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Sample records for adenovirus major late

  1. Comparison of human and monkey cells for the ability to attenuate transcripts that begin at the adenovirus major late promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Seiberg, M.; Aloni, Y. ); Levine, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Late transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter can terminate prematurely at a site 182 to 188 nucleotides downstream. Experiments have been designed, with run-on transcription in nuclei in vitro or riboprobe protection of RNA obtained both in vivo and in vitro, that demonstrate that the ratio of attenuator RNA to readthrough RNA is greater in monkey cells (CV-1) than in human cells (HeLa). This may explain, in part, why the human adenoviruses replicate more poorly in CV-1 cells than in HeLa cells. A mutant adenovirus that replicates better than wild-type virus in monkey cells produces less of the attenuator RNA than wild-type adenovirus does in monkey cells. Monkey cell extracts have been shown to contain a factor that, when added to human cell extracts transcribing adenovirus DNA in vitro, increases the production of attenuator RNA in these reactions. These observations help to explain a portion of the block to the production of infectious adenoviruses in monkey cells.

  2. Modification of an adenovirus major late promoter-binding factor during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Fernández-Tomás, C; Gariglio, P; Weinmann, R

    1989-01-01

    To further characterize the mechanism involved in poliovirus-induced inhibition of HeLa cells mRNA synthesis, in vitro formation of DNA-protein complexes between nuclear upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) and the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter upstream promoter element (UPE; located between -45 and -65 base pairs) was studied. Using the gel shift assay, we found differences between the UPE-protein complex formed with partially purified nuclear extracts from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and that obtained in the presence of mock-infected extracts. Formation of the modified UPE-USF complex coincided with virus-induced inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis in vivo and with a less efficient in vitro transcriptional activity of the nuclear extracts from infected cells. Furthermore, using a cross-linking protocol, we found that the host 46-kilodalton UPE-binding USF factor was severely diminished and that a virus-induced or -modified 50-kilodalton polypeptide appeared to be specifically bound to the UPE template. Images PMID:2474675

  3. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: high-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael; Difatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-03-22

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of recombinant HPV L1 completely prevents persistent HPV infection [Koutsky, L. A., Ault, K. A., Wheeler, C. M., Brown, D. R., Barr, E., Alvarez, F. B., Chiacchierini, L. M. & Jansen, K. U. (2002) N. Engl. J. Med. 347, 1645-1651], suggesting that L1 expressed from recombinant adenoviruses might provide protective immunity. In our recombinants, COPV L1 is incorporated into adenovirus late region 5 (Ad L5) and is expressed as a member of the adenoviral major late transcriptional unit (MLTU). COPV L1 production by the most prolific recombinant is comparable to that of the most abundant adenoviral protein, hexon. COPV L1 production by recombinants is influenced by Ad L5 gene order, the specific mRNA processing signals associated with COPV L1, and the state of a putative splicing inhibitor in the COPV L1 gene. Recombinant COPV L1 protein assembles into VLPs that react with an antibody specific for conformational epitopes on native COPV L1 protein that correlate with protection in vivo. The designs of these recombinants can be applied directly to the production of recombinants appropriate for assessing immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal models and in human trials. PMID:15767581

  4. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: High-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Michael; DiFatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of recombinant HPV L1 completely prevents persistent HPV infection [Koutsky, L. A., Ault, K. A., Wheeler, C. M., Brown, D. R., Barr, E., Alvarez, F. B., Chiacchierini, L. M. & Jansen, K. U. (2002) N. Engl. J. Med. 347, 1645–1651], suggesting that L1 expressed from recombinant adenoviruses might provide protective immunity. In our recombinants, COPV L1 is incorporated into adenovirus late region 5 (Ad L5) and is expressed as a member of the adenoviral major late transcriptional unit (MLTU). COPV L1 production by the most prolific recombinant is comparable to that of the most abundant adenoviral protein, hexon. COPV L1 production by recombinants is influenced by Ad L5 gene order, the specific mRNA processing signals associated with COPV L1, and the state of a putative splicing inhibitor in the COPV L1 gene. Recombinant COPV L1 protein assembles into VLPs that react with an antibody specific for conformational epitopes on native COPV L1 protein that correlate with protection in vivo. The designs of these recombinants can be applied directly to the production of recombinants appropriate for assessing immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal models and in human trials. PMID:15767581

  5. Translation of adenovirus 2 late mRNAs microinjected into cultured African green monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.D.; Anderson, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    Adenovirus 2-infected monkey cells fail to synthesize fiber, a 62,000 M/sub r/ virion polypeptide expressed at late times in productively infected cells. Yet these cells contain fiber mRNA that, after isolation, can be translated in vitro. The reason for the failure of monkey cells to translate fiber mRNA has been approached by microinjecting adenovirus mRNA into the cytoplasm of cultured monkey cells. Late adenovirus 2 mRNA, isolated from infected HeLa cells, was efficiently expressed when microinjected into the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-C. Expressed viral proteins identified by immunoprecipitation included the adenovirus fiber polypeptide. This result demonstrates that the monkey cell translational apparatus is capable of recognizing and expressing functional adenovirus mRNA. Microinjection of late virus mRNA into cells previously infected with wild-type adenovirus 2 failed to increase significantly the yield of infectious virus. 26 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  6. Genome expression and mRNA maturation at late stages of productive adenovirus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Wold, W S; Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Devine, C

    1976-11-01

    RNA from adenovirus 2-infected KB cells was annealed in liquid with RNA in vast excess to viral heavy (l) and light (r) 32P-labeled DNA strands. Hybridization kinetics were analyzed by computer to estimate the number of viral RNA abundance classes, their relative concentrations, and the fraction of each DNA strand from which they originated. Early whole cell RNA extracted 5 h postinfection annealed rapidly to 10 to 15% of l and r strands and then slowly to final values of 60 and 40% of l and r strands. By 9 h postinfection the expression of late genes was apparent and whole cell RNA annealed to 20 and 75% of l and r strands. Whole cell RNA extracted between 12 and 36 h postinfection annealed to 7 to 15% and 75 to 90% of l and r strands. Late nuclear RNA hybridized to 10 and 90% of l and r strands, and late polyribosomal RNA hybridized to 20 and 75% of l and r strands. Based upon kinetic analyses, we estimate that mRNA synthesized exclusively during late stages arises from about 6 to 8% and 45 to 49% of l and r strands. This assumes that the early class I mRNA (in low concentration late) originates from 8 to 10% and 6 to 10% of l and r strands and that early class II mRNA (in high concentration late) is derived from 2% and 8 to 13% of l and r strands. Mixing experiments indicated that early mRNA is a subset of RNA extracted from polyribosomes late after infection and that late nuclear RNA contains sequences complementary to early l strand class I nRNA. RNA-RNA hybrids were isolated from late mRNA containing sequences from 60% of l and r strands, but it is not known when these were synthesized, and therefore whether complementary RNA transcripts are synthesized late after infection, as they are known to be synthesized early. These results demonstrate that portions of the genome are transcribed into RNA sequences that remain confined to the nucleus and are not exported to polyribosomes as mRNA.

  7. The Adenovirus L4-33K Protein Regulates both Late Gene Expression Patterns and Viral DNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Guimet, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) L4-33K protein has been linked to disparate functions during infection. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative RNA splicing factor which activates splicing of viral late gene transcripts that contain weak 3′ splice sites. Additionally, L4-33K has been indicated to play a role in adenovirus assembly. We generated and characterized an Ad5 L4-33K mutant virus to further explore its function(s) during infection. Infectivity, viral genome replication, and most viral gene expression of the L4-33K mutant virus are comparable to those of the wild-type virus, except for a prominent decrease in the levels of the late proteins IIIa and pVI. The L4-33K mutant virus produces only empty capsids, indicating a defect in viral DNA packaging. We demonstrate that L4-33K does not preferentially bind to viral packaging sequences in vivo, and mutation of L4-33K does not interfere with the binding of the known viral packaging proteins IVa2, L4-22K, L1-52/55K, and IIIa to the packaging sequences in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the phenotype of an Ad5 L4-33K mutant virus is complex. The L4-33K protein regulates the accumulation of selective Ad late gene mRNAs and is involved in the proper transition of gene expression during the late phase of infection. The L4-33K protein also plays a role in adenovirus morphogenesis by promoting the packaging of the viral genome into the empty capsid. These results demonstrate the multifunctional nature of the L4-33K protein and its involvement in several different and critical aspects of viral infection. PMID:23552425

  8. Definition of a novel promoter for the major adenovirus-associated virus mRNA.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Roeder, R G

    1980-11-01

    A 660 nucleotide adenovirus-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) DNA fragment which encodes the 5' terminal leader and the entire intervening sequence of the major viral mRNA has been cloned into pBR322, and its primary sequence has been determined. The 5' terminal viral mRNA sequence was deduced by sequencing the reverse-transcriptase cDNA extension product of a 5' end-labeled DNA primer complementary to the RNA 5' terminal region. From combined DNA and RNA sequence analyses (which confirm our previous mapping data) we conclude that the major AAV2 transcript contains a 5' terminal leader sequence about 55 nucleotides in length encoded from a continuous region of DNA (near position 39 on the viral genome) 320 bases from the RNA body. The DNA sequences of the splice junctions are similar to those found for other class II genes. No other nucleotide sequence, indicative of promotion at another (upstream) site, is present at the 5' terminus. The DNA region encoding and flanking the leader sequence displays structural features expected for a class II gene promoter, including the canonical ATATAA sequence 23-25 bases upstream from the presumed initiation site. When the cloned viral DNA fragment is transcribed in vitro by RNA polymerase II in a cell-free system, a transcript is produced with a 5' end that is similar or identical to that found on the in vivo mRNA. Taken together these data strongly suggest that the major polysomal RNA may be generated from a transcription unit with a promoter at position 39, even though this transcription unit is part of a larger transcription unit with an upstream promoter near position 6. This indication of overlapping transcription units with independent promoters provides a major new insight into parvovirus gene expression.

  9. The 11,600-MW protein encoded by region E3 of adenovirus is expressed early but is greatly amplified at late stages of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Scaria, A; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1992-01-01

    We have reported that an 11,600-MW (11.6K) protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus. We have now prepared two new antipeptide antisera that have allowed us to characterize this protein further. The 11.6K protein migrates as multiple diffuse bands having apparent Mws of about 14,000, 21,000, and 31,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblotting as well as virus mutants with deletions in the 11.6K gene were used to show that the various gel bands represent forms of 11.6K. The 11.6K protein was synthesized in very low amounts during early stages of infection, from the scarce E3 mRNAs d and e which initiate from the E3 promoter. However, 11.6K was synthesized very abundantly at late stages of infection, approximately 400 times the rate at early stages, from new mRNAs termed d' and e'. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA blot experiments indicated that mRNAs d' and e' had the same body (the coding portion) and the same middle exon (the y leader) as early E3 mRNAs d and e, but mRNAs d' and e' were spliced at their 5' termini to the major late tripartite leader which is found in all mRNAs in the major late transcription unit. mRNAs d' and e' and the 11.6K protein were the only E3 mRNAs and protein that were scarce early and were greatly amplified at late stages of infection. This suggests that specific cis- or trans-acting sequences may function to enhance the splicing of mRNAs d' and e' at late stages of infection and perhaps to suppress the splicing of mRNAs d and e at early stages of infection. We propose that the 11.6K gene be considered not only a member of region E3 but also a member of the major late transcription unit. Images PMID:1316473

  10. Human adenovirus type 8: the major agent of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC).

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Banik, Urmila

    2014-12-01

    Human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-8) is the most common causative agent of a highly contagious eye disease known as epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). HAdV-8 strains have been classified into genome types HAdV-8A to 8K and HAdV/D1 to D12 according to restriction endonuclease analysis. This review focuses on the significance of HAdV-8 as an agent of EKC. Molecular analysis of HAdV-8 genome types HAdV-53 and HAdV-54 was performed to reveal potential genetic variation in the hexon and fiber, which might affect the antigenicity and tropism of the virus, respectively. On the basis of the published data, three patterns of HAdV-8 genome type distribution were observed worldwide: (1) genome types restricted to a microenvironment, (2) genome types distributed within a country, and (3) globally dispersed genome types. Simplot and zPicture showed that the HAdV-8 genome types were nearly identical to each other. HAdV-54 is very close to the HAdV-8P, B and E genomes, except in the hexon. In a restriction map, HAdV-8P, B, and E share a very high percentage of restriction sites with each other. Hypervariable regions (HVRs) of the hexon were conserved and were 100% identical among the genome types. The fiber knob of HAdV-8P, A, E, J and HAdV-53 were 100% identical. In phylogeny, HVRs of the hexon and fiber knob of the HAdV-8 genome types segregated into monophyletic clusters. Neutralizing antibodies against one genome type will provide protection against other genome types, and the selection of future vaccine strains would be simple due to the stable HVRs. Molecular analysis of whole genomes, particularly of the capsid proteins of the remaining genome types, would be useful to substantiate our observations.

  11. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  12. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  13. Role of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases II and III in Transcription of the Adenovirus Genome Late in Productive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Roberto; Raskas, Heschel J.; Roeder, Robert G.

    1974-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II, and III were isolated and partially purified from KB (human) cells 18 hr after infection with adenovirus 2. As reported previously for the enzymes from other animal cells, RNA polymerase II was completely sensitive to low concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 0.02 μg/ml), RNA polymerase III was completely sensitive to high concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 20 μg/ml) and RNA polymerase I was totally resistant to concentrations of α-amanitin less than or equal to 200 μg/ml. RNA synthesis by the endogenous RNA polymerase activities in nuclei isolated from infected cells was completely sensitive to α-amanitin, thus suggesting that RNA polymerase I is not involved in viral DNA transcription even though it is present in these cells. The α-amanitin inhibition curve was biphasic and showed inflection points at about 0.02 and 20 μg/ml, suggesting the participation of both RNA polymerases II and III in the synthesis of RNA in these nuclei. Furthermore, at least a large fraction of the synthesis of the nuclear precursors to viral mRNA, monitored by hybridization to viral DNA, showed the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did RNA polymerase II; and the synthesis of both viral 5.5S RNA and (presumably cellular) 5S RNA in the isolated nuclei exhibited the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did purified RNA polymerase III. Thus, these data provide strong supporting evidence for previous studies which suggested the involvement of an RNA polymerase II in transcription of the adenovirus genome and demonstrate the role of an RNA polymerase III activity in the synthesis of viral 5.5S RNA and cellular 5S RNA. PMID:4530313

  14. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  15. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  16. Acid-Soluble Material of Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P. A.; Jaume, F.; Flamencourt, P.; Biserte, G.

    1970-01-01

    Two methods are described for adenovirus capsid disruption and extraction of acid-soluble proteins from the viral core. The acid-soluble material of adenovirus consisted of three major proteins, one of them being selectively extracted after mild disruption of the virus particle. Some chemical properties of these proteins are reported. Images PMID:4986288

  17. Major element compositional variation within and between different late Eocene microtektite strewnfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S. L.; Keller, G.; Stallard, R. F.

    1987-03-01

    The major element composition of microspherules from all three late Eocene stratigraphic layers was analyzed using an electron microprobe. The results indicate a major element compositional overlap beween individual microspherules of different microtektite layers or strewn fields. However, multivariate factor analysis shows that the microtektites of the three late Eocene layers follow recognizably different compositional trends. The microtektite population of the North American strewn field is characterized by high concentrations of SiO2, Al2O3, and TiO2; the microspherules of an older layer, the Gl. cerroazulensis Zone, are relatively enriched in FeO and MgO and impoverished in SiO2 and TiO2; while those of the oldest layer in the uppermost G. semiinvoluta Zone are relatively enriched in CaO and impoverished in Al2O3 and Na2O.

  18. Antarctic Bottom Water: Major Change in Velocity during the Late Cenozoic between Australia and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Watkins, N D; Kennett, J P

    1971-08-27

    Paleomagnetic and micropaleontological studies of deep-sea sedimentary cores between Australia and Antarctica define an extensive area centered in the south Tasman Basin, where sediment as old as Early Pliocene has been systematically eroded by bottom currents. This major sedimentary disconformity has been produced by a substantial increase in velocity of Antarctic bottom water, possibly associated with late Cenozoic climatic cooling and corresponding increased glaciation of Antarctica. PMID:17812192

  19. Antarctic Bottom Water: Major Change in Velocity during the Late Cenozoic between Australia and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Watkins, N D; Kennett, J P

    1971-08-27

    Paleomagnetic and micropaleontological studies of deep-sea sedimentary cores between Australia and Antarctica define an extensive area centered in the south Tasman Basin, where sediment as old as Early Pliocene has been systematically eroded by bottom currents. This major sedimentary disconformity has been produced by a substantial increase in velocity of Antarctic bottom water, possibly associated with late Cenozoic climatic cooling and corresponding increased glaciation of Antarctica.

  20. Hyaluronidase expression by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances its intratumoral spread and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Gros, Alena; Mercade, Elena; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    Successful virotherapy requires efficient virus spread within tumors. We tested whether the expression of hyaluronidase, an enzyme which dissociates the extracellular matrix (ECM), could enhance the intratumoral distribution of an oncolytic adenovirus and improve its therapeutic activity. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that intratumoral coadministration of hyaluronidase in mice-bearing tumor xenografts improves the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus. Next, we constructed a replication-competent adenovirus expressing a soluble form of the human sperm hyaluronidase (PH20) under the control of the major late promoter (MLP) (AdwtRGD-PH20). Intratumoral treatment of human melanoma xenografts with AdwtRGD-PH20 resulted in degradation of hyaluronan (HA), enhanced viral distribution, and induced tumor regression in all treated tumors. Finally, the PH20 cDNA was inserted in an oncolytic adenovirus that selectively kills pRb pathway-defective tumor cells. The antitumoral activity of the novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing PH20 (ICOVIR17) was compared to that of the parental virus ICOVIR15. ICOVIR17 showed more antitumor efficacy following intratumoral and systemic administration in mice with prestablished tumors, along with an improved spread of the virus within the tumor. Importantly, a single intravenous dose of ICOVIR17 induced tumor regression in 60% of treated tumors. These results indicate that ICOVIR17 is a promising candidate for clinical testing.

  1. Cis and trans activation of adenovirus IVa2 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, V; Salzman, N P

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional control region of the adenovirus IVa2 promoter was analyzed by cloning this promoter in front of a gene coding for bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CATase) and estimating levels of CATase and IVa2 promoter specific RNA synthesized after transfection. To produce detectable amounts of CATase with the IVa2 promoter, an enhancer has to be present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, the adenovirus E1A gene can not stimulate CATase synthesis. When cells were transfected with plasmids containing enhancer sequences and various IVa2 mutant promoters upstream of the CAT gene, we observed that CATase activity was not reduced significantly even after deletion of all sequences upstream of the RNA initiation site. Synthesis of IVa2 specific RNA was dependent on plasmids containing an enhancer (SV40 72 bp repeat) that was present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, co-transfection to provide the adenovirus E1A gene in trans also stimulated IVa2 RNA synthesis. When HeLa cells were transfected with various deletion mutants with an enhancer in cis it was seen that sequences -38 to -64 base pairs upstream of the RNA initiation site are necessary for efficient transcription. The E1A gene in trans and an enhancer in cis have an additive effect on RNA synthesis from both IVa2 and major late promoters. The basis for the conflicting results between transcription and CATase synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:2989786

  2. Synthesis of human adenovirus early RNA species is similar in productive and abortive infections of monkey and human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K P; Klessig, D F

    1982-01-01

    Northern (RNA) blot analysis has been used to show that synthesis of early mRNA species is similar in monkey cells productively or abortively infected with human adenovirus. mRNA species from all five major early regions (1A, 1B, 2, 3, 4) are identical in size and comparable in abundance whether isolated from monkey cells infected with adenovirus type 2 or with the host range mutant Ad2hr400 or coinfected with adenovirus type 2 plus simian virus 40. The mRNA species isolated from monkey cells are identical in size to those isolated from human cells. Production of virus-associated RNA is also identical in productive and abortive infections of monkey cells. Synthesis of virus-associated RNA is, however, significantly greater in HeLa cells than in CV1 cells at late times after infection regardless of which virus is used in the infection. Images PMID:6283181

  3. Intratumoral spread of wild-type adenovirus is limited after local injection of human xenograft tumors: virus persists and spreads systemically at late time points.

    PubMed

    Sauthoff, Harald; Hu, Jing; Maca, Cielo; Goldman, Michael; Heitner, Sheila; Yee, Herman; Pipiya, Teona; Rom, William N; Hay, John G

    2003-03-20

    Oncolytic replicating adenoviruses are a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer. Despite the assumed biologic advantage of continued viral replication and spread from infected to uninfected cancer cells, early clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of current vectors is limited. In xenograft tumor models using immune-incompetent mice, wild-type adenovirus is also rarely able to eradicate established tumors. This suggests that innate immune mechanisms may clear the virus or that barriers within the tumor prevent viral spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of viral distribution and spread after intratumoral injection of virus in a human tumor xenograft model. After intratumoral injection of wild-type virus, high levels of titratable virus persisted within the xenograft tumors for at least 8 weeks. Virus distribution within the tumors as determined by immunohistochemistry was patchy, and virus-infected cells appeared to be flanked by tumor necrosis and connective tissue. The close proximity of virus-infected cells to the tumor-supporting structure, which is of murine origin, was clearly demonstrated using a DNA probe that specifically hybridizes to the B1 murine DNA repeat. Importantly, although virus was cleared from the circulation 6 hr after intratumoral injection, after 4 weeks systemic spread of virus was detected. In addition, vessels of infected tumors were surrounded by necrosis and an advancing rim of virus-infected tumor cells, suggesting reinfection of the xenograft tumor through the vasculature. These data suggest that human adenoviral spread within tumor xenografts is impaired by murine tumor-supporting structures. In addition, there is evidence for continued viral replication within the tumor, with subsequent systemic dissemination and reinfection of tumors via the tumor vasculature. Despite the limitations of immune-incompetent models, an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the tumor

  4. Prospective Interrelationships Between Late Adolescent Personality and Major Depressive Disorder in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sylia; DiRago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Background A well-established body of literature demonstrates concurrent associations between personality traits and major depressive disorder (MDD), but there have been relatively fewer investigations of their dynamic interplay over time. Methods Prospective interrelationships between late adolescent personality and MDD in early adulthood were examined in a community sample of male and female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study (N = 1252). Participants were classified into naturally occurring MDD groups based on the timing (adolescent- versus adult-onset) and course (chronic/recurrent versus remitting) of MDD. MDD diagnoses were assessed at ages 17, 20, 24, and 29, and personality traits (Negative Emotionality [NEM], Positive Emotionality [PEM], Constraint [CON]) were assessed at ages 17, 24, and 29. Results Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that higher age-17 NEM was associated with the subsequent development of MDD, and any MDD, regardless of onset or course, was associated with higher NEM through age 29. Moreover, the chronic/recurrent MDD groups failed to show the normative decrease in NEM from late adolescence to early adulthood. Lower age-17 PEM was also associated with the subsequent development of MDD, but only among the chronic/recurrent MDD groups. Finally, the adolescent-onset MDD groups reported lower age-17 CON relative to the never depressed and adult-onset MDD groups. Conclusions Taken together, results speak to the role of personality traits for conferring risk for the onset of MDD in late adolescence and early adulthood, as well as the pernicious implications of chronic/recurrent MDD, particularly when it onsets during adolescence, for adaptive personality development. PMID:23689064

  5. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  6. Searching for Massive Major Mergers in Dense Environments at Late Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, Xiachang; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Haines, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Major gas-poor (dry) merging between two comparably massive spheroidal galaxies are postulated to be the central mechanism responsible for the assembly of the most massive (Mstar>1e11 Msun) elliptical galaxies. Numerical simulations predict that these mergers may occur at late cosmic times and typically in dense environments. Previous work based on a complete sample of high-mass (>5e10 Msun) galaxies with z<0.12 selected from the Yang et al. (2007) SDSS Galaxy Group Catalog and analyzed for residual asymmetric features in SDSS r-band images provided a lower limit to the frequency of massive pairs with interaction signatures residing in groups and clusters with halo masses >2.5e13 Msun. The tidal signatures of such interactions may often be too faint to be clearly detected at the sensitivity of SDSS imaging data. To improve constraints and test the identification of dry merging, we obtained V-band images 1.5 mag deeper than SDSS for a random selection of one-quarter of the pairs with no SDSS tidal signatures, plus a subset of six previously identified interactions. This sample contains 27 pairs, each shares the same group halo, and has small projected separations and spectroscopic redshift differences. Using GALFIT image residuals, we visually identify interactions signatures with surface brightnesses down to ~26.5 mag/arcsec^2 at S/N ≥ 5. We confirm 80% of previous interaction identifications based on shallower SDSS imaging, and identify four new systems with mutual tidal signatures that were previously classified non-interacting. Applying these new deeper detection statistics based on very small numbers indicates that the frequency and, thus, the rate of massive major mergers in dense environments is 50% to 3 times larger than previously estimated with the SDSS. As such, 2-5% of high-mass galaxies in large groups are involved in the major merger assembly of massive galaxies.

  7. Autonomous neurobiological pathways to late-life major depressive disorder: clinical and pathophysiological implications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Mintz, Jim; Bilker, Warren; Gottlieb, Gary

    2002-02-01

    The objective of our study was to elucidate distinct paths to depression in a model that incorporates age, measures of medical comorbidity, neuroanatomical compromise, and cognitive status in a sample of patients with late-life major depressive disorder (MDD) and nondepressed controls. Our study was cross-sectional in nature and utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) estimates of brain and high-intensity lesion volumes together with clinical indices of cerebrovascular and nonvascular medical comorbidity. Neuroanatomic and clinical measures were incorporated into a structural covariance model in order to test pathways to MDD. Our data indicate that there are two paths to MDD; one path is represented by vascular and nonvascular medical comorbidity that contribute to high-intensity lesions that lead to depression. Smaller brain volumes represent a distinct path to the mood disorder. Age influences depression by increasing atrophy and overall medical comorbidity but has no direct impact on MDD. These findings demonstrate that there are distinct biological substrates to the neuroanatomical changes captured on MRI. These observations further suggest that neurobiological mechanisms acting in parallel may compromise brain structure/function, thereby predisposing individuals to clinical brain disorders such as depression. PMID:11790518

  8. Blood Transcriptomic Markers in Patients with Late-Onset Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeo; Kurachi, Masashi; Okano, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Noriko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Harada, Kenichiro; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Koji; Takahashi, Keisuke; Narita, Kosuke; Fukuda, Masato; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Mikuni, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated transcriptomic markers of late-onset major depressive disorder (LOD; onset age of first depressive episode ≥ 50 years) from the genes expressed in blood cells and identified state-dependent transcriptomic markers in these patients. We assessed the genes expressed in blood cells by microarray and found that the expression levels of 3,066 probes were state-dependently changed in the blood cells of patients with LOD. To select potential candidates from those probes, we assessed the genes expressed in the blood of an animal model of depression, ovariectomized female mice exposed to chronic ultra-mild stress, by microarray and cross-matched the differentially expressed genes between the patients and the model mice. We identified 14 differentially expressed genes that were similarly changed in both patients and the model mice. By assessing statistical significance using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), the following 4 genes were selected as candidates: cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector c (CIDEC), ribonuclease 1 (RNASE1), solute carrier family 36 member-1 (SLC36A1), and serine/threonine/tyrosine interacting-like 1 (STYXL1). The discriminating ability of these 4 candidate genes was evaluated in an independent cohort that was validated. Among them, CIDEC showed the greatest discriminant validity (sensitivity 91.3% and specificity 87.5%). Thus, these 4 biomarkers should be helpful for properly diagnosing LOD.

