order of the four human Y RNA genes on chromosome 7q36 was determined. Phylogenetic comparative analyses of promoter and RNA structure indicate that the Y5 RNA gene has been subjected to positive selection during primate evolution. Consistent with the proposal of O'Brien and Harley [O'Brian,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1992) Gene 116, 285-289], analysis of flanking sequences suggest that the hY5 RNA gene may have originated as a retroposon. PMID:8836182

  17. Architecture of the human regulatory network derived from ENCODE data.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Mark B; Kundaje, Anshul; Hariharan, Manoj; Landt, Stephen G; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Cheng, Chao; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Rozowsky, Joel; Alexander, Roger; Min, Renqiang; Alves, Pedro; Abyzov, Alexej; Addleman, Nick; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Boyle, Alan P; Cayting, Philip; Charos, Alexandra; Chen, David Z; Cheng, Yong; Clarke, Declan; Eastman, Catharine; Euskirchen, Ghia; Frietze, Seth; Fu, Yao; Gertz, Jason; Grubert, Fabian; Harmanci, Arif; Jain, Preti; Kasowski, Maya; Lacroute, Phil; Leng, Jing; Lian, Jin; Monahan, Hannah; O'Geen, Henriette; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Partridge, E Christopher; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Pauli, Florencia; Raha, Debasish; Ramirez, Lucia; Reddy, Timothy E; Reed, Brian; Shi, Minyi; Slifer, Teri; Wang, Jing; Wu, Linfeng; Yang, Xinqiong; Yip, Kevin Y; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend; Farnham, Peggy J; Myers, Richard M; Weissman, Sherman M; Snyder, Michael

    2012-09-06

    Transcription factors bind in a combinatorial fashion to specify the on-and-off states of genes; the ensemble of these binding events forms a regulatory network, constituting the wiring diagram for a cell. To examine the principles of the human transcriptional regulatory network, we determined the genomic binding information of 119 transcription-related factors in over 450 distinct experiments. We found the combinatorial, co-association of transcription factors to be highly context specific: distinct combinations of factors bind at specific genomic locations. In particular, there are significant differences in the binding proximal and distal to genes. We organized all the transcription factor binding into a hierarchy and integrated it with other genomic information (for example, microRNA regulation), forming a dense meta-network. Factors at different levels have different properties; for instance, top-level transcription factors more strongly influence expression and middle-level ones co-regulate targets to mitigate information-flow bottlenecks. Moreover, these co-regulations give rise to many enriched network motifs (for example, noise-buffering feed-forward loops). Finally, more connected network components are under stronger selection and exhibit a greater degree of allele-specific activity (that is, differential binding to the two parental alleles). The regulatory information obtained in this study will be crucial for interpreting personal genome sequences and understanding basic principles of human biology and disease.

  18. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  19. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected with Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Muneyasu; He, Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DN(dominant-negative)Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Materials and Methods Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 MOI) and irradiated with single doses or 0-5 doses of 3 Gy with 6 h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing 100% N2. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after (final) irradiation, and cell survival determined by colony formation. Survival data were fitted to L-Q model or exponential line. Results Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of HCT8 and HT29 cells. Virus enhancement ratio (VER) for single dose irradiation at surviving fraction of 0.1 was ~1.3 for both oxic and hypoxic HCT8, and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. Similar VER of 1.2–1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses but these values were smaller than values found for DNKu70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference is discussed. The OERs for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses were 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus-infection slightly altered them. Conclusion Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DNKu70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple doses. PMID:20510198

  20. Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Human Adenovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Tonsillar Lymphocytes Isolated from Patients Diagnosed with Tonsillar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Farzaneh; Sandström, Karl; Bondeson, Kåre; Laurell, Göran; Lidian, Adnan; Svensson, Catharina; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Surgically removed palatine tonsils provide a conveniently accessible source of T and B lymphocytes to study the interplay between foreign pathogens and the host immune system. In this study we have characterised the distribution of human adenovirus (HAdV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in purified tonsillar T and B cell-enriched fractions isolated from three patient age groups diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy and chronic/recurrent tonsillitis. HAdV DNA was detected in 93 out of 111 patients (84%), while EBV DNA was detected in 58 patients (52%). The most abundant adenovirus type was HAdV-5 (68%). None of the patients were positive for HCMV. Furthermore, 43 patients (39%) showed a co-infection of HAdV and EBV. The majority of young patients diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy were positive for HAdV, whereas all adult patients diagnosed with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis were positive for either HAdV or EBV. Most of the tonsils from patients diagnosed with either tonsillar hypertrophy or chronic/recurrent tonsillitis showed a higher HAdV DNA copy number in T compared to B cell-enriched fraction. Interestingly, in the majority of the tonsils from patients with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis HAdV DNA was detected in T cells only, whereas hypertrophic tonsils demonstrated HAdV DNA in both T and B cell-enriched fractions. In contrast, the majority of EBV positive tonsils revealed a preference for EBV DNA accumulation in the B cell-enriched fraction compared to T cell fraction irrespective of the patients' age. PMID:27136093

  1. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models.

  2. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kirtley, Michelle L.; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E.; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Baze, Wallace B.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Lawrence, William S.; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Peterson, Johnny W.; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis. We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. PMID:27170642

  3. Dynamic Encoding of Face Information in the Human Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Li, Yuanning; Konecky, Roma O.; Pyles, John A.; Walls, Shawn A.; Destefino, Vincent; Wang, Wei; Richardson, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Humans’ ability to rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and classify faces under variable conditions derives from a network of brain regions highly tuned to face information. The fusiform face area (FFA) is thought to be a computational hub for face processing, however temporal dynamics of face information processing in FFA remains unclear. Here we use multivariate pattern classification to decode the temporal dynamics of expression-invariant face information processing using electrodes placed directly upon FFA in humans. Early FFA activity (50-75 ms) contained information regarding whether participants were viewing a face. Activity between 200-500 ms contained expression-invariant information about which of 70 faces participants were viewing along with the individual differences in facial features and their configurations. Long-lasting (500+ ms) broadband gamma frequency activity predicted task performance. These results elucidate the dynamic computational role FFA plays in multiple face processing stages and indicate what information is used in performing these visual analyses. PMID:25482825

  4. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers.

  6. Serotype-specific neutralizing antibody epitopes of human adenovirus type 3 (HAdV-3) and HAdV-7 reside in multiple hexon hypervariable regions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongling; Li, Xiao; Tian, Xingui; Zhou, Zhichao; Xing, Ke; Li, Haitao; Tang, Ni; Liu, Wenkuan; Bai, Peisheng; Zhou, Rong

    2012-08-01

    Human adenovirus types 3 and 7 (HAdV-3 and HAdV-7) occur epidemically and contribute greatly to respiratory diseases, but there is no currently available licensed recombinant HAdV-3/HAdV-7 bivalent vaccine. Identification of serotype-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb) epitopes for HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 will be beneficial for development of recombinant HAdV-3/HAdV-7 bivalent vaccines. In this study, four NAb epitopes within hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs) were predicted for HAdV-3 and HAdV-7, respectively, by using bioinformatics. Eight hexon chimeric adenovirus vectors with the alternation of only one predicted neutralizing epitope were constructed. Further in vitro and in vivo neutralization assays indicated that E2 (residing in HVR2) and E3 (residing in HVR5) are NAb epitopes for HAdV-7, and E3 plays a more important role in generating NAb responses. Cross-neutralization assays indicated that all four predicted epitopes, R1 to R4, are NAb epitopes for HAdV-3, and R1 (residing in HVR1) plays the most important role in generating NAb responses. Humoral immune responses elicited by the recombinant rAdH7R1 (containing the R1 epitope) were significantly and durably suppressed by HAdV-3-specific NAbs. Surprisingly, the rAdΔE3GFP-specific neutralizing epitope responses induced by rAdMHE3 (R3 replaced by E3) and rAdMHE4 (R4 replaced by E4) were weaker than those of rAdMHE1 (R1 replaced by E1) or rAdMHE2 (R2 relaced by E2) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, rAdMHE4 replicated more slowly in HEp-2 cells, and the final yield was about 10-fold lower than that of rAdΔE3GFP. The current findings contribute not only to the development of new adenovirus vaccine candidates, but also to the construction of new gene delivery vectors.

  7. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    PubMed

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers.

  8. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  9. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common in late winter, spring, and early summer conjunctivitis (pinkeye) and pharyngoconjunctival fever caused by adenovirus tend to ... cystitis usually resolves on its own. Eye infections: Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) is a mild inflammation of the conjunctiva ( ...

  10. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved. PMID:26292027

  11. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming.

    PubMed

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved.

  12. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the main neutralization and hemagglutination determinants of all human adenovirus prototypes as a basis for molecular classification and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2005-12-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. The neutralization epsilon determinant (loops 1 and 2) and the hemagglutination gamma determinant are relevant for the taxonomy of HAdV. Precise type identification of HAdV prototypes is crucial for detection of infection chains and epidemiology. epsilon and gamma determinant sequences of all 51 HAdV were generated to propose molecular classification criteria. Phylogenetic analysis of epsilon determinant sequences demonstrated sufficient genetic divergence for molecular classification, with the exception of HAdV-15 and HAdV-29, which also cannot be differentiated by classical cross-neutralization. Precise sequence divergence criteria for typing (<2.5% from loop 2 prototype sequence and <2.4% from loop 1 sequence) were deduced from phylogenetic analysis. These criteria may also facilitate identification of new HAdV prototypes. Fiber knob (gamma determinant) phylogeny indicated a two-step model of species evolution and multiple intraspecies recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. HAdV-29 was identified as a recombination variant of HAdV-15 (epsilon determinant) and a speculative, not-yet-isolated HAdV prototype (gamma determinant). Subanalysis of molecular evolution in hypervariable regions 1 to 6 of the epsilon determinant indicated different selective pressures in subclusters of species HAdV-D. Additionally, gamma determinant phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that HAdV-8 did not cluster with -19 and -37 in spite of their having the same tissue tropism. The phylogeny of HAdV-E4 suggested origination by interspecies recombination between HAdV-B (hexon) and HAdV-C (fiber), as in simian adenovirus 25, indicating additional zoonotic transfer. In conclusion, molecular classification by systematic sequence analysis of immunogenic determinants yields new insights into HAdV phylogeny and evolution.

  14. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  15. Characterization of human antibody-reactive epitopes encoded by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S A; Yu, X P; Valentine, J M; Galloway, D A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously reported that the most common human serum immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to human papillomavirus type 16 and type 18 (HPV16 and HPV18)-encoded proteins are directed against the minor capsid proteins (HPV16 L2 and HPV18 L2) and to the E7 protein of HPV16 (S. A. Jenison, X.-P. Yu, J. M. Valentine, L. A. Koutsky, A. E. Christiansen, A. M. Beckmann, and D. A. Galloway, J. Infect. Dis. 162:60-69, 1990). In this study, the antibody-reactive segments of the HPV16 E7, HPV16 L2, and HPV18 L2 polypeptides were mapped by using nested sets of deleted recombinant proteins. A single major immunoreactive region was identified in the HPV16 E7 polypeptide between amino acids (aa) 21 and 34 (DLYCYE-QLNDSSEE). In contrast, three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV16 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa149 and aa204, and three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV18 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa110 and aa211. With the exception of one serum sample, serum immunoglobulin G antibodies which reacted with HPV16 L2 polypeptides or with HPV18 L2 polypeptides were not cross-reactive. Images PMID:1704924

  16. Human Adenovirus Type 37 Uses αVβ1 and α3β1 Integrins for Infection of Human Corneal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Rickard J.; Persson, B. David; Skalman, Lars Nygård; Frängsmyr, Lars; Lindström, Mona; Rankin, Greg; Lundmark, Richard; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a severe, contagious ocular disease that affects 20 to 40 million individuals worldwide every year. EKC is mainly caused by six types of human adenovirus (HAdV): HAdV-8, -19, -37, -53, -54, and -56. Of these, HAdV-8, -19, and -37 use sialic acid-containing glycans as cellular receptors. αVβ3, αVβ5, and a few additional integrins facilitate entry and endosomal release of other HAdVs. With the exception of a few biochemical analyses indicating that HAdV-37 can interact physically with αVβ5, little is known about the integrins used by EKC-causing HAdVs. Here, we investigated the overall integrin expression on human corneal cells and found expression of α2, α3, α6, αV, β1, and β4 subunits in human corneal in situ epithelium and/or in a human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell line but no or less accessible expression of α4, α5, β3, or β5. We also identified the integrins used by HAdV-37 through a series of binding and infection competition experiments and different biochemical approaches. Together, our data suggest that HAdV-37 uses αVβ1 and α3β1 integrins for infection of human corneal epithelial cells. Furthermore, to confirm the relevance of these integrins in the HAdV-37 life cycle, we developed a corneal multilayer tissue system and found that HAdV-37 infection correlated well with the patterns of αV, α3, and β1 integrin expression. These results provide further insight into the tropism and pathogenesis of EKC-causing HAdVs and may be of importance for future development of new antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE Keratitis is a hallmark of EKC, which is caused by six HAdV types (HAdV-8, -19, -37, -53, -54, and -56). HAdV-37 and some other HAdV types interact with integrin αVβ5 in order to enter nonocular human cells. In this study, we found that αVβ5 is not expressed on human corneal epithelial cells, thus proposing other host factors mediate corneal infection. Here, we first characterized integrin

  17. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  18. Timing predictability enhances regularity encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Gorina-Careta, Natàlia; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Escera, Carles

    2016-11-17

    The encoding of temporal regularities is a critical property of the auditory system, as short-term neural representations of environmental statistics serve to auditory object formation and detection of potentially relevant novel stimuli. A putative neural mechanism underlying regularity encoding is repetition suppression, the reduction of neural activity to repeated stimulation. Although repetitive stimulation per se has shown to reduce auditory neural activity in animal cortical and subcortical levels and in the human cerebral cortex, other factors such as timing may influence the encoding of statistical regularities. This study was set out to investigate whether temporal predictability in the ongoing auditory input modulates repetition suppression in subcortical stages of the auditory processing hierarchy. Human auditory frequency-following responses (FFR) were recorded to a repeating consonant-vowel stimuli (/wa/) delivered in temporally predictable and unpredictable conditions. FFR amplitude was attenuated by repetition independently of temporal predictability, yet we observed an accentuated suppression when the incoming stimulation was temporally predictable. These findings support the view that regularity encoding spans across the auditory hierarchy and point to temporal predictability as a modulatory factor of regularity encoding in early stages of the auditory pathway.

  19. Timing predictability enhances regularity encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gorina-Careta, Natàlia; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Escera, Carles

    2016-01-01

    The encoding of temporal regularities is a critical property of the auditory system, as short-term neural representations of environmental statistics serve to auditory object formation and detection of potentially relevant novel stimuli. A putative neural mechanism underlying regularity encoding is repetition suppression, the reduction of neural activity to repeated stimulation. Although repetitive stimulation per se has shown to reduce auditory neural activity in animal cortical and subcortical levels and in the human cerebral cortex, other factors such as timing may influence the encoding of statistical regularities. This study was set out to investigate whether temporal predictability in the ongoing auditory input modulates repetition suppression in subcortical stages of the auditory processing hierarchy. Human auditory frequency–following responses (FFR) were recorded to a repeating consonant–vowel stimuli (/wa/) delivered in temporally predictable and unpredictable conditions. FFR amplitude was attenuated by repetition independently of temporal predictability, yet we observed an accentuated suppression when the incoming stimulation was temporally predictable. These findings support the view that regularity encoding spans across the auditory hierarchy and point to temporal predictability as a modulatory factor of regularity encoding in early stages of the auditory pathway. PMID:27853313

  20. A tumor-stroma targeted oncolytic adenovirus replicated in human ovary cancer samples and inhibited growth of disseminated solid tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-12-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 10(10) v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15-40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression.

  1. A Tumor-stroma Targeted Oncolytic Adenovirus Replicated in Human Ovary Cancer Samples and Inhibited Growth of Disseminated Solid Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 1010 v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15–40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression. PMID:22948673

  2. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions. PMID:24516464

  3. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions.

  4. The organotypic multicellular spheroid is a relevant three-dimensional model to study adenovirus replication and penetration in human tumors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Dirven, Clemens M; Pherai, D Shareen; Kater, Mathijs; Van der Valk, Paul; Vogels, Ronald; Vandertop, W Peter; Pinedo, Herbert M; Curiel, David T; Gerritsen, Winald R

    2002-11-01

    The use of adenoviruses for gene transfer and as oncolytic agents is currently receiving widespread attention. As specific constraints to adenovirus distribution and spread cannot be studied in cell cultures, there is a need for an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model mimicking the in vivo biology of tumors. We studied the interactions between tumor and adenoviruses using multicellular spheroids grown from primary brain tumor material. Using beta-galactosidase and luciferase reporter genes expressed by replication-defective adenoviruses, we showed that infection was restricted to the first layer of cells. Using a replication-competent adenovirus expressing the luciferase gene, we showed that transgene expression in the spheroid was considerably enhanced and that viral spreading deep into the 3D structure took place. In addition, a tetrazolium salt-based metabolic assay could be used to compare the oncolytic activity of different concentrations of replication-competent adenoviruses. We can conclude that organotypic spheroids offer a versatile in vitro system for studying distribution, spread, and oncolysis by adenoviruses in a clinically relevant model.