  9. Blood Transcriptomic Markers in Patients with Late-Onset Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeo; Kurachi, Masashi; Okano, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Noriko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Harada, Kenichiro; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Koji; Takahashi, Keisuke; Narita, Kosuke; Fukuda, Masato; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Mikuni, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated transcriptomic markers of late-onset major depressive disorder (LOD; onset age of first depressive episode ≥ 50 years) from the genes expressed in blood cells and identified state-dependent transcriptomic markers in these patients. We assessed the genes expressed in blood cells by microarray and found that the expression levels of 3,066 probes were state-dependently changed in the blood cells of patients with LOD. To select potential candidates from those probes, we assessed the genes expressed in the blood of an animal model of depression, ovariectomized female mice exposed to chronic ultra-mild stress, by microarray and cross-matched the differentially expressed genes between the patients and the model mice. We identified 14 differentially expressed genes that were similarly changed in both patients and the model mice. By assessing statistical significance using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), the following 4 genes were selected as candidates: cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector c (CIDEC), ribonuclease 1 (RNASE1), solute carrier family 36 member-1 (SLC36A1), and serine/threonine/tyrosine interacting-like 1 (STYXL1). The discriminating ability of these 4 candidate genes was evaluated in an independent cohort that was validated. Among them, CIDEC showed the greatest discriminant validity (sensitivity 91.3% and specificity 87.5%). Thus, these 4 biomarkers should be helpful for properly diagnosing LOD. PMID:26926397

  10. Blood Transcriptomic Markers in Patients with Late-Onset Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shigeo; Kurachi, Masashi; Okano, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Noriko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Harada, Kenichiro; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Koji; Takahashi, Keisuke; Narita, Kosuke; Fukuda, Masato; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Mikuni, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated transcriptomic markers of late-onset major depressive disorder (LOD; onset age of first depressive episode ≥ 50 years) from the genes expressed in blood cells and identified state-dependent transcriptomic markers in these patients. We assessed the genes expressed in blood cells by microarray and found that the expression levels of 3,066 probes were state-dependently changed in the blood cells of patients with LOD. To select potential candidates from those probes, we assessed the genes expressed in the blood of an animal model of depression, ovariectomized female mice exposed to chronic ultra-mild stress, by microarray and cross-matched the differentially expressed genes between the patients and the model mice. We identified 14 differentially expressed genes that were similarly changed in both patients and the model mice. By assessing statistical significance using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), the following 4 genes were selected as candidates: cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector c (CIDEC), ribonuclease 1 (RNASE1), solute carrier family 36 member-1 (SLC36A1), and serine/threonine/tyrosine interacting-like 1 (STYXL1). The discriminating ability of these 4 candidate genes was evaluated in an independent cohort that was validated. Among them, CIDEC showed the greatest discriminant validity (sensitivity 91.3% and specificity 87.5%). Thus, these 4 biomarkers should be helpful for properly diagnosing LOD. PMID:26926397

  11. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided. PMID:17656792

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  14. CD46 Is a Cellular Receptor for All Species B Adenoviruses except Types 3 and 7

    PubMed Central

    Marttila, Marko; Persson, David; Gustafsson, Dan; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Wadell, Göran; Arnberg, Niklas

    2005-01-01

    The 51 human adenovirus serotypes are divided into six species (A to F). Adenovirus serotypes from all species except species B utilize the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor for attachment to host cells in vitro. Species B adenoviruses primarily cause ocular and respiratory tract infections, but certain serotypes are also associated with renal disease. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus type 11 (species B) uses CD46 (membrane cofactor protein) as a cellular receptor instead of the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (A. Segerman et al., J. Virol. 77:9183-9191, 2003). In the present study, we found that transfection with human CD46 cDNA rendered poorly permissive Chinese hamster ovary cells more permissive to infection by all species B adenovirus serotypes except adenovirus types 3 and 7. Moreover, rabbit antiserum against human CD46 blocked or efficiently inhibited all species B serotypes except adenovirus types 3 and 7 from infecting human A549 cells. We also sequenced the gene encoding the fiber protein of adenovirus type 50 (species B) and compared it with the corresponding amino acid sequences from selected serotypes, including all other serotypes of species B. From the results obtained, we conclude that CD46 is a major cellular receptor on A549 cells for all species B adenoviruses except types 3 and 7. PMID:16254377

  15. Major events in the late Precambrian to early Triassic geohistory of the Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, T.E.; Connally, T.C.; Van der Eem, J.G.L.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The late Precambrian to Early Triassic of the Arabian Peninsula occur in five supergroups. Their geohistory resulted from sedimentation along fluvial to midshelf facies tracts, eustatic oscillation and periodic uplift. The first supergroup, Plate Precambrian-Middle Cambrian, includes the Siq/Salib and Yatib formations. Deposited by north-eastward-flowing braided streams, they eroded and buried an Arabian shield topography. The Saq Formation lies in angular unconformity on the Siq which documents early Middle Cambrian uplift. Supergroup two, Middle Cambrian-middle Caradocian, the Burj and Saq formations, the Hanadir, Kahfah, and Ra'an members, Qasim Formation, were deposited on a stable continental margin in fluvio-deltaic to midshelf settings. Coastal onlap occurred in the Middle Cambrian, early Llanvirn, middle Llandeilo and early Caradoc. Middle Caradocian uplift deeply eroded parts of central and southern Arabia. Supergroup three of middle Caradocian-early Llandoverian are the Quwarah Member, Qasim Formation and the Zarqa/Sarah formations. They were deposited in a fluvio-deltaic shallow shelf. Late Ashgill uplift, combined with glacially induced sea level lowering, incised valleys up to 2000 ft (610 m) deep. Supergroup four, early Llandovery-Middle Carboniferous, includes the Qalibah, Tawil, Jauf, Jubah and Berwath formations. They were deposited in a fluvio-deltaic marine, river dominated system. The Quysaiba and Sharawra members, Qalibah Formation, were the offshore clays and prodelta sands, the Tawil-Jubah were the fluvial to delta front, and the Berwath the delta plain facies. Deep pre-Tawil erosion documents late Silurian-Early Devonian uplift. The fifth supergroup are the Juwayl, Unayzah, Khuff and Sudair formations. The first two units were deposited in a glacio-fluvial system which eroded and infilled a Hercynian topography. The Khuff transgression occurred during the Artinsklan-Tartarian and the Early Triassic regressive Sudair documents renewed uplift.

  16. Evolution of the Carbon Cycle During Major Turning Point in Oceanogaphy in the Late Jurassic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, P.; Louis-Schmid, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Weissert, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Late Jurassic was a time of accelerated fragmentation of Pangea resulting in a reorganisation of climate and oceanography. Some of these changes culminated in the Oxfordian as reflected in the Sr-isotope record. The 87/86Sr ratio reach the lowest values of the Mesozoic, indicative for high seafloor spreading and/or low continental weathering rates. Oxygen isotope values suggest that the Late Callovian and the Early Oxfordian were an exceptionally cool time in the Jurassic. The opening Tethyan ocean was chosen for an investigation of the evolution of the global carbon cycle and of changing current patterns along the east-west trending seaway. The carbon isotope curve shows a large-amplitude shift from low values around 1.5‰ (VPDB) in the Early Oxfordian towards values of around 3‰ in the Middle Oxfordian (Transversarium ammonite zone). After these high values, the ratio decreases towards values of 2‰. We used bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphy to correlate the evolution of current intensity based on an expanded reference carbon isotope section from the Vocontian trough (France). Stable carbon isotope records provide a very good tool for correlation between different paleoceanographic settings. Strong oceanic currents sweeping the Tethyan seafloor caused the formation of hardgrounds on sedimentary highs, whereas protected basins act as sedimentary sinks, with high sediment accumulation rates. These hardgrounds are of Late Callovian to Early Oxfordian age. The decrease of current activity corresponds to the top of the condensed sediments and the onset of normal accumulation rates. It coincides with the time of most positive carbon isotope values in the Transversarium ammonite zone. The carbon isotope shift corresponds exactly to the change in current pattern along the northern part of the Tethyan seaway. The synchronous change in carbon cycling and in physical oceanography suggests that there are feedbacks between physical oceanography and carbon cycling

  17. The NGC 4013 tale: a pseudo-bulged, late-type spiral shaped by a major merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianling; Hammer, Francois; Puech, Mathieu; Yang, Yanbin; Flores, Hector

    2015-10-01

    Many spiral galaxy haloes show stellar streams with various morphologies when observed with deep images. The origin of these tidal features is discussed, either coming from a satellite infall or caused by residuals of an ancient, gas-rich major merger. By modelling the formation of the peculiar features observed in the NGC 4013 halo, we investigate their origin. By using GADGET-2 with implemented gas cooling, star formation, and feedback, we have modelled the overall NGC 4013 galaxy and its associated halo features. A gas-rich major merger occurring 2.7-4.6 Gyr ago succeeds in reproducing the NGC 4013 galaxy properties, including all the faint stellar features, strong gas warp, boxy-shaped halo and vertical 3.6 μm luminosity distribution. High gas fractions in the progenitors are sufficient to reproduce the observed thin and thick discs, with a small bulge fraction, as observed. A major merger is able to reproduce the overall NGC 4013 system, including the warp strength, the red colour and the high stellar mass density of the loop, while a minor merger model cannot. Because the gas-rich model suffices to create a pseudo-bulge with a small fraction of the light, NGC 4013 is perhaps the archetype of a late-type galaxy formed by a relatively recent merger. Then late type, pseudo-bulge spirals are not mandatorily made through secular evolution, and the NGC 4013 properties also illustrate that strong warps in isolated galaxies may well occur at a late phase of a gas-rich major merger.

  18. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  19. ALK5-dependent TGF-β signaling is a major determinant of late stage adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingbo; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Andrea; Villeda, Saul A; Jaeger, Philipp A; Olayiwola, Oluwatobi; Fainberg, Nina; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway serves critical functions in central nervous system (CNS) development, but apart from its proposed neuroprotective actions, its physiological role in the adult brain is unclear. We observed a prominent activation of TGF-β signaling in the adult dentate gyrus and expression of downstream Smad proteins in this neurogenic zone. Consistent with a function of TGF-β signaling in adult neurogenesis, genetic deletion of the TGF-β receptor ALK5 reduced the number, migration, and dendritic arborization of newborn neurons. Conversely, constitutive activation of neuronal ALK5 in forebrain caused a striking increase in these aspects of neurogenesis and was associated with higher expression of c-fos in newborn neurons and with stronger memory function. Our findings describe a new and unexpected role for ALK5-dependent TGF-β signaling as a regulator of the late stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis which may have implications for changes in neurogenesis during aging and disease. PMID:24859199

  20. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-01

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  1. Embryonic Development and Rates of Metabolic Activity in Early and Late Hatching Eggs of the Major Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Maria L.; Duncan, Frances D.; Brooke, Basil D.

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae eggs generally hatch at the completion of embryo development; two-three days post oviposition. However, staggered or delayed hatching has been observed whereby a single batch of eggs shows marked variation in time-to-hatch, with some eggs hatching 18 days post oviposition or later. The mechanism enabling delayed hatch has not been clearly elucidated but is likely mediated by environmental and genetic factors that either induce diapause or slow embryo development. This study aimed to compare metabolic activity and embryonic development between eggs collected from sub-colonies of the baseline Anopheles gambiae GAH colony previously selected for early or late time-to-hatch. Egg batches from early and late hatch sub-colonies as well as from the baseline colony were monitored for hatching. For both time-to-hatch selected sub-colonies and the baseline colony the majority of eggs hatched on day two post oviposition. Nevertheless, eggs produced by the late hatch sub-colony showed a significantly longer mean time to hatch than those produced by the early hatch sub-colony. The overall proportions that hatched were similar for all egg batches. CO2 output between eggs from early and late hatch sub-colonies showed significant differences only at 3 and 7 days post oviposition where eggs from the early hatch and the late hatch sub-colony were more metabolically active, respectively. No qualitative differences were observed in embryo development between the sub-colonies. It is concluded that all viable embryos develop to maturity at the same rate and that a small proportion then enter a state of diapause enabling them to hatch later. As it has previously been shown that it is possible to at least partially select for late hatch, this characteristic is likely to involve genetic as well as environmental factors. Delayed hatching in An. gambiae is likely an adaptation to maximise reproductive output despite the increased risk of desiccation in an unstable aquatic

  2. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  3. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  4. Predicting the Next Eye Pathogen: Analysis of a Novel Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Zhou, Xiaohong; Rajaiya, Jaya; Yousuf, Mohammad A.; Singh, Gurdeep; DeSerres, Joshua J.; Walsh, Michael P.; Wong, Sallene; Seto, Donald; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT For DNA viruses, genetic recombination, addition, and deletion represent important evolutionary mechanisms. Since these genetic alterations can lead to new, possibly severe pathogens, we applied a systems biology approach to study the pathogenicity of a novel human adenovirus with a naturally occurring deletion of the canonical penton base Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) loop, thought to be critical to cellular entry by adenoviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a new highly recombinant species D human adenovirus (HAdV-D60). A synthesis of in silico and laboratory approaches revealed a potential ocular tropism for the new virus. In vivo, inflammation induced by the virus was dramatically greater than that by adenovirus type 37, a major eye pathogen, possibly due to a novel alternate ligand, Tyr-Gly-Asp (YGD), on the penton base protein. The combination of bioinformatics and laboratory simulation may have important applications in the prediction of tissue tropism for newly discovered and emerging viruses. PMID:23572555

  5. Trace element abundances in major minerals of Late Permian coals from southwestern Guizhou province, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; Ren, D.; Zheng, C.; Zeng, R.; Chou, C.-L.; Liu, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen samples of minerals were separated by handpicking from Late Permian coals in southwestern Guizhou province, China. These 14 minerals were nodular pyrite, massive recrystallized pyrite, pyrite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid and from ground water; clay minerals; and calcite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid and from ground water. The mineralogy, elemental composition, and distribution of 33 elements in these samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and ion-selective electrode (ISE). The results show that various minerals in coal contain variable amounts of trace elements. Clay minerals have high concentrations of Ba, Be, Cs, F, Ga, Nb, Rb, Th, U, and Zr. Quartz has little contribution to the concentration of trace elements in bulk coal. Arsenic, Mn, and Sr are in high concentrations in calcite. Pyrite has high concentrations of As, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb, Se, Tl, and Zn. Different genetic types of calcite in coal can accumulate different trace elements; for example Ba, Co, Cr, Hg, Ni, Rb, Sn, Sr, and Zn are in higher concentrations in calcite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid than in that deposited from ground water. Furthermore, the concentrations of some trace elements are quite variable in pyrite; different genetic types of pyrites (Py-A, B, C, D) have different concentrations of trace elements, and the concentrations of trace elements are also different in pyrite of low-temperature hydrothermal origin collected from different locations. The study shows that elemental concentration is rather uniform in a pyrite vein. There are many micron and submicron mosaic pyrites in a pyrite vein, which is enriched in some trace elements, such as As and Mo. The

  6. Late cenozoic evolution of Fortymile Ash: Major change in drainage pattern in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region during late miocene volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, S.C.; Warren, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of sedimentary provenance and altitude distribution of volcanic strata along Fortymile Wash, the primary desert wash east of Yucca Mountain, NV, indicates a major change in surface drainage basins related to late Miocene volcanic disruption. This event resulted in the establishment of the modern Fortymile Wash basin before 3 Ma, and probably by latest Miocene time. An understanding of this event is useful for evaluation of extensive alluviation east of Yucca Mountain and its relation to paleoclimate, hydrology and tectonics. To the northeast of Yucca Mountain, Fortymile Wash provides southward surface drainage from 60% of the area of the 11 Ma Timber Mountain caldera via Fortymile Canyon, a major breach in the caldera wall. In the southeast caldera moat, the distribution of volcanic units that predate and include the 9.4 Ma Thirsty Canyon Group and the characteristics of intercalated sediments indicate a northward paleoslope and sediment transport from a major drainage divide near Dome Mountain, a shield volcano now deeply incised by Fortymile Canyon. Eruption of the Thirsty Canyon Group from the Black Mountain area, 10 km northwest of the Timber Mountain caldera, is likely to have dammed a counterclockwise drainage system of the east moat. Following drainage disruption, the east moat filled with sediment up to the level of a new southward outlet at the saddle between Dome Mountain and the onlapping rhyolite of Shoshone Mountain. An older canyon south of this saddle received the overflow from the east moat and became the throughgoing Fortymile Canyon, integrating the east moat basin with a lower base level in Jackass Flats. Well-integrated southward drainage existed by the time the trachybasalt flows of Buckboard Mesa (2.8 Ma) were emplaced, because basal elevations of these flows slope southward about 100 m above modern Fortymile Wash.

  7. Pleistocene Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest a Single Major Dispersal of Non-Africans and a Late Glacial Population Turnover in Europe.

    PubMed

    Posth, Cosimo; Renaud, Gabriel; Mittnik, Alissa; Drucker, Dorothée G; Rougier, Hélène; Cupillard, Christophe; Valentin, Frédérique; Thevenet, Corinne; Furtwängler, Anja; Wißing, Christoph; Francken, Michael; Malina, Maria; Bolus, Michael; Lari, Martina; Gigli, Elena; Capecchi, Giulia; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Beauval, Cédric; Flas, Damien; Germonpré, Mietje; van der Plicht, Johannes; Cottiaux, Richard; Gély, Bernard; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Wehrberger, Kurt; Grigorescu, Dan; Svoboda, Jiří; Semal, Patrick; Caramelli, David; Bocherens, Hervé; Harvati, Katerina; Conard, Nicholas J; Haak, Wolfgang; Powell, Adam; Krause, Johannes

    2016-03-21

    How modern humans dispersed into Eurasia and Australasia, including the number of separate expansions and their timings, is highly debated [1, 2]. Two categories of models are proposed for the dispersal of non-Africans: (1) single dispersal, i.e., a single major diffusion of modern humans across Eurasia and Australasia [3-5]; and (2) multiple dispersal, i.e., additional earlier population expansions that may have contributed to the genetic diversity of some present-day humans outside of Africa [6-9]. Many variants of these models focus largely on Asia and Australasia, neglecting human dispersal into Europe, thus explaining only a subset of the entire colonization process outside of Africa [3-5, 8, 9]. The genetic diversity of the first modern humans who spread into Europe during the Late Pleistocene and the impact of subsequent climatic events on their demography are largely unknown. Here we analyze 55 complete human mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) of hunter-gatherers spanning ∼35,000 years of European prehistory. We unexpectedly find mtDNA lineage M in individuals prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This lineage is absent in contemporary Europeans, although it is found at high frequency in modern Asians, Australasians, and Native Americans. Dating the most recent common ancestor of each of the modern non-African mtDNA clades reveals their single, late, and rapid dispersal less than 55,000 years ago. Demographic modeling not only indicates an LGM genetic bottleneck, but also provides surprising evidence of a major population turnover in Europe around 14,500 years ago during the Late Glacial, a period of climatic instability at the end of the Pleistocene. PMID:26853362

  8. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  9. Late Major Hemoptysis After Lung Volume Reduction With Coils Induced by Dual Antiaggregation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Antonio; Casutt, Alessio; Koutsokera, Angela; Noetzli, Jasmine; Perentes, Jean Yannis; Krueger, Thorsten; Pons, Marco; Nicod, Laurent P; Lovis, Alban

    2016-02-01

    Lung-volume reduction using coils is an effective and safe treatment for selected patients presenting severe emphysema and hyperinflation. Most complications occur during the first 30 days after the procedure. Although frequent, hemoptysis is usually transient and minor. Antiaggregation therapy is common in patients with emphysema who, very often, have additional tobacco-associated comorbidities. Aspirin is considered safe for most major interventions; however, clopidogrel is mainly contraindicated and considered an exclusion criterion. We present a case of life-threatening hemoptysis caused by dual antiaggregation therapy "accidentally" introduced 3 months after the procedure. So far no recommendations exist on the optimal therapeutic strategy after lung-volume reduction with coils. PMID:26777971

  10. Major storm periods and climate forcing in the Western Mediterranean during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Devillers, Benoît; Dezileau, Laurent; Oueslati, Hamza; Bony, Guénaëlle

    2015-12-01

    Big storm events represent a major risk for populations and infrastructures settled on coastal lowlands. In the Western Mediterranean, where human societies colonized and occupied the coastal areas since the Ancient times, the variability of storm activity for the past three millennia was investigated with a multi-proxy sedimentological and geochemical study from a lagoonal sequence. Mappings of the geochemistry and magnetic susceptibility of detrital sources in the watershed of the lagoon and from the coastal barriers were undertaken in order to track the terrestrial or coastal/marine origin of sediments deposited into the lagoon. The multi-proxy analysis shows that coarser material, low magnetic susceptibility, and high strontium content characterize the sedimentological signature of the paleostorm levels identified in the lagoonal sequence. A comparison with North Atlantic and Western Mediterranean paleoclimate proxies shows that the phases of high storm activity occurred during cold periods, suggesting a climatically-controlled mechanism for the occurrence of these storm periods. Besides, an in-phase storm activity pattern is found between the Western Mediterranean and Northern Europe. Spectral analyses performed on the Sr content revealed a new 270-year solar-driven pattern of storm cyclicity. For the last 3000 years, this 270-year cycle defines a succession of ten major storm periods (SP) with a mean duration of 96 ± 54 yr. Periods of higher storm activity are recorded from >680 to 560 cal yr BC (SP10, end of the Iron Age Cold Period), from 140 to 820 cal yr AD (SP7 to SP5) with a climax of storminess between 400 and 800 cal yr AD (Dark Ages Cold Period), and from 1230 to >1800 cal yr AD (SP3 to SP1, Little Ice Age). Periods of low storm activity occurred from 560 cal yr BC to 140 cal yr AD (SP9 and SP8, Roman Warm Period) and from 820 to 1230 cal yr AD (SP4, Medieval Warm Period).

  11. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  12. Late Pleistocene Major Sedimentary Reworking Event (Homogenite) in Marmara Sea Central Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Schneider, J.-L.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Cagatay, N.; Labeyrie, L.; Wendenbaum, E.; Boutareau, S.; Ménot-Combes, G.; Hadjas, I.; Turon, J.-L.; Marmacore Scientific Party

    2003-04-01

    Among eight long piston-cores retrieved during MARMACORE Cruise, two were dedicated to the Marmara Sea Central Basin especially for paleoseismic purpose. There, very high-resolution profiles evidenced a main acoustically transparent unit ponded in the whole basin and resembling the so-called " homogenite " described in central-eastern Mediterranean and in deep lakes. Core MD01-2431 (26.4 m) crossed a major sedimentary event comprising three parts, from bottom to top : 0.7 m of mud clasts within coarse sand, 1.9 m of poorly-stratified sand, and 4.8 m of homogenous clayey silt (top at 15.2 m bsf). Two wood-fragments found in the homogenous horizon (60 cm-separated) yielded 17 100 yrs BP calibrated AMS C14 values. Textural investigation on involved sediments lead to consider the whole set as a unique reworking event with : mass waisting evolving into turbidite, basal liquefaction and erosion of in situ fine sediments, segregation by oscillation (seiche-like or constrained turbidite effect) of finer fraction. If admitting a triggering of the whole set by an earthquake comparable to the strongest historical ones, the unusual reworked volume of soft sediments could be explained by an occurrence during a period of particularly high terrigenous supply.

  13. mtDNA analysis reveals a major late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; D'Urbano, L; Lahermo, P; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Rengo, C; Forster, P; Savontaus, M L; Bonné-Tamir, B; Scozzari, R

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 419 individuals from nine Eurasian populations, by high-resolution RFLP analysis, and it was followed by sequencing of the control region of a subset of these mtDNAs and a detailed survey of previously published data from numerous other European populations. This analysis revealed that a major Paleolithic population expansion from the "Atlantic zone" (southwestern Europe) occurred 10,000-15,000 years ago, after the Last Glacial Maximum. As an mtDNA marker for this expansion we identified haplogroup V, an autochthonous European haplogroup, which most likely originated in the northern Iberian peninsula or southwestern France at about the time of the Younger Dryas. Its sister haplogroup, H, which is distributed throughout the entire range of Caucasoid populations and which originated in the Near East approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, also took part in this expansion, thus rendering it by far the most frequent (40%-60%) haplogroup in western Europe. Subsequent migrations after the Younger Dryas eventually carried those "Atlantic" mtDNAs into central and northern Europe. This scenario, already implied by archaeological records, is given overwhelming support from both the distribution of the autochthonous European Y chromosome type 15, as detected by the probes 49a/f, and the synthetic maps of nuclear data. PMID:9545392

  14. Delivery of avian cytokines by adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A; Pooley, C; Lowenthal, J W

    2000-01-01

    A fowl adenovirus serotype 8 (FAV-8) recombinant was constructed by inserting an expression cassette consisting of the FAV major late promoter/splice leader sequences (MLP/SL), the chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) gene and SV40 polyA into sites in the right hand end of the FAV-8 genome. One recombinant (A3-13) was constructed by an insertion of ChIFN-gamma into a 1.3 kilobase pair (kbp) deletion which removed a putative open reading frame (ORF) with identity to the CELO (FAV serotype 1) 36 kDa homologue. A second recombinant (S4) removed a further 0.9 kbp and a third recombinant (AA1) was constructed in a small 50 base pair (bp) SpeI deletion. The recombinants displayed differing growth characteristics in CK monolayers. A3-13 grew slowly and only attained a titre of 10(5) pfu/ml, S4 had intermediate growth and AA1 showed wild type growth kinetics. These differing growth properties indicated that removal of the 36 kDa homologue had an effect on growth in vitro. Supernatants from CK monolayers infected with the recombinant virus were assayed for the production of ChIFN-gamma. Detectable levels of ChIFN-gamma were observed in supernatants as early as 24 h post infection (p.i.), peaked at 48 h p.i. and this level was maintained for at least 10 days. The level of production of ChIFN-gamma correlated with each recombinant's growth characteristics in vitro. Chickens treated with rFAV-ChIFN-gamma showed increased weight gains compared to controls and suffered reduced weight loss when challenged with the coccidial parasite Eimeria acervulina. PMID:10717297

  15. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  16. Alternative poly(A) site utilization during adenovirus infection coincides with a decrease in the activity of a poly(A) site processing factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K P; Weiss, E A; Nevins, J R

    1993-01-01

    The recognition and processing of a pre-mRNA to create a poly(A) addition site, a necessary step in mRNA biogenesis, can also be a regulatory event in instances in which the frequency of use of a poly(A) site varies. One such case is found during the course of an adenovirus infection. Five poly(A) sites are utilized within the major late transcription unit to produce more than 20 distinct mRNAs during the late phase of infection. The proximal half of the major late transcription unit is also expressed during the early phase of a viral infection. During this early phase of expression, the L1 poly(A) site is used three times more frequently than the L3 poly(A) site. In contrast, the L3 site is used three times more frequently than the L1 site during the late phase of infection. Recent experiments have suggested that the recognition of the poly(A) site GU-rich downstream element by the CF1 processing factor may be a rate-determining step in poly(A) site selection. We demonstrate that the interaction of CF1 with the L1 poly(A) site is less stable than the interaction of CF1 with the L3 poly(A) site. We also find that there is a substantial decrease in the level of CF1 activity when an adenovirus infection proceeds to the late phase. We suggest that this reduction in CF1 activity, coupled with the relative instability of the interaction with the L1 poly(A) site, contributes to the reduced use of the L1 poly(A) site during the late stage of an adenovirus infection. Images PMID:8384308

  17. Aeolian to shallow-marine shelf architecture off a major desert since the Late Pleistocene (northern Mauritania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebuth, T. J. J.; Mersmeyer, H.; Kudrass, H. R.; Westphal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Continental shelves off major desert regions are not expected to host substantial amounts of sediments due to long-lasting and unfocused material supply and a high re-mobilization potential of aeolian material. This study, in contrast, demonstrates that significant volumes of sediments have accumulated on the northern Mauritanian shelf under the arid climate conditions and prevail over consecutive climatic cycles. Eight late Pleistocene to Holocene depositional units, each formed under contrasting depositional conditions, are identified in high-resolution seismo-acoustic data and dated sediment cores. These are: (1) a highly differentiated Pleistocene paleo-landscape older than the past climatic cycle, (2) a continental dune complex (MIS-4), (3) a thick regressive shallow-water clinoform (late MIS-3), (4) a regressive to lowstand shore deposit (latest MIS-3), and (5) a local transgressive cover (LGM to deglacial). Additionally, (6) an open-shelf highstand cover, (7) an outer-shelf highstand wedge and (8) mid-shelf mud depocenters have formed during the Holocene sea-level highstand. The common local offshore formation and preservation of confined stratigraphic units, in particular from during MIS-3, mark the interplay of: a) episodes of pronounced arid climatic conditions resulting in enhanced aeolian and coastal sediment input, b) shelf current patterns focusing sediment deposition locally, and c) early post-depositional sediment stabilization providing protection against erosion. Prominent internal surfaces at 63 and 115 m modern water depths indicate widespread and intense erosional activity during late MIS-3 regression and MIS-2 lowstand to post-LGM transgression, hosting coarse shell sands and gravels from beach and shoreface paleo-environments. The reasons for the high preservation potential of confined stratigraphic units are: a) carbonaceous cementation, b) sediment composition (massive widespread shore-related gravel and shell beds with subtle minor

  18. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakajima, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles. PMID:26926035

  19. Sr, C, and O isotope geochemistry of Ordovician brachiopods: a major isotopic event around the Middle-Late Ordovician transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Graham A.; Carden, Giles A. F.; Veizer, Jαn; Meidla, Tõnu; Rong, Jia-Yu; Li, Rong-Yu

    2003-06-01

    Here we present Sr, C, and O isotope curves for Ordovician marine calcite based on analyses of 206 calcitic brachiopods from 10 localities worldwide. These are the first Ordovician-wide isotope curves that can be placed within the newly emerging global biostratigraphic framework. A total of 182 brachiopods were selected for C and O isotope analysis, and 122 were selected for Sr isotope analysis. Seawater 87Sr/ 86Sr decreased from 0.7090 to 0.7078 during the Ordovician, with a major, quite rapid fall around the Middle-Late Ordovician transition, most probably caused by a combination of low continental erosion rates and increased submarine hydrothermal exchange rates. Mean δ 18O values increase from -10‰ to -3‰ through the Ordovician with an additional short-lived increase of 2 to 3‰ during the latest Ordovician due to glaciation. Although diagenetic alteration may have lowered δ 18O in some samples, particularly those from the Lower Ordovician, maximum δ 18O values, which are less likely to be altered, increase by more than 3‰ through the Ordovician in both our data and literature data. We consider that this long-term rise in calcite δ 18O records the effect of decreasing tropical seawater temperatures across the Middle-Late Ordovician transition superimposed on seawater δ 18O that was steadily increasing from ≤-3‰ standard mean ocean water (SMOW). By contrast, δ 13C variation seems to have been relatively modest during most of the Ordovician with the exception of the globally documented, but short-lived, latest Ordovician δ 13C excursion up to +7‰. Nevertheless, an underlying trend in mean δ 13C can be discerned, changing from moderately negative values in the Early Ordovician to moderately positive values by the latest Ordovician. These new isotopic data confirm a major reorganization of ocean chemistry and the surface environment around 465 to 455 Ma. The juxtaposition of the greatest recorded swings in Phanerozoic seawater 87Sr/ 86Sr and

  20. The Transmembrane Domain of the Adenovirus E3/19K Protein Acts as an Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Signal and Contributes to Intracellular Sequestration of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sester, Martina; Ruszics, Zsolt; Mackley, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The human adenovirus E3/19K protein is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that abrogates cell surface transport of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) molecules. Previous data suggested that E3/19K comprises two functional modules: a luminal domain for interaction with MHC-I and MICA/B molecules and a dilysine motif in the cytoplasmic tail that confers retrieval from the Golgi apparatus back to the ER. This study was prompted by the unexpected phenotype of an E3/19K molecule that was largely retained intracellularly despite having a mutated ER retrieval motif. To identify additional structural determinants responsible for ER localization, chimeric molecules were generated containing the luminal E3/19K domain and the cytoplasmic and/or transmembrane domain (TMD) of the cell surface protein MHC-I Kd. These chimeras were analyzed for transport, cell surface expression, and impact on MHC-I and MICA/B downregulation. As with the retrieval mutant, replacement of the cytoplasmic tail of E3/19K allowed only limited transport of the chimera to the cell surface. Efficient cell surface expression was achieved only by additionally replacing the TMD of E3/19K with that of MHC-I, suggesting that the E3/19K TMD may confer static ER retention. This was verified by ER retention of an MHC-I Kd molecule with the TMD replaced by that of E3/19K. Thus, we have identified the E3/19K TMD as a novel functional element that mediates static ER retention, thereby increasing the concentration of E3/19K in the ER. Remarkably, the ER retrieval signal alone, without the E3/19K TMD, did not mediate efficient HLA downregulation, even in the context of infection. This suggests that the TMD is required together with the ER retrieval function to ensure efficient ER localization and transport inhibition of MHC-I and MICA/B molecules. PMID:23514889

  1. The adenovirus E1B-55K transforming polypeptide modulates transport or cytoplasmic stabilization of viral and host cell mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Pilder, S; Moore, M; Logan, J; Shenk, T

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 5 mutant H5dl338 lacks 524 base pairs within early region 1B. The mutation removed a portion of the region encoding the related E1B-55K and -17K polypeptides but did not disturb the E1B-21K coding region. The virus can be propagated in 293 cells which contain and express the adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B regions, but it is defective for growth in HeLa cells, in which its final yield is reduced about 100-fold compared with the wild-type virus. The mutant also fails to transform rat cells at normal efficiency. The site of the dl338 defect was studied in HeLa cells. Early gene expression and DNA replication appeared normal. Late after infection, mRNAs coded by the major late transcription unit accumulated to reduced levels. At a time when transcription rates and steady-state nuclear RNA species were normal, the rate at which late mRNA accumulated in the cytoplasm was markedly reduced. Furthermore, in contrast to the case with the wild type, transport and accumulation of cellular mRNAs continued late after infection with dl338. Thus, the E1B product appears to facilitate transport and accumulation of viral mRNAs late after infection while blocking the same processes for cellular mRNAs. Images PMID:2946932

  2. Synchroneity of major Late Neogene sea level fluctuations and paleoceanographically controlled changes as recorded by two carbonate platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Christian; Kroon, Dick; Reijmer, John J. G.

    2000-12-01

    Shallow-water carbonate systems are reliable recorders of sea level fluctuations and changes in ambient seawater conditions. Drilling results from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 133 and 166 indicate that the timing of late Neogene sedimentary breaks triggered by sea level lowerings is synchronous in the sedimentary successions of the Queensland Plateau and the Great Bahama Bank. This synchrony indicates that these sea level changes were eustatic in origin. The carbonate platforms were also affected by contemporary, paleoceanographically controlled fluctuations in carbonate production. Paleoceanographic changes are recorded at 10.7, 3.6, and 1.7-2.0 Ma. At the Queensland Plateau, sea surface temperature shifts are documented by shifts from tropical to temperate carbonates (10.7 Ma) and vice versa (3.6 Ma); the modern tropical platform was established at 2.0-1.8 Ma. At Great Bahama Bank, changes were registered in compositional variations of platform-derived sediment, such as major occurrence of peloids (3.6 Ma) and higher rates of neritic carbonate input (1.7 Ma). The synchroneity of these changes attests to the far-field effects of modifications in the oceanographic circulation on shallow-water, low-latitude carbonate production.

  3. Critical Role for Arginine Methylation in Adenovirus-Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Demetris C.; O'Shea, Clodagh C.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During the late stages of adenovirus infection, the 100K protein (100K) inhibits the translation of cellular messages in the cytoplasm and regulates hexon trimerization and assembly in the nucleus. However, it is not known how it switches between these two functions. Here we show that 100K is methylated on arginine residues at its C terminus during infection and that this region is necessary for binding PRMT1 methylase. Methylated 100K is exclusively nuclear. Mutation of the third RGG motif (amino acids 741 to 743) prevents localization to the nucleus during infection, suggesting that methylation of that sequence is important for 100K shuttling. Treatment of infected cells with methylation inhibitors inhibits expression of late structural proteins. These data suggest that arginine methylation of 100K is necessary for its localization to the nucleus and is a critical cellular function necessary for productive adenovirus infection. PMID:17686851

  4. Late Holocene development of a major fluvial discontinuity in floodplain wetlands of the Blood River, eastern South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, Stephen; McCarthy, Terence; Rodnight, Helena; Keen-Zebert, Amanda; Rowberry, Matthew; Brandt, Dion

    2014-01-01

    In dryland settings, most floodplain wetlands form in low gradient, low energy environments that are characterised by strong interactions between flow, sediment and biota. Some floodplain wetlands are only partly channelled or largely unchannelled, and represent major discontinuities in drainage networks, fundamentally influencing downvalley water and sediment transfer. In the > 15 km2 Blood River floodplain wetlands, located in subhumid to semiarid eastern South Africa, field investigations, aerial photographs, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages provide evidence for development of a major discontinuity during the very late Holocene. Between ~ 800 and 100 years ago, the wetlands were characterised by a through-going, meandering channel set within a floodplain up to 2.5 km wide. A sinuous channel remains in the lower part of the wetlands but during the last ~ 100 years major morphological and sedimentary changes have occurred upvalley. The former through-going, meandering channel has been replaced by a straighter channel that decreases in size downstream and terminates in a 'floodout', characterised here by an unchannelled reedbed. Small tributaries supply water and limited sediment to this floodout and another floodout located farther downvalley. Organo-clastic sediments > 3 m thick have accumulated in the floodouts as broad lobes, in places burying the former meander-belt sediments. On the steepened, downvalley sides of these lobes, small headcutting channels convey water that filters through the reedbeds. If headcutting through the lobes continues, a through-going channel may re-establish upvalley, possibly eventually linking with the sinuous but now moribund channel in the lower part of the wetlands. Along the Blood River, the initial cause(s) of the sequence of changes is not known, but these channel-floodplain adjustments are partially analogous to the system-scale, autogenic morphological and sedimentary dynamics of those dryland fluvial systems

  5. Crystal Structure of the Fibre Head Domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; San Martín, Carmen; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1) fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest. PMID:25486282

  6. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  7. Adenovirus-based genetic vaccines for biodefense.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Julie L; Kobinger, Gary; Wilson, James M; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    The robust host responses elicited against transgenes encoded by (E1-)(E3-) adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to develop Ad-based vectors as platform technologies for vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens. This review focuses on pathogens of major concern as bioterror agents and why Ad vectors are ideal as anti-bioterror vaccine platforms, providing examples from our laboratories of using Ad vectors as vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens and how Ad vectors can be developed to enhance vaccine efficacy in the bioterror war.

  8. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  9. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  10. The rio caliente ignimbrite: Analysis of a compound intraplinian ignimbrite from a major late quaternary Mexican eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. V.

    1981-06-01

    The Rio Caliente ignimbrite is a multi-flow unit or compound ignimbrite formed during a major late Quaternary explosive rhyolitic eruption of La Primavera volcano, Mexico. The eruption sequence of the ignimbrite is complex and it occurs between lower and upper plinian air-fall deposits. It is, therefore, an intraplinian ignimbrite. Air-fall layers, pyroclastic surge, mudflow and fluviatile reworked pumice deposits also occur interbedded between ignimbrite flow units. A chaotic near-vent facies of the ignimbrite includes co-ignimbrite lag breccias segregated from proximal pumice flows. The facies locates a central vent but one which could not have been associated with a well defined edifice. Many of the lithics in the exposed lag breccias and near-vent facies of the ignimbrite appear to be fragments of welded Rio Caliente ignimbrite, and indicate considerable vent widening, or migration, during the eruption. Nearer vent the ignimbrite is thickest and composed of the largest number of flow units. Here it is welded and is a simple cooling unit. Evidence suggests that it was only the larger thicker pumice flows that escaped to the outer parts of the sheet. Detailed analysis of four flow units indicates that the pumice flows were generally poorly expanded, less mobile flows which would be produced by collapse of low eruption columns. The analogy of a compound ignimbrite with a compound lava flow is, therefore, good — a compound lava flow forms instead of a simple one when the volumetric discharge rate (or intensity) is low, and in explosive eruptions this predicts lower eruption column heights. A corollary is that the ignimbrite has a high aspect ratio. The complex eruption sequence shows the reinstatement of plinian activity several times during the eruption after column collapse occurred. This, together with erosional breaks and evidence that solidified fragments of already welded ignimbrite were re-ejected, all suggest the eruption lasted a relatively significant

  11. Late cenozoic evolution of Fortymile Wash: Major change in drainage pattern in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region during late miocene volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, S.C.; Warren, R.G.

    1994-04-01

    The site characterization of Yucca Mountain, NV as a potential high level nuclear waste repository includes study of the surficial deposits as a record of the paleoenvironmental history of the Yucca Mountain region. An important aspect of this history is an understanding of the evolution of paleogeography leading to establishment of the present drainage pattern. Establishment of drainage basin evolution is needed before geomorphic response to paleoclimate and tectonics can be assessed, because a major change in drainage basin geometry can predominantly affect the sedimentary record. Because alluvial aquifers are significant to regional hydrology, a major change in surface drainage resulting in buried alluvium could have hydrogeologic significance. In this paper, we report on geologic evidence for a major modification in surface drainage pattern in the Yucca Mountain region, resulting in the probable establishment of the Fortymile Wash drainage basin by latest Miocene time.

  12. Human adenoviruses: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Green, Maurice; Loewenstein, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    Detailed protocols are described for the propagation of adenoviruses (Ads) and adenovirus (Ad) vectors and their purification by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. A discussion of monolayer and spinner cell culture techniques suitable, respectively, for small- and large-scale growth of adenoviruses is provided. Protocols for cloning into and growth of Ad replication-deficient vectors using a convenient commercially available system are described. Lastly, time-tested plaque titration protocols for the accurate and convenient measurement of the infectivity of adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors are provided in detail.

  13. Severe conjunctivitis due to multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae and adenovirus 53 coinfection in a traveler returning from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Mueller, Andreas; Weißbrich, Benedikt; Schubert, Jörg; Schargus, Marc; Stich, August

    2013-01-01

    A male traveler returning from Thailand with severe bilateral conjunctivitis was tested for causative pathogens by culture and polymerase chain reaction in late 2010. The culturally grown Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain was resistant against penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. The patient was also found to have an eye infection with the unusual and likely recombinant adenovirus type 53. Besides multidrug-resistant gonococcal strains the unusual adenovirus strain is found circulating in Asia and both pathogens may be a risk for travelers.

  14. Major and trace element geochemistry and Os isotopic composition of metalliferous umbers from the Late Cretaceous Japanese accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2005-07-01

    Metalliferous umbers and red shales occur as unique products of the Kula-Pacific ridge-forearc collision in the Late Cretaceous Shimanto Supergroup, an accretionary complex in Japan. These umbers are closely associated with greenstones of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) origin and are regarded as hydrothermal metalliferous precipitates related to MOR-type volcanism. The umbers and red shales were deposited in the trench area where both terrigenous detritus from land and hydrothermal metalliferous particulates from a MOR were supplied simultaneously. Besides a predominance of Fe and Mn, the umbers exhibit remarkable enrichments in P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, Mo, rare earth elements (REEs), and Os relative to continental crustal abundances. The X/Fe (X = Mn, P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, and REEs) ratios and PAAS-normalized REE patterns of the umbers are very similar to those of modern hydrothermal plume fallout precipitates deposited on flanks of MOR. This indicates that the umbers preserve primary geochemical signatures of hydrothermal metalliferous sediments that scavenged seawater-derived elements and thus can be used as a proxy for Late Cretaceous seawater. The marine 187Os/188Os ratios reconstructed from the late Maastrichtian umbers range from 0.42 to 0.56 and are very consistent with recent data obtained from the Pacific and Atlantic pelagic carbonates that record an abrupt decline from 0.55 to 0.4 during the period between 67.0 Ma and 65.7 Ma.

  15. Characterization of the major altered leader sequence of late mRNA induced by SV40 deletion mutant d1-1811.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, G; Iserentant, D; Gheysen, D; Fiers, W

    1979-12-11

    d1-1811 is a viable SV40 mutant with a 40 base pair deletion that includes the major wild-type capping site of late mRNA at map position 0.72. The late viral mRNAs induced by d1-1811 have now been further characterized by inversed S1-mapping analysis. The S1-resistant, 32P-labeled RNA fragments derived from the leader region were examined by fingerprinting and by analysis of RNase T2-generated 5'-terminal cap structures. The results show that most if not all of the mutant leader fragments analyzed have their 5' terminus to the left of the d1-1811 deletion site, i.e., closer to the origin of DNA replication. The major altered leader fragment is a continuous transcript from the DNA in the region 0.716 to 0.761 map unit and its 5' terminus has been precisely mapped at nucleotide L290. The observation that the cap structure of the major altered leader is only a minor cap species in wild-type late RNA suggests regulation in the use of different capping sites in SV40.

  16. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for

  17. SEQUENTIAL CELLULAR CHANGES PRODUCED BY TYPES 5 AND 7 ADENOVIRUSES IN HELA CELLS AND IN HUMAN AMNIOTIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Georgiana S.; Denny, Floyd W.; Ginsberg, Harold S.

    1959-01-01

    The sequential cytological changes which develop in tissue culture cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 7 are described and compared with those produced by adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, and 4. The evidence that is presented indicates that types 1, 2, and 5 belong to one major subdivision of the adenovirus group and types 3, 4, and 7 to another. That the host cell nucleus is the principal site of adenovirus synthesis has been confirmed by fluorescent antibody studies. They have demonstrated the occurrence of type-specific adenovirus antigen in the characteristic intranuclear inclusions and other virus-induced structures reported to contain virus-like particles or shown by electronmicroscopy. PMID:13803575

  18. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  19. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease.

  20. Adenovirus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are an important cause of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, and they continue to provide clinical challenges pertaining to diagnostics and treatment. The growing number of HAdV types identified by genomic analysis, as well as the improved understanding of the sites of viral persistence and reactivation, requires continuous adaptions of diagnostic approaches to facilitate timely detection and monitoring of HAdV infections. In view of the clinical relevance of life-threatening HAdV diseases in the immunocompromised setting, there is an urgent need for highly effective treatment modalities lacking major side effects. The present review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding and management of HAdV infections. PMID:24982316

  1. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  2. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sook-Young; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  3. The nucleotide sequence and a first generation gene transfer vector of species B human adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Schaffner, Walter; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2005-12-20

    Human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 3 causes respiratory infections. It is considered highly virulent, accounting for about 13% of all Ad isolates. We report here the complete Ad3 DNA sequence of 35,343 base pairs (GenBank accession DQ086466). Ad3 shares 96.43% nucleotide identity with Ad7, another virulent subspecies B1 serotype, and 82.56 and 62.75% identity with the less virulent species B2 Ad11 and species C Ad5, respectively. The genomic organization of Ad3 is similar to the other human Ads comprising five early transcription units, E1A, E1B, E2, E3, and E4, two delayed early units IX and IVa2, and the major late unit, in total 39 putative and 7 hypothetical open reading frames. A recombinant E1-deleted Ad3 was generated on a bacterial artificial chromosome. This prototypic virus efficiently transduced CD46-positive rodent and human cells. Our results will help in clarifying the biology and pathology of adenoviruses and enhance therapeutic applications of viral vectors in clinical settings.

  4. The nucleotide sequence and a first generation gene transfer vector of species B human adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Schaffner, Walter; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2005-12-20

    Human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 3 causes respiratory infections. It is considered highly virulent, accounting for about 13% of all Ad isolates. We report here the complete Ad3 DNA sequence of 35,343 base pairs (GenBank accession DQ086466). Ad3 shares 96.43% nucleotide identity with Ad7, another virulent subspecies B1 serotype, and 82.56 and 62.75% identity with the less virulent species B2 Ad11 and species C Ad5, respectively. The genomic organization of Ad3 is similar to the other human Ads comprising five early transcription units, E1A, E1B, E2, E3, and E4, two delayed early units IX and IVa2, and the major late unit, in total 39 putative and 7 hypothetical open reading frames. A recombinant E1-deleted Ad3 was generated on a bacterial artificial chromosome. This prototypic virus efficiently transduced CD46-positive rodent and human cells. Our results will help in clarifying the biology and pathology of adenoviruses and enhance therapeutic applications of viral vectors in clinical settings. PMID:16169033

  5. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  6. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  7. A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for virus infectivity titrations as exemplified in an adenovirus system.

    PubMed

    Everitt, E; Varga, M J

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), employing a capturing antihexon monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing free hexons, was developed for quantitative infectivity titration of adenovirus in a microscale titration assay. The method is based on the quantitative assessment of the total excess production of the major structural protein late in infection in samples consisting of 10(5) virus-infected HeLa cells maintained as stationary suspension cultures. Results are obtained with a coefficient of variation of 10% within 50 hours after virus infection. The method was designed for monitoring substances interfering with viral replication, e.g., neutralizing antibodies or antiviral drugs. Since it measured the total antigen content associated with cells as well as antigens possibly released into the growth medium the general approach should be applicable to any viral system where a structural protein is synthesized in excess.

  8. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  9. Major Late Toxicities After Conformal Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-Patient- and Treatment-Related Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anne W.M. Ng, W.T.; Hung, W.M.; Choi, C.W.; Tung, Raymond; Ling, Y.H.; Cheng, Peter T.C.; Yau, T.K.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Leung, Samuel K.C.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2003, 422 patients were treated with a conformal technique with 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 70 Gy. Conventional fractionation (5 fractions weekly) was used in 232 patients and accelerated fractionation (6 fractions weekly) in 190 patients. One hundred seventy-one patients were treated with the basic radiotherapy course alone (Group 1), 55 patients had an additional boost of 5 Gy in 2 fractions (Group 2), and 196 patients underwent concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 3). Results: The 5-year overall toxicity rate was significantly greater in Group 3 than in Group 1 (37% vs. 27%, p = 0.009). Although the overall rate in Group 2 was not elevated (28% vs. 27%, p = 0.697), a significant increase in temporal lobe necrosis was observed (4.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Multivariate analyses showed that age and concurrent chemotherapy were significant factors. The hazard ratio of overall toxicity attributed to chemotherapy was 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-2.99, p = 0.001). The mean radiation dose to the cochlea was another significant factor affecting deafness, with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05, p = 0.005) per 1-Gy increase. The cochlea that received >50 Gy had a significantly greater deaf rate (Group 1, 18% vs. 7%; and Group 3, 22% vs. 14%). Conclusion: The therapeutic margin for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is extremely narrow, and a significant increase in brain necrosis could result from dose escalation. The significant factors affecting the risk of deafness included age, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and greater radiation dose to the cochlea.

  10. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 short fibre

    SciTech Connect

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. Schoehn, Guy

    2008-08-15

    There are more than 100 known adenovirus serotypes, including 50 human serotypes. They can infect all 5 major vertebrate classes but only Aviadenovirus infecting birds and Mastadenovirus infecting mammals have been well studied. CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan) adenovirus is responsible for mild respiratory pathologies in birds. Most studies on CELO virus have focussed on its genome sequence and organisation whereas the structural work on CELO proteins has only recently started. Contrary to most adenoviruses, the vertices of CELO virus reveal pentons with two fibres of different lengths. The distal parts (or head) of those fibres are involved in cellular receptor binding. Here we have determined the atomic structure of the short-fibre head of CELO (amino acids 201-410) at 2.0 A resolution. Despite low sequence identity, this structure is conserved compared to the other adenovirus fibre heads. We have used the existing CELO long-fibre head structure and the one we show here for a structure-based alignment of 11 known adenovirus fibre heads which was subsequently used for the construction of an evolutionary tree. Both the fibre head sequence and structural alignments suggest that enteric human group F adenovirus 41 (short fibre) is closer to the CELO fibre heads than the canine CAdV-2 fibre head, that lies closer to the human virus fibre heads.