  5. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  6. Encoding of relative enclosure size in a dynamic three-dimensional virtual environment by humans.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kelly, Debbie M

    2009-10-01

    Human participants searched in a dynamic three-dimensional virtual-environment rectangular enclosure for a distinctly colored bin located in one of the four corners. During test trials, all bins were rendered identical in color, and the shape of the rectangular search space either remained the same or was modified to a relatively sized contracted rectangle, an expanded rectangle, or a square. Participants made one choice response during test trials. In the rectangular enclosures, more of participants' choice responses were allocated to the geometrically correct corners than to the geometrically incorrect corners. In the square enclosure, participants' choice responses were allocated equivalently to each of the four corners. Results replicate previous enclosure size studies demonstrating encoding of enclosure geometry with human and non-human animal subjects conducted in real environments and extend these results to include encoding of relative enclosure geometry. Results are discussed with respect to theoretical accounts of geometry learning.

  7. Effects of Acute Methamphetamine on Emotional Memory Formation in Humans: Encoding vs Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  8. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  9. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  10. Adenovirus capsid-display of the retro-oriented human complement inhibitor DAF reduces Ad vector–triggered immune responses in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seregin, Sergey S.; Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Appledorn, Daniel M.; Hartman, Zachary C.; Schuldt, Nathaniel J.; Scott, Jeannine; Godbehere, Sarah; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used in human clinical trials. However, at higher dosages, Ad vector–triggered innate toxicities remain a major obstacle to many applications. Ad interactions with the complement system significantly contribute to innate immune responses in several models of Ad-mediated gene transfer. We constructed a novel class of Ad vectors, genetically engineered to “capsid-display” native and retro-oriented versions of the human complement inhibitor decay-accelerating factor (DAF), as a fusion protein from the C-terminus of the Ad capsid protein IX. In contrast to conventional Ad vectors, DAF-displaying Ads dramatically minimized complement activation in vitro and complement-dependent immune responses in vivo. DAF-displaying Ads did not trigger thrombocytopenia, minimized endothelial cell activation, and had diminished inductions of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses. The retro-oriented display of DAF facilitated the greatest improvements in vivo, with diminished activation of innate immune cells, such as dendritic and natural killer cells. In conclusion, Ad vectors can capsid-display proteins in a manner that not only retains the functionality of the displayed proteins but also potentially can be harnessed to improve the efficacy of this important gene transfer platform for numerous gene transfer applications. PMID:20511542

  11. Human full-length coagulation factor X and a GLA domain-derived 40-mer polypeptide bind to different regions of the adenovirus serotype 5 hexon capsomer.

    PubMed

    Sumarheni, Sudir; Hong, Saw See; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Boulanger, Pierre; Schoehn, Guy; Fender, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of human adenovirus (HAdV)-C5 and many other adenoviruses with blood coagulation factors (e.g., human factor X, FX) involves the binding of their GLA domain to the hexon capsomers, resulting in high levels of hepatotropism and potential hepatotoxicity. In this study, we tested the possibility of preventing these undesirable effects by using a GLA-mimicking peptide as a competitor. An FX GLA domain-derived, 40-mer polypeptide carrying 12 carboxyglutamate residues was synthesized (GLA(mim)). Surface plasmon resistance (SPR) analysis showed that GLA(mim) reacted with free and capsid-embedded hexon with a nanomolar affinity. Unexpectedly, GLA(mim) failed to compete with FX for hexon binding, and instead significantly increased the formation of FX-hexon or FX-adenovirion complexes. This observation was confirmed by in vitro cell transduction experiments using HAdV-C5-Luciferase vector (HAdV5-Luc), as preincubation of HAdV5-Luc with GLA(mim) before FX addition resulted in a higher transgene expression compared with FX alone. HAdV-C5 virions complexed with GLA(mim) were analyzed by cryoelectron microscopy. Image reconstruction demonstrated the bona fide hexon-GLA(mim) interaction, as for the full-length FX, although with considerable differences in stoichiometry and relative location on the hexon capsomer. Three extra densities were found at the periphery of each hexon, whereas one single FX molecule occupied the central cavity of the hexon trimeric capsomer. A refined analysis indicated that each extra density is found at the expected location of one highly variable loop 1 of the hexon, involved in scavenger receptor recognition. HAdV5-Luc complexed with a bifunctional GLA(mim)RGD peptide showed a lesser hepatotropism, compared with control HAdV5-Luc alone, and efficiently targeted αβ-integrin-overexpressing tumor cells in an in vivo mouse tumor model. Collectively, our findings open new perspectives in the design of adenoviral vectors for biotherapy.

  12. Using the E4orf6-Based E3 Ubiquitin Ligase as a Tool To Analyze the Evolution of Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Timra; Ballmann, Mónika Z.; Papp, Tibor; Pénzes, Judit J.; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; Branton, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT E4orf6 proteins from all human adenoviruses form Cullin-based ubiquitin ligase complexes that, in association with E1B55K, target cellular proteins for degradation. While most are assembled with Cul5, a few utilize Cul2. BC-box motifs enable all these E4orf6 proteins to assemble ligase complexes with Elongins B and C. We also identified a Cul2-box motif used for Cul2 selection in all Cul2-based complexes. With this information, we set out to determine if other adenoviruses also possess the ability to form the ligase complex and, if so, to predict their Cullin usage. Here we report that all adenoviruses known to encode an E4orf6-like protein (mastadenoviruses and atadenoviruses) maintain the potential to form the ligase complex. We could accurately predict Cullin usage for E4orf6 products of mastadenoviruses and all but one atadenovirus. Interestingly, in nonhuman primate adenoviruses, we found a clear segregation of Cullin binding, with Cul5 utilized by viruses infecting great apes and Cul2 by Old/New World monkey viruses, suggesting that a switch from Cul2 to Cul5 binding occurred during the period when great apes diverged from monkeys. Based on the analysis of Cullin selection, we also suggest that the majority of human adenoviruses, which exhibit a broader tropism for the eye and the respiratory tract, exhibit Cul5 specificity and resemble viruses infecting great apes, whereas those that infect the gastrointestinal tract may have originated from monkey viruses that share Cul2 specificity. Finally, aviadenoviruses also appear to contain E4orf6 genes that encode proteins with a conserved XCXC motif followed by, in most cases, a BC-box motif. IMPORTANCE Two early adenoviral proteins, E4orf6 and E1B55K, form a ubiquitin ligase complex with cellular proteins to ubiquitinate specific substrates, leading to their degradation by the proteasome. In studies with representatives of each human adenovirus species, we (and others) previously discovered that some

  13. Encoding human sexual chemosensory cues in the orbitofrontal and fusiform cortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Chen, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensory communication of affect and motivation is ubiquitous among animals. In humans, emotional expressions are naturally associated with faces and voices. Whether chemical signals play a role as well has hardly been addressed. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that the right orbitofrontal cortex, right fusiform cortex, and right hypothalamus respond to airborne natural human sexual sweat, indicating that this particular chemosensory compound is encoded holistically in the brain. Our findings provide neural evidence that socioemotional meanings, including the sexual ones, are conveyed in the human sweat. PMID:19118174

  14. Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J.

    1995-04-10

    We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Low-dose donor bone marrow cells and splenocytes plus adenovirus encoding for CTLA4Ig gene promote stable mixed chimerism and long-term survival of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-Z; Zhang, Q-Y; Xie, S-S

    2003-12-01

    Co-stimulatory blockade combined with donor bone marrow transfusion engenders stable mixed chimerism and robust tolerance to various organ and cell transplants. However, repeated administration of costly agents to block the co-stimulatory pathway and the high doses of donor bone marrow cells (BMCs) used in most protocols are impeding clinical development of this strategy. To circumvent these shortcomings, we developed a plan in which repeated administration of costly agents was replaced by a single injection of adenovirus containing the gene of interest, and the high dose of donor BMCs replaced by a mixture of low-dose donor BMCs and splenocytes (SPLCs). Cardiac allografts from DA(RT-1(a)) rats were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomens of LEW(RT-1(1)) rats. A cocktail of adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene (AdCTLA4Ig), donor BMCs (100 x 10(6)), and SPLCs (50 x 10(6)) was administered to recipients via the portal vein immediately after grafting (n = 6). Treatment with regimens, including AdCTLA4Ig only, AdCTLA4Ig plus donor BMCs, and AdCTLA4Ig plus donor SPLCs, significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival in recipient rats, while animals that received no treatment or treatment with control adenovirus (AdLacZ) promptly rejected their allografts. Nevertheless, LEW recipients treated with AdCTLA4Ig and the mixture of a low dose of donor BMCs and SPLCs developed stable mixed chimerism, rendering them long-term survivors of cardiac allografts that also accepted skin grafts from the donor but not the third-party strain. We conclude that blockade of CD28-B7 pathway with AdCTLA4Ig plus a mixture of low doses of donor BMCs and SPLCs is a feasible strategy to induce long-term mixed chimerism with a potential application for clinical development.

  16. Non-spin-echo 3D transverse hadamard encoded proton spectroscopic imaging in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ouri; Tal, Assaf; Goelman, Gadi; Gonen, Oded

    2013-07-01

    A non-spin-echo multivoxel proton MR localization method based on three-dimensional transverse Hadamard spectroscopic imaging is introduced and demonstrated in a phantom and the human brain. Spatial encoding is achieved with three selective 90° radiofrequency pulses along perpendicular axes: The first two create a longitudinal ±M(Z) Hadamard order in the volume of interest. The third pulse spatially Hadamard-encodes the ±M(Z)s in the volume of interest in the third direction while bringing them to the transverse plane to be acquired immediately. The approaching-ideal point spread function of Hadamard encoding and very short acquisition delay yield signal-to-noise-ratios of 20 ± 8, 23 ± 9, and 31 ± 10 for choline, creatine, and N-acetylaspartate in the human brain at 1.5 T from 1 cm(3) voxels in 21 min. The advantages of transverse Hadamard spectroscopic imaging are that unlike gradient (Fourier) phase-encoding: (i) the volume of interest does not need to be smaller than the field of view to prevent aliasing; (ii) the number of partitions in each direction can be small, 8, 4, or even 2 at no cost in point spread function; (iii) the volume of interest does not have to be contiguous; and (iv) the voxel profile depends on the available B1 and pulse synthesis paradigm and can, therefore, at least theoretically, approach "ideal" "1" inside and "0" elsewhere.

  17. Theta oscillations at encoding mediate the context-dependent nature of human episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Staudigl, Tobias; Hanslmayr, Simon

    2013-06-17

    Human episodic memory is highly context dependent. Therefore, retrieval benefits when a memory is recalled in the same context compared to a different context. This implies that items and contexts are bound together during encoding, such that the reinstatement of the initial context at test improves retrieval. Animal studies suggest that theta oscillations and theta-to-gamma cross-frequency coupling modulate such item-context binding, but direct evidence from humans is scarce. We investigated this issue by manipulating the overlap of contextual features between encoding and retrieval. Participants studied words superimposed on movie clips and were later tested by presenting the word with either the same or a different movie. The results show that memory performance and the oscillatory correlates of memory formation crucially depend on the overlap of the context between encoding and test. When the context matched, high theta power during encoding was related to successful recognition, whereas the opposite pattern emerged in the context-mismatch condition. In addition, cross-frequency coupling analysis revealed a context-dependent theta-to-gamma memory effect specifically in the left hippocampus. These results reveal for the first time that context-dependent episodic memory effects are mediated by theta oscillatory activity.

  18. Role of preterminal protein processing in adenovirus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A; Leith, I R; Nicholson, J; Hounsell, J; Hay, R T

    1997-01-01

    Preterminal protein (pTP), the protein primer for adenovirus DNA replication, is processed at two sites by the virus-encoded protease to yield mature terminal protein (TP). Here we demonstrate that processing to TP, via an intermediate (iTP), is conserved in all serotypes sequenced to date; and in determining the sites cleaved in Ad4 pTP, we extend the previously published substrate specificity of human adenovirus proteases to include a glutamine residue at P4. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies raised against pTP, we show that processing to iTP and TP are temporally separated in the infectious cycle, with processing to iTP taking place outside the virus particles. In vitro and in vivo studies of viral DNA replication reveal that iTP can act as a template for initiation and elongation and argue against a role for virus-encoded protease in switching off DNA replication. Virus DNA with TP attached to its 5' end (TP-DNA) has been studied extensively in in vitro DNA replication assays. Given that in vivo pTP-DNA, not TP-DNA, is the template for all but the first round of replication, the two templates were compared in vitro and shown to have different properties. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that a region spanning the TP cleavage site is involved in defining the subnuclear localization of pTP. Therefore, a likely role for the processing of pTP-DNA is to create a distinct template for early transcription (TP-DNA), while the terminal protein moiety, be it TP or pTP, serves to guide the template to the appropriate subcellular location through the course of infection. PMID:9261355

  19. Role of preterminal protein processing in adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Webster, A; Leith, I R; Nicholson, J; Hounsell, J; Hay, R T

    1997-09-01

    Preterminal protein (pTP), the protein primer for adenovirus DNA replication, is processed at two sites by the virus-encoded protease to yield mature terminal protein (TP). Here we demonstrate that processing to TP, via an intermediate (iTP), is conserved in all serotypes sequenced to date; and in determining the sites cleaved in Ad4 pTP, we extend the previously published substrate specificity of human adenovirus proteases to include a glutamine residue at P4. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies raised against pTP, we show that processing to iTP and TP are temporally separated in the infectious cycle, with processing to iTP taking place outside the virus particles. In vitro and in vivo studies of viral DNA replication reveal that iTP can act as a template for initiation and elongation and argue against a role for virus-encoded protease in switching off DNA replication. Virus DNA with TP attached to its 5' end (TP-DNA) has been studied extensively in in vitro DNA replication assays. Given that in vivo pTP-DNA, not TP-DNA, is the template for all but the first round of replication, the two templates were compared in vitro and shown to have different properties. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that a region spanning the TP cleavage site is involved in defining the subnuclear localization of pTP. Therefore, a likely role for the processing of pTP-DNA is to create a distinct template for early transcription (TP-DNA), while the terminal protein moiety, be it TP or pTP, serves to guide the template to the appropriate subcellular location through the course of infection.

  20. Proinflammatory Effects of Interferon Gamma in Mouse Adenovirus 1 Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary K.; Procario, Megan C.; Twisselmann, Nele; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Archambeau, Ashley J.; Michele, Daniel E.; Day, Sharlene M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses are frequent causes of pediatric myocarditis. Little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, and the species specificity of human adenoviruses has limited the development of animal models, which is a significant barrier to strategies for prevention or treatment. We have developed a mouse model of myocarditis following mouse adenovirus 1 (MAV-1) infection to study the pathogenic mechanisms of this important cause of pediatric myocarditis. Following intranasal infection of neonatal C57BL/6 mice, we detected viral replication and induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the hearts of infected mice. MAV-1 caused myocyte necrosis and induced substantial cellular inflammation that was composed predominantly of CD3+ T lymphocytes. Depletion of IFN-γ during acute infection reduced cardiac inflammation in MAV-1-infected mice without affecting viral replication. We observed decreased contractility during acute infection of neonatal mice, and persistent viral infection in the heart was associated with cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy in adulthood. IFN-γ is a proinflammatory mediator during adenovirus-induced myocarditis, and persistent adenovirus infection may contribute to ongoing cardiac dysfunction. IMPORTANCE Studying the pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by different viruses is essential in order to characterize both virus-specific and generalized factors that contribute to disease. Very little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, which is a significant impediment to the development of treatment or prevention strategies. We used MAV-1 to establish a mouse model of human adenovirus myocarditis, providing the means to study host and pathogen factors contributing to adenovirus-induced cardiac disease during acute and persistent infection. The MAV-1 model will enable fundamental studies of viral myocarditis, including IFN-γ modulation as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25320326

  1. Re-emergent human adenovirus genome type 7d caused an acute respiratory disease outbreak in Southern China after a twenty-one year absence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suhui; Wan, Chengsong; Ke, Changwen; Seto, Jason; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Zou, Lirong; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zetao; Jing, Shuping; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Wan, Xuan; Wu, Xianbo; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2014-12-08

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), among other illnesses. Of the ARD genotypes, HAdV-7 presents with more severe morbidity and higher mortality than the others. We report the isolation and identification of a genome type HAdV-7d (DG01_2011) from a recent outbreak in Southern China. Genome sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) comparisons with past pathogens indicate HAdV-7d has re-emerged in Southern China after an absence of twenty-one years. Recombination analysis reveals this genome differs from the 1950s-era prototype and vaccine strains by a lateral gene transfer, substituting the coding region for the L1 52/55 kDa DNA packaging protein from HAdV-16. DG01_2011 descends from both a strain circulating in Southwestern China (2010) and a strain from Shaanxi causing a fatality and outbreak (Northwestern China; 2009). Due to the higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with HAdV-7, the surveillance, identification, and characterization of these strains in population-dense China by REA and/or whole genome sequencing are strongly indicated. With these accurate identifications of specific HAdV types and an epidemiological database of regional HAdV pathogens, along with the HAdV genome stability noted across time and space, the development, availability, and deployment of appropriate vaccines are needed.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of a post-influenza pandemic outbreak of acute respiratory infections in Korea caused by human adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Ji; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Kim, Kisoon

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of upper respiratory tract infections associated with human adenovirus (HAdV) occurred on a national scale in Korea from September to December 2010, following a major H1N1 influenza pandemic. Data from the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Surveillance System (KINRESS) showed an unusually high positive rate accounting for up to 20% of all diagnosed cases. To determine the principal cause of the outbreak, direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by sequence analysis targeting parts of the hexon gene of HAdV was performed. Serotypes of 1,007 PCR-diagnosed HAdV-positive samples from patients with an acute upper respiratory tract illness were determined and epidemiological characteristics including major aged group and clinical symptoms were analyzed. The principal symptom of HAdV infections was fever and the vulnerable aged group was 1-5 years old. Based on sequence analysis, HAdV-3 was the predominant serotype in the outbreak, with an incidence of 74.3%. From the beginning of 2010 until May, the major serotypes were HAdV-1, 2, and 5 (70-100%) in any given period. However, an outbreak dominated by HAdV-3 started between July and August and peaked in September. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that there was no genetic variation in HAdV-3. The results demonstrated that an outbreak of upper respiratory illness followed by H1N1 influenza pandemic in Korea was caused mainly by emerged HAdV-3. J.