  11. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late-stage erythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage of major nuclear substructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J; Short, Sarah A; Koury, Mark J; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-09-15

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in 3 cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium, and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA (Nuclear mitotic apparatus), and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus, nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  12. Shared Decision-Making in the Primary Care Treatment of Late-Life Major Depression: A Needed New Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Patrick J.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Hoffman, Amy S.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We suggest that clinicians consider models of shared decision-making for their potential ability to improve the treatment of major depression in the primary care setting and overcome limitations of collaborative care and other interventions. Methods We explore the characteristics and techniques of patient-clinician shared decision-making, with particular emphasis on this model’s relevance to the unique treatment concerns of depressed older adults. Results We describe a shared decision-making intervention to engage older adults in depression treatment in the primary care sector. Conclusions It is timely to examine shared decision-making models for elderly depressed primary care patients given their potential ability to improve treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. PMID:19946872

  13. Amalgamation of East Eurasia Since Late Paleozoic: Constraints from the Apparent Polar Wander Paths of the Major China Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Potter, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    It has been a longstanding challenge in the last few decades to quantitatively reconstruct the paleogeographic evolution of East Eurasia because of its great tectonic complexities. As the core region, the major China cratons including North China Block, South China Block and Tarim Block hold the key clues for the understanding of the amalgamation history, tectonic activities and biological affinity among the component blocks and terranes in East Eurasia. Compared with the major Gondwana and Laurentia plates, however, the apparent polar wander paths of China are not well constrained due to the outdated paleomagnetic database and relatively loose pole selection process. With the recruitment of the new high-fidelity poles published in the last decade, the rejection of the low quality data and the strict implementation of Voo's grading scheme, we build an updated paleomagnetic database for the three blocks from which three types of apparent polar wander paths (APWP) are computed. Version 1 running mean paths are constructed during the pole selection and compared with those from the previous publications. Version 2 running mean and spline paths with different sliding time windows are computed from the thoroughly examined poles to find the optimal paths with the steady trend, reasonable speed for the polar drift and plate rotation. The spline paths are recommended for the plate reconstructions, however, considering the poor data coverage during certain periods. Our new China APWPs, together with the latest European reference path, the geological, geochronological and biological evidence from the studied Asian plates allow us to reevaluate the paleogeographic and tectonic history of East Eurasia.

  14. Adenovirus E1A Targets the DREF Nuclear Factor To Regulate Virus Gene Expression, DNA Replication, and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Radko, Sandi; Koleva, Maria; James, Kris M. D.; Jung, Richard; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adenovirus E1A gene is the first gene expressed upon viral infection. E1A remodels the cellular environment to maximize permissivity for viral replication. E1A is also the major transactivator of viral early gene expression and a coregulator of a large number of cellular genes. E1A carries out its functions predominantly by binding to cellular regulatory proteins and altering their activities. The unstructured nature of E1A enables it to bind to a large variety of cellular proteins and form new molecular complexes with novel functions. The C terminus of E1A is the least-characterized region of the protein, with few known binding partners. Here we report the identification of cellular factor DREF (ZBED1) as a novel and direct binding partner of E1A. Our studies identify a dual role for DREF in the viral life cycle. DREF contributes to activation of gene expression from all viral promoters early in infection. Unexpectedly, it also functions as a growth restriction factor for adenovirus as knockdown of DREF enhances virus growth and increases viral genome copy number late in the infection. We also identify DREF as a component of viral replication centers. E1A affects the subcellular distribution of DREF within PML bodies and enhances DREF SUMOylation. Our findings identify DREF as a novel E1A C terminus binding partner and provide evidence supporting a role for DREF in viral replication. IMPORTANCE This work identifies the putative transcription factor DREF as a new target of the E1A oncoproteins of human adenovirus. DREF was found to primarily localize with PML nuclear bodies in uninfected cells and to relocalize into virus replication centers during infection. DREF was also found to be SUMOylated, and this was enhanced in the presence of E1A. Knockdown of DREF reduced the levels of viral transcripts detected at 20 h, but not at 40 h, postinfection, increased overall virus yield, and enhanced viral DNA replication. DREF was also found to localize to

  15. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection. PMID:20573817

  16. Late Quaternary chronology of major dune ridge development in the northeast Rub' al-Khali, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Oliver A. C.; Thomas, David S. G.; Goudie, Andrew S.; Bailey, Richard M.

    The northeastern sector of the Rub' al-Khali desert in the eastern United Arab Emirates (UAE) is dominated by large NE-SW trending dune ridges orientated perpendicular to the currently prevailing northwesterly wind regime. In this study, extensive use has been made of artificially exposed sections through these major dune ridges that reveal internal sedimentary structures and allow an intensive, high-resolution sampling programme to be carried out. Here, we present the optical dating results for samples from 7 sections. The results indicate that dune activity and preservation occurred within the periods 7-3 ka, 16-10 ka and 22-20 ka with evidence of earlier preservation during marine oxygen isotope stages MIS 3 and 5, with net accumulation rates in the range 2.2-25 m.ka - 1 . In several instances, hiatuses in the preserved record of dune accumulation coincide with stratigraphic bounding surfaces visible in the exposed section profiles with associated truncation of internal sedimentary structures. Caution must be exercised when interpreting such gaps in the recorded accumulation chronologies of these dunes since these may simply constitute phases of low preservation potential rather than phases of low aeolian activity. Other factors such as sediment supply and availability in relation to sea-level dynamics may be significant and are also considered.

  17. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; et al

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  18. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  19. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  20. Trajectories of postsurgical pain in children: risk factors and impact of late pain recovery on long-term health outcomes after major surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabbitts, Jennifer A; Zhou, Chuan; Groenewald, Cornelius B; Durkin, Lindsay; Palermo, Tonya M

    2015-11-01

    Over 1 million children undergo inpatient surgery annually in the United States. Emerging research indicates that many children have longer-term problems with pain. However, limited data exist on the course of pain over time and the impact of pain recovery on long-term health outcomes. We sought to prospectively characterize children's postsurgical pain trajectories using repeated assessments over 12 months. In addition, we identified presurgical child and parent psychological risk factors associated with persistent pain and examined relationships between pain trajectories and long-term health outcomes. Sixty children aged 10 to 18 years undergoing major surgery and their parent/guardian were enrolled. Participants completed assessments at 5 time points: presurgery, inhospital, 2 weeks, 4 months, and 1 year postsurgery. Child and parent pain catastrophizing was assessed during the week before surgery. Children completed daily monitoring with an electronic pain diary and reported on pain characteristics, health-related quality of life, and activity limitations. Group-based longitudinal modeling revealed 2 distinct trajectories of postsurgical pain: early recovery (n = 49, 82%) and late recovery (n = 11, 18%). In a logistic regression model controlling for age and sex, parental pain catastrophizing before surgery significantly predicted membership in the late recovery group (odds ratio = 1.11, P = 0.03), whereas child catastrophizing and baseline pain did not (Ps < 0.05). In a multivariate regression controlling for age and sex, late pain recovery was significantly associated with poorer health-related quality of life (β = -10.7, P = 0.02) and greater activity limitations (β = 3.6, P = 0.04) at 1 year. Our findings suggest that preoperative interventions that modify parent behaviors and cognitions might be beneficial in this population.

  1. Adenovirus type 2 nuclear RNA accumulating during productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bachenheimer, S L

    1977-01-01

    The viral-specific nuclear RNA which accumulates early and late during productive infection of HeLa cells by adenovirus-type 2 (Ad2) has been characterized with respect to its size and stability after denaturation by Me2SO. Early nuclear transcripts, under nondenaturing conditions, sediment in the range 28 to 45S, but treatment with Me2SO prior to sedimentation results in a shift to about 20S. Later nuclear RNA accumulates as a composite of two populations of molecules: one with a broad size distribution centering on 45S under nondenaturing conditions and less than 32S after denaturation and a second having a narrow size distribution around 35S which is quite stable to Me2SO. Analysis of late RNA by hybridization to Sma fragments of Ad2 DNA suggests that the 35S RNA species is derived from a limited portion of the left half of the viral genome. PMID:864839

  2. Adenovirus type 2 terminal protein: purification and comparison of tryptic peptides with known adenovirus-coded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, M L; Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1979-01-01

    The protein covalently bound to the 5' termini of adenovirus type 2 DNA has been purified from virus labeled with [35S]methionine, using exclusion chromatography of disrupted virions to isolate the DNA-protein complex, which is then digested with DNase. The terminal protein isolated from mature virus is most effectively labeled if the cells are exposed to [35S]methionine during the "intermediate" period of 13 to 21 h postinfection, suggesting that the protein is synthesized during this interval. The tryptic peptides of the terminal protein were compared with those of several known adenovirus-coded proteins and found to be unrelated. In particular, the terminal protein is not related to the 38-50K early proteins encoded by the leftmost 4.4% of the adenovirus genome, one region essential for the transforming activity of the virus. Neither is it related to the 72K single-strand-specific DNA binding protein, the minor virion component IVa2, or the major capsid component hexon. Images PMID:513195

  3. Biosynthesis and properties of the adenovirus 2 L1-encoded 52,000- and 55,000-Mr proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 L1 region, which is located at 30.7 to 39.2 map units on the viral genome, is transcribed from the major late promoter during both early and late stages of virus replication, and a 52,000-Mr (52K) protein-55K protein doublet has been translated in vitro on L1-specific RNA. To investigate the biosynthesis and properties of the L1 52K and 55K proteins, we prepared antibody against a synthetic peptide encoded near the predicted N terminus. As determined by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, the antipeptide antibody recognized major 52K and 55K proteins synthesized in adenovirus type 2-infected cells that appeared to be identical to the 52K-55K doublet translated in vitro. The immunoprecipitated 52K and 55K proteins were very closely related, as shown by a peptide map analysis. Both L1 proteins were phosphorylated, and they were phosphorylated at similar sites. No precursor-product relationship was detected between the 52K and 55K proteins by a pulse-chase analysis. Biosynthesis of the L1 52K and 55K proteins began about 6 to 7 h postinfection, after biosynthesis of the early region 1A and early region 1B 19K (175R) T antigens, and reached a maximum rate at about 15 h; the maximum rate was maintained until at least 25 h postinfection. At all times, the 55K protein appeared to be synthesized at a severalfold-higher level than the 52K protein. Both proteins were quite stable and accumulated until late times after infection. Viral DNA replication was not essential for formation of the L1 proteins. Thus, the L1 52K-55K gene appears to be regulated in a manner different from the classical early and late viral genes but similar to the protein encoded by the i-leader (Symington et al., J. Virol. 57:849-856, 1986). The L1 proteins were detected in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence microscopy with antipeptide antibody and were found to be primarily associated with the nuclear membrane by an immunoblot analysis of subcellular fractions

  4. Infectious entry pathway of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, M J; Weibull, C; Everitt, E

    1991-01-01

    Internalization of the infectious fraction of human adenovirus type 2 into HeLa cells was followed by a quantitative internalization assay. Treatments known to selectively block receptor-mediated endocytosis reduced the internalization of infectious virus to an extent close to the reduction of endocytosis of transferrin. This suggests that one of the first steps in the infectious cycle of adenovirus type 2 is internalization by the coated-pit and -vesicle pathway. Images PMID:1920625

  5. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  6. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling.

  7. Adenovirus-vectored Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has highlighted the need for the availability of effective vaccines against outbreak pathogens that are suitable for use in frontline workers who risk their own health in the course of caring for those with the disease, and also for members of the community in the affected area. Along with effective contact tracing and quarantine, use of a vaccine as soon as an outbreak is identified could greatly facilitate rapid control and prevent the outbreak from spreading. This review describes the progress that has been made in producing and testing adenovirus-based Ebola vaccines in both pre-clinical and clinical studies, and considers the likely future use of these vaccines.

  8. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  9. A genetic fiber modification to achieve matrix-metalloprotease-activated infectivity of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Luna, Jeroni; Giménez-Alejandre, Marta; Vaquero, Eva; García de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-10-28

    Selective tumor targeting of oncolytic adenovirus at the level of cell entry remains a major challenge to improve efficacy and safety. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors and in particular in pancreatic cancer. In the current work, we have exploited the expression of MMPs together with the penetration capabilities of a TAT-like peptide to engineer tumor selective adenoviruses. We have generated adenoviruses containing CAR-binding ablated fibers further modified with a C-terminus TAT-like peptide linked to a blocking domain by an MMP-cleavable sequence. This linker resulted in a MMP-dependent cell transduction of the reporter MMP-activatable virus AdTATMMP and in efficient transduction of neoplastic cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Intravenous and intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice showed very low AdTATMMP activity in the normal pancreas, whereas increased transduction was observed in pancreatic tumors of transgenic Ela-myc mice. Intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice bearing orthotopic tumors led to a 25-fold increase in tumor targeting compared to the wild type fiber control. A replication competent adenovirus, Ad(RC)MMP, with the MMP-activatable fiber showed oncolytic efficacy and increased antitumor activity compared to Adwt in a pancreatic orthotopic model. Reduced local and distant metastases were observed in Ad(RC)MMP treated-mice. Moreover, no signs of pancreatic toxicity were detected. We conclude that MMP-activatable adenovirus may be beneficial for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  10. Adenovirus Type 37 Uses Sialic Acid as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnberg, Niklas; Edlund, Karin; Kidd, Alistair H.; Wadell, Göran

    2000-01-01

    Two cellular receptors for adenovirus, coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) α2, have recently been identified. In the absence of CAR, MHC-I α2 has been suggested to serve as a cellular attachment protein for subgenus C adenoviruses, while members from all subgenera except subgenus B have been shown to interact with CAR. We have found that adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) attachment to CAR-expressing CHO cells was no better than that to CHO cells lacking CAR expression, suggesting that CAR is not used by Ad37 during attachment. Instead, we have identified sialic acid as a third adenovirus receptor moiety. First, Ad37 attachment to both CAR-expresing CHO cells and MHC-I α2-expressing Daudi cells was sensitive to neuraminidase treatment, which eliminates sialic acid on the cell surface. Second, Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was more than 10-fold stronger than that to the Pro-5 subline Lec2, which is deficient in sialic acid expression. Third, neuraminidase treatment of A549 cells caused a 60% decrease in Ad37 replication in a fluorescent-focus assay. Moreover, the receptor sialoconjugate is most probably a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside, since Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was sensitive to protease treatment. Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells occurs via α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides rather than α(2→6)-linked ones, since (i) α(2→3)-specific but not α(2→6)-specific lectins blocked Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells and (ii) pretreatment of Pro-5 cells with α(2→3)-specific neuraminidase resulted in decreased Ad37 binding. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike Ad5, Ad37 makes use of α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides on glycoproteins for entry instead of using CAR or MHC-I α2. PMID:10590089

  11. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  12. Coordinate regulation of two cytoplasmic RNA species transcribed from early region 2 of the adenovirus 2 genome.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, C J; Rosenthal, R; Bhaduri, S; Raskas, H

    1981-06-01

    Early region 2 (E2) of the adenovirus 2 genome specifies a 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein that is required for viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy studies have detected two major forms of 20S E2 mRNA, one species with a 5' leader from map position 75 and a second form having a leader from position 72 (Chow et al., J. Mol. Biol. 134:265-303, 1979). Only the species with a leader from position 75 was detected at early times; however, both forms were found at late times. We have analyzed the temporal regulation of E2 expression by documenting mRNA accumulation in the cytoplasm. Kinetic studies of pulse-labeled RNAs demonstrated a peak of E2 cytoplasmic RNa synthesis at 10 to 12 h, coinciding with the time of maximal synthesis of the 72,000-dalton DNA binding protein and viral DNA. To estimate the relative abundances of the two major E2 RNA species at various times during infection, total E2 cytoplasmic and polysomal 20S RNAs were isolated by hybridization-selection with specific DNA probes. The leader sequences in the selected RNAs were then quantitated by further RNA-DNA hybridization. We found that the elevated accumulation rate for E2 cytoplasmic RNA at late times reflected an increase in formation of both major species. Moreover, for all time points examined 66% of the mRNA species had a 5' end from map position 75, and 33% had a 5' terminus from position 72. Continuous labeling experiments provided evidence that both RNA forms have comparable half-lives. The results suggest that the two major species encoded by E2 are regulated in a coordinate fashion late in infection.

  13. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  14. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-10-16

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  15. Combining moderators to identify clinical profiles of patients who will, and will not, benefit from aripiprazole augmentation for treatment resistant late-life major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Smagula, Stephen F; Wallace, Meredith L; Anderson, Stewart J; Karp, Jordan F; Lenze, Eric J; Mulsant, Benoit H; Butters, Meryl A; Blumberger, Daniel M; Diniz, Breno S; Lotrich, Francis E; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F

    2016-10-01

    Personalizing treatment for late-life depression requires identifying and integrating information from multiple factors that influence treatment efficacy (moderators). We performed exploratory moderator analyses using data from a multi-site, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of aripiprazole augmentation. Patients (n = 159) aged ≥60 years had major depressive disorder that failed to remit with venlafaxine monotherapy. We examined effect sizes of 39 potential moderators of aripiprazole (vs. placebo) augmentation efficacy using the outcome of percentage reduction in depressive symptom after 12 weeks. We then incorporated information from the individually relevant variables in combined moderators. A larger aripiprazole treatment effect was related to: white race, better physical function, better performance on Trail-Making, attention, immediate, and delayed memory tests, greater psychomotor agitation and suicidality symptoms, and a history of adequate antidepressant pharmacotherapy. A smaller aripiprazole treatment effect was observed in patients with: more pain and more work/activity impairment and libido symptoms. Combining information from race and Trail-Making test performance (base combined moderator (Mb*)) produced a larger effect size (Spearman effect size = 0.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.15, 0.42)) than any individual moderator. Adding other individually relevant moderators in the full combined moderator (Mf*) further improved effect size (Spearman effect size = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.52)) and identified a sub-group benefiting more from placebo plus continuation venlafaxine monotherapy than adjunctive aripiprazole. Combining moderators can help clinicians personalize depression treatment. We found the majority of our patients benefited from adjunctive aripiprazole, but a smaller subgroup that is identifiable using clinical measures appeared to benefit more from continuation venlafaxine plus placebo. PMID:27438687

  16. human adenoviruses role in ophthalmic pterygium formation

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Mishar; Kelishadi, Mandana; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Javid, Naeme; Bazouri, Masoud; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmic pterygium is a common benign lesion of unknown origin and the pathogenesis might be vision-threatening. This problem is often associated with exposure to solar light. Recent evidence suggests that potentially oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Expression of specific adenovirus genes such as E1A and E1B, which potentially have many functions, may contribute to their oncogenic activity as well as relevance to cellular immortalization. Objectives: For the first time, we aimed to investigate involvement of adenoviruses in pterygium formation. Patients and Methods: Fifty tissue specimens of pterygium from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (as cases), 50 conjunctival swab samples from the same patients and 10 conjunctival biopsy specimens from individuals without pterygium such as patients undergoing cataract surgery (as controls) were analyzed for evidence of adenovirus infection with polymerase chain reaction using specific primers chosen from the moderately conserved region of the hexon gene. Furthermore, β-globin primers were used to access the quality of extracted DNA. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16) software. Results: Of 50 patients, 20 were men and 30 women with mean age of 61.1 ± 16.9 years ranged between 22 and 85 years. All samples of pterygia had positive results for adenoviruses DNA with polymerase chain reaction, but none of the negative control groups displayed adenoviruses. The pterygium group and the control groups were β-globin positive. Direct sequencing of PCR products confirmed Adenovirus infection. Conclusions: Adenoviruses might act as a possible cause of pterygium formation and other factors could play a synergistic role in the development. However, further larger studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26034543

  17. The Adenovirus L4-22K Protein Is Multifunctional and Is an Integral Component of Crucial Aspects of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Orozco, Diana

    2012-01-01

    A variety of cellular and viral processes are coordinately regulated during adenovirus (Ad) infection to achieve optimal virus production. The Ad late gene product L4-22K has been associated with disparate activities during infection, including the regulation of late gene expression, viral DNA packaging, and infectious virus production. We generated and characterized two L4-22K mutant viruses to further explore L4-22K functions during viral infection. Our results show that L4-22K is indeed important for temporal control of viral gene expression not only because it activates late gene expression but also because it suppresses early gene expression. We also show that the L4-22K protein binds to viral packaging sequences in vivo and is essential to recruit two other packaging proteins, IVa2 and L1-52/55K, to this region. The elimination of L4-22K gave rise to the production of only empty virus capsids and not mature virions, which confirms that the L4-22K protein is required for Ad genome packaging. Finally, L4-22K contributes to adenovirus-induced cell death by regulating the expression of the adenovirus death protein. Thus, the adenovirus L4-22K protein is multifunctional and an integral component of crucial aspects of infection. PMID:22811519

  18. Functional significance of the TATA element major groove in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D K; Wang, K C; Roeder, R G

    1997-01-01

    The binding of TFIID to the TATA element initiates assembly of a preinitiation complex and thus represents one of the most important steps for transcriptional regulation. The fact that the TATA binding protein (TBP), a subunit of TFIID, exclusively contacts the minor groove of the TATA element led us to ask whether the major groove of the TATA element plays any role in transcription initiation or its regulation. Our results show that modifications of the major groove of the TATA element in the adenovirus major late promoter have no effect on TFIID binding affinity or on transcription in a cell-free system reconstituted with purified factors. However, major groove modifications do decrease the levels of both basal and activator-mediated transcription in unfractionated nuclear extracts, indicating that the intact structure of the major groove of the TATA element is functionally important for transcription initiation in a more physiological context. PMID:9336466

  19. Impact of preexisting adenovirus vector immunity on immunogenicity and protection conferred with an adenovirus-based H5N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Vemula, Sai V; Couëtil, Laurent; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenoviruses in the majority of the human population might adversely impact the development of adaptive immune responses against adenovirus vector-based vaccines. To address this issue, we primed BALB/c mice either intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with varying doses of wild type (WT) human adenovirus subtype 5 (HAd5). Following the development of immunity against HAd5, we immunized animals via the i.n. or i.m. route of inoculation with a HAd vector (HAd-HA-NP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) influenza virus. The immunogenicity and protection results suggest that low levels of vector immunity (<520 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with up to 10(7) plaque forming units (p.f.u.) of HAd-WT did not adversely impact the protective efficacy of the vaccine. Furthermore, high levels of vector immunity (approximately 1500 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with 10(8) p.f.u. of HAd-WT were overcome by either increasing the vaccine dose or using alternate routes of vaccination. A further increase in the priming dose to 10(9) p.f.u. allowed only partial protection. These results suggest possible strategies to overcome the variable levels of human immunity against adenoviruses, leading to better utilization of HAd vector-based vaccines.

  20. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  1. Adenovirus type 2 activates cell cycle-dependent genes that are a subset of those activated by serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H T; Baserga, R; Mercer, W E

    1985-01-01

    We have studied a panel of 10 genes and cDNA sequences that are expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner in different types of cells from different species and that are inducible by different mitogens. These include five sequences (c-myc, 4F1, 2F1, 2A9, and KC-1) that are preferentially expressed in the early part of the G1 phase, three genes (ornithine decarboxylase, p53, and c-rasHa) preferentially expressed in middle or late G1, and two genes (thymidine kinase and histone H3) preferentially expressed in the S phase of the cell cycle. We have studied the expression of these genes in nonpermissive (tsAF8) and semipermissive (Swiss 3T3) cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Under the conditions of these experiments, adenovirus type 2 infection stimulates cellular DNA synthesis in both tsAF8 and 3T3 cells. However, four of the five early G1 genes (c-myc, 4F1, KC-1, and 2A9) and one of the late G1 genes (c-ras) are not induced by adenovirus infection, although they are strongly induced by serum. The other sequences (2F1, ornithine decarboxylase, p53, thymidine kinase, and histone H3) are activated by both adenovirus and serum. We conclude that the cell cycle-dependent genes activated by adenovirus 2 are a subset of the cell cycle-dependent genes activated by serum. The data suggest that the mechanisms by which serum and adenovirus induce cellular DNA synthesis are not identical. Images PMID:2427924

  2. GWAS-identified risk variants for major depressive disorder: Preliminary support for an association with late-life depressive symptoms and brain structural alterations.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joanne; Artero, Sylvaine; Carrière, Isabelle; Maller, Jerome J; Meslin, Chantal; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated risk factors for major depressive disorder (MDD), however there has been little attempt to replicate these findings in population-based studies of depressive symptoms. Variants within three genes, BICC1, PCLO and GRM7 were selected for replication in our study based on the following criteria: they were identified in a prior MDD GWAS study; a subsequent study found evidence that they influenced depression risk; and there is a solid biological basis for a role in depression. We firstly investigated whether these variants were associated with depressive symptoms in our population-based cohort of 929 elderly (238 with clinical depressive symptoms and 691 controls), and secondly to investigate associations with structural brain alterations. A number of nominally significant associations were identified, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance levels. Common SNPs in BICC1 and PCLO were associated with a 50% and 30% decreased risk of depression, respectively. PCLO rs2522833 was also associated with the volume of grey matter (p=1.6×10(-3)), and to a lesser extent with hippocampal volume and white matter lesions. Among depressed individuals rs9870680 (GRM7) was associated with the volume of grey and white matter (p=10(-4) and 8.3×10(-3), respectively). Our results provide some support for the involvement of BICC1 and PCLO in late-life depressive disorders and preliminary evidence that these genetic variants may also influence brain structural volumes. However effect sizes remain modest and associations did not reach corrected significance levels. Further large imaging studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  3. Centennial- to decadal scale environmental shifts in and around Lake Pannon (Vienna Basin) related to a major Late Miocene lake level rise

    PubMed Central

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Kern, Andrea; Soliman, Ali; Minati, Klaus; Piller, Werner E.; Danielopol, Dan L.; Zuschin, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A detailed ultra-high-resolution analysis of a 37-cm-long core of Upper Miocene lake sediments of the long-lived Lake Pannon has been performed. Despite a general stable climate at c. 11–9 Ma, several high-frequency oscillations of the paleoenvironments and depositional environments are revealed by the analysis over a short time span of less than 1000 years. Shifts of the lake level, associated with one major 3rd order flooding are reflected by all organisms by a cascade of environmental changes on a decadal scale. Within a few decades, the pollen record documents shifting vegetation zones due to the landward migration of the coast; the dinoflagellate assemblages switch towards “offshore-type” due to the increasing distance to the shore; the benthos is affected by low oxygen conditions due to the deepening. This general trend is interrupted by smaller scale cycles, which lack this tight interconnection. Especially, the pollen data document a clear cyclicity that is expressed by iterative low pollen concentration events. These “negative” cycles are partly reflected by dinoflagellate blooms suggesting a common trigger-mechanism and a connection between terrestrial environments and surface waters of Lake Pannon. The benthic fauna of the core, however, does not reflect these surface water cycles. This forcing mechanism is not understood yet but periodic climatic fluctuations are favoured as hypothesis instead of further lake level changes. Short phases of low precipitation, reducing pollen production and suppressing effective transport by local streams, might be a plausible mechanism. This study is the first hint towards solar activity related high-frequency climate changes during the Vallesian (Late Miocene) around Lake Pannon and should encourage further ultra-high-resolution analyses in the area. PMID:21179376

  4. Characterization of a New Species of Adenovirus in Falcons

    PubMed Central

    Schrenzel, Mark; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Rotstein, Dave; Maalouf, Gabriel; Snook, Eric; Sandfort, Cal; Rideout, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In 1996, a disease outbreak occurred at a captive breeding facility in Idaho, causing anorexia, dehydration, and diarrhea or sudden death in 72 of 110 Northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) from 9 to 35 days of age and in 6 of 102 peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from 14 to 25 days of age. Sixty-two Northern aplomado and six peregrine falcons died. Epidemiologic analyses indicated a point source epizootic, horizontal transmission, and increased relative risk associated with cross-species brooding of eggs. Primary lesions in affected birds were inclusion body hepatitis, splenomegaly, and enteritis. The etiology in all mortalities was determined by molecular analyses to be a new species of adenovirus distantly related to the group I avian viruses, serotypes 1 and 4, Aviadenovirus. In situ hybridization and PCR demonstrated that the virus was epitheliotropic and lymphotropic and that infection was systemic in the majority of animals. Adeno-associated virus was also detected by PCR in most affected falcons, but no other infectious agents or predisposing factors were found in any birds. Subsequent to the 1996 epizootic, a similar disease caused by the same adenovirus was found over a 5-year period in orange-breasted falcons (Falco deiroleucus), teita falcons (Falco fasciinucha), a merlin (Falco columbarius), a Vanuatu peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nesiotes), and gyrfalcon × peregrine falcon hybrids (Falco rusticolus/peregrinus) that died in Wyoming, Oklahoma, Minnesota, and California. These findings indicate that this newly recognized adenovirus is widespread in western and midwestern North America and can be a primary pathogen in different falcon species. PMID:16000466

  5. Characterization of a new species of adenovirus in falcons.

    PubMed

    Schrenzel, Mark; Oaks, J Lindsay; Rotstein, Dave; Maalouf, Gabriel; Snook, Eric; Sandfort, Cal; Rideout, Bruce

    2005-07-01

    In 1996, a disease outbreak occurred at a captive breeding facility in Idaho, causing anorexia, dehydration, and diarrhea or sudden death in 72 of 110 Northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) from 9 to 35 days of age and in 6 of 102 peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from 14 to 25 days of age. Sixty-two Northern aplomado and six peregrine falcons died. Epidemiologic analyses indicated a point source epizootic, horizontal transmission, and increased relative risk associated with cross-species brooding of eggs. Primary lesions in affected birds were inclusion body hepatitis, splenomegaly, and enteritis. The etiology in all mortalities was determined by molecular analyses to be a new species of adenovirus distantly related to the group I avian viruses, serotypes 1 and 4, Aviadenovirus. In situ hybridization and PCR demonstrated that the virus was epitheliotropic and lymphotropic and that infection was systemic in the majority of animals. Adeno-associated virus was also detected by PCR in most affected falcons, but no other infectious agents or predisposing factors were found in any birds. Subsequent to the 1996 epizootic, a similar disease caused by the same adenovirus was found over a 5-year period in orange-breasted falcons (Falco deiroleucus), teita falcons (Falco fasciinucha), a merlin (Falco columbarius), a Vanuatu peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nesiotes), and gyrfalcon x peregrine falcon hybrids (Falco rusticolus/peregrinus) that died in Wyoming, Oklahoma, Minnesota, and California. These findings indicate that this newly recognized adenovirus is widespread in western and midwestern North America and can be a primary pathogen in different falcon species.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Adenovirus Respiratory Infections in Taiwanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Shen, Fan-Ching; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Tsai, Huey-Pin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chi, Chia-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are important causes of respiratory infections in children. They usually cause mild upper respiratory symptoms, but they can also produce severe pneumonia and other complications. The aims of this retrospective study were to better define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in Taiwanese children during 2002 and 2013, detect reinfections and co-infections, and characterize the clinical features and laboratory findings according to the causative genotypes. We collected a representative sample of 182 isolates of adenoviruses from 175 children during the 12-year study period. The most prevalent species was HAdV-B genotype 3 (HAdV-3) (92/182, 50.5%) followed by HAdV-C (HAdV-2) (38/182, 20.9%). A single outbreak of HAdV-E (6/182, 3.3%) was noted in 2007. The mean age of children with adenovirus infections was 3.7 ± 2.0 years, with a slight predominance of males (53.1%). Children with HAdV-B tended to be older, had more lower respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, and a higher rate of hospitalization than those with HAdV-C (P < 0.05). Adenovirus co-infections were noted in 25/175 (14.3%) of the children. The most frequent co-infections were with species B (HAdV-3) and C (HAdV-2) (14/25, 56.0%). Additional infections were noted in 23/175 (13.1%) of the children. Of these repeated infections, the initial isolates were always genotypes of HAdV-C. The second isolates were genotypes of HAdV-B or HAdV-E. The clinical features of the first HAdV-B infection and the reinfection of HAdV-B followed the HAdV-C were similar. In conclusion, HAdV-B, C, and E were the only adenovirus species that were isolated from children who were sufficiently ill with respiratory infections to require a visit to the hospital. Human adenovirus B (HAdV-3) accounted for half of these species. HAdV-B was more likely than other species to produce severe disease. The high incidence of adenovirus co-infection and

  7. The adenovirus that causes hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J M; Hedges, J F; Woods, L W; Reubel, G H; MacLachlan, N J

    1999-01-01

    DNA sequence data was obtained from an adenovirus previously shown to be the cause of a distinctive, fatal hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer in California. A 256 base fragment of the viral hexon gene was amplified by PCR from purified adenovirus preparations. The amplicon then was cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic relationships with other mammalian adenoviruses were also determined. Although sequence analysis of this portion of the hexon gene indicates that the black-tailed deer adenovirus is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3, the biologic properties of the two viruses are clearly distinct.

  8. Association of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein with RNA Both in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghon, Vaughn G.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1986-12-01

    The multifunctional DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenovirus binds RNA. The association of purified DBP with RNA in vitro was demonstrated by using either a gel filtration or a filter binding assay. This association is sensitive to ionic strength and exhibits no apparent sequence specificity. DBP also interacts with RNA in vivo; it can be crosslinked to polyadenylylated RNA by UV-irradiation of intact cells during the late phase of adenovirus infections. The 46-kDa carboxyl-terminal domain of DBP binds RNA in vitro and was found to be associated with polyadenylylated RNA in vivo. This is the same domain that interacts with DNA. However, the differences in sensitivity of DBP to trypsin when bound to RNA versus DNA suggest that RNA and DNA either bind at different sites within this domain or induce different conformational changes within the protein.

  9. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  10. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  11. Adenovirus type 12-specific RNA sequences during productive infection of KB cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J R; Mak, S

    1976-01-01

    The complementary strands of adenovirus type 12 DNA were separated, and virus-specific RNA was analyzed by saturation hybridization in solution. Late during infection whole cell RNA hybridized to 75% of the light (1) strand and 15% of the heavy (H) strand, whereas cytoplasmic RNA hybridized to 65% of the 1 strand and 15% of the h strand. Late nuclear RNA hybridized to about 90% of the 1 strand and at least 36% of the h strand. Double-stranded RNA was isolated from infected cells late after infection, which annealed to greater than 30% of each of the two complementary DNA strands. Early whole cell RNA hybridized to 45 to 50% of the 1 strand and 15% of the h strand, whereas early cytoplasmic RNA hybridized to about 15% of each of the complementary strands. All early cytoplasmic sequences were present in the cytoplasm at late times. PMID:950688

  12. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  13. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  14. Sequence relationships between adenovirus 2 early RNA and viral RNA size classes synthesized at 18 hours after infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tal, J; Craig, E A; Raskas, H J

    1975-01-01

    Synthesis of cytoplasmic viral RNA was studied during infection of cultured human (KB) cells with adenovirus 2. At 6 h, before viral DNA synthesis began 5% of the poly(A)-containing RNA hybridized to viral DNA; by 12 h and at later times more than 80% was virus specified. At 18 h after infection, four major size classes of cytoplasmic viral RNA were identified among the poly(A)-containing molecules. These size classes migrated as 27S, 24S, 19S, and 12 to 15S in polyacrylamide gels. The three larger size classes could also be identified in denaturing formamide gels. Hybridization of the 27S, 24S, and 19S viral RNAs was not inhibited by RNA harvested from cells at early times in infection. Therefore, these three major RNAs must code for late viral proteins. Hybridization of the 12 to 15S RNA was partially inhibited by RNA from cultures harvested at early times, suggesting that in this size class some of the RNA labeled at 18 h codes for early viral proteins. PMID:1113370

  15. Ad 2.0: a novel recombineering platform for high-throughput generation of tailored adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mück-Häusl, Martin; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses containing a double-stranded DNA genome of 26–45 kb were broadly explored in basic virology, for vaccination purposes, for treatment of tumors based on oncolytic virotherapy, or simply as a tool for efficient gene transfer. However, the majority of recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) is based on a small fraction of adenovirus types and their genetic modification. Recombineering techniques provide powerful tools for arbitrary engineering of recombinant DNA. Here, we adopted a seamless recombineering technology for high-throughput and arbitrary genetic engineering of recombinant adenoviral DNA molecules. Our cloning platform which also includes a novel recombination pipeline is based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). It enables generation of novel recombinant adenoviruses from different sources and switching between commonly used early generation AdVs and the last generation high-capacity AdVs lacking all viral coding sequences making them attractive candidates for clinical use. In combination with a novel recombination pipeline allowing cloning of AdVs containing large and complex transgenes and the possibility to generate arbitrary chimeric capsid-modified adenoviruses, these techniques allow generation of tailored AdVs with distinct features. Our technologies will pave the way toward broader applications of AdVs in molecular medicine including gene therapy and vaccination studies. PMID:25609697

  16. Adenovirus serotype 5 hexon mediates liver gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; McVey, John H; Bhella, David; Parker, Alan L; Barker, Kristeen; Atoda, Hideko; Pink, Rebecca; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Greig, Jenny A; Denby, Laura; Custers, Jerome; Morita, Takashi; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Barouch, Dan H; van Rooijen, Nico; Napoli, Claudio; Havenga, Menzo J E; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2008-02-01

    Adenoviruses are used extensively as gene transfer agents, both experimentally and clinically. However, targeting of liver cells by adenoviruses compromises their potential efficacy. In cell culture, the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber protein engages the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to bind cells. Paradoxically, following intravascular delivery, CAR is not used for liver transduction, implicating alternate pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that coagulation factor (F)X directly binds adenovirus leading to liver infection. Here, we show that FX binds to the Ad5 hexon, not fiber, via an interaction between the FX Gla domain and hypervariable regions of the hexon surface. Binding occurs in multiple human adenovirus serotypes. Liver infection by the FX-Ad5 complex is mediated through a heparin-binding exosite in the FX serine protease domain. This study reveals an unanticipated function for hexon in mediating liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:18267072

  17. Late-orogenic, post-orogenic, and anorogenic granites: Distinction by major-element and trace-element chemistry and possible origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Granites classified into four categories based solely on tectonics of occurrence and associated rock types also have compositional characteristics that are consistent within groups and different among groups. Orogenically related granites include late-orogenic varieties (LO) associated with calc-alkaline batholiths, and post-orogenic varieties (PO), which occur in broad zones of isolated diapiric plutons in recently deformed orogenic belts. Inclined REE patterns, moderate Sr contents, and K{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} relationships show that late-orogenic granites formed by fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and amphibole from calcalkaline magmas. Flatter REE patterns and K{sub 2}O contents near 5%, plus the absence of associated magmatic rocks, indicate that the post-orogenic granites developed by partial melting of subduction-produced mafic/intermediate magmatic rocks. Both the late- and post-orogenic granites can be part of material newly added to continental crust as a result of orogeny. Anorogenic granites in anorthosite/rapakivi complexes (AR) or alkaline ring complexes (RC) have LIL contents too high to have been equilibrated with a mafic mineral assemblage. These anorogenic rocks probably formed by partial melting of preexisting sialic crust and do not represent new crustal increment.

  18. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Roberta L.; Wilkinson, John C.; Ornelles, David A.

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  19. Psychosocial Interventions for the Acute Treatment of Late-life Major Depression: A Systematic Review of Evidence-based Treatments, Predictors of Treatment Outcomes and Moderators of Treatment Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kiosses, Dimitris N.; Leon, Andrew C.; Areán, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for the acute treatment of late-life depression and identify predictors of treatment outcomes and moderators of treatment effects. The results of the systematic review may help to advance the development of personalized psychosocial treatments for late-life major depression. Based on our criteria, Problem Solving Therapy (PST), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Treatment Initiation and Participation Program (TIP) have supportive evidence of efficacy, pending replication. Even though the data on the predictors of treatment outcomes and moderators of treatment effects are still preliminary, it appears that baseline anxiety and stress level, personality pathology, endogenous depression, and reduced self-rated health are associated with worse depression outcomes. More research is also recommended to examine the moderating effects of baseline depression severity; for instance, our review indicates that Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) may work better in participants with high baseline depression severity than in participants with low depression severity. Recommendations for future novel psychosocial interventions for the acute treatment of late-life major depression include application of these interventions in non-traditional settings, involvement of the caregivers in the treatment of cognitively and functionally impaired older adults with major depression, and expansion of research to include more racially and ethnically diverse populations as the samples of the examined studies is highly selective, i.e. overly healthy, cognitively intact, Caucasian, and highly educated. PMID:21536164

  20. A simple method for the simultaneous detection of E1A and E1B in adenovirus stocks.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Erika; Murata, Takehide; Watanabe, Sanae; Kujime, Yukari; Hirose, Megumi; Pan, Jianzhi; Yamazaki, Takahito; Ugai, Hideyo; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have been developed for use as therapeutic agents and for the introduction of exogenous genes into living cells. However, the occurrence of replication-competent adenoviruses (RCA) in adenovirus stocks produced in 293 cells remains a major problem in terms of the safe use of such vectors. To overcome the problems associated with the occurrence of RCA, we have established a simple method for the simultaneous detection of amplified E1A and E1B from RCA that might contaminate adenoviral stocks. The products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were fractionated by regular electrophoresis on agarose gels and visualized by staining with ethidium bromide. This method is rapid and inexpensive for detection of RCA in the preparation of adenoviruses. PMID:14654922

  1. A simple method for the simultaneous detection of E1A and E1B in adenovirus stocks.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Erika; Murata, Takehide; Watanabe, Sanae; Kujime, Yukari; Hirose, Megumi; Pan, Jianzhi; Yamazaki, Takahito; Ugai, Hideyo; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have been developed for use as therapeutic agents and for the introduction of exogenous genes into living cells. However, the occurrence of replication-competent adenoviruses (RCA) in adenovirus stocks produced in 293 cells remains a major problem in terms of the safe use of such vectors. To overcome the problems associated with the occurrence of RCA, we have established a simple method for the simultaneous detection of amplified E1A and E1B from RCA that might contaminate adenoviral stocks. The products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were fractionated by regular electrophoresis on agarose gels and visualized by staining with ethidium bromide. This method is rapid and inexpensive for detection of RCA in the preparation of adenoviruses.

  2. Transductional targeting with recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Valerie; Leissner, Philippe; Winter, Arend; Mehtali, Majid; Lusky, Monika

    2002-09-01

    Replication-deficient adenoviruses are considered as gene delivery vectors for the genetic treatment of a variety of diseases. The ability of such vectors to mediate efficient expression of therapeutic genes in a broad spectrum of dividing and non-dividing cell types constitutes an advantage over alternative gene transfer vectors. However, this broad tissue tropism may also turn disadvantageous when genes encoding potentially harmful proteins (e.g. cytokines, toxic proteins) are expressed in surrounding normal tissues. Therefore, specific restrictions of the viral tropism would represent a significant technological advance towards safer and more efficient gene delivery vectors, in particular for cancer gene therapy applications. In this review, we summarize various strategies used to selectively modify the natural tropism of recombinant adenoviruses. The advantages, limitations and potential impact on gene therapy operations of such modified vectors are discussed. PMID:12189719

  3. Identification of a cellular repressor of transcription of the adenoviral late IVa(2) gene that is unaltered in activity in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, H J; Flint, S J

    2000-11-25

    The gene encoding the adenovirus type 2 IVa(2) protein, a sequence-specific activator of transcription from the viral major late promoter, is itself transcribed only during the late phase of infection. We previously identified a cellular protein (IVa(2)-RF) that binds specifically to an intragenic sequence of the IVa(2) transcription unit. We now report that precise substitutions within the IVa(2)-RF-binding site that decreased binding affinity increased the efficiency of IVa(2) transcription in in vitro reactions containing IVa(2)-RF. Consistent with the conclusion that this cellular protein represses IVa(2) transcription, mutations that led to more efficient transcription in the presence of IVa(2)-RF were without effect in reactions lacking this cellular protein. No change in the concentration or activity of IVa(2)-RF could be detected in adenovirus-infected cells during the period in which the IVa(2) gene is transcribed. We therefore propose that restriction of IVa(2) transcription to the late phase is the result of titration of this cellular repressor as the number of copies of the IVa(2) promoter increases upon replication of the viral genome.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of an Equine Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ardans, Alexander A.; Pritchett, Randall F.; Zee, Yuan Chung

    1973-01-01

    A viral agent was isolated from lung tissue obtained upon necropsy of an Arabian foal which had exhibited clinical signs of pneumonia. The virus is 75 nm in diameter, cubic in symmetry, and resistant to chloroform and low pH (3.0). It contains deoxyribonucleic acid and has a buoyant density of 1.31 g/cm3 in cesium chloride. These findings indicate that the virus is a member of the adenovirus group. Images PMID:16558078

  5. Coacervate microspheres as carriers of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kalyanasundaram, S; Feinstein, S; Nicholson, J P; Leong, K W; Garver, R I

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic utility of recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) is limited in part by difficulties in directing the viruses to specific sites and by the requirement for bolus administration, both of which limit the efficiency of target tissue infection. As a first step toward overcoming these limitations, rAds were encapsulated in coacervate microspheres comprised of gelatin and alginate followed by stabilization with calcium ions. Ultrastructural evaluation showed that the microspheres formed in this manner were 0.8-10 microM in diameter, with viruses evenly distributed. The microspheres achieved a sustained release of adenovirus with a nominal loss of bioactivity. The pattern of release and the total amount of virus released was modified by changes in microsphere formulation. Administration of the adenovirus-containing microspheres to human tumor nodules engrafted in mice showed that the viral transgene was transferred to the tumor cells. It is concluded that coacervate microspheres can be used to encapsulate bioactive rAd and release it in a time-dependent manner.

  6. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  7. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  8. An enhancer element is located 340 base pairs upstream from the adenovirus-2 E1A capsite.

    PubMed Central

    Hen, R; Borrelli, E; Sassone-Corsi, P; Chambon, P

    1983-01-01

    A chimeric recombinant, containing the 270 bp left-terminal fragment of Adenovirus-2 (Ad2) inserted upstream from the -34 to +33 Ad2 major late promoter (Ad2MLP) element, has been used to characterize the transcription stimulatory element which is located at least 231 bp upstream from the E1A capsite in the left-end of Ad2 (Ref. 1). We demonstrate that this element, which acts in cis, possesses several properties characteristic of transcriptional enhancers. Firstly, it potentiates initiation of transcription from the capsite of the heterologous Ad2MLP and from "cryptic" sites often preceded by TATA box-like sequences. Secondly, although there is no critical distance requirement between the enhancer element and the Ad2MLP, the extent of stimulation decreases as the distance between the two element increases. However, in contrast to the other known viral or cellular enhancers which are bidirectional, the Ad2 enhancer is unidirectional, i.e. it potentiates the Ad2MLP element only when it is inserted in its "natural" orientation with respect to the direction of transcription. Using two convergent series of deletions, we have localized the Ad2 enhancer element within a 24 bp segment located at approximately 160 bp from the Ad2 left-end, i.e. 340 bp upstream from the E1A capsite. This 24 bp segment contains a sequence which exhibits a striking homology with the consensus sequence of several viral and cellular enhancers. Images PMID:6324099

  9. Adenovirus RIDα uncovers a novel pathway requiring ORP1L for lipid droplet formation independent of NPC1.

    PubMed

    Cianciola, Nicholas L; Greene, Diane J; Morton, Richard E; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is caused by mutations in NPC1 or NPC2, which coordinate egress of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol from late endosomes. We previously reported that the adenovirus-encoded protein RIDα rescues the cholesterol storage phenotype in NPC1-mutant fibroblasts. We show here that RIDα reconstitutes deficient endosome-to-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transport, allowing excess LDL-cholesterol to be esterified by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase and stored in lipid droplets (LDs) in NPC1-deficient cells. Furthermore, the RIDα pathway is regulated by the oxysterol-binding protein ORP1L. Studies have classified ORP1L as a sterol sensor involved in LE positioning downstream of GTP-Rab7. Our data, however, suggest that ORP1L may play a role in transport of LDL-cholesterol to a specific ER pool designated for LD formation. In contrast to NPC1, which is dispensable, the RIDα/ORP1L-dependent route requires functional NPC2. Although NPC1/NPC2 constitutes the major pathway, therapies that amplify minor egress routes for LDL-cholesterol could significantly improve clinical management of patients with loss-of-function NPC1 mutations. The molecular identity of putative alternative pathways, however, is poorly characterized. We propose RIDα as a model system for understanding physiological egress routes that use ORP1L to activate ER feedback responses involved in LD formation.

  10. An unrecognized major collision of the Okhotomorsk Block with East Asia during the Late Cretaceous, constraints on the plate reorganization of the Northwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Tai

    2013-11-01

    Interactions at plate boundaries induce stresses that constitute critical controls on the structural evolution of intraplate regions. However, the traditional tectonic model for the East Asian margin during the Mesozoic, invoking successive episodes of paleo-Pacific oceanic subduction, does not provide an adequate context for important Late Cretaceous dynamics across East Asia, including: continental-scale orogenic processes, significant sinistral strike-slip faulting, and several others. The integration of numerous documented field relations requires a new tectonic model, as proposed here. The Okhotomorsk continental block, currently residing below the Okhotsk Sea in Northeast Asia, was located in the interior of the Izanagi Plate before the Late Cretaceous. It moved northwestward with the Izanagi Plate and collided with the South China Block at about 100 Ma. The indentation of the Okhotomorsk Block within East Asia resulted in the formation of a sinistral strike-slip fault system in South China, formation of a dextral strike-slip fault system in North China, and regional northwest-southeast shortening and orogenic uplift in East Asia. Northeast-striking mountain belts over 500 km wide extended from Southeast China to Southwest Japan and South Korea. The peak metamorphism at about 89 Ma of the Sanbagawa high-pressure metamorphic belt in Southwest Japan was probably related to the continental subduction of the Okhotomorsk Block beneath the East Asian margin. Subsequently, the north-northwestward change of motion direction of the Izanagi Plate led to the northward movement of the Okhotomorsk Block along the East Asian margin, forming a significant sinistral continental transform boundary similar to the San Andreas fault system in California. Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks in Southwest Japan were rapidly exhumed through the several-kilometer wide ductile shear zone at the lower crust and upper mantle level. Accretionary complexes successively accumulated along the East

  11. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples.

  12. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  13. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins. PMID:24811321

  14. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  15. Non-classical export of an adenovirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Lloyd C; Achermann, Dominik P; Keller, Stephan; Straub, Monika; Greber, Urs F

    2003-06-01

    The icosahedral capsids of Adenoviruses (Ads) consist of the hexon and stabilizing proteins building the facettes, and of the vertex protein penton base (Pb) anchoring the protruding fibers. The fibers bind to the Coxsackie virus B Ad cell surface receptor (CAR) and Pb to integrins. Here we describe a novel property of the Ad2 Pb. Pb was found to leave the infected cell and, upon exit, it attached to the surrounding noninfected cells forming a radial gradient with highest Pb levels on cells adjacent to the infected cell. The producer cells remained intact until at least 30 h post infection. At this point, Pb was not recovered from the extracellular medium, suggesting that its cell-cell spread might not involve free Pb. When viral particles were released at late stages of infection, soluble Pb was found in the extracellular medium and it randomly bound to noninfected cells. Nonlytic export of Pb occurred upon transient transfection with plasmid DNA, but plasmid-encoded fiber was not exported, indicating that cell-cell spread of Pb is autonomous of infection. Pb export was not affected by Brefeldin A-induced disruption of the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that it occurred via a nonclassical mechanism. Interestingly, the coexpression of Pb and fiber leads to both Pb and fiber export, termed 'protein abduction'. We suggest that fiber abduction might support viral dissemination in infected tissues by interfering with tissue integrity.

  16. Experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in yearling black-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Burd, M; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1997-10-01

    An apparently novel adenovirus was associated with an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California (USA) during 1993-1994. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. Six black-tailed yearling deer (O. hemionus columbianus) were inoculated with purified adenovirus isolated from a black-tailed fawn that died of acute adenovirus hemorrhagic disease during the epizootic. Three of six inoculated deer also received intramuscular injections of dexamethasone sodium phosphate every 3 days during the study. Eight days post-inoculation, one deer (without dexamethasone) developed bloody diarrhea and died. Necropsy and histopathologic findings were identical to lesions in free-ranging animals that died of the natural disease. Hemorrhagic enteropathy and pulmonary edema were the significant necropsy findings and there was microscopic vascular damage and endothelial intranuclear inclusion bodies in the vessels of the intestines and lungs. Adenovirus was identified in necrotic endothelial cells in the lungs by fluorescent antibody staining, immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. Adenovirus was reisolated from tissues of the animal that died of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease. Similar gross and microscopic lesions were absent in four of six adenovirus-inoculated deer and in the negative control animal which were necropsied at variable intervals during the 14 wk study. One deer was inoculated with purified adenovirus a second time, 12 wk after the first inoculation. Fifteen days after the second inoculation, this deer developed severe ulceration of the tongue, pharynx and rumen and necrotizing osteomyelitis of the mandible which was associated with

  17. Late-glacial and Holocene Vegetation and Climate Variability, Including Major Droughts, in the Sky Lakes Region of Southeastern New York State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menking, Kirsten M.; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Anderson, Roger Y.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment cores from Lakes Minnewaska and Mohonk in the Shawangunk Mountains of southeastern New York were analyzed for pollen, plantmacrofossils, macroscopic charcoal, organic carbon content, carbon isotopic composition, carbon/nitrogen ratio, and lithologic changes to determine the vegetation and landscape history of the greater Catskill Mountain region since deglaciation. Pollen stratigraphy generally matches the New England pollen zones identified by Deevey (1939) and Davis (1969), with boreal genera (Picea, Abies) present during the late Pleistocene yielding to a mixed Pinus, Quercus and Tsuga forest in the early Holocene. Lake Minnewaska sediments record the Younger Dryas and possibly the 8.2 cal kyr BP climatic events in pollen and sediment chemistry along with an 1400 cal yr interval of wet conditions (increasing Tsuga and declining Quercus) centered about 6400 cal yr BP. BothMinnewaska andMohonk reveal a protracted drought interval in themiddle Holocene, 5700-4100 cal yr BP, during which Pinus rigida colonized the watershed, lake levels fell, and frequent fires led to enhanced hillslope erosion. Together, the records show at least three wet-dry cycles throughout the Holocene and both similarities and differences to climate records in New England and central New York. Drought intervals raise concerns for water resources in the New York City metropolitan area and may reflect a combination of enhanced La Niña, negative phase NAO, and positive phase PNA climatic patterns and/or northward shifts of storm tracks.