  3. Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human CaCo-2 cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decay Accelerating Factor (DAF) and Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) have been identified as cellular receptors for Coxsackie B viruses (CV-B). The aim of this study is to elucidate the different binding properties of CV-B serotypes and to find out if there are any amino acid changes that could be associated to the different phenotypes. Twenty clinical CV-B isolates were tested on CaCo-2 cell line using anti-DAF (BRIC216) and anti-CAR (RmcB) antibodies. CV-B3 Nancy prototype strain and a recombinant strain (Rec, CV-B3/B4) were tested in parallel. The P1 genomic region of 12 CV-B isolates from different serotypes was sequenced and the Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER) along with the virus growth cycle was measured. Results Infectivity assays revealed clear differences between CV-B isolates with regard to their interactions with DAF and CAR. All tested CV-B isolates showed an absolute requirement for CAR but varied in their binding to DAF. We also reported that for some isolates of CV-B, DAF attachment was not adapted. Genetic analysis of the P1 region detected multiple differences in the deduced amino acid sequences. Conclusion Within a given serotype, variations exist in the capacity of virus isolates to bind to specific receptors, and variants with different additional ligands may arise during infection in humans as well as in tissue culture. PMID:24885774

  4. An outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by a virus associated RNA II gene mutation strain of human adenovirus 7 in China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Sheng, Chunyu; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7 (HAdV-7) strains are a major cause of acute respiratory disease (ARD) among adults and children, associated with fatal pneumonia. An ARD outbreak caused by HAdV-7 that involved 739 college students was reported in this article. To better understand the underlying cause of this large-scale epidemic, virus strains were isolated from infected patients and sequence variations of the whole genome sequence were detected. Evolutionary trees and alignment results indicated that the major capsid protein genes hexon and fibre were strongly conserved among serotype 7 strains in China at that time. Instead, the HAdV-7 strains presented three thymine deletions in the virus associated RNA (VA RNA) II terminal region. We also found that the mutation might lead to increased mRNA expression of an adjacent gene, L1 52/55K, and thus promoted faster growth. These findings suggest that sequence variation of VA RNA II gene was a potential cause of such a severe HAdV-7 infection and this gene should be a new-emerging factor to be monitored for better understanding of HAdV-7 infection. PMID:28225804

  5. Fatal Community-acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Re-emergent Human Adenovirus 7d Associated with Higher Severity of Illness and Fatality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwu; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Yuxian; Chen, Manjun; Guo, Yonghui; Yu, Nan; Chodosh, James; Fu, Ning; Che, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), such as community-acquired pneumonia. HAdV-7d, a re-emergent genomic variant, has been recently reported in Asia and the United States after a several-decade absence. However, whether HAdV-7d is associated with higher severity than other types is currently unclear. In this study, the clinical and epidemiological investigation showed that fever, cough, and sore throat were the three most common respiratory symptoms of HAdV infections. HAdV-7 caused longer duration of fever, higher morbidity of tachypnea/dyspnea, pleural effusion, diarrhea, hepatosplenomegaly, consciousness alteration, as well as higher rates of pneumonia, mechanical ventilation and higher fatality rate (28.6%) than other types, particularly HAdV-3 and HAdV-2. The genomes of seven HAdV-7d isolates from mild, severe, and fatal cases were sequenced and highly similar with each other. Surprisingly, two isolates (2011, 2012) had 100% identical genomes with an earlier strain from a fatal ARD outbreak in China (2009), which elucidates the virus origin and confirms the unexpected HAdV genomic conservation and stability. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that L1 52/55-kDa DNA packaging protein may be associated with the higher severity of illness and fatality rate of HAdV-7. Clinicians need to be aware of HAdVs in children with ARD. PMID:27848998

  6. Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of Daxx by the Viral E1B-55K Protein in Human Adenovirus-Infected Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Wimmer, Peter; Sirma, Hüseyin; Everett, Roger D.; Blanchette, Paola; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The death-associated protein Daxx found in PML (promyelocytic leukemia protein) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is involved in transcriptional regulation and cellular intrinsic antiviral resistence against incoming viruses. We found that knockdown of Daxx in a nontransformed human hepatocyte cell line using RNA interference (RNAi) techniques results in significantly increased adenoviral (Ad) replication, including enhanced viral mRNA synthesis and viral protein expression. This Daxx restriction imposed upon adenovirus growth is counteracted by early protein E1B-55K (early region 1B 55-kDa protein), a multifunctional regulator of cell-cycle-independent Ad5 replication. The viral protein binds to Daxx and induces its degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. We show that this process is independent of Ad E4orf6 (early region 4 open reading frame 6), known to promote the proteasomal degradation of cellular p53, Mre11, DNA ligase IV, and integrin α3 in combination with E1B-55K. These results illustrate the importance of the PML-NB-associated factor Daxx in virus growth restriction and suggest that E1B-55K antagonizes innate antiviral activities of Daxx and PML-NBs to stimulate viral replication at a posttranslational level. PMID:20484509

  7. Posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression in human cells: effects of heat shock, inhibition of protein synthesis, and adenovirus infection on translation and mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, N G; Morimoto, R I

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 gene expression in two human cell lines, HeLa and 293 cells, which constitutively express high levels of HSP70. HSP70 mRNA translates with high efficiency in both control and heat-shocked cells. Therefore, heat shock is not required for the efficient translation of HSP70 mRNA. Rather, the main effect of heat shock on translation is to suppress the translatability of non-heat shock mRNAs. Heat shock, however, has a marked effect on the stability of HSP70 mRNA; in non-heat-shocked cells the half-life of HSP70 mRNA is approximately 50 min, and its stability increases at least 10-fold upon heat shock. Moreover, HSP70 mRNA is more stable in cells treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that a heat shock-sensitive labile protein regulates its turnover. An additional effect on posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression can be found in adenovirus-infected cells, in which HSP70 mRNA levels decline precipititously late during infection although hsp70 transcription continues unabated. Images PMID:3437893

  8. An outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by a virus associated RNA II gene mutation strain of human adenovirus 7 in China, 2015.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Qiongshu; Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Sheng, Chunyu; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7 (HAdV-7) strains are a major cause of acute respiratory disease (ARD) among adults and children, associated with fatal pneumonia. An ARD outbreak caused by HAdV-7 that involved 739 college students was reported in this article. To better understand the underlying cause of this large-scale epidemic, virus strains were isolated from infected patients and sequence variations of the whole genome sequence were detected. Evolutionary trees and alignment results indicated that the major capsid protein genes hexon and fibre were strongly conserved among serotype 7 strains in China at that time. Instead, the HAdV-7 strains presented three thymine deletions in the virus associated RNA (VA RNA) II terminal region. We also found that the mutation might lead to increased mRNA expression of an adjacent gene, L1 52/55K, and thus promoted faster growth. These findings suggest that sequence variation of VA RNA II gene was a potential cause of such a severe HAdV-7 infection and this gene should be a new-emerging factor to be monitored for better understanding of HAdV-7 infection.

  9. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Laura A; Rhodes, Eric R; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Ryu, Jongseong; Popovici, Jonathan; Hoelle, Jill M; Sivaganesan, Mano; Hayes, Samuel L; Rodgers, Mark R; Ryu, Hodon

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate for human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a propagation method that utilizes a commercially available medium to produce UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores with a consistent UV sensitivity. It is further demonstrated that the endospores of B. pumilus strain (ATCC 27142), produced using this protocol (half strength Columbia broth, 5 days incubation, with 0.1mM MnSO4), display a UV dose-response that is similar to that of HAdV. Endospore stocks could be stored in ethanol for up to two months at 4 °C without a significant change in UV sensitivity. Synergistic endospore damage was observed by pre-heat treatment of water samples followed by UV irradiation. UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores are a potential surrogate of HAdV for UV treatment performance tests in water utilities which do not have in-house research virology laboratories.

  10. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Kenneth T.; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; White, Jason P.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Montague, P. Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson’s disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson’s disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  11. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kenneth T; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; White, Jason P; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul E M; Montague, P Read

    2016-01-05

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson's disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson's disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons.

  12. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding human trehalase.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, R; Taketani, S; Sasai-Takedatsu, M; Kino, M; Tokunaga, R; Kobayashi, Y

    1997-11-20

    A complete cDNA clone encoding human trehalase, a glycoprotein of brush-border membranes, has been isolated from a human kidney library. The cDNA encodes a protein of 583 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 66,595. Human enzyme contains a typical cleavable signal peptide at amino terminus, five potential glycosylation sites, and a hydrophobic region at carboxyl terminus where the protein is anchored to plasma membranes via glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme showed similarity to sequences of the enzyme from rabbit, silk worm, Tenebrio molitor, Escherichia coli and yeast. Northern blots revealed that human trehalase mRNA of approx. 2.0 kb was found mainly in the kidney, liver and small intestine. Expression of the recombinant trehalase in E. coli provided a high level of the enzyme activity. The isolation and expression of cDNA for human trehalase should facilitate studies of the structure of the gene, as well as a basis for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism.

  14. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puntel, Mariana; Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M.; Farrokhi, Catherine; VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; and others

    2013-05-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ► High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ► HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ► We performed a dose escalation study at

  15. Localization of the human genes encoding the two subunits of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Motta, S; Pavone, L; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1994-09-01

    TFIIE is a general transcription factor for class II genes composed of two types of subunits, a large one of 56 kDa and a small of 34 kDa. By Southern analysis at high and at low stringency of a panel of mouse/human hybrid cell lines and by in situ chromosomal hybridization, we have demonstrated that both polypeptides are encoded by genes that are single copy in the human genome and are localized at 3q13-q21 and at 8p12, respectively. A TaqI RFLP (heterozygosity index of 0.07) was detected at the locus for the 56-kDa subunit.

  16. The human HNRPD locus maps to 4q21 and encodes a highly conserved protein.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, L A; Li, M J; DePace, A; Bray-Ward, P; Maizels, N

    1998-05-01

    The hnRNP D protein interacts with nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Like many other proteins that interact with RNA, it contains RBD (or "RRM") domains and arg-gly-gly (RGG) motifs. We have examined the organization and localization of the human and murine genes that encode the hnRNP D protein. Comparison of the predicted sequences of the hnRNP D proteins in human and mouse shows that they are 96.9% identical (98.9% similar). This very high level of conservation suggests a critical function for hnRNP D. Sequence analysis of the human HNRPD gene shows that the protein is encoded by eight exons and that two additional exons specify sequences in the 3' UTR. Use of two of the coding exons is determined by alternative splicing of the HNRPD mRNA. The human HNRPD gene maps to 4q21. The mouse Hnrpd gene maps to the F region of chromosome 3, which is syntenic with the human 4q21 region.

  17. An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0629 TITLE: An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Igor P. Dmitriev...Aug 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1...epithelial cells, the origin of most human cancers. However, realization of the full potential of Ad vectors for targeted cancer treatment is currently

  18. The 10,400- and 14,500-dalton proteins encoded by region E3 of adenovirus form a complex and function together to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Stewart, A R; Yei, S P; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1991-01-01

    In adenovirus-infected cells, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) is internalized from the cell surface via endosomes and is degraded, and the E3 10,400-dalton protein (10.4K protein) is required for this effect (C. R. Carlin, A. E. Tollefson, H. A. Brady, B. L. Hoffman, and W. S. M. Wold, Cell 57:135-144, 1989). We now report that both the E3 10.4K and E3 14.5K proteins are required for this down-regulation of EGF-R in adenovirus-infected cells. Down-regulation of cell surface EGF-R was demonstrated by results from several methods, namely the absence of EGF-R autophosphorylation in an immune complex kinase assay, the inability to iodinate EGF-R on the cell surface, the formation of endosomes containing EGF-R as detected by immunofluorescence, and the degradation of the metabolically [35S]Met-labeled fully processed 170K species of EGF-R. No effect on the initial synthesis of EGF-R was observed. This down-regulation was ascribed to the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins through the analysis of cells infected with rec700 (wild-type), dl748 (10.4K-, 14.5K+), or dl764 (10.4K+, 14.5K-) or coinfected with dl748 plus dl764. Further evidence that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins function in concert was obtained by demonstrating that the 10.4K protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the 14.5K protein by using three different antisera to the 14.5K protein, strongly implying that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins exist as a complex. Together, these results indicate that the 10.4K and 14.5K proteins function as a complex to stimulate endosome-mediated internalization and degradation of EGF-R in adenovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:1851870

  19. The human subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus differentially encode reward during action control.

    PubMed

    Justin Rossi, Peter; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have recently been shown to encode reward, but few studies have been performed in humans. We investigated STN and GPi encoding of reward and loss (i.e., valence) in humans with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that STN and GPi neurons would change their firing rate in response to reward- and loss-related stimuli, we recorded the activity of individual neurons while participants performed a behavioral task. In the task, action choices were associated with potential rewarding, punitive, or neutral outcomes. We found that STN and GPi neurons encode valence-related information during action control, but the proportion of valence-responsive neurons was greater in the STN compared to the GPi. In the STN, reward-related stimuli mobilized a greater proportion of neurons than loss-related stimuli. We also found surprising limbic overlap with the sensorimotor regions in both the STN and GPi, and this overlap was greater than has been previously reported. These findings may help to explain alterations in limbic function that have been observed following deep brain stimulation therapy of the STN and GPi. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1952-1964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  1. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-02-15

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses.

  2. Roughness encoding in human and biomimetic artificial touch: spatiotemporal frequency modulation and structural anisotropy of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Beccai, Lucia; Wessberg, Johan; Wasling, Helena Backlund; Mattioli, Fabio; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    The influence of fingerprints and their curvature in tactile sensing performance is investigated by comparative analysis of different design parameters in a biomimetic artificial fingertip, having straight or curved fingerprints. The strength in the encoding of the principal spatial period of ridged tactile stimuli (gratings) is evaluated by indenting and sliding the surfaces at controlled normal contact force and tangential sliding velocity, as a function of fingertip rotation along the indentation axis. Curved fingerprints guaranteed higher directional isotropy than straight fingerprints in the encoding of the principal frequency resulting from the ratio between the sliding velocity and the spatial periodicity of the grating. In parallel, human microneurography experiments were performed and a selection of results is included in this work in order to support the significance of the biorobotic study with the artificial tactile system.

  3. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  4. MicroRNA hsa-miR-138 inhibits adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells through adenovirus EID-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuo; Bian, Chunjing; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Shan; Wang, Shihua; Liao, Lianming; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2011-02-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAD-MSCs) could provide new insights into the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, and broaden the spectrum of potential hAD-MSCs-based cell therapy. In this study, we reported that a human microRNA, hsa-miR-138, could inhibit the adipogenic differentiation of hAD-MSCs. Our results showed that miR-138 was significantly down-regulated during adipogenic differentiation. Overexpression of miR-138 in hAD-MSCs could effectively reduce lipid droplets accumulation, inhibit expression of key adipogenic transcription factors cytidine-cytidine-adenosine-adenosine-thymidine (CCAAT) enhancer binding protein alpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 as well as several other adipogenic marker genes, such as fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase. Further studies showed that the expression of adenovirus early region 1-A-like inhibitor of differentiation 1 (EID-1), a nuclear receptor coregulator, was inversely correlated with that of miR-138 when hAD-MSCs were differentiated into adipocytes. Knockdown of EID-1 by RNA interference inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hAD-MSCs. In addition, luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-138 directly targeted the 3' untranslated region of EID-1, implying that the negative role of miR-138 in the adipocyte differentiation of hAD-MSCs is at least partially mediated via repressing EID-1. Taken together, this study shows that miR-138 plays a negative role in adipogenic differentiation and sheds light on the role of miRNAs during differentiation of hAD-MSCs toward adipocytes.

  5. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  6. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Dual temporal encoding mechanisms in human auditory cortex: Evidence from MEG and EEG.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huizhen; Crain, Stephen; Johnson, Blake W

    2016-03-01

    Current hypotheses about language processing advocate an integral relationship between encoding of temporal information and linguistic processing in the brain. All such explanations must accommodate the evident ability of the perceptual system to process both slow and fast time scales in speech. However most cortical neurons are limited in their capability to precisely synchronise to temporal modulations at rates faster than about 50Hz. Hence, a central question in auditory neurophysiology concerns how the full range of perceptually relevant modulation rates might be encoded in the cerebral cortex. Here we show with concurrent noninvasive magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) measurements that the human auditory cortex transitions between a phase-locked (PL) mode of responding to modulation rates below about 50Hz, and a non-phase-locked (NPL) mode at higher rates. Precisely such dual response modes are predictable from the behaviours of single neurons in auditory cortices of non-human primates. Our data point to a common mechanistic explanation for the single neuron and MEG/EEG results and support the hypothesis that two distinct types of neuronal encoding mechanisms are employed by the auditory cortex to represent a wide range of temporal modulation rates. This dual encoding model allows slow and fast modulations in speech to be processed in parallel and is therefore consistent with theoretical frameworks in which slow temporal modulations (such as rhythm or syllabic structure) are akin to the contours or edges of visual objects, whereas faster modulations (such as periodicity pitch or phonemic structure) are more like visual texture.

  8. Human posterior parietal cortex encodes the movement goal in a pro-/anti-reach task

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on reach planning in humans has implicated a frontoparietal network, including the precuneus (PCu), a putative human homolog of the monkey parietal reach region (PRR), and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Using a pro-/anti-reach task, electrophysiological studies in monkeys have demonstrated that the movement goal rather than the location of the visual cue is encoded in PRR and PMd. However, if only the effector but not the movement goal is specified (underspecified condition), the PRR and PMd have been shown to represent all potential movement goals. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated whether the human PCu and PMd likewise encode the movement goal, and whether these reach-related areas also engage in situations with underspecified compared with specified movement goals. By using a pro-/anti-reach task, we spatially dissociated the location of the visual cue from the location of the movement goal. In the specified conditions, pro- and anti-reaches activated similar parietal and premotor areas. In the PCu contralateral to the moving arm, we found directionally selective activation fixed to the movement goal. In the underspecified conditions, we observed activation in reach-related areas of the posterior parietal cortex, including PCu. However, the activation was substantially weaker in parietal areas and lacking in PMd. Our results suggest that human PCu encodes the movement goal rather than the location of the visual cue if the movement goal is specified and even engages in situations when only the visual cue but not the movement goal is defined. PMID:25904714

  9. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  10. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  11. Suppression of Adenovirus Replication by Cardiotonic Steroids.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Filomena; Stoilov, Peter; Lingwood, Clifford; Brown, Martha; Cochrane, Alan

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of adenovirus on the host pre-RNA splicing machinery for expression of its complete genome potentially makes it vulnerable to modulators of RNA splicing, such as digoxin and digitoxin. Both drugs reduced the yields of four human adenoviruses (HAdV-A31, -B35, and -C5 and a species D conjunctivitis isolate) by at least 2 to 3 logs by affecting one or more steps needed for genome replication. Immediate early E1A protein levels are unaffected by the drugs, but synthesis of the delayed protein E4orf6 and the major late capsid protein hexon is compromised. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that both drugs altered E1A RNA splicing (favoring the production of 13S over 12S RNA) early in infection and partially blocked the transition from 12S and 13S to 9S RNA at late stages of virus replication. Expression of multiple late viral protein mRNAs was lost in the presence of either drug, consistent with the observed block in viral DNA replication. The antiviral effect was dependent on the continued presence of the drug and was rapidly reversible. RIDK34, a derivative of convallotoxin, although having more potent antiviral activity, did not show an improved selectivity index. All three drugs reduced metabolic activity to some degree without evidence of cell death. By blocking adenovirus replication at one or more steps beyond the onset of E1A expression and prior to genome replication, digoxin and digitoxin show potential as antiviral agents for treatment of serious adenovirus infections. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which digoxin and digitoxin inhibit adenovirus replication will guide the development of novel antiviral therapies.

  12. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease.

  13. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Evaluation and Validation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Quantitation of Human Adenovirus 14 from Clinical Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    copies of genomic DNA per reaction. The assay did not cross-react with other adenoviruses, influenza , respiratory syncytial virus, or common respiratory...unable to Figure 1. Alignment of species HAdV-B Hexon sequences which span the HAdV-14 primers and TaqMan probe. Note that the HAdV- 14a and HAdV-14p...assay: Adenovirus strains HAdV-14 (VR-15), -3 (VR- 3), -4 (VR-1572), -7 (VR-7), -11 (VR-12), -21 (VR-256), Haemoph- ilus influenza , Influenza A virus

  15. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a human macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, W Y; Temple, P A; Witek-Giannotti, J S; Remold, H G; Clark, S C; David, J R

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was isolated, through functional expression cloning in COS-1 cells, from a cDNA library prepared from a lectin-stimulated T-cell hybridoma, T-CEMB. The 115-amino acid polypeptide encoded by the MIF cDNA (p7-1) was effectively released from the transfected COS-1 cells and yielded readily detectable MIF activity in the culture supernatant despite the apparent lack of a classical protein secretory sequence. Insertional mutational analysis and elution of MIF activity from polyacrylamide gel slices demonstrated that the Mr 12,000 protein with MIF activity released by the COS-1 cells is encoded by p7-1. The p7-1 cDNA hybridized with a 700-base mRNA expressed by Con-A-stimulated lymphocytes but not unstimulated lymphocytes. The availability of the MIF cDNA clone and recombinant MIF will facilitate the analysis of the role of this lymphokine in cell-mediated immunity, immunoregulation, and inflammation. Images PMID:2552447

  16. The Roles of Human Lateral Temporal Cortical Neuronal Activity in Recent Verbal Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfield-McNeill, Julie; Corina, David

    2009-01-01

    Activity of 98 single neurons in human lateral temporal cortex was measured during memory encoding for auditory words, text, or pictures and compared with identification of material of the same modality in extracellular recordings during awake neurosurgery for epilepsy. Frequency of activity was divided into early or late epochs or activity sustained throughout both; 44 neurons had significant changes in one or more categories. Polymodal and sustained changes lateralized to dominant hemisphere and late changes to nondominant. The majority of polymodal neurons shifted categories for different modalities. In dominant hemisphere, the timing and nature of changes in activity provide the basis for a model of the roles of temporal cortex in encoding. Superior temporal gyrus excitatory activity was related to the early epoch, when perception and processing occur, and middle gyrus to the late epoch, when semantic labeling occurs. The superior two-thirds of middle gyrus also demonstrated sustained inhibition. In a subset of lateral temporal neurons, memory-encoding activity reflected simultaneous convergence of sustained attentional and early perceptual inputs. PMID:18469317

  17. Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Human Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination Generates a Stable Pool of Protective Long-Lived CD8+ T Effector Memory Cells Specific for a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; de Alencar, Bruna C.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Araújo, Adriano F.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we described a heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective human recombinant adenovirus type 5 as a powerful strategy to elicit long-lived CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against experimental systemic infection of mice with a human intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present study, we further characterized the protective long-lived CD8+ T cells. We compared several functional and phenotypic aspects of specific CD8+ T cells present 14 or 98 days after the last immunizing dose and found the following: (i) the numbers of specific cells were similar, as determined by multimer staining or by determining the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay; (ii) these cells were equally cytotoxic in vivo; (iii) following in vitro stimulation, a slight decline in the frequency of multifunctional cells (CD107a+ IFN-γ+ or CD107a+ IFN-γ+ tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+]) was paralleled by a significant increase of CD107a singly positive cells after 98 days; (iv) the expression of several surface markers was identical, except for the reexpression of CD127 after 98 days; (v) the use of genetically deficient mice revealed a role for interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23, but not IFN-γ, in the maintenance of these memory cells; and (vi) subsequent immunizations with an unrelated virus or a plasmid vaccine or the depletion of CD4+ T cells did not significantly erode the number or function of these CD8+ T cells during the 15-week period. From these results, we concluded that heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination generated a stable pool of functional protective long-lived CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype. PMID:21357719

  18. Direct evidence for encoding of motion streaks in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Apthorp, Deborah; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Kaul, Christian; Bahrami, Bahador; Alais, David; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Temporal integration in the visual system causes fast-moving objects to generate static, oriented traces (‘motion streaks’), which could be used to help judge direction of motion. While human psychophysics and single-unit studies in non-human primates are consistent with this hypothesis, direct neural evidence from the human cortex is still lacking. First, we provide psychophysical evidence that faster and slower motions are processed by distinct neural mechanisms: faster motion raised human perceptual thresholds for static orientations parallel to the direction of motion, whereas slower motion raised thresholds for orthogonal orientations. We then used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity while human observers viewed either fast (‘streaky’) or slow random dot stimuli moving in different directions, or corresponding static-oriented stimuli. We found that local spatial patterns of brain activity in early retinotopic visual cortex reliably distinguished between static orientations. Critically, a multivariate pattern classifier trained on brain activity evoked by these static stimuli could then successfully distinguish the direction of fast (‘streaky’) but not slow motion. Thus, signals encoding static-oriented streak information are present in human early visual cortex when viewing fast motion. These experiments show that motion streaks are present in the human visual system for faster motion. PMID:23222445

  19. Evaluation of efficacy and safety for recombinant human adenovirus-p53 in the control of the malignant pleural effusions via thoracic perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Biaoxue, Rong; Hui, Pan; Wenlong, Gao; Shuanying, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A certain number of studies have showed that p53 gene transfer has an anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. This study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of thoracic perfusion of recombinant human adenovirus p53 (rAd-p53, Gendicine) for controlling malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We searched for the relevant studies from the database of MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrance Library and CNKI to collect the trials concerning the efficacy and safety of rAd-p53 to treat MPE. Fourteen randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with 879 patients were involved in this analysis. The rAd-p53 combined with chemotherapeutic agents significantly improved the overall response rate (ORR) (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 3.73) and disease control rate (DCR) (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 2.32) of patients with MPE as well as the quality of life (QOL) of patients (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 4.27), compared with that of chemotherapeutic agents alone. In addition, the participation of rAd-p53 did not have an obvious impact on the most of incidence of adverse reactions (AEs) (P < 0.05) except the fever (P < 0.001). However, the fever was self-limited and could be tolerated well. The application of rAd-p53 through thoracic perfusion for treating MPE had a better efficacy and safety, which could be a potential choice for controlling MPE. PMID:27976709

  20. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness.

  1. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Chen, Ke-DA; Gao, Meng; Chen, Gang; Jin, Su-Feng; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yun-Shui; Li, Jian-Bo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×10(9) IU/ml and 3.0×10(9) IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 10(9) IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ(2)MSB=20.00 and χ(2)WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development.

  2. Color signal encoding for high dynamic range and wide color gamut based on human perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Mahdi; Miller, Scott; Daly, Scott; Atkins, Robin

    2014-01-01

    A new EOTF based on human perception, called PQ (Perceptual Quantizer), was proposed in a previous work (SMPTE Mot. Imag. J 2013, 122:52-59) and its performance was evaluated for a wide range of luminance levels and encoding bitdepth values. This paper is an extension of that previous work to include the color aspects of the PQ signal encoding. The efficiency of the PQ encoding and bit-depth requirements were evaluated and compared for standard color gamuts of Rec 709 (SRGB), and the wide color gamuts of Rec 2020, P3, and ACES for a variety of signal representations as RGB, YCbCr, and XYZ. In a selected color space for any potential local gray level 26 color samples were simulated by deviating one quantization step from the original color in each signal dimension. The quantization step sizes were simulated based on the PQ and gamma curves for different bit-depth values and luminance ranges for each of the color gamut spaces and signal representations. Color differences between the gray field and the simulated color samples were computed using CIE DE2000 color difference equation. The maximum color difference values (quantization error) were used as a metric to evaluate the performance of the corresponding EOTF curve. Extended color gamuts were found to require more bits to maintain low quantization error. Extended dynamic range required fewer additional bits in to maintain quantization error. Regarding the visual detection thresholds, the minimum bit-depth required by the PQ and gamma encodings are evaluated and compared through visual experiments.

  3. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus.

  4. A Plasmodium vivax plasmid DNA- and adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine encoding blood stage antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a prime/boost heterologous immunization regimen partially protects Aotus monkeys against blood stage challenge.

    PubMed

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-02-08

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of P. falciparum it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside of Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against malaria. In this study we assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, AMA1 and MSP142 in a recombinant DNA plasmid prime/adenoviral vector (Ad) boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens of each antigen, prime/boost with both antigens, and empty vector controls, and then subjected to blood stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, based on their ability to induced the longest pre-patent period and time to peak parasitemia; the lowest peak and mean parasitemia; the smallest area under the parasitemia curve and the highest self-cured rate. Overall, pre-challenge MSP1 antibody titers strongly correlated with decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad5 vaccine encoding blood stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen, provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and regimen for further development.

  5. Differential processing of colony-stimulating factor 1 precursors encoded by two human cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rettenmier, C W; Roussel, M F

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis of macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) was examined in mouse NIH-3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a retroviral vector expressing the 554-amino-acid product of a human 4-kilobase (kb) CSF-1 cDNA. Similar to results previously obtained with a 1.6-kb human cDNA that codes for a 256-amino-acid CSF-1 precursor, the results of the present study showed that NIH-3T3 cells expressing the product of the 4-kb clone produced biologically active human CSF-1 and were transformed by an autocrine mechanism when cotransfected with a vector containing a human c-fms (CSF-1 receptor) cDNA. The 4-kb CSF-1 cDNA product was synthesized as an integral transmembrane glycoprotein that was assembled into disulfide-linked dimers and rapidly underwent proteolytic cleavage to generate a soluble growth factor. Although the smaller CSF-1 precursor specified by the 1.6-kb human cDNA was stably expressed as a membrane-bound glycoprotein at the cell surface and was slowly cleaved to release the extracellular growth factor, the cell-associated product of the 4-kb clone was efficiently processed to the secreted form and was not detected on the plasma membrane. Digestion with glycosidic enzymes indicated that soluble CSF-1 encoded by the 4-kb cDNA contained both asparagine(N)-linked and O-linked carbohydrate chains, whereas the product of the 1.6-kb clone had only N-linked oligosaccharides. Removal of the carbohydrate indicated that the polypeptide chain of the secreted 4-kb cDNA product was longer than that of the corresponding form encoded by the smaller clone. These differences in posttranslational processing may reflect diverse physiological roles for the products of the two CSF-1 precursors in vivo. Images PMID:3264877

  6. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding.

    PubMed

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions involving the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we test whether interactions between these two stress hormone systems also affect human memory formation as well as the associated pattern of brain activation. To this end, forty-eight male human subjects received hydrocortisone, yohimbine or both before presentation of emotional and neutral pictures. Activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and PFC was monitored with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during encoding of these stimuli, when hormonal levels were elevated. Memory performance was tested 1 week later. We investigated whether an increased level of one of the two hormone systems would lead to differential effects compared to the combined application of the drugs on brain activation and memory performance. We report that the application of cortisol led to an overall enhancing effect on recognition memory, with no significant additional effect of yohimbine. However, during encoding the brain switched from amygdala/hippocampus activation with either hormone alone, to a strong deactivation of prefrontal areas under the influence of the combination of both exogenous hormones. Although we did not find evidence that exogenous stimulation of the noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems led to significant interaction effects on memory performance in this experiment, we conclude that stress hormone levels during encoding did differentially determine the activation pattern of the brain circuits here involved.