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis and Structural Predictions of Human Adenovirus Penton Proteins as a Basis for Tissue-Specific Adenovirus Vector Design▿

    PubMed Central

    Madisch, Ijad; Hofmayer, Soeren; Moritz, Christian; Grintzalis, Alexander; Hainmueller, Jens; Pring-Akerblom, Patricia; Heim, Albert

    2007-01-01

    The penton base is a major capsid protein of human adenoviruses (HAdV) which forms the vertices of the capsid and interacts with hexon and fiber protein. Two hypervariable loops of the penton are exposed on the capsid surface. Sequences of these and 300 adjacent amino acid residues of all 51 HAdV and closely related simian adenoviruses were studied. Adjacent sequences and predicted overall secondary structure were conserved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clustering corresponding to the HAdV species and recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. All HAdV except serotypes 40 and 41 of species F exhibited an integrin binding RGD motif in the second loop. The lengths of the loops (HVR1 and RGD loops) varied significantly between HAdV species with the longest RGD loop observed in species C and the longest HVR1 in species B. Long loops may permit the insertion of motifs that modify tissue tropism. Genetic analysis of HAdV prime strain p17′H30, a neutralization variant of HAdV-D17, indicated the significance of nonhexon neutralization epitopes for HAdV immune escape. Fourteen highly conserved motifs of the penton base were analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis of HAdV-D8 and tested for sustained induction of early cytopathic effects. Thus, three new motifs essential for penton base function were identified additionally to the RGD site, which interacts with a secondary cellular receptor responsible for internalization. Therefore, our penton primary structure data and secondary structure modeling in combination with the recently published fiber knob sequences may permit the rational design of tissue-specific adenoviral vectors. PMID:17522221

  19. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  20. PEGylated Adenoviruses: From Mice to Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wonganan, Piyanuch; Croyle, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a non-toxic polymer used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for over 60 years, can profoundly influence the pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and toxciologic profile of protein and peptide-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the history of PEGylation and PEG chemistry and highlights the value of this technology in the context of the design and development of recombinant viruses for gene transfer, vaccination and diagnostic purposes. Specific emphasis is placed on the application of this technology to the adenovirus, the most potent viral vector with the most highly characterized toxicity profile to date, in several animal models. PMID:21994645

  1. Adenovirus L1 52- and 55-kilodalton proteins are required for assembly of virions.

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, T B; Soloway, P D; Ornelles, D A; Doerfler, W; Shenk, T

    1989-01-01

    A variant of adenovirus type 5 that contained a mutation within the L1 52- and 55-kilodalton (52/55K) protein-coding region was isolated. The mutant, termed ts369, produced L1 52/55K proteins with a two-amino-acid substitution and was temperature sensitive. Temperature-shift experiments indicated that the ts369 defect was late in the viral growth cycle. DNA replication and synthesis of late proteins occurred normally in ts369-infected cells at the nonpermissive temperature, but mature virions were not produced. Rather, capsidlike particles associated with the left-terminal region of the viral chromosome accumulated. These incomplete particles could not be chased into mature virions when the infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature. However, previously synthesized proteins could be assembled into virions in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor upon shiftdown from the nonpermissive temperature, suggesting that the inactivation of the L1 52/55K proteins was reversible. These results indicate that the adenovirus L1 52/55K proteins play a role in the assembly of infectious virus particles. Images PMID:2760976

  2. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  3. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  4. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  5. Ice-proximal glaciomarine sedimentation and sea-level change in the inverness area, Scotland: A review of the deglaciation of a major ice stream of the British Late Devensian ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Jon W.; Auton, Clive A.; Firth, Callum R.

    Evidence of both rising and falling relative sea levels and glacitectonic movements is preserved in two formations of raised glaciomarine deposits that were laid down in front of an oscillating 'grounded' tidewater glacier in the Inverness Firth. These changes occurred during the latter stages of the disintegration of the Moray Firth ice-stream, one of the major ice streams that drained the British main Late Devensian ice sheet. Most of the glaciomarine deposits antedate a sequence of glacio-isostatically tilted Late Devensian marine shorelines and associated littoral and estuarine deposits. The shorelines began forming at about 13,000 BP and record a progressive fall in relative sea level. A new model for the deglaciation of the Moray Firth region is proposed after a critical appraisal of published accounts of both onshore and offshore Quaternary sequences. The disintegration of the Moray Firth ice stream involved several rapid phases of retreat to pinning points, caused by iceberg calving and triggered by rising global sea level. Each retreat was followed by minor readvances or stillstands, possibly caused by short-lived accelerated periods of glacio-isostatic rebound and concomitant temporary falls in relative sea level. Two such events occurred in the Inverness Firth: the Ardersier Oscillation and the Alturlie Stillstand. Substantial differences (lower relative sea levels, later deglaciation) are apparent between the pattern of ice-retreat in the Moray Firth region and published accounts of the deglaciation of the Irish Sea basin. These differences require a reassessment of some current hypotheses concerning the disintegration of major ice streams associated with high relative sea levels. Furthermore, geological and geomorphological evidence suggesting both rising and falling sea levels in the Inverness area, prior to ca. 13,500 BP, is not fully compatible with recently published computer simulations of the dissolution of the British main Late Devensian ice

  6. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  7. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  8. Are flatter diurnal cortisol rhythms associated with major depression and anxiety disorders in late adolescence? The role of life stress and daily negative emotion.

    PubMed

    Doane, Leah D; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Craske, Michelle; Griffith, James W; Adam, Emma K

    2013-08-01

    Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning have been associated with major depression disorder (MDD) and some anxiety disorders. Few researchers have tested the possibility that high levels of recent life stress or elevations in negative emotion may partially account for the HPA axis alterations observed in these disorders. In a sample of 300 adolescents from the Youth Emotion Project, we examined associations between MDD and anxiety disorders, dimensional measures of internalizing symptomatology, life stress, mood on the days of cortisol testing, and HPA axis functioning. Adolescents with a past MDD episode and those with a recent MDD episode comorbid with an anxiety disorder had flatter diurnal cortisol slopes than adolescents without a history of internalizing disorders. Higher reports of general distress, a dimension of internalizing symptomatology, were also associated with flatter slopes. Negative emotion, specifically sadness and loneliness, was associated with flatter slopes and partially accounted for the associations between comorbid MDD and anxiety disorders and cortisol. The associations between past MDD and cortisol slopes were not accounted for by negative emotion, dimensional variation in internalizing symptomatology, or levels of life stress, indicating that flatter cortisol slopes may also be a "scar" marker of past experiences of MDD.

  9. Adenovirus serotype 30 fiber does not mediate transduction via the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Law, Lane K; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-01-01

    Prior work by members of our laboratory and others demonstrated that adenovirus serotype 30 (Ad30), a group D adenovirus, exhibited novel transduction characteristics compared to those of serotype 5 (Ad5, belonging to group C). While some serotype D adenoviruses bind to the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), the ability of Ad30 fiber to bind CAR is unknown. We amplified and purified Ad30 and cloned the Ad30 fiber by overlap PCR. Alignment of Ad30 fiber with Ad3, Ad35, Ad5, Ad9, and Ad17 revealed that Ad30, like Ad9 and Ad17, has a shortened fiber sequence relative to that of Ad5. The knob region of fiber was 45% identical to that of the Ad5 knob regions. We made a chimeric recombinant virus (Ad5GFPf30) in which the Ad5 fiber (amino acids [aa]47 to 582) was replaced with Ad30 fiber sequences (aa 46 to 372), and CAR-mediated viral entry was determined on CAR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. While CAR expression significantly increased Ad5GFP-mediated transduction in CHO cells (from 1 to 36%), it did not enhance Ad5GFPf30 gene transfer. Binding of radiolabeled Ad5GFPf30 or Ad30 wild-type virus was also not improved by the expression of CAR. These results suggest that Ad30 fiber is distinct from Ad5, Ad9, and Ad17 fibers in its inability to direct transduction via CAR. PMID:11752156

  10. Adenovirus 5 and chimeric adenovirus 5/F35 employ distinct B-lymphocyte intracellular trafficking routes that are independent of their cognate cell surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Mathieu; Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Jung, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Gene transfer applications with adenovirus (Ad) type 5 are limited by its native tropism, hampering their use in several cell types. To address this limitation, several Ad vectors bearing chimeric fiber have been produced to take advantage of the different cellular receptors used by other subgroups of Ads. In this study, we have compared the transduction efficiency of Ad5 and the chimeric Ad5/F35 in primary human B lymphocytes and B-cell lines as a function of the developmental stage. We found that transduction efficiencies of the two Ads differ independently of their targeted cellular receptor but are related to the intracellular localization of the virus. In efficiently transduced cells, Ads were localized in early endosomes or cytosol, whereas in poorly transduced cells they were localized within late endosomes/lysosomes. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of cells with phosphatase inhibitors known to redirect endocytosis towards caveolae, increased Ad5/F35 transduction efficiency.

  11. Human Papillomavirus E6 Knockdown Restores Adenovirus Mediated-estrogen Response Element Linked p53 Gene Transfer in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Koji; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Ishiko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The p53 gene is inactivated by the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein in the majority of cervical cancers. Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with siRNA for HPV E6 permitted adenovirus-mediated transduction of a p53 gene linked to an upstream estrogen response element (ERE). Our previous study in non-siRNA treated HHUA cells, which are derived from an endometrial cancer and express estrogen receptor β, showed enhancing effects of an upstream ERE on adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction. In HeLa S3 cells treated with siRNA for HPV E6, adenovirus-mediated transduction was enhanced by an upstream ERE linked to a p53 gene carrying a proline variant at codon 72, but not for a p53 gene with arginine variant at codon 72. Expression levels of p53 mRNA and Coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR) mRNA after adenovirus-mediated transfer of an ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) were higher compared with those after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells. Western blot analysis showed lower β-tubulin levels and comparatively higher p53/β-tubulin or CAR /β-tubulin ratios in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with those in non-siRNA-treated cells. Apoptosis, as measured by annexin V binding, was higher after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with that after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated cells.

  12. Regulation of glycoprotein D synthesis: does alpha 4, the major regulatory protein of herpes simplex virus 1, regulate late genes both positively and negatively?

    PubMed Central

    Arsenakis, M; Campadelli-Fiume, G; Roizman, B

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies have described the alpha 4/c113 baby hamster kidney cell line which constitutively expresses the alpha 4 protein, the major regulatory protein of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Introduction of the HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) gene, regulated as a gamma 1 gene, into these cells yielded a cell line which constitutively expressed both the alpha 4 and gamma 1 gB genes. The expression of the gB gene was dependent on the presence of functional alpha 4 protein. In this article we report that we introduced into the alpha 4/c113 and into the parental BHK cells, the HSV-1 BamHI J fragment, which encodes the domains of four genes, including those of glycoproteins D, G, and I (gD, gG, and gI), and most of the coding sequences of the glycoprotein E (gE) gene. In contrast to the earlier studies, we obtained significant constitutive expression of gD (also a gamma 1 gene) in a cell line (BJ) derived from parental BHK cells, but not in a cell line (alpha 4/BJ) which expresses functional alpha 4 protein. RNA homologous to the gD gene was present in significant amounts in the BJ cell line; smaller amounts of this RNA were detected in the alpha 4/BJ cell line. RNA homologous to gE, presumed to be polyadenylated from signals in the vector sequences, was present in the BJ cells but not in the alpha 4/BJ cells. The expression of the HSV-1 gD and gE genes was readily induced in the alpha 4/BJ cells by superinfection with HSV-2. The BJ cell line was, in contrast, resistant to expression of HSV-1 and HSV-2 genes. The BamHI J DNA fragment copy number was approximately 1 per BJ cell genome equivalent and 30 to 50 per alpha 4/BJ cell genome equivalent. We conclude that (i) the genes specifying gD and gB belong to different viral regulatory gene subsets, (ii) the gD gene is subject to both positive and negative regulation, (iii) both gD and gE mRNAs are subject to translational controls although they may be different, and (iv) the absence of expression of gD in the alpha 4/BJ

  13. Mapping of Ppd-B1, a Major Candidate Gene for Late Heading on Wild Emmer Chromosome Arm 2BS and Assessment of Its Interactions with Early Heading QTLs on 3AL.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Wu, Shasha; Ding, Mingquan; Li, Jingjuan; Shi, Zhaobin; Wei, Wei; Guo, Jialian; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yurong; Rong, Junkang

    2016-01-01

    Wheat heading date is an important agronomic trait determining maturation time and yield. A set of common wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring; CS)-wild emmer (T. turgidum L. subsp. dicoccoides (TDIC)) chromosome arm substitution lines (CASLs) was used to identify and allocate QTLs conferring late or early spike emergence by examining heading date. Genetic loci accelerating heading were found on TDIC chromosome arms 3AL and 7BS, while loci delaying heading were located on 4AL and 2BS. To map QTLs conferring late heading on 2BS, F2 populations derived from two cross combinations of CASL2BS × CS and CASL3AL × CASL2BS were developed and each planted at two times, constituting four F2 mapping populations. Heading date varied continuously among individuals of these four populations, suggesting quantitative characteristics. A genetic map of 2BS, consisting of 23 SSR and one single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) marker(s), was constructed using these F2 populations. This map spanned a genetic length of 53.2 cM with average marker density of 2.3 cM. The photoperiod-sensitivity gene Ppd-B1 was mapped to chromosome arm 2BS as a SSCP molecular marker, and was validated as tightly linked to a major QTL governing late heading of CASL2BS in all mapping populations. A significant dominance by additive effect of Ppd-B1 with the LUX gene located on 3AL was also detected. CS had more copies of Ppd-B1 than CASL2BS, implying that increased copy number could elevate the expression of Ppd-1 in CS, also increasing expression of LUX and FT genes and causing CS to have an earlier heading date than CASL2BS in long days. PMID:26848576

  14. Viral DNA synthesis-dependent titration of a cellular repressor activates transcription of the human adenovirus type 2 IVa2 gene.

    PubMed

    Iftode, C; Flint, S J

    2004-12-21

    Synthesis of progeny DNA genomes in cells infected by human subgroup C adenoviruses leads to several changes in viral gene expression. These changes include transcription from previously silent, late promoters, such as the IV(a2) promoter, and a large increase in the efficiency of major-late (ML) transcription. Some of these changes appear to take place sequentially, because the product of the IV(a2) gene has been implicated in stimulation of ML transcription. Our previous biochemical studies suggested that IV(a2) transcription is regulated by viral DNA synthesis-dependent relief of transcriptional repression by a cellular protein that we termed IV(a2)-RF. To test the relevance of such a repressor-titration mechanism during the viral infectious cycle, we introduced into the endogenous IV(a2) promoter two mutations that impair in vitro-binding of IV(a2)-RF, but introduce no change (Rep7) or one conservative amino acid substitution (Rep6) into the overlapping coding sequence for the viral DNA polymerase. The results of run-on transcription assays indicated that both mutations induced earlier-than-normal and more efficient IV(a2) transcription. Both mutations were also observed to result in modest increases in the efficiency of viral DNA synthesis. However, measurement of the concentration of IV(a2) transcripts as a function of IV(a2) template concentration demonstrated that the Rep mutations increased by up to 60-fold the efficiency with which IV(a2) templates were used during the initial period of the late phase of infection, as predicted by the repressor titration hypothesis. These mutations also increased the efficiency of ML transcription in infected cells.

  15. Adenovirus type 5 early region 1b gene product is required for efficient shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Babiss, L E; Ginsberg, H S

    1984-01-01

    To determine the role adenovirus 5 early region 1b-encoded 21- and 55-kilodalton proteins play in adenovirus productive infection, mutants have been isolated which were engineered to contain small deletions or insertions at 5.8, 7.9, or 9.6 map units. By using an overlap recombination procedure involving H5dl314 (delta 3.7 to 4.6 map units) DNA cleaved at 2.6 map units with ClaI and the adenovirus 5 XhoI-C (0 to 15.5 map units) fragment containing the desired mutation, viral mutants were isolated by their ability to produce plaques on KB cell line 18, which constitutively expresses only viral early region 1b functions (Babiss et al., J. Virol. 46:454-465, 1983). DNA sequence analysis of the viral mutants isolated (H5dl118, H5dl110, H5in127, and H5dl163) indicates that all of the viruses contain mutations which affect the 55-kilodalton protein, whereas dl118 should also produce a truncated form of the 21-kilodalton protein. When analyzed for their replication characteristics in HeLa cells, all of the mutant viruses exhibited extended eclipse periods and effected yields that were reduced to 10% or less of that produced by H5sub309 (parent virus of the mutants which is phenotypically identical to wild-type adenovirus 5). When compared with characteristics of sub309, the early and late transcription and DNA replication of the mutants were similar, but synthesis of late polypeptides and late cytoplasmic mRNAs was greatly reduced. Quantitation of mutant virus-specific late mRNAs associated with polysomes revealed a threefold reduction when compared with that of sub309. Analysis of infected cell extracts further revealed that these mutants were incapable of efficiently shutting off host cell protein synthesis, suggesting that the 55-kilodalton protein plays a role in this process. These data suggest that early region 1b products may function by interacting with additional viral or host cell macromolecules to modulate host cell shutoff or that some late viral mRNA or

  16. Directed evolution of mutator adenoviruses resistant to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicolle D; Skorohodova, Ksenia V; Gounder, Anshu P; Smith, Jason G

    2013-05-01

    We incorporated a previously identified mutation that reduces the fidelity of the DNA polymerase into a human adenovirus vector. Using this mutator vector, we demonstrate rapid selection of resistance to a neutralizing anti-hexon monoclonal antibody due to a G434D mutation in hexon that precludes antibody binding. Since mutator adenoviruses can accumulate compound mutations that are unattainable using traditional random mutagenesis techniques, this approach will be valuable to the study of antivirals and host factor interactions.

  17. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Matoq, Amr; Salahuddin, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection. PMID:27340581

  18. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials have been done with either naked oncolytic Ad or combination with chemotherapies. However, the systemic injection of oncolytic Ad in clinical applications is restricted due to significant liver toxicity and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, Ad has been engineered physically or chemically with numerous polymers for shielding the Ad surface, accomplishing extended blood circulation time and reduced immunogenicity as well as hepatotoxicity. In this review, we describe and classify the characteristics of polymer modified oncolytic Ad following each strategy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, this review concludes with the highlights of various polymer-coated Ads and their prospects, and directions for future research. PMID:26453806

  19. Two Types of Functionally Distinct Fiber Containing Structural Protein Complexes Are Produced during Infection of Adenovirus Serotype 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Yan, Yuhua; Jin, Jie; Lin, Hongyu; Li, Zongyi; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jin; Xi, Chao; Lieber, Andre; Fan, Xiaolong; Ran, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens. The localization of their receptors coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, and desmoglein-2 in cell-cell junction complexes between polarized epithelial cells represents a major challenge for adenovirus infection from the apical surface. Structural proteins including hexon, penton base and fiber are excessively produced in serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5)-infected cells. We have characterized the composition of structural protein complexes released from Ad5 infected cells and their capacity in remodeling cell-cell junction complexes. Using T84 cells as a model for polarized epithelium, we have studied the effect of Ad5 structural protein complexes in remodeling cell-cell junctions in polarized epithelium. The initial Ad5 infection in T84 cell culture was inefficient. However, progressive distortion of cell-cell junction in association with fiber release was evident during progression of Ad5 infection. Incubation of T84 cell cultures with virion-free supernatant from Ad5 infected culture resulted in distortion of cell-cell junctions and decreased infectivity of Ad5-GFP vector. We used gel filtration chromatography to fractionate fiber containing virion–free supernatant from Ad5 infected culture supernatant. Fiber containing fractions were further characterized for their capacity to inhibit the infection of Ad5-GFP vector, their composition in adenovirus structural proteins using western blot and LC-MS/MS and their capacity in remolding cell-cell junctions. Fiber molecules in complexes containing penton base and hexon, or mainly hexon were identified. Only the fiber complexes with relatively high content of penton base, but not the fiber-hexon complexes with low penton base, were able to penetrate into T84 cells and cause distortion of cell-cell junctions. Our findings suggest that these two types of fiber complexes may play different roles in adenoviral infection. PMID:25723153

  20. Comparison of the Life Cycles of Genetically Distant Species C and Species D Human Adenoviruses Ad6 and Ad26 in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mallory A.; Middha, Sumit; Hofherr, Sean E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our understanding of adenovirus (Ad) biology is largely extrapolated from human species C Ad5. Most humans are immune to Ad5, so lower-seroprevalence viruses like human Ad6 and Ad26 are being tested as therapeutic vectors. Ad6 and Ad26 differ at the DNA level by 34%. To better understand how this might impact their biology, we examined the life cycle of the two viruses in human lung cells in vitro. Both viruses infected A549 cells with similar efficiencies, executed DNA replication with identical kinetics within 12 h, and began killing cells within 72 h. While Ad6-infected cells remained adherent until death, Ad26-infected cells detached within 12 h of infection but remained viable. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of mRNA from infected cells demonstrated that viral transcripts constituted 1% of cellular mRNAs within 6 h and 8 to 16% within 12 h. Quantitative PCR and NGS revealed the activation of key early genes at 6 h and transition to late gene activation by 12 h by both viruses. There were marked differences in the balance of E1A and E1B activation by the two viruses and in the expression of E3 immune evasion mRNAs. Ad6 was markedly more effective at suppressing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) display on the cell surface and in evading TRAIL-mediated apoptosis than was Ad26. These data demonstrate shared as well as divergent life cycles in these genetically distant human adenoviruses. An understanding of these differences expands the knowledge of alternative Ad species and may inform the selection of related Ads for therapeutic development. IMPORTANCE A burgeoning number of adenoviruses (Ads) are being harnessed as therapeutics, yet the biology of these viruses is generally extrapolated from Ad2 and Ad5. Here, we are the first to compare the transcriptional programs of two genetically distant Ads by mRNA next-generation sequencing (NGS). Species C Ad6 and Ad26 are being pursued as lower-seroprevalence Ad vectors but differ at the DNA

  1. Adenovirus type 12-induced rat tumor cells of neuroepithelial origin: persistence and expression of the viral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Ibelgaufts, H; Doerfler, W; Scheidtmann, K H; Wechsler, W

    1980-01-01

    Four cell lines derived from adenovirus type 12-induced rat brain tumors were studied. The polyploid cells displayed neuroepithelial characteristics and were transplantable into syngeneic rats and nude mice. In tissue culture the cells grew in monolayers and multilayers. A very high saturation density was reached, and the cells plated in agar and were easily agglutinated with low concentrations of concanavalin A. Between 2 and 11 copies of the viral genome per diploid cellular genome were detected by reassociation kinetics analysis in the different lines. The patterns of distribution of viral DNA sequences in these lines, as revealed by blot analysis, suggest colinear integration of the intact viral genome into the cellular DNA. The patterns of integration were stable after more than 15 months of prolonged tissue culture and after animal reimplantation. Integration patterns were identical in three of the tumor lines and different in another line. Viral sequences were transcribed. The extent of homology found toward adenovirus type 12 DNA in polyadenylated polysome-associated mRNA isolated from the tumor lines suggests that the early and some of the late genes of adenovirus type 12 DNA are transcribed in these tumor cells. Infectious virus was not rescuable from these lines. Images PMID:7365869

  2. ADENO-ASSOCIATED SATELLITE VIRUS INTERFERENCE WITH THE REPLICATION OF ITS HELPER ADENOVIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Wade P.; Casazza, Anna M.; Alcott, Judith; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1968-01-01

    Adeno-associated satellite virus type 4 interferes with the replication of its helper adenovirus. No interferon-like soluble substance could be detected in satellite-infected cultures and other DNA- and RNA-containing viruses were not inhibited by coinfection with satellite virus under conditions which reduced adenovirus yields by more than 90% in monkey cells. Altering the concentration of adenovirus in the presence of constant amounts of satellite resulted in a constant degree of interference over a wide range of adenovirus inocula and suggested that adenovirus concentration was not a significant factor in the observed interference. The interference with adenovirus replication was abolished by pretreating satellite preparations with specific antiserum, ultraviolet light or heating at 80°C for 30 min. This suggested that infectious satellite virus mediated the interference. Satellite virus concentration was found to be a determinant of interference and studies indicated that the amount of interference with adenovirus was directly proportional to the concentration of satellite virus. 8 hr after adenovirus infection, the replication of adenovirus was no longer sensitive to satellite interference. This was true even though the satellite virus was enhanced as effectively as if the cells were infected simultaneously with both viruses. Interference with adenovirus infectivity was accompanied by reduced yields of complement-fixing antigen and of virus particles which suggested that satellite virus interfered with the formation and not the function of adenovirus products. When cells were infected either with adenovirus alone or with adenovirus plus satellite, the same proportion of cells plated as adenovirus infectious centers. However, the number of plaque-forming units of adenovirus formed per cell in the satellite-infected cultures was reduced by approximately 90%, the same magnitude of reduction noted in whole cultures coinfected with satellite and adenovirus. This

  3. Adenovirus tumor targeting and hepatic untargeting by a coxsackie/adenovirus receptor ectodomain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen bispecific adapter.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Pereboeva, Larisa; Komarova, Svetlana; Idan, Anat; Curiel, David T; Herschman, Harvey R

    2007-06-01

    Adenovirus vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy. However, because of their lack of tumor tropism and their preference for liver infection following systemic administration, they cannot be used for systemic attack on metastatic disease. Many epithelial tumors (e.g., colon, lung, and breast) express carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). To block the natural hepatic tropism of adenovirus and to "retarget" the virus to CEA-expressing tumors, we used a bispecific adapter protein (sCAR-MFE), which fuses the ectodomain of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (sCAR) with a single-chain anti-CEA antibody (MFE-23). sCAR-MFE untargets adenovirus-directed luciferase transgene expression in the liver by >90% following systemic vector administration. Moreover, sCAR-MFE can "retarget" adenovirus to CEA-positive epithelial tumor cells in cell culture, in s.c. tumor grafts, and in hepatic tumor grafts. The sCAR-MFE bispecific adapter should, therefore, be a powerful agent to retarget adenovirus vectors to epithelial tumor metastases.