  7. “Hit-and-Run” Transformation by Adenovirus Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nevels, Michael; Täuber, Birgitt; Spruss, Thilo; Wolf, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    According to classical concepts of viral oncogenesis, the persistence of virus-specific oncogenes is required to maintain the transformed cellular phenotype. In contrast, the “hit-and-run” hypothesis claims that viruses can mediate cellular transformation through an initial “hit,” while maintenance of the transformed state is compatible with the loss (“run”) of viral molecules. It is well established that the adenovirus E1A and E1B gene products can cooperatively transform primary human and rodent cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and that these cells permanently express the viral oncogenes. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the adenovirus E4 region encodes two novel oncoproteins, the products of E4orf6 and E4orf3, which cooperate with the viral E1A proteins to transform primary rat cells in an E1B-like fashion. Unexpectedly, however, cells transformed by E1A and either E4orf6 or E4orf3 fail to express the viral E4 gene products, and only a subset contain E1A proteins. In fact, the majority of these cells lack E4- and E1A-specific DNA sequences, indicating that transformation occurred through a hit-and-run mechanism. We provide evidence that the unusual transforming activities of the adenoviral oncoproteins may be due to their mutagenic potential. Our results strongly support the possibility that even tumors that lack any detectable virus-specific molecules can be of viral origin, which could have a significant impact on the use of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:11238835

  8. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  9. Nucleotide sequence and the encoded amino acids of human apolipoprotein A-I mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Brewer, H B

    1984-01-01

    The cDNA clones encoding the precursor form of human liver apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), preproapoA-I, have been isolated from a cDNA library. A 17-base synthetic oligonucleotide based on residues 108-113 of apoA-I and a 26-base primer-extended, dideoxynucleotide-terminated cDNA were used as hybridization probes to select for recombinant plasmids bearing the apoA-I sequence. The complete nucleic acid sequence of human liver preproapoA-I has been determined by analysis of the cloned cDNA. The sequence is composed of 801 nucleotides encoding 267 amino acid residues. PreproapoA-I contains an 18-amino-acid prepeptide and a 6-amino-acid propeptide connected to the amino terminus of the 243-amino acid mature apoA-I. Southern blotting analysis of chromosomal DNA obtained from peripheral blood indicated the apoA-I gene is contained in a 2.1-kilobase-pair Pst I fragment and there is no gross difference in structural organization between the normal apoA-I gene and the Tangier disease apoA-I gene. Images PMID:6198645

  10. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; García Pérez, José Luis; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-08-05

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells.

  11. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  12. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-04-11

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined.

  13. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J.; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans. PMID:25071182

  14. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  15. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  16. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  17. Molecular mechanisms deployed by virally encoded G protein-coupled receptors in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Montaner, Silvia; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transduction. Surprisingly, open reading frames for multiple GPCRs were hijacked in the process of coevolution between Herpesviridae family viruses and their human and mammalian hosts. Virally encoded GPCRs (vGPCRs) evolved as parts of viral genomes, and this evolution allowed the power of host GPCR signaling circuitries to be harnessed in order to ensure viral replicative success. Phylogenetically, vGPCRs are distantly related to human chemokine receptors, although they feature several unique characteristics. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying vGPCR-mediated viral pathogenesis. These mechanisms include constitutive activity, aberrant coupling to human G proteins and β-arrestins, binding and activation by human chemokines, and dimerization with other GPCRs expressed in infected cells. The likely structural basis for these molecular events is described for the two closest viral homologs of human GPCRs. This information may aid in the development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies against viral diseases.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Cynomolgus Macaque Adenovirus (CynAdV-1) Isolate from a Primate Colony in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-11-03

    The genome sequence of a simian adenovirus from a cynomolgus macaque, denoted CynAdV-1, is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis supports CynAdV-1 in an independent clade, comprising a new simian adenovirus (SAdV) species. These genome data are critical for understanding the evolution and relationships of primate adenoviruses, including zoonosis and emergent human pathogens.

  19. Assessment of the risks for human health of adenoviruses, hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams in the Eastern Cape.

    PubMed

    Chigor, Vincent N; Sibanda, Timothy; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-06-01

    Buffalo River is an important water resource in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The potential risks of infection constituted by exposure to human enteric viruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams along its course were assessed using mean values and static quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The daily risks of infection determined by the exponential model [for human adenovirus (HAdV) and enterovirus (EnV)] and the beta-Poisson model (for hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotavirus (RoV)) varied with sites and exposure scenario. The estimated daily risks of infection values at the sites where the respective viruses were detected, ranged from 7.31 × 10(-3) to 1 (for HAdV), 4.23 × 10(-2) to 6.54 × 10(-1) (RoV), 2.32 × 10(-4) to 1.73 × 10(-1) (HAV) and 1.32 × 10(-4) to 5.70 × 10(-2) (EnV). The yearly risks of infection in individuals exposed to the river/dam water via drinking, recreational, domestic or irrigational activities were unacceptably high, exceeding the acceptable risk of 0.01% (10(-4) infection/person/year), and the guideline value used as by several nations for drinking water. The risks of illness and death from infection ranged from 6.58 × 10(-5) to 5.0 × 10(-1) and 6.58 × 10(-9) to 5.0 × 10(-5), respectively. The threats here are heightened by the high mortality rates for HAV, and its endemicity in South Africa. Therefore, we conclude that the Buffalo River and its source water dams are a public health hazard. The QMRA presented here is the first of its kinds in the Eastern Cape Province and provides the building block for a quantitatively oriented local guideline for water quality management in the Province.

  20. Encoding of nested levels of acoustic regularity in hierarchically organized areas of the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Recasens, Marc; Grimm, Sabine; Wollbrink, Andreas; Pantev, Christo; Escera, Carles

    2014-11-01

    Our auditory system is able to encode acoustic regularity of growing levels of complexity to model and predict incoming events. Recent evidence suggests that early indices of deviance detection in the time range of the middle-latency responses (MLR) precede the mismatch negativity (MMN), a well-established error response associated with deviance detection. While studies suggest that only the MMN, but not early deviance-related MLR, underlie complex regularity levels, it is not clear whether these two mechanisms interplay during scene analysis by encoding nested levels of acoustic regularity, and whether neuronal sources underlying local and global deviations are hierarchically organized. We registered magnetoencephalographic evoked fields to rapidly presented four-tone local sequences containing a frequency change. Temporally integrated local events, in turn, defined global regularities, which were infrequently violated by a tone repetition. A global magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) was obtained at 140-220 ms when breaking the global regularity, but no deviance-related effects were shown in early latencies. Conversely, Nbm (45-55 ms) and Pbm (60-75 ms) deflections of the MLR, and an earlier MMNm response at 120-160 ms, responded to local violations. Distinct neuronal generators in the auditory cortex underlay the processing of local and global regularity violations, suggesting that nested levels of complexity of auditory object representations are represented in separated cortical areas. Our results suggest that the different processing stages and anatomical areas involved in the encoding of auditory representations, and the subsequent detection of its violations, are hierarchically organized in the human auditory cortex.

  1. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Claire M.; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. PMID:27225773

  2. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  3. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  4. Sequential priming with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccines, with or without encoded cytokines, and a replicating adenovirus-SIV recombinant followed by protein boosting does not control a pathogenic SIVmac251 mucosal challenge.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Thorsten; Boyer, Jean D; Malkevich, Nina; Patterson, L Jean; Venzon, David; Summers, Ebonita L; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V S; Lee, Eun Mi; Weiner, David B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2008-11-01

    Previously, combination DNA/nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad)- or poxvirus-vectored vaccines have strongly protected against SHIV(89.6P), DNAs expressing cytokines have modulated immunity elicited by DNA vaccines, and replication-competent Ad-recombinant priming and protein boosting has strongly protected against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge. Here we evaluated a vaccine strategy composed of these promising components. Seven rhesus macaques per group were primed twice with multigenic SIV plasmid DNA with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA or IL-15 DNA. After a multigenic replicating Ad-SIV immunization, all groups received two booster immunizations with SIV gp140 and SIV Nef protein. Four control macaques received control DNA plasmids, empty Ad vector, and adjuvant. All vaccine components were immunogenic, but the cytokine DNAs had little effect. Macaques that received IL-15-DNA exhibited higher peak anti-Nef titers, a more rapid anti-Nef anamnestic response postchallenge, and expanded CD8(CM) T cells 2 weeks postchallenge compared to the DNA-only group. Other immune responses were indistinguishable between groups. Overall, no protection against intrarectal challenge with SIV(mac251) was observed, although immunized non-Mamu-A*01 macaques as a group exhibited a statistically significant 1-log decline in acute viremia compared to non-Mamu-A*01 controls. Possible factors contributing to the poor outcome include administration of cytokine DNAs to sites different from the Ad recombinants (intramuscular and intratracheal, respectively), too few DNA priming immunizations, a suboptimal DNA delivery method, failure to ensure delivery of SIV and cytokine plasmids to the same cell, and instability and short half-life of the IL-15 component. Future experiments should address these issues to determine if this combination approach is able to control a virulent SIV challenge.

  5. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13420.001 PMID:26880543

  6. Germline-encoded neutralization of a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor by the human antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Yik Andy; Foletti, Davide; Deng, Xiaodi; Abdiche, Yasmina; Strop, Pavel; Glanville, Jacob; Pitts, Steven; Lindquist, Kevin; Sundar, Purnima D.; Sirota, Marina; Hasa-Moreno, Adela; Pham, Amber; Melton Witt, Jody; Ni, Irene; Pons, Jaume; Shelton, David; Rajpal, Arvind; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both an important pathogen and a human commensal. To explore this ambivalent relationship between host and microbe, we analysed the memory humoral response against IsdB, a protein involved in iron acquisition, in four healthy donors. Here we show that in all donors a heavily biased use of two immunoglobulin heavy chain germlines generated high affinity (pM) antibodies that neutralize the two IsdB NEAT domains, IGHV4-39 for NEAT1 and IGHV1-69 for NEAT2. In contrast to the typical antibody/antigen interactions, the binding is primarily driven by the germline-encoded hydrophobic CDRH-2 motifs of IGHV1-69 and IGHV4-39, with a binding mechanism nearly identical for each antibody derived from different donors. Our results suggest that IGHV1-69 and IGHV4-39, while part of the adaptive immune system, may have evolved under selection pressure to encode a binding motif innately capable of recognizing and neutralizing a structurally conserved protein domain involved in pathogen iron acquisition. PMID:27857134

  7. Human anterior prefrontal cortex encodes the 'what' and 'when' of future intentions.

    PubMed

    Momennejad, Ida; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-05-15

    On a daily basis we form numerous intentions to perform specific actions. However, we often have to delay the execution of intended actions while engaging in other demanding activities. Previous research has shown that patterns of activity in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) can reveal our current intentions. However, two fundamental questions have remained unresolved: (a) how does the PFC encode information about future tasks while we are busy engaging in other activities, and (b) how does the PFC enable us to commence a stored task at the intended time? Here we investigate how the brain stores and retrieves future intentions during occupied delays, i.e. while a person is busy performing a different task. For this purpose, we conducted a neuroimaging study with a time-based prospective memory paradigm. Using multivariate pattern classification and fMRI we show that during an occupied delay, activity patterns in the anterior PFC encode the content of 'what' subjects intend to do next, and 'when' they intend to do it. Importantly, distinct anterior PFC regions store the 'what' and 'when' components of future intentions during occupied maintenance and self-initiated retrieval. These results show a role for anterior PFC activity patterns in storing future action plans and ensuring their timely retrieval.

  8. Inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma on adenovirus replication and late transcription.

    PubMed

    Mistchenko, A S; Diez, R A; Falcoff, R

    1989-06-15

    We have previously shown that human interferon-gamma inhibited adenovirus multiplication in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. This action was previous to capsid proteins synthesis and did not involve virus adsorption nor penetration. In this report we have analysed viral mRNA levels at early (7 hr post infection (p.i.)) or late (20 hr p.i.) times, as well as DNA replication in Wish cells pretreated with interferon-gamma and infected with adenovirus 5. Controls included untreated cells as well as cells treated with interferon-alpha, to which adenovirus are reported to be resistant. Transcription of adenovirus regions E1, E4, L1 and L2 has been analysed by Northern blot. Adenovirus DNA replication was determined by DNA-DNA hybridization with total adenovirus 2 DNA. We have also searched for adenovirus E1A proteins by immunoblot with a specific monoclonal antibody. Although pretreatment of cells with either interferon-alpha or interferon-gamma resulted in reduced amounts of E1 and E4 mRNA in the early phase of infection (7 hr p.i.), the near complete inhibition of viral DNA and late transcription was only achieved by interferon-gamma. Immunoblot has shown the absence of the 48-kD E1A protein in cells pretreated with interferon-gamma. The lack of this regulatory adenovirus protein may be involved in the inhibitory mechanism of interferon-gamma on adenovirus.

  9. Oncolytic virotherapy for osteosarcoma using midkine promoter-regulated adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Takagi-Kimura, M; Yamano, T; Tagawa, M; Kubo, S

    2014-03-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy using adenoviruses has potential therapeutic benefits for a variety of cancers. We recently developed MOA5, a tumor-specific midkine promoter-regulated oncolytic vector based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). We modified the binding tropism of MOA5 by replacing the cell-binding domain of the Ad5 fiber knob with that from another adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35); the resulting vector was designated MOA35. Here we evaluated the therapeutic efficacies of MOA5 and MOA35 for human osteosarcoma. Midkine mRNA expression and its promoter activity was significantly high in five human osteosarcoma cell lines, but was restricted in normal cells. Very low levels of adenovirus cellular receptor coxsackievirus/adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad5 receptor) expression were observed in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells, whereas high levels of CAR expression were seen in the other osteosarcoma cell lines. By contrast, CD46 (Ad35 receptor) was highly expressed in all osteosarcoma cell lines. Infectivity and in vitro cytocidal effect of MOA35 was significantly enhanced in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells compared with MOA5, although the cytocidal effects of MOA5 were sometimes higher in high CAR-expressing cell lines. In MG-63 xenograft models, MOA35 significantly enhanced antitumor effects compared with MOA5. Our findings indicate that MOA5 and MOA35 allow tailored virotherapy and facilitate more effective treatments for osteosarcoma.

  10. Evidence that the SRY protein is encoded by a single exon on the human Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Behlke, M.A. Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Bogan, J.S.; Beer-Romero, P.; Page, D.C. )

    1993-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the SRY gene, a 4741-bp portion of the sex-determining region of the human Y chromosome was sequenced and characterized. Two RNAs were found to hybridize to this genomic segment, one transcript deriving from SRY and the second cross-hybridizing to a pseudogene located 2.5 kb 5[prime] of the SRY open reading frame (ORF). Analysis of the SRY transcript using 3[prime] and 5[prime] rapid amplification and cloning of ends suggested that the entire SRY protein is encoded by a single exon. A 700-bp CpG island is located immediately 5[prime] of the pseudogene (and 2 kb 5[prime] of the SRY ORF). Within this CpG island lies the sequence CGCCCCCGC, a potential binding site for the EGR-1/WT1 family of transcription factors, some of which appear to function in gonadal development. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Evidence for joint encoding of motion and disparity in human visual perception.

    PubMed

    Neri, Peter; Levi, Dennis M

    2008-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings have established that motion and disparity signals are jointly encoded by subpopulations of neurons in visual cortex. However, the question of whether these neurons play a perceptual role has proven challenging and remains open. To answer this question we combined two powerful psychophysical techniques: perceptual adaptation and reverse correlation. Our results provide a detailed picture of how visual information about motion and disparity is processed by human observers, and how this processing is modified by prolonged sensory stimulation. We were able to isolate two perceptual components: a separable component, supported by separate motion and disparity signals, and an inseparable joint component, supported by motion and disparity signals that are concurrently represented at the level of the same neural mechanism. Both components are involved in the perception of stimuli containing motion and disparity information in line with the known existence of corresponding neuronal subpopulations in visual cortex.

  12. Inflammation scores predict the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated with transarterial chemoembolization and recombinant human type-5 adenovirus H101

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response plays an important role in cancer development and progression. An original inflammation-based staging system for predicting survival in patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with recombinant human type-5 adenovirus H101 is not available. This study aimed to validate the prognostic value of inflammation scores for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were treated with TACE combined with H101. Methods The data from 216 patients with HCC who underwent TACE combined with H101 from January 2007 to July 2015 were retrospectively collected, and the association of the inflammation scores with overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify variables associated with OS. The prognostic value of the inflammation scores, including the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), neutrophil/ platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR-PLR), modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), prognostic nutritional index (PNI), prognostic index (PI), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM), Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) and Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) staging systems were analyzed and compared using the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs). Results The estimated 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 61.3%, 44.2%, and 40.5% for the entire study cohort, respectively; the median OS was 17 months. According to the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, the pretreatment NLR, tumor diameter and pretreatment alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels were independent predictors of OS. The CLIP score had superior discriminative abilities compared with other staging systems, and the NLR-PLR score consistently displayed a higher AUROC value than the other inflammation-based prognostic scores. The combination of the NLR-PLR and CLIP scores exhibited a superior prognostic ability for OS compared to the NLR-PLR or

  13. Induction of murine tumors in adult mice by a combination of either avian sarcoma virus or human adenovirus and syngeneic mouse embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Nitta, K

    1983-01-01

    Primary murine Rous sarcoma was produced in adult mice of seven strains, C57BL/6, DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H/He, CBAJ, AKR, and DDD, by s.c. inoculation of a mixture of 5 X 10(6) chicken tumor cells containing Schmidt-Ruppin Rous sarcoma virus and 9- to 12-day-old mouse embryo cells (MEC) (2 X 10(6) ) of the syngeneic strain. The sarcoma developed at the site of injection in almost all mice tested, but there were some differences in the latent period and the survival time among mouse strains. When the number of cells inoculated was reduced to 5 X 10(4) for chicken tumor cells induced by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus (SR-CTC) and 2 X 10(4) for MEC, no tumor was produced in C3H/He mice. These tumors had strain specificity and the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus genome in masked form. The tumor at the site of injection originated in the embryo cells injected along with SR-CTC. This was confirmed by CBAT6/T6 marker chromosome analysis of the tumor cells of CBA mice induced with SR-CTC plus CBAT6/T6 MEC and also confirmed by transplantation of a C57BL/6 X C3H/He F1 tumor which had been induced with SR-CTC plus C3H/He or C57BL/6 MEC. Tumor induction in adult mouse by a mixture of virus and syngeneic 9- to 14-day-old embryo cells was tested for human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) and simian virus 40. Primary Ad12 tumor was also induced in adult CBA, C3H/He, and DDD mice by 4 X 10(5 to 6) 50% tissue culture infective dose of Ad12 with 5 X 10(6) syngeneic embryo cells. This tumor contained Ad12 T-antigen-positive particles in cells. But in the case of simian virus 40, the tumor did not appear for about 300 days of observation.

  14. Decoding the disease-associated proteins encoded in the human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lien-Chin; Liu, Mei-Ying; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Liao, Pao-Chi; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Yu, Jau-Song; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-01-04

    Chromosome 4 is the fourth largest chromosome, containing approximately 191 megabases (~6.4% of the human genome) with 757 protein-coding genes. A number of marker genes for many diseases have been found in this chromosome, including genetic diseases (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma) and biomedical research (cardiac system, aging, metabolic disorders, immune system, cancer and stem cell) related genes (e.g., oncogenes, growth factors). As a pilot study for the chromosome 4-centric human proteome project (Chr 4-HPP), we present here a systematic analysis of the disease association, protein isoforms, coding single nucleotide polymorphisms of these 757 protein-coding genes and their experimental evidence at the protein level. We also describe how the findings from the chromosome 4 project might be used to drive the biomarker discovery and validation study in disease-oriented projects, using the examples of secretomic and membrane proteomic approaches in cancer research. By integrating with cancer cell secretomes and several other existing databases in the public domain, we identified 141 chromosome 4-encoded proteins as cancer cell-secretable/shedable proteins. Additionally, we also identified 54 chromosome 4-encoded proteins that have been classified as cancer-associated proteins with successful selected or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) assays developed. From literature annotation and topology analysis, 271 proteins were recognized as membrane proteins while 27.9% of the 757 proteins do not have any experimental evidence at the protein-level. In summary, the analysis revealed that the chromosome 4 is a rich resource for cancer-associated proteins for biomarker verification projects and for drug target discovery projects.

  15. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramunas, John; Yakubov, Eduard; Brady, Jennifer J.; Corbel, Stéphane Y.; Holbrook, Colin; Brandt, Moritz; Stein, Jonathan; Santiago, Juan G.; Cooke, John P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere extension has been proposed as a means to improve cell culture and tissue engineering and to treat disease. However, telomere extension by nonviral, nonintegrating methods remains inefficient. Here we report that delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT to human fibroblasts and myoblasts increases telomerase activity transiently (24–48 h) and rapidly extends telomeres, after which telomeres resume shortening. Three successive transfections over a 4 d period extended telomeres up to 0.9 kb in a cell type-specific manner in fibroblasts and myoblasts and conferred an additional 28 ± 1.5 and 3.4 ± 0.4 population doublings (PDs), respectively. Proliferative capacity increased in a dose-dependent manner. The second and third transfections had less effect on proliferative capacity than the first, revealing a refractory period. However, the refractory period was transient as a later fourth transfection increased fibroblast proliferative capacity by an additional 15.2 ± 1.1 PDs, similar to the first transfection. Overall, these treatments led to an increase in absolute cell number of more than 1012-fold. Notably, unlike immortalized cells, all treated cell populations eventually stopped increasing in number and expressed senescence markers to the same extent as untreated cells. This rapid method of extending telomeres and increasing cell proliferative capacity without risk of insertional mutagenesis should have broad utility in disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.—Ramunas, J., Yakubov, E., Brady, J. J., Corbel, S. Y., Holbrook, C., Brandt, M., Stein, J., Santiago, J. G., Cooke, J. P., Blau, H. M. Transient delivery of modified mRNA encoding TERT rapidly extends telomeres in human cells. PMID:25614443

  16. Gene therapy for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Su-Ping; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Bin; Han, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-10-01

    Incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains high in endemic regions. Prevention of tumor recurrences and metastases is a crucial approach to improve therapeutic outcome in NPC patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cotransfer of the tumor suppressor gene, p53, in combination with the immunostimulatory genes, GM-CSF and B7-1, on tumor regression and subsequent tumor recurrence. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying human wild-type p53, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and B7-1 genes (Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1), which mediated high-level expression of these three genes in NPC CNE-1 cells. Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 infection inhibited the growth of CNE-1 cells and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro. In CNE-1 xenograft tumor models in huPBL-nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, an intratumoral injection of Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 resulted in a reduced tumor burden, compared to normal saline (NS) and Ad-p53 controls. Tumors in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group displayed diffuse necrosis and infiltration of human T-cells. Further, the tumor occurrence of CNE-1 cell rechallenge largely decreased after the primary tumor was intratumorally injected with Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 in the HuPBL-NOD/SCID mice model. Only 2 of 8 (25%) animals in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group had developed measurable tumors, which demonstrated extensive necrosis and much more human T-cell infiltration, compared to 5 of 7 (71%) in the NS and Ad-p53 groups. Therefore, the adenovirus-mediated introduction of p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes could improve local control and prevent the recurrence or metastases of NPC tumors, which suggests a potential therapeutic value in NPC treatment.

  17. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Briana Jill; Bhatia, Shilpa; Adams, Lisa K; Boling, Susan; Carroll, Jennifer L; Li, Xiao-Lin; Rogers, Donna L; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre; Pereboev, Alexander V; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs) with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells). To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ). Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to adenovirus in serum. Additionally... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus...

  20. Safety of adenovirus-mediated transfer of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator cDNA to the lungs of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, R W; Amin, R S; Perez, C R; Wert, S E; Keller, G; Boivin, G P; Hirsch, R; De Inocencio, J; Lu, P; Reising, S F; Yei, S; Whitsett, J A; Trapnell, B C

    1996-02-10

    To define the toxicity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) gene therapy with a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (Av1Cf2) in a nonhuman primate model, 10(10) plaque forming units (pfu) were instilled directly through a bronchoscope into the right lung of 5 macaques, and a lower dose of 4 x 10(6) pfu was administered to the right lung of 1 macaque. One sham-treated control received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The macaques were evaluated sequentially by clinical examination, vital signs, weight, hematology, blood chemistry, chest radiography, pulse oximetry, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at baseline and 3-28 days post-treatment. After the period of observation, macaques were sacrificed for autopsy and histological examination. The macaques tolerated the experimental therapy clinically with no changes in body temperature, oxygen saturation, heart rate, body weight, or blood pressure. However, 1 macaque with visible evidence of aspiration at the time of initial bronchoscopy developed tachypnea with right lower lobe (RLL) pneumonia on chest radiograph and by histology. There were no changes in Hgb, Wbc, BUN, plasma electrolytes, bilirubin, or hepatic transaminases. In the macaques that received 10(10) pfu, there was a progressive increase in the number of CD8+ lymphocytes in BAL that was maximal at 28 days. Histological examination of the treated lungs of the high-dose macaques at 3 days showed marked peribronchial and perivascular cuffing by inflammatory cells and alveolar accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. The alveolitis appeared to be resolving at 28 days, although the perivascular and peribronchial aggregates of mononuclear cells were still present. In the high-dose macaques, BAL interleukin-8 (IL-8) was increased at all time points (256-388 pg/ml versus 1-84 pg/ml at baseline and in control), whereas IL-1 beta was increased only at days 21 and 28 (341-852 pg/ml versus 30-92 pg/ml at baseline and in control

  1. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  2. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy.

  3. Perforin and Gamma Interferon Expression Are Required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Protective Immunity against a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, Elicited by Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Haolla, Filipe A.; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8+ T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-γ or IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-γ in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-γ-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-γ in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  4. Human cytomegalovirus UL49 encodes an early, virion-associated protein essential for virus growth in human foreskin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Yuan, Jian; Li, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Zhi-Feng; Luo, Zhi-Wen; Li, Shi-Qian; He, Chi-Qiang; Jia, Xue-Fang; Zhang, Xin; Zuo, Hui; Liu, Yi-Min; Chang, Martin; Li, Yue-Qin; Zhou, Tian-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Despite recent results of deletion experiments showing that open reading frame (ORF) UL49 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is essential, the expression, function and functional location of its encoded protein remain unknown. We generated an antibody specific for pUL49 to investigate the protein product encoded by the UL49 ORF and identified its function in HCMV-infected host foreskin fibroblasts. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) of HCMV strain Towne (pRV-Towne) and the UL49-deleted mutant pRV-delUL49Towne were used to observe virus growth by plaque assay. Using a UL49-protein-binding antibody, we located pUL49 in the fibroblast cytoplasm. pUL49 exhibited expression kinetics resembling those of the class β-2 proteins and was detected in the virion tegument. Following deletion of UL49 ORF, the virus failed to replicate, but it could be recovered by addition of pUL49 from pCDNA3.1 (+)-UL49. Our findings indicate that UL49 ORF is essential for HCMV replication in host foreskin fibroblasts.

  5. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  6. Novel human growth hormone like protein HGH-V encoded in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Seeburg, P.H.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes the human growth hormone protein, HGH-V, having the amino acid sequence: phe pro thr ile pro leu ser arg leu phe asp asn ala met leu arg ala arg arg leu tyr gln leu ala tyr asp thr tyr gln glu phe glu glu ala tyr ile leu lys glu gln lys tyr ser phe leu gln asn pro gln thr ser leu cys phe ser glu ser ile pro thr pro ser asn arg val lys thr gln gln lys ser asn leu glu leu leu arg ile ser leu leu leu ile gln ser trp leu glu pro val gln leu leu arg ser val phe ala asn ser leu val tyr gly ala ser asp ser asn val tyr arg his leu lys asp leu glu glu gly ile gln thr leu met trp arg leu glu asp gly ser pro arg thr gly gln ile phe asn-glycosylation site gln ser tyr ser lys phe asp thr lys ser his asn asp asp ala leu leu lys asn tyr gly leu leu tyr cys Phe arg lys asp met asp lys val glu thr phe leu arg ile val gln cys arg ser val glu gly ser cys gly phe.

  7. Adenovirus E4orf4 protein-induced death of p53-/- H1299 human cancer cells follows a G1 arrest of both tetraploid and diploid cells due to a failure to initiate DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Lauriane; Sriskandarajah, Neera; Mui, Melissa Z; Teodoro, Jose G; Blanchette, Paola; Branton, Philip E

    2013-12-01

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein selectively kills human cancer cells independently of p53 and thus represents a potentially promising tool for the development of novel antitumor therapies. Previous studies suggested that E4orf4 induces an arrest or a delay in mitosis and that both this effect and subsequent cell death rely largely on an interaction with the B55 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In the present report, we show that the death of human H1299 lung carcinoma cells induced by expression of E4orf4 is typified not by an accumulation of cells arrested in mitosis but rather by the presence of both tetraploid and diploid cells that are arrested in G1 because they are unable to initiate DNA synthesis. We believe that these E4orf4-expressing cells eventually die by various processes, including those resulting from mitotic catastrophe.

  8. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  9. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  10. Muscle spindles in human tibialis anterior encode muscle fascicle length changes.

    PubMed

    Day, James; Bent, Leah R; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide exquisitely sensitive proprioceptive information regarding joint position and movement. Through passively driven length changes in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), muscle spindles detect joint rotations because of their in-parallel mechanical linkage to muscle fascicles. In human microneurography studies, muscle fascicles are assumed to follow the MTU and, as such, fascicle length is not measured in such studies. However, under certain mechanical conditions, compliant structures can act to decouple the fascicles, and, therefore, the spindles, from the MTU. Such decoupling may reduce the fidelity by which muscle spindles encode joint position and movement. The aim of the present study was to measure, for the first time, both the changes in firing of single muscle spindle afferents and changes in muscle fascicle length in vivo from the tibialis anterior muscle (TA) during passive rotations about the ankle. Unitary recordings were made from 15 muscle spindle afferents supplying TA via a microelectrode inserted into the common peroneal nerve. Ultrasonography was used to measure the length of an individual fascicle of TA. We saw a strong correlation between fascicle length and firing rate during passive ankle rotations of varying rates (0.1-0.5 Hz) and amplitudes (1-9°). In particular, we saw responses observed at relatively small changes in muscle length that highlight the sensitivity of the TA muscle to small length changes. This study is the first to measure spindle firing and fascicle dynamics in vivo and provides an experimental basis for further understanding the link between fascicle length, MTU length, and spindle firing patterns.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle spindles are exquisitely sensitive to changes in muscle length, but recordings from human muscle spindle afferents are usually correlated with joint angle rather than muscle fascicle length. In this study, we monitored both muscle fascicle length and spindle firing from the human tibialis

  11. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:23127366

  12. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. Molecular cloning of MER-2, a human chromosome-11-encoded red blood cell antigen, using linkage of cotransfected markers.

    PubMed

    Bill, J; Palmer, E; Jones, C

    1987-09-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a human gene MER-2 located on chromosome 11 that encodes a cell surface antigen which is polymorphic on red blood cells. An essential element of the cloning strategy was cotransfection-induced linkage of pSV2-neo, which encodes resistance to the antibiotic G418, to the human MER-2 gene. An important feature of the pSV2-neo construct is that the same gene (the transposon, Tn5) that encodes G418 resistance in eukaryotic cells confers neomycin resistance in bacteria. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cotransfected with pSV2-neo and genomic DNA from a CHO X human cell hybrid containing a single human chromosome (chromosome 11). Transfectants expressing both the human MER-2 gene and G418 resistance were isolated by selection in the antibiotic G418, followed by indirect immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibody 1D12, which recognizes the MER-2 antigen, manual enrichment, and single-cell cloning. Genomic DNA from a primary transfectant positive for MER-2 expression and G418 resistance was used to construct a cosmid library and cosmid clones able to grow in neomycin were isolated. Of 150,000 cosmid clones screened, 90 were resistant to neomycin and of these, 11 contained human repetitive sequences. Five neomycin-resistant cosmid clones containing human repetitive DNA were able to transfect CHO cells for G418 resistance and MER-2 expression.

  14. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  15. Elasticity and Binding of Adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Negishi, Atsuko; Seeger, Adam; McCarty, Doug; Taylor, Russell; Samulshi, Jude; Superfine, Richard

    1999-11-01

    Adenovirus was the first human virus found to cause the transformation of cells and is one of the more common vectors being used for the development of gene therapy. As such, much is known about the viral structure and genome; however, the events of the early infection cycle, such as binding of the virus to the cell membrane and the release of genetic material from the capsid, for this and other nonenveloped viruses, are not fully understood. With the atomic force microscope (AFM) we are able to image the virus in both air and liquids, allowing us to change the surrounding environment, varying such physiologically relevant parameters as osmolality or pH. We additionally have the ability to do manipulations on single virus particles in these environments using the nanoManipulator. The nanoManipulator is an advanced interface for AFM that allows real time three dimensional rendering of the topographical data, allows the sample surface to be non-destructively felt using a hand held stylus that responds to the information being sensed at the tip, and allows controlled modification of the surface. Using this tool we have translated single virions over various surfaces, allowing us to measure the adhesion between the capsid and these surfaces. Additionally, we are able to place the tip directly atop individual viruses and measure their elasticity under a compressive load being supplied by that tip. We can explore how this property changes as a function of the properties of the surrounding liquid.