  4. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  5. Enteric adenovirus type 40: complementation of the E4 defect in Ad2 dl808.

    PubMed

    Mautner, V; Mackay, N

    1991-07-01

    The enteric adenovirus type 40 cannot be passaged in HeLa cells, but will grow productively in cells that express the E1B region of adenovirus types 2 or 5. Even in such permissive cells, the lytic cycle is prolonged, there is an abnormal pattern of E1B early gene expression and a failure to switch off host cell functions, suggesting that other gene functions might be impaired in Ad40. For Ad2, E4 ORF 6 and ORF 3 proteins are known to have an essential role in progressing from the early to the late phase of lytic infection and the shutoff of host functions requires an interaction between the E4 ORF 6 34K protein and the E1B 55K protein. To test whether E4 functions of Ad40 are impaired, complementation tests have been made between Ad40 and the E4 deletion mutant Ad2 dl808, which lacks all but ORF 1 of the E4 region. In HeLa and Vero cells, Ad40 complements dl808 to levels equivalent to an Ad2 wild-type infection, as demonstrated by measuring virion packaged DNA, virus titration, and viral protein synthesis. Surprisingly, Ad2 dl808 fails to reciprocally complement Ad40. The results show that Ad40 produces functional E4 ORF 6 and/or ORF 3 activity, and that their expression precedes DNA replication.

  6. Analysis of the viral replication cycle of adenovirus serotype 2 after inactivation by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Gall, Aimee M; Shisler, Joanna L; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-04-01

    Free chlorine is effective at inactivating a wide range of waterborne viral pathogens including human adenovirus (HAdV), but the mechanisms by which free chlorine inactivates HAdV and other human viruses remain to be elucidated. Such advances in fundamental knowledge are key for development of new disinfection technologies and novel sensors to detect infectious viruses in drinking water. We developed and tested a quantitative assay to analyze several steps in the HAdV replication cycle upon increasing free chlorine exposure. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect HAdV genomic DNA as a means to quantify attachment and genome replication of untreated and treated virions. Also, we used quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) to quantify the transcription of E1A (first early protein) and hexon mRNA. We compared these replication cycle events to virus inactivation kinetics to determine what stage of the virus replication cycle was inhibited as a function of free chlorine exposure. We observed that adenovirus inactivated at levels up to 99.99% by free chlorine still attached to host cells; however, viral DNA synthesis and early E1A and late hexon gene transcription were inhibited. We conclude that free chlorine exposure interferes with a replication cycle event occurring postbinding but prior to early viral protein synthesis.

  7. Characterization of brain mGluR5 binding in a pilot study of late-life major depressive disorder using positron emission tomography and [11C]ABP688

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, C; Sovago, J; Gardus, J; Xu, J; Yang, J; Behrje, R; Kumar, J S D; Devanand, D P; Pelton, G H; Mathis, C A; Mason, N S; Gomez-Mancilla, B; Aizenstein, H; Mann, J J; Parsey, R V

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders and is a potential treatment target in major depressive disorder (MDD). This study compared brain mGluR5 binding in elderly patients suffering from MDD with that in elderly healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]ABP688. Twenty elderly (mean age: 63.0±6.3) subjects with MDD and twenty-two healthy volunteers in the same age range (mean age: 66.4±7.3) were examined with PET after a single bolus injection of [11C]ABP688, with many receiving arterial sampling. PET images were analyzed on a region of interest and a voxel level to compare mGluR5 binding in the brain between the two groups. Differences in [11C]ABP688 binding between patients with early- and late-onset depression were also assessed. In contrast to a previously published report in a younger cohort, no significant difference in [11C]ABP688 binding was observed between elderly subjects with MDD and healthy volunteers. [11C]ABP688 binding was also similar between subgroups with early- or late-onset depression. We believe this is the first study to examine mGluR5 expression in depression in the elderly. Although future work is required, results suggest potential differences in the pathophysiology of elderly depression versus depression earlier in life. PMID:26645628

  8. Adenovirus-associated deaths in US military during postvaccination period, 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Potter, Robert N; Cantrell, Joyce A; Mallak, Craig T; Gaydos, Joel C

    2012-03-01

    Adenoviruses are frequent causes of respiratory disease in the US military population. A successful immunization program against adenovirus types 4 and 7 was terminated in 1999. Review of records in the Mortality Surveillance Division, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, identified 8 deaths attributed to adenovirus infections in service members during 1999-2010.

  9. Characterization of a new adenovirus isolated from black-tailed deer in California.

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, H D; Hobbs, L A; Woods, L W

    2001-01-01

    An adenovirus associated with systemic and localized vascular damage was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in a newly recognized epizootic hemorrhagic disease in California black-tailed deer. In this study, we describe the cultural, physicochemical and serological characteristics of a virus isolated from lung using neonatal white-tail deer lung and turbinate cell cultures. The virus had the cultural, morphological and physicochemical characteristics of members of the Adenoviridae family. The virus would not replicate in low passage fetal bovine, caprine or ovine cells. Antiserum to the deer adenovirus, strain D94-2569, neutralized bovine adenovirus type-6 (BAdV-6), BAdV-7, and caprine adenovirus type-1 (GAdV-1). Antiserum to BAdV-6 did not neutralize the deer adenovirus but antiserum to BAdV-7 and GAdV-1 neutralized the deer adenovirus. Cross-neutralization with the other bovine, caprine and ovine adenovirus species was not observed. Restriction endonuclease patterns generated for the deer adenovirus were unique compared to those for the currently recognized bovine, caprine and ovine adenovirus types. Amino acid sequence alignments of the hexon gene from the deer adenovirus strain D94-2569 indicate that it is a member of the proposed new genus (Atadenovirus) of the Adenoviridae family. While closely related antigenically to BAdV-7 and GAdV-1, the deer adenovirus appears sufficiently distinct culturally and molecularly to justify consideration as a new adenovirus type.

  10. Enhanced UV inactivation of adenoviruses under polychromatic UV lamps.

    PubMed

    Linden, Karl G; Thurston, Jeanette; Schaefer, Raymond; Malley, James P

    2007-12-01

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The U.S. EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm(-2) is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date published in the peer-reviewed literature have been based on UV disinfection experiments using UV irradiation at 253.7 nm produced from a conventional low-pressure UV source. The work reported here presents inactivation data for adenovirus based on polychromatic UV sources and details the significant enhancement in inactivation achieved using these polychromatic sources. When full-spectrum, medium-pressure UV lamps were used, 4-log inactivation of adenovirus type 40 is achieved at a UV fluence of less than 60 mJ cm(-2) and a surface discharge pulsed UV source required a UV fluence of less than 40 mJ cm(-2). The action spectrum for adenovirus type 2 was also developed and partially explains the improved inactivation based on enhancements at wavelengths below 230 nm. Implications for water treatment, public health, and the future of UV regulations for virus disinfection are discussed. PMID:17933932

  11. Bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Lisanework E; Kumar, Pankaj; Gaba, Amit; Makadiya, Niraj; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-01-15

    The use of vaccines is an effective and relatively inexpensive means of controlling infectious diseases, which cause heavy economic losses to the livestock industry through animal loss, decreased productivity, treatment expenses and decreased carcass quality. However, some vaccines produced by conventional means are imperfect in many respects including virulence, safety and efficacy. Moreover, there are no vaccines for some animal diseases. Although genetic engineering has provided new ways of producing effective vaccines, the cost of production for veterinary use is a critical criterion for selecting the method of production and delivery of vaccines. The cost effective production and intrinsic ability to enter cells has made adenovirus vectors a highly efficient tool for delivery of vaccine antigens. Moreover, adenoviruses induce both humoral and cellular immune responses to expressed vaccine antigens. Since nonhuman adenoviruses are species specific, the development of animal specific adenoviruses as vaccine delivery vectors is being evaluated. This review summarizes the work related to the development of bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle in animals, particularly cattle.

  12. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  13. [Adenovirus-delivered BMI-1 shRNA].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Li; Zhen, Jie

    2009-10-01

    Recently, some plasmid vectors that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs have been developed, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors possess certain advantages over synthesized siRNA, many disadvantages exist, including low and variable transfection efficiency. This study was aimed to establish an adenoviral siRNA delivery system without above-mentioned disadvantages on the basis of commercially available vectors. A vector was designed to target the human polycomb gene BMI-1. The pAd-BMI-1shRNA-CMV-GFP vector was produced by cloning a 300 bp U6-BMI-1 cassette from the pGE1BMI-1shRNA plasmid and a CMV-GFP cassette from pAdTrack CMV in pShutter vector. The adenovirus was produced from the 293A packaging cell line and then infected K562 cells. The mRNA and protein levels of Bmi-1 were detected by real time-PCR and Western blot respectively. The results showed that the adenovirus carrying the BMI-1shRNA was successfully produced. After being transfected with the adenovirus, the K562 cells dramatically down-regulated BMI-1 expression, whereas the adenoviruses carrying control shRNA had no effect on BMI-1 expression. It is concluded that the adenoviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and may become a candidate vector carrying siRNA drugs for gene therapy. PMID:19840467

  14. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  15. New Insights on Adenovirus as Vaccine Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lasaro, Marcio O; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for treatment of genetic diseases. Their usefulness for permanent gene replacement was limited by their high immunogenicity, which resulted in rapid elimination of transduced cells through induction of T and B cells to antigens of Ad and the transgene product. The very trait that excluded their use for sustained treatment of genetic diseases made them highly attractive as vaccine carriers. Recently though results showed that Ad vectors based on common human serotypes, such as serotype 5, may not be ideal as vaccine carriers. A recently conducted phase 2b trial, termed STEP trial, with an AdHu5-based vaccine expressing antigens of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) not only showed lack of efficacy in spite of the vaccine's immunogenicity, but also suggested an increased trend for HIV acquisition in individuals that had circulating AdHu5 neutralizing antibodies prior to vaccination. Alternative serotypes from humans or nonhuman primates (NHPs), to which most humans lack pre-existing immunity, have been vectored and may circumvent the problems encountered with the use of AdHu5 vectors in humans. In summary, although Ad vectors have seen their share of setbacks in recent years, they remain viable tools for prevention or treatment of a multitude of diseases. PMID:19513019

  16. Viability of human adenovirus from hospital fomites.

    PubMed

    Ganime, Ana Carolina; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Santos, Marisa; Costa Filho, Rubens; Leite, José Paulo G; Miagostovich, Marize P

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of environmental microbial contamination in healthcare facilities may be a valuable tool to determine pathogens transmission in those settings; however, such procedure is limited to bacterial indicators. Viruses are found commonly in those environments and are rarely used for these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess distribution and viability of a human DNA virus on fomites in an Adult Intensive Care Unit of a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) were investigated in 141 fomites by scraping the surface area and screening by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using TaqMan® System (Carlsbad, CA). Ten positive samples were selected for virus isolation in A549 and/or HEp2c cell lines. A total of 63 samples (44.7%) were positive and presented viral load ranging from 2.48 × 10(1) to 2.1 × 10(3) genomic copies per millilitre (gc/ml). The viability was demonstrated by integrated cell culture/nested-PCR in 5 out of 10 samples. Nucleotide sequencing confirmed all samples as HAdV and characterized one of them as specie B, serotype 3 (HAdV-3). The results indicate the risk of nosocomial transmission via contaminated fomites and point out the use of HAdV as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

  17. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Gnessi, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv) mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed. PMID:26184280

  18. Selection of nonfastidious adenovirus species in 293 cells inoculated with stool specimens containing adenovirus 40.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1985-08-01

    Of 35 stool specimens isolated and examined in 293 cells, 15 isolates contained adenovirus species 40 (Ad40), and 4 of these 15 isolates also contained a nonfastidious adenovirus species (Ad1 in two cases, Ad18 or Ad31) which was selected over Ad40 during serial passage in the 293 cells. The selection of Ad1 over Ad40 was examined in detail. Restriction analysis of intracellular DNA and the relative infectivity titers of Ad40 and Ad1 at each passage level after the inoculation of 293 cells with a particular stool specimen demonstrated that although the amount of Ad40 DNA synthesized far exceeded that of Ad1, the relative infectivity titer of Ad40 was low. The growth characteristics of Ad40 were then compared with those of Ad1, Ad18, and Ad41 in singly infected 293 cell cultures. One-step growth curves showed the same growth rate in each case, with a latent period of 12 h and a maximum titer at 24 to 36 h postinfection. Yields of infectious Ad40 virus were consistently 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those of Ad1. This difference was reflected by a reduced yield of total AD40 virions (p1.34) as determined by 35S labeling experiments. However, the 3- to 10-fold reduction in total yield of Ad40 virions did not account for the 100- to 1,000-fold reduction in the yield of infectious virus. PMID:2993350

  19. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  20. Regulation of a viral proteinase by a peptide and DNA in one-dimensional space: I. binding to DNA AND to hexon of the precursor to protein VI, pVI, of human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Suomalainen, Maarit; Greber, Urs F; Freimuth, Paul; Blainey, Paul C; Luo, Guobin; Xie, X Sunney; Mangel, Walter F

    2013-01-18

    The precursor to adenovirus protein VI, pVI, is a multifunctional protein with different roles early and late in virus infection. Here, we focus on two roles late in infection, binding of pVI to DNA and to the major capsid protein hexon. pVI bound to DNA as a monomer independent of DNA sequence with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d)((app)), of 46 nm. Bound to double-stranded DNA, one molecule of pVI occluded 8 bp. Upon the binding of pVI to DNA, three sodium ions were displaced from the DNA. A ΔG(0)(0) of -4.54 kcal/mol for the nonelectrostatic free energy of binding indicated that a substantial component of the binding free energy resulted from nonspecific interactions between pVI and DNA. The proteolytically processed, mature form of pVI, protein VI, also bound to DNA; its K(d)((app)) was much higher, 307 nm. The binding assays were performed in 1 mm MgCl(2) because in the absence of magnesium, the binding to pVI or protein VI to DNA was too tight to determine a K(d)((app)). Three molecules of pVI bound to one molecule of the hexon trimer with an equilibrium dissociation constant K(d)((app)) of 1.1 nm.

  1. Complete genome sequences of pigeon adenovirus 1 and duck adenovirus 2 extend the number of species within the genus Aviadenovirus.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ana; Kaján, Győző L; Kosiol, Carolin; Harrach, Balázs; Schlötterer, Christian; Hess, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Complete genomes of the first isolates of pigeon adenovirus 1 (PiAdV-1) and Muscovy duck adenovirus (duck adenovirus 2, DAdV-2) were sequenced. The PiAdV-1 genome is 45,480bp long, and has a gene organization most similar to turkey adenovirus 1. Near the left end of the genome, it lacks ORF0, ORF1A, ORF1B and ORF1C, and possesses ORF52, whereas six novel genes were found near the right end. The DAdV-2 genome is 43,734bp long, and has a gene organization similar to that of goose adenovirus 4 (GoAdV-4). It lacks ORF51, ORF1C and ORF54, and possesses ORF55A and five other novel genes. PiAdV-1 and DAdV-2 genomes contain two and one fiber genes, respectively. Genome organization, G+C content, molecular phylogeny and host type confirm the need to establish two novel species (Pigeon aviadenovirus A and Duck aviadenovirus B) within the genus Aviadenovirus. Phylogenetic data show that DAdV-2 is most closely related to GoAdV-4.

  2. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  3. Disseminated adenovirus infection in an immunocompromised host. Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Landry, M L; Fong, C K; Neddermann, K; Solomon, L; Hsiung, G D

    1987-09-01

    In this report, a bone marrow transplant recipient with rapidly fatal gastroenteritis is presented. The presence of intranuclear inclusions on postmortem light microscopic examination of liver, lung, and small bowel tissue was considered diagnostic of cytomegalovirus infection. However, electron microscopic examination of liver tissue demonstrated adenovirus infection. This was confirmed by isolation of an adenovirus type 2 with unusual laboratory features from liver, lung, colon contents, serum, esophageal swab, and oral ulcerations. Results of a complement fixation test for antibodies to adenovirus performed on postmortem serum samples were negative, and a titer of 1:4 was noted for antibody against cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the diagnostic pitfalls that may be encountered in establishing a specific viral diagnosis in severely ill patients. PMID:2821806

  4. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus. PMID:26189043

  5. Species-Specific Identification of Human Adenoviruses in Sewage.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Magdalena; Krzysztoszek, Arleta; Witek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) diversity in sewage was assessed by species-specific molecular methods. Samples of raw sewage were collected in 14 sewage disposal systems from January to December 2011, in Poland. HAdVs were detected in 92.1% of the analysed sewage samples and was significantly higher at cities of over 100 000 inhabitants. HAdV DNA was detected in sewage during all seasons. The most abundant species identified were HAdV-F (average 89.6%) and -A (average 19.6%), which are associated with intestine infections. Adenoviruses from B species were not detected. The result of the present study demonstrate that human adenoviruses are consistently present in sewage in Poland, demonstrating the importance of an adequate treatment before the disposal in the environment. Multiple HAdV species identified in raw sewage provide new information about HAdV circulation in the Polish population. PMID:26094312

  6. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus.

  7. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  8. CD46-Utilizing Adenoviruses Inhibit C/EBPβ-Dependent Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Iacobelli-Martinez, Milena; Nepomuceno, Ronald R.; Connolly, Jodi; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of adenovirus serotypes utilize the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) for virus-host cell attachment, but subgroup B and subgroup D (adenovirus type 37 [Ad37]) viruses recognize CD46. CD46 is a ubiquitously expressed receptor that serves as a cofactor for the inactivation of the complement components C3b and C4b, and it also serves as a receptor for diverse microbial pathogens. A reported consequence of CD46 engagement is a reduced capability of human immune cells to express interleukin-12 (IL-12), a cytokine involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Studies were thus undertaken to determine whether CD46-utilizing Ads alter the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Subgroup B (Ad16 and -35) and Ad37, but not Ad2 or -5, significantly reduced IL-12 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and lipopolysaccharide. IL-12 mRNA (p35 and p40 subunits) levels as well as other cytokine mRNA levels (IL-1α and -β, IL-1Ra, and IL-6) were decreased upon interaction with CD46-utilizing Ads. Analysis of transcription factor activity required for cytokine expression indicated that CD46-utilizing Ads preferentially inhibited IFN-γ-induced C/EBPβ protein expression, consequently reducing its ability to form DNA complexes. Interference with IFN-γ signaling events by CD46-utilizing Ads, but not CAR-utilizing Ads, reveals a potentially critical difference in the host immune response against distinct Ad vectors, a situation that has implications for gene delivery and vaccine development. PMID:16103178

  9. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of adenovirus design and production.

    PubMed

    Alba, Raul; Baker, Andrew H; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviruses have many attributes, which have made them one of the most widely investigated vectors for gene therapy applications. These include ease of genetic manipulation to produce replication-deficient vectors, ability to readily generate high titer stocks, efficiency of gene delivery into many cell types, and ability to encode large genetic inserts. Recent advances in adenoviral vector engineering have included the ability to genetically manipulate the tropism of the vector by engineering of the major capsid proteins, particularly fiber and hexon. Furthermore, simple replication-deficient adenoviral vectors deleted for expression of a single gene have been complemented by the development of systems in which the majority of adenoviral genes are deleted, generating sophisticated Ad vectors which can mediate sustained transgene expression following a single delivery. This chapter outlines methods for developing simple transgene over expressing Ad vectors and detailed strategies to engineer mutations into the major capsid proteins.

  10. The Prevalence of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in the Childhood Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Bora, Gulhan; Kaya, Bulent; Yakut, Kahraman

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis stemming from viral causes is very common during the childhood period. Rotavirus and enteric adenovirus are the most common factors of acute gastroenteritis encountered in infants and children. However, the epidemiology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in the east Anatolia region is not well-known. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the distribution of antigen positivity in rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigen tests required cases and demographic data retrospectively in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital. Patients and Methods The records of stool sample analyses for 1154 patients admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2011 with complaints of diarrhea were retrospectively examined. The presence of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigens in stool specimens was investigated by means of an immunochromatographic test. Results Viral antigens were detected in 327 (28.3%) stool specimens out of 1154. Among the positive results, the frequency was 73.7% for rotavirus and 26.2% for adenovirus. While the detected rotavirus antigen rate was high for all age groups, it was highest for children under the age of 2, with a rate of 57.1%. Moreover, the rotavirus infections were observed at a rate of 44.3% in winter and of 24.6% in autumn. Conclusions The most important factor in childhood acute gastroenteritis in east Anatolia is the rotavirus. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens should be routinely investigated as a factor in fresh stool samples for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteritis in children in the winter and autumn months. PMID:27635215

  11. Biosynthesis of adenovirus type 2 i-leader protein.

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J S; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The i-leader is a 440-base-pair sequence located between 21.8 and 23.0 map units on the adenovirus type 2 genome and is spliced between the second and third segments of the major tripartite leader in certain viral mRNA molecules. The i-leader contains an open translational reading frame for a hypothetical protein of Mr about 16,600, and a 16,000-Mr polypeptide (16K protein) has been translated in vitro on mRNA selected with DNA containing the i-leader (A. Virtanen, P. Aleström, H. Persson, M. G. Katze, and U. Pettersson, Nucleic Acids Res. 10:2539-2548, 1982). To determine whether the i-leader protein is synthesized during productive infection and to provide an immunological reagent to study the properties and functions of the i-leader protein, we prepared antipeptide antibodies directed to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide which is encoded near the N terminus of the hypothetical i-leader protein and contains a high acidic amino acid and proline content. Antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated from extracts of adenovirus type 2-infected cells a major 16K protein that comigrated with a 16K protein translated in vitro. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by Edman degradation of radiolabeled 16K antigen showed that methionine is present at residue 1 and leucine is present at residues 8 and 10, as predicted from the DNA sequence, establishing that the 16K protein precipitated by this antibody is indeed the i-leader protein. Thus, the i-leader protein is a prominent species that is synthesized during productive infection. The i-leader protein is often seen as a doublet on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that either two related forms of i-leader protein are synthesized in infected cells or that a posttranslational modification occurs. Time course studies using immunoprecipitation analysis with antipeptide antibodies revealed that the E1A 289R T antigen and the E1B-19K (175R) T antigen are synthesized beginning at 2 to 3 and 4 to 5 h postinfection

  12. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  13. Effects of cold atmospheric plasmas on adenoviruses in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Dumler, K.; Shimizu, T.; Morfill, G. E.; Wolf, A.; Boxhammer, V.; Schlegel, J.; Gansbacher, B.; Anton, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were performed with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) to inactivate adenovirus, a non-enveloped double stranded DNA virus, in solution. The plasma source used was a surface micro-discharge technology operating in air. Various plasma diagnostic measurements and tests were performed in order to determine the efficacy of CAPs and to understand the inactivation mechanism(s). Different stages of the adenovirus ‘life cycle’ were investigated—infectivity and gene expression as well as viral replication and spread. Within 240 s of CAP treatment, inactivation of up to 6 decimal log levels can be achieved.

  14. Human Adenovirus Type 2 but Not Adenovirus Type 12 Is Mutagenic at the Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase Locus of Cloned Rat Liver Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paraskeva, Christos; Roberts, Carl; Biggs, Paul; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    1983-01-01

    Using resistance to the base analog 8-azaguanine as a genetic marker, we showed that adenovirus type 2, but not adenovirus type 12, is mutagenic at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of cloned diploid rat liver epithelial cells. Adenovirus type 2 increased the frequency of 8-azaguanine-resistant colonies by up to ninefold over the spontaneous frequency, depending on expression time and virus dose. PMID:6572280

  15. Bovine adenovirus type 10 identified in fatal cases of adenovirus-associated enteric disease in cattle by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, J A; Benkö, M; Moffett, D A; Harrach, B

    1996-01-01

    A severe, naturally occurring enteric disease of cattle in which adenovirus inclusions are present in the intestinal vascular endothelium has been recognized in several countries; three different adenovirus serotypes have been isolated from affected animals. An in situ hybridization technique for the detection of bovine adenoviral DNA was developed and applied to tissue from 13 cattle in Northern Ireland diagnosed to have the disease. Bovine adenovirus serotype 10 (BAV-10) was identified in the vascular inclusions of all cattle, providing strong evidence that adenoviral enteric vascular disease in cattle is associated with this serotype. The existence of BAV-10 has only recently been recognized. The first molecular biology-based technique for the diagnosis of BAV-10 infection is described. The animals in the present study are the first in which BAV-10 has had a confirmed role in a pathologic process. PMID:8727916

  16. Distinct temporal changes in host cell lncRNA expression during the course of an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxing; Chen, Maoshan; Lind, Sara Bergström; Pettersson, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    The deregulation of cellular long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression during a human adenovirus infection was studied by deep sequencing. Expression of lncRNAs increased substantially following the progression of the infection. Among 645 significantly expressed lncRNAs, the expression of 398 was changed more than 2-fold. More than 80% of them were up-regulated and 80% of them were detected during the late phase. Based on the genomic locations of the deregulated lncRNAs in relation to known mRNAs and miRNAs, they were predicted to be involved in growth, structure, apoptosis and wound healing in the early phase, cell proliferation in the intermediate phase and protein synthesis, modification and transport in the late phase. The most significant functions of cellular RNA-binding proteins, previously shown to interact with the deregulated lncRNAs identified here, are involved in RNA splicing, nuclear export and translation events. We hypothesize that adenoviruses exploit the lncRNA network to optimize their reproduction. PMID:27003248

  17. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  18. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  19. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  20. Adenovirus Dodecahedron, as a Drug Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Zochowska, Monika; Paca, Agnieszka; Schoehn, Guy; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Dublet, Bernard; Szolajska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer antibiotic used in many cancer regimens. Its utility is limited by systemic toxicity and dose-dependent pneumonitis able to progress to lung fibrosis. The latter can affect up to nearly 50% of the total patient population, out of which 3% will die. We propose to improve BLM delivery by tethering it to an efficient delivery vector. Adenovirus (Ad) dodecahedron base (DB) is a particulate vector composed of 12 copies of a pentameric viral protein responsible for virus penetration. The vector efficiently penetrates the plasma membrane, is liberated in the cytoplasm and has a propensity to concentrate around the nucleus; up to 300000 particles can be observed in one cell in vitro. Principal Findings Dodecahedron (Dd) structure is preserved at up to about 50°C at pH 7–8 and during dialysis, freezing and drying in the speed-vac in the presence of 150 mM ammonium sulfate, as well as during lyophilization in the presence of cryoprotectants. The vector is also stable in human serum for 2 h at 37°C. We prepared a Dd-BLM conjugate which upon penetration induced death of transformed cells. Similarly to free bleomycin, Dd-BLM caused dsDNA breaks. Significantly, effective cytotoxic concentration of BLM delivered with Dd was 100 times lower than that of free bleomycin. Conclusions/Significance Stability studies show that Dds can be conveniently stored and transported, and can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes under various climates. Successful BLM delivery by Ad Dds demonstrates that the use of virus like particle (VLP) results in significantly improved drug bioavailability. These experiments open new vistas for delivery of non-permeant labile drugs. PMID:19440379

  1. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, R; van de Bildt, M W G; Schapendonk, C M E; van Leeuwen, M; van Boheemen, S; de Jong, A A W; Osterhaus, A D M E; Smits, S L; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species.