  16. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-01-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus. PMID:8627709

  17. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  18. Genetic analysis of the variable region genes encoding a monospecific human natural anti-DNA antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, M D; Misener, V; Olee, T; Chen, P P; Siminovitch, K A

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that natural autoantibodies may play an integral role in the development of the normal immune repertoire. To explore the genetic origins of these antibodies, we have isolated and sequenced the variable (V) region genes encoding both the heavy (H) and light (L) chains of a natural anti-DNA antibody, Kim11.4. The genes appear to be derived from the VH4.18 (subgroup VHIV), JH5, Hum1L1 (subgroup V lambda I) and J lambda 3 germline genes. The origin of the H chain diversity gene is more obscure, being potentially derived from one or more of several germline genes, arranged in either the forward or reverse orientations. Both the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes share significant degrees of similarity with those utilized in other autoantibodies, indicating that at least some degree of V restriction may exist in human autoreactive B cells. The pattern of nucleotide differences between the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes and their putative germline counterparts suggests that the Kim11.4 genes may have undergone somatic mutation and arisen as a result of antigen selection. PMID:8324896

  19. US28, a Virally-Encoded GPCR as an Antiviral Target for Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungjin; Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Choongho

    2017-01-01

    Viruses continue to evolve a new strategy to take advantage of every aspect of host cells in order to maximize their survival. Due to their central roles in transducing a variety of transmembrane signals, GPCRs seem to be a prime target for viruses to pirate for their own use. Incorporation of GPCR functionality into the genome of herpesviruses has been demonstrated to be essential for pathogenesis of many herpesviruses-induced diseases. Here, we introduce US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as the best-studied example of virally-encoded GPCRs to manipulate host GPCR signaling. In this review, we wish to summarize a number of US28-related topics including its regulation of host signaling pathways, its constitutive internalization, its structural and functional analysis, its roles in HCMV biology and pathogenesis, its proliferative activities and role in oncogenesis, and pharmacological modulation of its biological activities. This review will aid in our understanding of how pathogenic viruses usurp the host GPCR signaling for successful viral infection. This kind of knowledge will enable us to build a better strategy to control viral infection by normalizing the virally-dysregulated host GPCR signaling. PMID:28035083

  20. Aspartylglucosaminuria: cDNA encoding human aspartylglucosaminidase and the missense mutation causing the disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, E; Baumann, M; Grön, K; Syvänen, A C; Enomaa, N; Halila, R; Aula, P; Peltonen, L

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a 2.1 kb cDNA which encodes human aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA, E.C. 3.5.1.26). The activity of this lysosomal enzyme is deficient in aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU), a recessively inherited lysosomal accumulation disease resulting in severe mental retardation. The polypeptide chain deduced from the AGA cDNA consists of 346 amino acids, has two potential N-glycosylation sites and 11 cysteine residues. Transient expression of this cDNA in COS-1 cells resulted in increased expression of immunoprecipitable AGA protein. Direct sequencing of amplified AGA cDNA from an AGU patient revealed a G----C transition resulting in the substitution of cysteine 163 with serine. This mutation was subsequently found in all the 20 analyzed Finnish AGU patients, in the heterozygous form in all 53 carriers and in none of 67 control individuals, suggesting that it represents the major AGU causing mutation enriched in this isolated population. Since the mutation produces a change in the predicted flexibility of the AGA polypeptide chain and removes an intramolecular S-S bridge, it most probably explains the deficient enzyme activity found in cells and tissues of AGU patients. Images PMID:1703489

  1. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  2. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-01-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  3. Direction of Movement Is Encoded in the Human Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1. PMID:22110768

  4. Inhibition of telomerase RNA (hTR) in cervical cancer by adenovirus-delivered siRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, H; Yao, G; Li, W; Wang, F; Jiang, Z; Li, M

    2007-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become a powerful tool for selectively silencing gene expression in cultured mammalian cells. In this study, a 67-bp oligonucleotide encoding human telomerase RNA (hTR) was introduced into pSIREN, a shuttle vector for construction of recombinant adenovirus. Then the U6-RNA promoter and siRNA-encoding insert were cut out from the pSIREN and subcloned into pAdeno-X to construct the plasmid pAd-hTR. After the pAd-hTR was transfected into a mammalian cell line HEK-293, adenovirus carrying the hTR-targeting siRNA (Ad-hTR-siRNA) was obtained. We performed a series of experiments to demonstrate silencing of the telomerase mediated by Ad-hTR-siRNA in HeLa cells. Compared with control virus (Ad-NT-siRNA), Ad-hTR-siRNA significantly reduced both hTR mRNA level (by 70.21%) and telomerase activity (by 58.87%) in HeLa cells. Moreover, it induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Treatment of subcutaneous tumor xenografted with Ad-hTR-siRNA could slow down tumor growth, at least partially due to the induction of apoptosis (P<0.05) in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated efficient and specific knockdown of telomerase in HeLa cell line by the hTR siRNA, and indicated the prospect of applying this siRNA expressing recombinant adenovirus system in cancer gene therapy.

  5. Hypercholesterolemia in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice and its reversal by adenovirus-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Gerard, R D; Hammer, R E; Herz, J

    1993-01-01

    We employed homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to produce mice lacking functional LDL receptor genes. Homozygous male and female mice lacking LDL receptors (LDLR-/- mice) were viable and fertile. Total plasma cholesterol levels were twofold higher than those of wild-type litter-mates, owing to a seven- to ninefold increase in intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) and LDL without a significant change in HDL. Plasma triglyceride levels were normal. The half-lives for intravenously administered 125I-VLDL and 125I-LDL were prolonged by 30-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively, but the clearance of 125I-HDL was normal in the LDLR-/- mice. Unlike wild-type mice, LDLR-/- mice responded to moderate amounts of dietary cholesterol (0.2% cholesterol/10% coconut oil) with a major increase in the cholesterol content of IDL and LDL particles. The elevated IDL/LDL level of LDLR-/- mice was reduced to normal 4 d after the intravenous injection of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus encoding the human LDL receptor driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The virus restored expression of LDL receptor protein in the liver and increased the clearance of 125I-VLDL. We conclude that the LDL receptor is responsible in part for the low levels of VLDL, IDL, and LDL in wild-type mice and that adenovirus-encoded LDL receptors can acutely reverse the hypercholesterolemic effects of LDL receptor deficiency. Images PMID:8349823

  6. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  10. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  11. Encoding/retrieval dissociation in working memory for human body forms.

    PubMed

    Bauser, Denise A Soria; Mayer, Kerstin; Daum, Irene; Suchan, Boris

    2011-06-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of working memory (WM) load on body processing mechanisms by using event-related potentials (ERPs). It is well known that WM load modulates the P3b (amplitude decreases as WM load increases). Additionally, WM load for faces modulates earlier ERPs like the N170. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of WM load for bodies on the P3b which is associated with WM. Additionally, we explored the effect of WM load on the N170, which is thought to be associated with configural processing, and P1, which has been observed in body as well as in face processing. Effects were analyzed during the encoding and retrieval phases. WM load was modulated by presenting one to four unfamiliar bodies simultaneously for memory encoding. The present study showed that early encoding processes (reflected by the P1 and N170) might not be modulated by WM load, whereas during the retrieval phase, early processes associated with structural encoding (N170) were affected by WM load. A possible explanation of the encoding/retrieval differences might be that subjects used distinct processing strategies in both phases. Parallel encoding of the simultaneously presented bodies might play an important role during the encoding phase where one to four bodies have to be stored, whereas serial matching might be used to compare the probe with the stored pictures during the retrieval phase. Additionally, WM load modulations were observed in later processing steps, which might be associated with stimulus identification and matching processes (reflected by the early P3b) during the encoding but not during the retrieval phase. The current findings further showed for both the encoding and the retrieval phase that the late P3b amplitude decreased as WM load for body images increased indicating that the late P3b is involved in WM processes which do not appear to be category-specific.

  12. Mechanisms of pathogenesis of emerging adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cook, James; Radke, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of human adenovirus infections can cause severe illness in people with no known predisposing conditions. The reasons for this increased viral pathogenicity are uncertain. Adenoviruses are constantly undergoing mutation during circulation in the human population, but related phenotypic changes of the viruses are rarely detected because of the infrequency of such outbreaks and the limited biological studies of the emergent strains. Mutations and genetic recombinations have been identified in these new strains. However, the linkage between these genetic changes and increased pathogenicity is poorly understood. It has been observed recently that differences in virus-induced immunopathogenesis can be associated with altered expression of non-mutant viral genes associated with changes in viral modulation of the host innate immune response. Initial small animal studies indicate that these changes in viral gene expression can be associated with enhanced immunopathogenesis in vivo. Available evidence suggests the hypothesis that there is a critical threshold of expression of certain viral genes that determines both the sustainability of viral transmission in the human population and the enhancement of immunopathogenesis. Studies of this possibility will require extension of the analysis of outbreak viral strains from a sequencing-based focus to biological studies of relationships between viral gene expression and pathogenic responses. Advances in this area will require increased coordination among public health organizations, diagnostic microbiology laboratories, and research laboratories to identify, catalog, and systematically study differences between prototype and emergent viral strains that explain the increased pathogenicity that can occur during clinical outbreaks. PMID:28184296

  13. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  14. A Single Maturation Cleavage Site in Adenovirus Impacts Cell Entry and Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Crystal L.; Besser, Eli S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteolytic maturation drives the conversion of stable, immature virus particles to a mature, metastable state primed for cell infection. In the case of human adenovirus, this proteolytic cleavage is mediated by the virally encoded protease AVP. Protein VI, an internal capsid cement protein and substrate for AVP, is cleaved at two sites, one of which is near the N terminus of the protein. In mature capsids, the 33 residues at the N terminus of protein VI (pVIn) are sequestered inside the cavity formed by peripentonal hexon trimers at the 5-fold vertex. Here, we describe a glycine-to-alanine mutation in the N-terminal cleavage site of protein VI that profoundly impacts proteolytic processing, the generation of infectious particles, and cell entry. The phenotypic effects associated with this mutant provide a mechanistic framework for understanding the multifunctional nature of protein VI. Based on our findings, we propose that the primary function of the pVIn peptide is to mediate interactions between protein VI and hexon during virus replication, driving hexon nuclear accumulation and particle assembly. Once particles are assembled, AVP-mediated cleavage facilitates the release of the membrane lytic region at the amino terminus of mature VI, allowing it to lyse the endosome during cell infection. These findings highlight the importance of a single maturation cleavage site for both infectious particle production and cell entry and emphasize the exquisite spatiotemporal regulation governing adenovirus assembly and disassembly. IMPORTANCE Postassembly virus maturation is a cornerstone principle in virology. However, a mechanistic understanding of how icosahedral viruses utilize this process to transform immature capsids into infection-competent particles is largely lacking. Adenovirus maturation involves proteolytic processing of seven precursor proteins. There is currently no information for the role of each independent cleavage event in the generation of

  15. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1–4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes. PMID:27902738

  16. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding.

    PubMed

    Gurariy, Gennadiy; Killebrew, Kyle W; Berryhill, Marian E; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1-4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes.

  17. Tenascin-X: a novel extracellular matrix protein encoded by the human XB gene overlapping P450c21B

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A human gene termed XB overlaps the P450c21B gene encoding steroid 21- hydroxylase and encodes a protein that closely resembles extracellular matrix proteins. Sequencing of phage and cosmid clones and of cDNA fragments shows that the XB gene spans 65 kb of DNA, consisting of 39 exons that encode a 12-kb mRNA. The predicted protein of over 400 kD consists of five distinct domains: a signal peptide, a hydrophobic domain containing three heptad repeats, a series of 18.5 EGF-like repeats, 29 fibronectin type III repeats, and a carboxy-terminal fibrinogen-like domain. Because the structure of the protein encoded by the XB gene closely resembles tenascin, we term this protein tenascin-X (TN-X), and propose a simplified nomenclature system for the family of tenascins. RNase protection experiments show that the TN-X transcript is expressed ubiquitously in human fetal tissues, with the greatest expression in the fetal testis and in fetal skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. Two adrenal-specific transcripts, P450c21B (steroid 21- hydroxylase) and Y (an untranslated transcript) overlap the XB gene on the complementary strand of DNA, yielding a unique array of overlapping transcripts: a "polygene." In situ hybridization histochemistry experiments show that the TN-X transcript and the P450c21 and Y transcripts encoded on the complementary DNA strand are all expressed in the same cells of the human adrenal cortex. Genetic data suggest that TN-X may be essential for life. PMID:7686164

  18. Interaction of human TNF and beta2-microglobulin with Tanapox virus-encoded TNF inhibitor, TPV-2L.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Jeng, David; Singh, Rajkumari; Coughlin, Jake; Essani, Karim; McFadden, Grant

    2009-04-10

    Tanapox virus (TPV) encodes and expresses a secreted TNF-binding protein, TPV-2L or gp38, that displays inhibitory properties against TNF from diverse mammalian species, including human, monkey, canine and rabbit. TPV-2L also has sequence similarity with the MHC-class I heavy chain and interacts differently with human TNF as compared to the known cellular TNF receptors or any of the known virus-encoded TNF receptor homologs derived from many poxviruses. In order to determine the TNF binding region in TPV-2L, various TPV-2L C-terminal truncations and internal deletions were created and the muteins were expressed using recombinant baculovirus vectors. C-terminal deletions from TPV-2L resulted in reduced binding affinity for human TNF and specific mutants of TNF that discriminate between TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. However, deletion of C-terminal 42 amino acid residues totally abolished the binding of human TNF and its mutants. Removal of any of the predicted internal domains resulted in a mutant TPV-2L protein incapable of binding to human TNF. Deletion of C-terminal residues also affected the ability of TPV-2L to block TNF-induced cellular cytotoxicity. In addition to TNF, TPV-2L can also form complexes with human beta2-microglobulin to form a novel macromolecular complex. In summary, the TPV-2L protein is a bona fide MHC-1 heavy chain family member that binds and inhibits human TNF in a fashion very distinct from other known poxvirus-encoded TNF inhibitors, and also can form a novel complex with the human MHC-1 light chain, beta2-microglobulin.

  19. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5.

    PubMed

    Gedge, L J E; Morrison, E E; Blair, G E; Walker, J H

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  20. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Coates, Emily E; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2017-03-09

    Background The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species, that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 8 weeks after vaccination; in addition, longer-term vaccine durability was assessed at 48 weeks after vaccination. Results In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen at week 4, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07) at week 4. Assessment of the durability of the antibody response showed that titers remained high at week 48, with the highest titers in those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Conclusions Reactogenicity and immune responses

  1. Aquaporin-1 Expression and Conventional Aqueous Outflow in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, W. Daniel; Chan, Darren W.H.; Conley, Shannon M.; Coons, Serena; Ethier, C. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin channels facilitate the enhanced permeability of secretory and absorptive tissues to water. In the conventional drainage tract, aquaporin-1 is expressed but its contribution to outflow facility is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of elevated aquaporin-1 expression by cells of the human conventional drainage pathway on outflow facility. Using thirteen pairs of human anterior segments in organ culture, we modified aquaporin-1 protein expression in outflow cells using adenovirus encoding human aquaporin-1. Contralateral anterior segments served as controls and were transduced with adenovirus encoding beta galactosidase. By confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that inner trabecular meshwork cells from anterior segments exposed to adenovirus (via injection into the inlet tubing during perfusion) had increased aquaporin-1 protein expression compared to endogenous levels. In contrast, elevation of aquaporin-1 protein in outer meshwork cells (juxtacanalicular region) and Schlemm’s canal required transduction of adenovirus into anterior segments using retroperfusion via episcleral veins. Regardless of exposure route, outflow facility of experimental segments was not different than control. Specifically, overexpression of aquaporin-1 in the inner meshwork resulted in an average facility change of −2.0 ± 9.2 %, while overexpression of aquaporin-1 in the resistance-generating region changed outflow facility by −3.2 ± 11.2 %. Taken together, these results indicate that a transcellular pathway, mediated by aquaporin-1, does not contribute significantly to bulk outflow through the conventional aqueous outflow tract of human eyes. PMID:18657536

  2. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  3. Adenovirus MART-1-engineered autologous dendritic cell vaccine for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Vujanovic, Lazar; Lee, Yohan; Dissette, Vivian B; Yang, Jin-Quan; Vu, Hong T; Seja, Elizabeth; Oseguera, Denise K; Potter, Douglas M; Glaspy, John A; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni

    2008-04-01

    We performed a phase 1/2 trial testing the safety, toxicity, and immune response of a vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a replication-defective adenovirus (AdV) encoding the full-length melanoma antigen MART-1/Melan-A (MART-1). This vaccine was designed to activate MART-1-specific CD+8 and CD4+ T cells. Metastatic melanoma patients received 3 injections of 10(6) or 10(7) DCs, delivered intradermally. Cell surface phenotype and cytokine production of the DCs used for the vaccines were tested, and indicated intermediate maturity. CD8+ T-cell responses to MART-1 27-35 were assessed by both major histocompatibility complex class I tetramer and interferon (IFN)-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) before, during, and after each vaccine and CD4+ T-cell responses to MART-1 51-73 were followed by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. We also measured antigen response breadth. Determinant spreading from the immunizing antigen MART-1 to other melanoma antigens [gp100, tyrosinase, human melanoma antigen-A3 (MAGE-A3)] was assessed by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. Twenty-three patients were enrolled and 14 patients received all 3 scheduled DC vaccines. Significant CD8+ and/or CD4+ MART-1-specific T-cell responses were observed in 6/11 and 2/4 patients evaluated, respectively, indicating that the E1-deleted adenovirus encoding the cDNA for MART-1/Melan-A (AdVMART1)/DC vaccine activated both helper and killer T cells in vivo. Responses in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to additional antigens were noted in 2 patients. The AdVMART1-transduced DC vaccine was safe and immunogenic in patients with metastatic melanoma.

  4. Adenovirus MART-1–engineered Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Vujanovic, Lazar; Lee, Yohan; Dissette, Vivian B.; Yang, Jin-Quan; Vu, Hong T.; Seja, Elizabeth; Oseguera, Denise K.; Potter, Douglas M.; Glaspy, John A.; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Summary We performed a phase 1/2 trial testing the safety, toxicity, and immune response of a vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a replication-defective adenovirus (AdV) encoding the full-length melanoma antigen MART-1/Melan-A (MART-1). This vaccine was designed to activate MART-1–specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Metastatic melanoma patients received 3 injections of 106 or 107 DCs, delivered intradermally. Cell surface phenotype and cytokine production of the DCs used for the vaccines were tested, and indicated intermediate maturity. CD8+ T-cell responses to MART-127-35 were assessed by both major histocompatibility complex class I tetramer and interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) before, during, and after each vaccine and CD4+ T-cell responses to MART-151-73 were followed by IFN-γ ELISPOT. We also measured antigen response breadth. Determinant spreading from the immunizing antigen MART-1 to other melanoma antigens [gp100, tyrosinase, human melanoma antigen-A3 (MAGE-A3)] was assessed by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Twenty-three patients were enrolled and 14 patients received all 3 scheduled DC vaccines. Significant CD8+ and/or CD4+ MART-1–specific T-cell responses were observed in 6/11 and 2/4 patients evaluated, respectively, indicating that the E1-deleted adeno-virus encoding the cDNA for MART-1/Melan-A (AdV-MART1)/DC vaccine activated both helper and killer T cells in vivo. Responses in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to additional antigens were noted in 2 patients. The AdVMART1-transduced DC vaccine was safe and immunogenic in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:18317358

  5. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  6. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  7. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  8. Adenovirus Vectors Target Several Cell Subtypes of Mammalian Inner Ear In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian inner ear harbors diverse cell types that are essential for hearing and balance. Adenovirus is one of the major vectors to deliver genes into the inner ear for functional studies and hair cell regeneration. To identify adenovirus vectors that target specific cell subtypes in the inner ear, we studied three adenovirus vectors, carrying a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from two vendors or with a genome editing gene Cre recombinase (Cre), by injection into postnatal days 0 (P0) and 4 (P4) mouse cochlea through scala media by cochleostomy in vivo. We found three adenovirus vectors transduced mouse inner ear cells with different specificities and expression levels, depending on the type of adenoviral vectors and the age of mice. The most frequently targeted region was the cochlear sensory epithelium, including auditory hair cells and supporting cells. Adenovirus with GFP transduced utricular supporting cells as well. This study shows that adenovirus vectors are capable of efficiently and specifically transducing different cell types in the mammalian inner ear and provides useful tools to study inner ear gene function and to evaluate gene therapy to treat hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. PMID:28116172

  9. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  10. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses.

  11. Evaluation of JPEG 2000 encoder options: human and model observer detection of variable signals in X-ray coronary angiograms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh; Eckstein, Miguel P

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the effect of the new still image compression standard JPEG 2000 using nontask based image quality metrics, i.e., peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) for nonmedical images. In this paper, the effect of JPEG 2000 encoder options was investigated using the performance of human and model observers (nonprewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, square-window Hotelling, Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling and channelized Hotelling model observer) for clinically relevant visual tasks. Two tasks were investigated: the signal known exactly but variable task (SKEV) and the signal known statistically task (SKS). Test images consisted of real X-ray coronary angiograms with simulated filling defects (signals) inserted in one of the four simulated arteries. The signals varied in size and shape. Experimental results indicated that the dependence of task performance on the JPEG 2000 encoder options was similar for all model and human observers. Model observer performance in the more tractable and computationally economic SKEV task can be used to reliably estimate performance in the complex but clinically more realistic SKS task. JPEG 2000 encoder settings different from the default ones resulted in greatly improved model and human observer performance in the studied clinically relevant visual tasks using real angiography backgrounds.

  12. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  13. A human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; McGregor, W. Glenn; Maher, Veronica M.; Nisson, Paul; Lawrence, Christopher W.

    1998-01-01

    To get a better understanding of mutagenic mechanisms in humans, we have cloned and sequenced the human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene. The yeast gene encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ, a nonessential enzyme that is thought to carry out translesion replication and is responsible for virtually all DNA damage-induced mutagenesis and the majority of spontaneous mutagenesis. The human gene encodes an expected protein of 3,130 residues, about twice the size of the yeast protein (1,504 aa). The two proteins are 29% identical in an amino-terminal region of ≈340 residues, 39% identical in a carboxyl-terminal region of ≈850 residues, and 29% identical in a 55-residue region in the middle of the two genes. The sequence of the expected protein strongly predicts that it is the catalytic subunit of a DNA polymerase of the pol ζ type; the carboxyl-terminal domain possesses, in the right order, the six motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DNA polymerases, most closely resembles yeast pol ζ among all polymerases in the GenBank database, and is different from the human α, δ, and ɛ enzymes. Human cells expressing high levels of an hsREV3 antisense RNA fragment grow normally, but show little or no UV-induced mutagenesis and are slightly more sensitive to killing by UV. The human gene therefore appears to carry out a function similar to that of its yeast counterpart. PMID:9618506

  14. Spatial auditory regularity encoding and prediction: Human middle-latency and long-latency auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Cornella, M; Bendixen, A; Grimm, S; Leung, S; Schröger, E; Escera, C

    2015-11-11

    By encoding acoustic regularities present in the environment, the human brain can generate predictions of what is likely to occur next. Recent studies suggest that deviations from encoded regularities are detected within 10-50ms after stimulus onset, as indicated by electrophysiological effects in the middle latency response (MLR) range. This is upstream of previously known long-latency (LLR) signatures of deviance detection such as the mismatch negativity (MMN) component. In the present study, we created predictable and unpredictable contexts to investigate MLR and LLR signatures of the encoding of spatial auditory regularities and the generation of predictions from these regularities. Chirps were monaurally delivered in an either regular (predictable: left-right-left-right) or a random (unpredictable left/right alternation or repetition) manner. Occasional stimulus omissions occurred in both types of sequences. Results showed that the Na component (peaking at 34ms after stimulus onset) was attenuated for regular relative to random chirps, albeit no differences were observed for stimulus omission responses in the same latency range. In the LLR range, larger chirp-and omission-evoked responses were elicited for the regular than for the random condition, and predictability effects were more prominent over the right hemisphere. We discuss our findings in the framework of a hierarchical organization of spatial regularity encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention.

  15. The Drosophila pigmentation gene pink (p) encodes a homologue of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5).

    PubMed

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Brooks, Elizabeth S; Krantz, David E; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2007-02-01

    Lysosome-related organelles comprise a group of specialized intracellular compartments that include melanosomes and platelet dense granules (in mammals) and eye pigment granules (in insects). In humans, the biogenesis of these organelles is defective in genetic disorders collectively known as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). Patients with HPS-2, and two murine HPS models, carry mutations in genes encoding subunits of adaptor protein (AP)-3. Other genes mutated in rodent models include those encoding VPS33A and Rab38. Orthologs of all of these genes in Drosophila melanogaster belong to the 'granule group' of eye pigmentation genes. Other genes associated with HPS encode subunits of three complexes of unknown function, named biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, -2 and -3, for which the Drosophila counterparts had not been characterized. Here, we report that the gene encoding the Drosophila ortholog of the HPS5 subunit of BLOC-2 is identical to the granule group gene pink (p), which was first studied in 1910 but had not been identified at the molecular level. The phenotype of pink mutants was exacerbated by mutations in AP-3 subunits or in the orthologs of VPS33A and Rab38. These results validate D. melanogaster as a genetic model to study the function of the BLOCs.

  16. Noninvasive visualization of adenovirus replication with a fluorescent reporter in the E3 region.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hidetaka A; Le, Long P; Davydova, Julia G; Gavrikova, Tatyana; Yamamoto, Masato

    2005-11-15

    To overcome the inefficacy and undesirable side effects of current cancer treatment strategies, conditionally replicative adenoviruses have been developed to exploit the unique mechanism of oncolysis afforded by tumor-specific viral replication. Despite rapid translation into clinical trials and the established safety of oncolytic adenoviruses, the in vivo function of these agents is not well understood due to lack of a noninvasive detection system for adenovirus replication. To address this issue, we propose the expression of a reporter from the adenovirus E3 region as a means to monitor replication. Adenovirus replication reporter vectors were constructed with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene placed in the deleted E3 region under the control of the adenoviral major late promoter while retaining expression of the adenovirus death protein to conserve the native oncolytic capability of the virus. Strong EGFP fluorescence was detected from these vectors in a replication-dependent manner, which correlated with viral DNA replication. Fluorescence imaging in vivo confirmed the ability to noninvasively detect fluorescent signal during replication, which generally corresponded with the underlying level of viral DNA replication. EGFP representation of viral replication was further confirmed by Western blot comparison with the viral DNA content in the tumors. Imaging reporter expression controlled by the adenoviral major late promoter provides a viable approach to noninvasively monitor adenovirus replication in preclinical studies and has the potential for human application with clinically relevant imaging reporters.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a human cDNA encoding the antimutator enzyme 8-hydroxyguanine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Wei, Ying-Fei; Carter, Kenneth C.; Klungland, Arne; Anselmino, Catherine; Wang, Rui-Ping; Augustus, Meena; Lindahl, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    The major mutagenic base lesion in DNA caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species is 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine). In bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this damaged base is excised by a DNA glycosylase with an associated lyase activity for chain cleavage. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a human cDNA with partial sequence homology to the relevant yeast gene. The encoded 47-kDa human enzyme releases free 8-hydroxyguanine from oxidized DNA and introduces a chain break in a double-stranded oligonucleotide specifically at an 8-hydroxyguanine residue base paired with cytosine. Expression of the human protein in a DNA repair-deficient E. coli mutM mutY strain partly suppresses its spontaneous mutator phenotype. The gene encoding the human enzyme maps to chromosome 3p25. These results show that human cells have an enzyme that can initiate base excision repair at mutagenic DNA lesions caused by active oxygen. PMID:9223306

  18. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells.

  19. Acute respiratory infection with mouse adenovirus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jason B.; Stempfle, Gregory S.; Wilkinson, John E.; Younger, John G.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory disease are limited by the strict species-specificity of the adenoviruses. Following intranasal inoculation of adult C57BL/6 mice with mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), we detected MAV-1 early region 3 (E3) and hexon gene expression in the lungs at 7 days post-infection (dpi). We detected MAV-1 E3 protein in the respiratory epithelium 7 dpi. We did not detect viral mRNA or protein at 14 dpi, but MAV-1 DNA was detected by PCR at 21 dpi. Chemokine transcript levels increased between 7 and 14 dpi in the lungs of infected mice. MAV-1 infection induced a patchy cellular infiltrate in lungs at 7 and 14 dpi. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of MAV-1 in the respiratory epithelium of infected mice and describing chemokine responses in the lung induced by MAV-1 respiratory infection. MAV-1 infection of mice has the potential to serve as a model for inflammatory changes seen in human adenovirus respiratory disease. PMID:16054189

  20. The functional role of human right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta rhythm in environmental encoding during virtual spatial navigation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Cornwell, Brian R; Cheyne, Douglas; Johnson, Blake W

    2017-03-01

    Low frequency theta band oscillations (4-8 Hz) are thought to provide a timing mechanism for hippocampal place cell firing and to mediate the formation of spatial memory. In rodents, hippocampal theta has been shown to play an important role in encoding a new environment during spatial navigation, but a similar functional role of hippocampal theta in humans has not been firmly established. To investigate this question, we recorded healthy participants' brain responses with a 160-channel whole-head MEG system as they performed two training sets of a virtual Morris water maze task. Environment layouts (except for platform locations) of the two sets were kept constant to measure theta activity during spatial learning in new and familiar environments. In line with previous findings, left hippocampal/parahippocampal theta showed more activation navigating to a hidden platform relative to random swimming. Consistent with our hypothesis, right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta was stronger during the first training set compared to the second one. Notably, theta in this region during the first training set correlated with spatial navigation performance across individuals in both training sets. These results strongly argue for the functional importance of right hippocampal theta in initial encoding of configural properties of an environment during spatial navigation. Our findings provide important evidence that right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta activity is associated with environmental encoding in the human brain. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1347-1361, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten.

  2. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  3. Ad-mTERT-delta19, a conditional replication-competent adenovirus driven by the human telomerase promoter, selectively replicates in and elicits cytopathic effect in a cancer cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Joo-Hang; Shin, Ha-Youn; Lee, Hansaem; Yang, Jai Myung; Kim, Jungho; Sohn, Joo-Hyuk; Kim, Hoguen; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2003-10-10

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, functions to stabilize telomere length during chromosomal replication. Previous studies have shown that hTERT promoter is highly active in most tumor and immortal cell lines but inactive in normal somatic cell types. The use of wild-type hTERT promoter, however, may be limited by its inability to direct high level and cancer cell-specific expression necessary for effective targeted gene therapy. To improve cancer cell specificity and the strength of the hTERT promoter, a modified hTERT, m-hTERT promoter was generated in which additional copies of c-Myc and Sp1 binding sites were incorporated adjacent to the promoter. As assessed using relative lacZ expression, hTERT and m-hTERT promoter activity was significantly upregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and within these upregulated cancer cells, m-hTERT promoter strength was substantially higher than that of the wild-type hTERT. Next, to restrict viral replication to tumor cells, a conditional replication-competent adenoviruses, Ad-TERT-Delta19 and Ad-mTERT-delta19 were generated in which the E1A gene, which is essential for viral replication, was placed under the control of the hTERT and m-hTERT promoter, respectively. While the wild-type Ad-TERT-delta19 replicated in and induced cytopathic effect in cancer and in some normal cell lines, Ad-mTERT-delta19 enhanced viral replication and cytopathic effect only in cancer cells. Furthermore, the growth of established human cervical carcinoma in nude mice was significantly suppressed by intratumoral injection of Ad-mTERT-delta19. Taken together, present results strongly suggest that the use of the m-hTERT promoter is not only useful in the regulation of therapeutic gene expression but also that replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus under the control of the m-hTERT promoter may be a new promising tool for the treatment of human malignancies.

  4. Modulation of Oscillatory Power and Connectivity in the Human Posterior Cingulate Cortex Supports the Encoding and Retrieval of Episodic Memories.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Germi, James; Rugg, Michael

    2017-04-07

    Existing data from noninvasive studies have led researchers to posit that the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) supports mnemonic processes: It exhibits degeneration in memory disorders, and fMRI investigations have demonstrated memory-related activation principally during the retrieval of memory items. Despite these data, the role of the PCC in episodic memory has received only limited treatment using the spatial and temporal precision of intracranial EEG, with previous analyses focused on item retrieval. Using data gathered from 21 human participants who underwent stereo-EEG for seizure localization, we characterized oscillatory patterns in the PCC during the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories. We identified a subsequent memory effect during item encoding characterized by increased gamma band oscillatory power and a low-frequency power desynchronization. Fourteen participants had stereotactic electrodes located simultaneously in the hippocampus and PCC, and with these unique data, we describe connectivity changes between these structures that predict successful item encoding and that precede item retrieval. Oscillatory power during retrieval matched the pattern we observed during encoding, with low-frequency (below 15 Hz) desynchronization and a gamma band (especially high gamma, 70-180 Hz) power increase. Encoding is characterized by synchrony between the hippocampus and PCC, centered at 3 Hz, consistent with other observations of properties of this oscillation akin to those for rodent theta activity. We discuss our findings in light of existing theories of episodic memory processing, including the information via desynchronization hypothesis and retrieved context theory, and examine how our data fit with existing theories for the functional role of the PCC. These include a postulated role for the PCC in modulating internally directed attention and for representing or integrating contextual information for memory items.

  5. Enhanced human memory consolidation with post-learning stress: interaction with the degree of arousal at encoding.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Larry; Gorski, Lukasz; Le, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that endogenous stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone modulate memory consolidation in animals. We recently provided the first demonstration that an endogenous stress hormone (epinephrine) can enhance human memory consolidation. However, these findings also suggested that post-learning stress hormone activation does not uniformly enhance memory for all recently acquired information; rather, that it interacts with the degree of arousal at initial encoding of material in modulating memory for the material. Here we tested this hypothesis by administering cold pressor stress (CPS) or a control procedure to subjects after they viewed slides of varying emotional content, and assessing memory for the slides 1 wk later. CPS, which significantly elevated salivary cortisol levels, enhanced memory for emotionally arousing slides compared with the controls, but did not affect memory for relatively neutral slides. These findings further support the view that post-learning stress hormone-related activity interacts with arousal at initial encoding to modulate memory consolidation.

  6. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Alternative RNA Splicing by the Adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins. PMID:25636034

  7. Regulation of human adenovirus alternative RNA splicing by the adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K proteins.

    PubMed

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-28

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.