  3. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections. PMID:26342465

  4. Late paternities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean

    2007-06-01

    Late paternities are frequent. Very often these couples ask for medically assisted procreation. In general, it is considered that the couple should not be treated differently from the couple where the father is younger. Recent studies show a certain number of specific risks linked to the late paternities. Doctors and society do not act in the same way towards men and women: a 'sensible age' for women to no longer attempt pregnancy has been set in many countries at 42 years of age, whereas men aged 80 can benefit from IVF attempts and be reimbursed by the state or insurance companies. This is an obvious inequity. PMID:17579995

  5. Use of adenovirus as a model system to illustrate a simple method using standard equipment and inexpensive excipients to remove live virus dependence on the cold-chain.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M; Ward, S J; Drew, J

    2014-05-19

    Thermolability of complex biological molecules is a major consideration for the long-term maintenance of titer during periods of storage. The development of a simple, cost effective method for long term storage of virus samples, which maintains viral titer would prove useful for a wide variety of applications including the preservation of viral vaccines, and is paramount for alleviating the reliance upon the cold chain. We have investigated the potential use of a method adapted for this purpose originating from a natural mechanism used by plants which helps to maintain the integrity of seeds, enabling them to overcome extensive periods of temperature elevation and desiccation. As maturation of a seed progresses, many complex biological macromolecules are laid down which maintain the germination potential. Sucrose and raffinose (in addition to other oligosaccharides) are commonly found to accumulate. In addition highly charged protein molecules accumulate, Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, reaching their maximal level when the seed is most desiccation and thermally tolerant, and indeed are among the first molecules to be lost when germination is initiated. We have examined the potential use of sucrose and raffinose in concert with chemical replacements for the LEA, which when dried with the active product forms an amorphous solid able to maintain the titer of infectious Adenovirus at elevated temperatures for extended periods, in the case of lyophilized presentations several months at 37 °C, or as liquid, stability for several weeks at 37 °C was achieved. We demonstrate that after embedding the active product in the matrix, the viral titer is preserved even at temperatures for relatively extended periods at temperatures significantly greater than ambient. In addition we believe that these results could open the way for a new type of vaccine which we refer to as a hybrid stability vaccine, whereby for the first time the same excipient components are used

  6. From Back-arc Drifting to Arc Accretion: the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Evolution of the Guerrero Terrane Recorded by a Major Provenance Change in Sandstones from the Sierra de los Cuarzos, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios Garcia, N. B.; Martini, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Guerrero terrane composed of Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous arc assemblages, were drifted from the North American continental mainland during lower Early Cretaceous spreading in the Arperos back arc basin, and subsequently accreted back to the continental margin in the late Aptian. Although the accretion of the Guerrero terrane represents one of the major tectonic processes that shaped the southern North American Pacific margin, the stratigraphic record related to such a regional event was not yet recognized in central Mexico. Due to the Sierra de los Cuarzos is located just 50 km east of the Guerrero terrane suture belt, its stratigraphic record should be highly sensitive to first order tectonic changes and would record a syn-tectonic deposits related to this major event. In that study area, were identified two main Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clastic units. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation represents the lowermost exposed stratigraphic record. Sedimentary structures, sandstones composition, and U-Pb detrital zircon ages document that the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation reflects a vigorous mass wasting along the margin of the North American continental mainland, representing the eastern side of the Arperos back arc basin. Sandstones of the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation are free from detrital contributions related to the Guerrero terrane juvenile sources, indicating that the Arperos Basin acted like an efficient sedimentological barrier that inhibited the influence of the arc massifs on the continental mainland deposits. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation is overlain by submarine slope deposits of the Pelones formation, which mark a sudden change in the depositional conditions. Provenance analysis documents that sandstones from the Pelones formation were fed by the mafic to intermediate arc assemblages of the Guerrero terrane, as well as by quartz-rich sources of the continental mainland, suggesting that, by the time of deposition of the Pelones

  7. Morphological, Biochemical, and Functional Study of Viral Replication Compartments Isolated from Adenovirus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Paloma; Anzures, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Guerrero, Adán; Wood, Christopher D.; Valdés, Margarita; Dobner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus (Ad) replication compartments (RC) are nuclear microenvironments where the viral genome is replicated and a coordinated program of late gene expression is established. These virus-induced nuclear sites seem to behave as central hubs for the regulation of virus-host cell interactions, since proteins that promote efficient viral replication as well as factors that participate in the antiviral response are coopted and concentrated there. To gain further insight into the activities of viral RC, here we report, for the first time, the morphology, composition, and activities of RC isolated from Ad-infected cells. Morphological analyses of isolated RC particles by superresolution microscopy showed that they were indistinguishable from RC within infected cells and that they displayed a dynamic compartmentalization. Furthermore, the RC-containing fractions (RCf) proved to be functional, as they directed de novo synthesis of viral DNA and RNA as well as RNA splicing, activities that are associated with RC in vivo. A detailed analysis of the production of viral late mRNA from RCf at different times postinfection revealed that viral mRNA splicing occurs in RC and that the synthesis, posttranscriptional processing, and release from RC to the nucleoplasm of individual viral late transcripts are spatiotemporally separate events. The results presented here demonstrate that RCf are a powerful system for detailed study into RC structure, composition, and activities and, as a result, the determination of the molecular mechanisms that induce the formation of these viral sites of adenoviruses and other nuclear-replicating viruses. IMPORTANCE RC may represent molecular hubs where many aspects of virus-host cell interaction are controlled. Here, we show by superresolution microscopy that RCf have morphologies similar to those of RC within Ad-infected cells and that they appear to be compartmentalized, as nucleolin and DBP display different localization in the

  8. CD40 Ligand and GMCSF Coexpression Enhance the Immune Responses and Protective Efficacy of PCV2 Adenovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Wang, Zhenyu; Chang, Lingling; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) capsid protein (Cap) is the major structural protein that is responsible for neutralizing antibodies development and protective immunity, thus it is usually used to develop vaccines against porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Porcine CD40 ligand (CD40L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) have positive immunostimulatory effects on immunocytes and have been applied in vaccine efficacy improvement as attractive adjuvant cytokines, respectively. However, whether these two cytokines can produce synergistic effect in vaccines still need to be further studied. In this study, porcine CD40L and GMCSF were inserted into recombinant adenoviruses to test the immunogenicity of PCV2 adenovirus vaccine in mice. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that Ad-Cap, Ad-CD40L-Cap, Ad-Cap-GMCSF, and Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF were successfully constructed. Indirect ELISA and virus neutralizing assay showed that CD40L and GMCSF could enhance humoral immune responses, and PCV2 Cap-specific antibody titer and neutralizing activities were significantly higher in Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF group than that in the other groups that just inserted either porcine CD40L or GMCSF in recombinant adenoviruses. Moreover, lymphocyte proliferation assay and cytokine release assay showed that CD40L and GMCSF enhanced the cellular immune responses of Ad-Cap, and had synergistic effects in lymphocyte proliferative activities and Th1-type cytokine production. Following PCV2 challenge, the viral loads in lungs of Ad-CD40L-Cap-GMCSF group were significantly lower compared with Ad-Cap, Ad-CD40L-Cap, and Ad-Cap-GMCSF group. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that CD40L and GMCSF could synergistically enhance the protective immune responses of PCV2 adenovirus vaccine, which would be used as a potent vaccine for the prevention and control of PCVAD. PMID:26982652

  9. Binding of adenovirus and its external proteins to Triton X-114. Dependence on pH.

    PubMed

    Seth, P; Willingham, M C; Pastan, I

    1985-11-25

    35S-Labeled adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (10 ng/ml) was incubated with 1% Triton X-114 at various pH values varying from 3.0 to 8.0. The detergent phase was separated from the aqueous phase by centrifugation, and the amounts of Ad2 were determined in the two phases. At pH 7.0-8.0, less than 5% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase; at pH 5.0 or below, about 60% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase. When a mixture of 35S-labeled capsid proteins was used at pH 7.0, 60-70% of the total proteins were associated with the detergent at pH 5.0, but less than 5% of the proteins interacted with detergent at pH 7.0. Among the three major external proteins (hexon, penton base, and fiber), penton base had the highest association with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0. Both intact virus and the capsid proteins that were associated with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0 were released into the aqueous phase on subsequent incubation at pH 7.0. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that mildly acidic pH induces amphiphilic properties in adenovirus capsid proteins and may help Ad2 escape from acidic endocytic vesicles.

  10. Binding of adenovirus and its external proteins to Triton X-114. Dependence on pH

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, P.; Willingham, M.C.; Pastan, I.

    1985-11-25

    TVS-Labeled adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (10 ng/ml) was incubated with 1% Triton X-114 at various pH values varying from 3.0 to 8.0. The detergent phase was separated from the aqueous phase by centrifugation, and the amounts of Ad2 were determined in the two phases. At pH 7.0-8.0, less than 5% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase; at pH 5.0 or below, about 60% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase. When a mixture of TVS-labeled capsid proteins was used at pH 7.0, 60-70% of the total proteins were associated with the detergent at pH 5.0, but less than 5% of the proteins interacted with detergent at pH 7.0. Among the three major external proteins (hexon, penton base, and fiber), penton base had the highest association with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0. Both intact virus and the capsid proteins that were associated with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0 were released into the aqueous phase on subsequent incubation at pH 7.0. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that mildly acidic pH induces amphiphilic properties in adenovirus capsid proteins and may help Ad2 escape from acidic endocytic vesicles.

  11. Members of adenovirus species B utilize CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Joshua J.; Vasu, Chenthamarakshan; Holterman, Mark J.; Curiel, David T.; Pereboev, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Alternate serotypes of adenovirus (Ad), including Ads of species B, are being explored to circumvent the disadvantages of Ad serotype 5 gene delivery vectors. Whereas the majority of human Ads utilize the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), none of the Ad species B use CAR. Ad species B is further divided into two subspecies, B1 and B2, and utilizes at least two classes of receptors: common Ad species B receptors and B2 specific receptors. CD46 has been implicated as a B2-specific receptor. Ad serotype 3 (Ad3), a member of B1, utilizes CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors. The receptor-interacting Ad fiber-knob domain is highly homologous among species B Ads. We hypothesized that other members of Ad species B may utilize CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors. All tested species B members showed specific binding to cells expressing CD80 and CD86, and the Ad fiber-knob domain from both B1 and B2 Ad efficiently blocked CD80- and CD86-mediated infection of Ad3 vectors. Members of both B1 and B2 demonstrated CD80- and CD86-specific infection of CHO cells expressing CD80 and CD86. Therefore, all of the members of Ad species B utilize CD80 and CD86 for infection of cells. PMID:16920215

  12. Virology and epidemiology analyses of global adenovirus-associated conjunctivitis outbreaks, 1953-2013.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhao, N; Sha, J; Wang, C; Jin, X; Amer, S; Liu, S

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the virology and epidemiology of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF) and acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreaks worldwide caused by the human adenovirus (HAdV) from 1953 to 2013. Eighty-three hexon sequences from 76 conjunctivitis outbreaks were analysed and subtyped using Mega 5.05, Clustal X and SimPlot software. Epidemiology was performed for the area, age and seasonal distribution. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the isolates could be divided into three subgenetic lineages, without a common ancestor. The major causes of the outbreaks were Ad8, Ad7 and Ad2 co-infection with enterovirus 70 (EV70) in EKC, PCF and AHC, respectively. The epidemiological findings suggested that EKC and AHC were circulating predominantly in Asia during the early winter and spring, whereas PCF was circulating mainly in China, Australia and the United States during the summer. This study suggests that EKC, AHC and PCF outbreaks have different circulating patterns throughout the world and are caused by different adenovirus serotypes. A global surveillance system should be established to monitor conjunctivitis outbreaks in the future.

  13. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  14. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  15. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  20. Targeting species D adenoviruses replication to counteract the epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, Natalia A; Speiseder, Thomas; Groitl, Peter; Spirin, Pavel V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Lebedev, Timofey D; Rubtsov, Petr M; Lam, Elena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Dobner, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses causing various infections; their pathogenicity varies dependent on virus species and type. Although acute infections can sometimes take severe courses, they are rarely fatal in immune-competent individuals. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are hyperacute and highly contagious infections of the eye caused by human adenovirus types within species D. Currently there is no causal treatment available to counteract these diseases effectively. The E2B region of the adenovirus genome encodes for the viral DNA polymerase, which is required for adenoviral DNA replication. Here we propose novel model systems to test this viral key factor, DNA polymerase, as a putative target for the development of efficient antiviral therapy based on RNA interference. Using our model cell lines we found that different small interfering RNAs mediate significant suppression (up to 90%) of expression levels of viral DNA polymerase upon transfection. Moreover, permanent expression of short hairpin RNA based on the most effective small interfering RNA led to a highly significant, more than tenfold reduction in replication for different human group D adenoviruses involved in ocular infections.

  1. Serologic and hexon phylogenetic analysis of ruminant adenoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the antigenic relationship among ruminant adenoviruses and determine their phylogenetic relationship based on the deduced hexon gene amino acid sequence. Results of reciprocal cross-neutralization tests demonstrated antigenic relationships in either on...

  2. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  3. Isolation of adenovirus from lambs with upper respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pommer, J; Schamber, G

    1991-07-01

    The role of viruses in the etiology of recurrent upper respiratory disease in newly weaned lambs was studied during 1984-1985 at the North Dakota Sheep Experiment Station. Serum samples collected from lambs at weaning, from lambs with signs of respiratory disease, and 3 weeks following the onset of clinical signs were tested for antibodies to ovine adenovirus (OAV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza type-3 virus (PI-3). Virus isolation studies were performed on nasal secretions samples taken at the same time. Parainfluenza type-3 was isolated from 1 of 275 lambs tested, and there was 2.5% overall 4-fold increase in antibody titer to PI-3 during the 2-year study. An adenovirus with a different restriction endonuclease digestion pattern from that previously reported adenovirus strains in the United States was isolated from 13 of 275 nasal secretions collected from lambs at the time of weaning. There was a 17.6% overall 4-fold increase in seroconversion to the adenovirus isolated from the lambs with clinical disease.

  4. Helping the Habitually Late Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Jerry

    1978-01-01

    The author gives three major reasons for a student being habitually late to class: resistance, disorganization, or unavoidable schedule conflicts. He makes specific suggestions to teachers for dealing with the disorganized and resistant latecomers. (SJL)

  5. Adenovirus uncoating and nuclear establishment are not affected by weak base amines.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, E; Everitt, E

    1996-01-01

    We have used four established lysosomotropic agents, ammonium chloride, amantadine, chloroquine, and methylamine, to monitor the possible interference with an early low-pH-dependent step during adenovirus replication. Two concentrations of each of the different agents were selected; one was essentially nontoxic to uninfected HeLa cells, and the other resulted in some toxicity as measured by trypan blue staining and by interference with cell monolayer establishment, cell proliferation, and radioisotope labelling. It was separately determined that these concentrations displayed pH-raising effects of the same magnitude as higher concentrations previously used in similar studies. Adenovirus uncoating in vivo, normally reaching its maximum within 1 h after infection, was not affected by any of the agents. The subsequent levels of successful nuclear entry events by the parental genomes were monitored by measuring the extent of transcription of an mRNA species coding for the early 72-kDa DNA-binding protein at 10 to 12 h postinfection. In HeLa, KB, HEp-2, and A549 cells, none of the agents were able to affect the levels of early transcription after administration at the point of infection or at 3 h after infection. The cumulative synthesis of the hexon antigen was assessed late in infection, and inhibitory effects were revealed upon administration of 10, 20, and 40 mM ammonium chloride, 10 mM methylamine, and 0.5 mM amantadine, irrespective of the time point of addition. Ammonium chloride at 5 mM reduced the hexon yield by 20% at the most when added within 50 min after infection. Chloroquine at concentrations of 2.5 and 5 microM specifically reduced the hexon yields by 30 to 40% when administered within the first 50 min of infection. On the basis of the lack of effects of nontoxic concentrations of the four agents on the early virus-cell interactive event of uncoating and the early virus-specified transcription, we conclude that a low-pH-dependent step early in the

  6. [Preparation of Recombinant Human Adenoviruses Labeled with miniSOG].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Xiao, Rong; Guo, Xiaojuan; Qu, Jianguo; Lu, Zhuozhuang; Hong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We wished to study the intracellular transport of adenoviruses. We constructed a novel recombinant adenovirus in which the structural protein IX was labeled with a mini-singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG). The miniSOG gene was synthesized by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned to the pcDNA3 vector, and expressed in 293 cells. Activation of miniSOG generated sufficient numbers of singlet oxygen molecules to catalyze polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product resolvable by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To construct miniSOG-labelled recombinant adenoviruses, the miniSOG gene was subcloned downstream of the IX gene in a pShuttle plasmid. Adenoviral plasmid pAd5-IXSOG was generated by homologous recombination of the modified shuttle plasmid (pShuttle-IXSOG) with the backbone plasmid (pAdeasy-1) in the BJ5183 strain of Eschericia coli. Adenovirus HAdV-5-IXSOG was rescued by transfection of 293 cells with the linearized pAd5-IXSOG. After propagation, virions were purified using the CsC1 ultracentrifugation method. Finally, HAdV-5-IXSOG in 2.0 mL with a particle titer of 6 x 1011 vp/mL was obtained. Morphology of HAdV-5-IXSOG was verified by TEM. Fusion of IX with the miniSOG gene was confirmed by PCR. In conclusion, miniSOG-labeled recombinant adenoviruses were constructed, which could be valuable tools for virus tracking by TEM. PMID:27295881

  7. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  8. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  9. Immunological and chemical identification of intracellular forms of adenovirus type 2 terminal protein.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Symington, J; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Thornton, H; Young, L

    1981-11-01

    Highly purified adenovirus type 2 terminal protein (TP) with an apparent M(r) of 55,000 (55K) was prepared in quantities of 10 to 30 mug from guanidine hydrochloride- or sodium dodecyl sulfate-disrupted virions (60 to 120 mg). Guinea pigs were immunized with 14 to 20 injections of TP in amounts of 1 to 2 mug. Antiserum to TP was used to study the intracellular polypeptides related to adenovirus type 2 TP. By immunoprecipitation with anti-TP serum, we identified 80K and 76K polypeptides in the nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic S100 fractions of [(35)S]methionine-labeled cells early and late after infection with Ad2. By immunoautoradiographic analysis which eliminates coprecipitation of unrelated proteins, we identified an 80K polypeptide (probably an 80K-76K doublet) in unlabeled, late infected cells, using anti-TP serum and (125)I-labeled staphylococcal protein A. About two- to threefold-higher levels of the 80K and 76K polypeptides were present in the nucleoplasm than in the S100 fraction, and two- to threefold-higher levels were found in late infected cells than in early infected cells (cycloheximide enhanced, arabinofuranosylcytosine treated). We did not detect the 80K or 76K polypeptide in uninfected cells, indicating that these polypeptides are virus coded. Tryptic peptide map analysis showed that the 80K and 76K polypeptides are very closely related and that they share peptides with the DNA-bound 55K TP. Our data provide the first direct demonstration of intracellular 80K and 76K forms of TP. The intracellular 80K and 76K polypeptides are closely related or identical to the 80K polypeptide that Challberg and co-workers (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:5105-5109, 1980) detected at the termini of adenovirus DNA synthesized in vitro and to the 87K polypeptide that Stillman and co-workers (Cell 23:497-508, 1981) translated in vitro. We did not detect the 55K TP in early or late infected cells, consistent with the proposal by Challberg and co-workers that the 80K

  10. Late-term abortion.

    PubMed

    Epner, J E; Jonas, H S; Seckinger, D L

    1998-08-26

    Recent proposed federal legislation banning certain abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, would modify the US Criminal Code such that physicians performing these procedures would be liable for monetary and statutory damages. Clarification of medical procedures is important because some of the procedures used to induce abortion prior to viability are identical or similar to postviability procedures. This article reviews the scientific and medical information on late-term abortion and late-term abortion techniques and includes data on the prevalence of late-term abortion, abortion-related mortality and morbidity rates, and legal issues regarding fetal viability and the balance of maternal and fetal interests. According to enacted American Medical Association (AMA) policy, the use of appropriate medical terminology is critical in defining late-term abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, which is a variant of but distinct from dilatation and evacuation. The AMA recommends that the intact dilatation and extraction procedure not be used unless alternative procedures pose materially greater risk to the woman and that abortions not be performed in the third trimester except in cases of serious fetal anomalies incompatible with life. Major medical societies are urged to collaborate on clinical guidelines on late-term abortion techniques and circumstances that conform to standards of good medical practice. More research on the advantages and disadvantages of specific abortion procedures would help physicians make informed choices about specific abortion procedures. Expanded ongoing data surveillance systems estimating the prevalence of abortion are also needed. PMID:9728645

  11. Late-term abortion.

    PubMed

    Epner, J E; Jonas, H S; Seckinger, D L

    1998-08-26

    Recent proposed federal legislation banning certain abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, would modify the US Criminal Code such that physicians performing these procedures would be liable for monetary and statutory damages. Clarification of medical procedures is important because some of the procedures used to induce abortion prior to viability are identical or similar to postviability procedures. This article reviews the scientific and medical information on late-term abortion and late-term abortion techniques and includes data on the prevalence of late-term abortion, abortion-related mortality and morbidity rates, and legal issues regarding fetal viability and the balance of maternal and fetal interests. According to enacted American Medical Association (AMA) policy, the use of appropriate medical terminology is critical in defining late-term abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, which is a variant of but distinct from dilatation and evacuation. The AMA recommends that the intact dilatation and extraction procedure not be used unless alternative procedures pose materially greater risk to the woman and that abortions not be performed in the third trimester except in cases of serious fetal anomalies incompatible with life. Major medical societies are urged to collaborate on clinical guidelines on late-term abortion techniques and circumstances that conform to standards of good medical practice. More research on the advantages and disadvantages of specific abortion procedures would help physicians make informed choices about specific abortion procedures. Expanded ongoing data surveillance systems estimating the prevalence of abortion are also needed.

  12. Adenovirus urethritis and concurrent conjunctivitis: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Olivia Louise; Samuel, Mannampallil Itty; Sudhanva, Malur; Ellis, Joanna; Taylor, Chris

    2015-03-01

    We present eight cases and review the literature of concurrent urethritis and conjunctivitis where adenovirus was identified as the causative pathogen. The focus of this review concerns the identification of specific sexual practices, symptoms, signs and any serotypes that seem more commonly associated with such adenovirus infections. We discuss the seasonality of adenovirus infection and provide practical advice for clinicians to give to the patient.

  13. High-level eucaryotic in vivo expression of biologically active measles virus hemagglutinin by using an adenovirus type 5 helper-free vector system.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D J

    1988-01-01

    The entire measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (HA)-coding region was reconstructed from cloned cDNAs and used as part of a hybrid transcription unit to replace a region of the adenovirus type 5 genome corresponding to the entire E1a transcription unit and most of the E1b transcription unit. The resulting recombinant virus was stable and able to replicate to high titers in 293 cells (which constitutively express the complementary E1a-E1b functions) in the absence of helper virus. During infection of 293 cells, the hybrid virus expressed MV HA protein which was indistinguishable from that expressed in MV-infected cells in terms of immunoreactivity, gel mobility, glycosylation, subcellular localization, and biologic activity. Infection of 293 cells with the hybrid virus led to high-level synthesis of the MV HA protein (equivalent to 65 to 130% of the level seen in MV-infected cells). At late times after high-multiplicity hybrid virus infection of HeLa and Vero cells (which do not express E1 functions), the level of HA protein synthesis was at least 35% of that seen in 293 cells. This MV-adenovirus recombinant will be useful in the study of the biologic properties of the MV HA protein and in assessment of the potential usefulness of hybrid adenoviruses as live-virus vaccine vectors. Images PMID:3292790

  14. Molecular biology of adenovirus type 2 semipermissive infections. I. Viral growth and expression of viral replicative functions during restricted adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Eggerding, F A; Pierce, W C

    1986-01-15

    As an initial step toward understanding the mechanisms underlying host cell restriction of adenovirus 2 (Ad2) replication, we have studied various cell lines derived from hamster (CHO-K1), rat (CREF, NRK-49F, C-3, C-9), and mouse (3T3-Swiss) tissues to determine their degree of permissivity to Ad2 replication. For each cell line tested, the time course of Ad2 growth was determined; the yield of infectious virus, as measured by titration on HeLa cell monolayers, was reduced 3 to 5 logs. This result is independent of the multiplicity of infection at multiplicities between 4 and 100 plaque-forming units (PFU) per cell. The Western immunoblotting technique was used to quantitate the amounts of early proteins (E1A 45-54K proteins, E1B 21 and 58K proteins, E2A 72K DNA binding protein) and late structural proteins (hexon, fiber) produced during restricted infections. All cell lines expressed 72K DNA binding protein and variable levels of other early proteins. C-3, C-9, and NRK-49F cells expressed hexon as well as low, but detectable levels of fiber protein. Mouse 3T3-Swiss cells failed to synthesize any detectable levels of late structural proteins. DNA synthesis analysis indicated all rodent cell lines were capable of replicating viral DNA. A decreased rate of viral DNA synthesis was observed in CREF cells. Evidence is presented which suggests newly synthesized viral DNA is unstable in 3T3-Swiss cells.

  15. Virus chimeras for gene therapy, vaccination, and oncolysis: adenoviruses and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Johanna K; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2012-07-01

    Several challenges need to be addressed when developing viruses for clinical applications in gene therapy, vaccination, or viral oncolysis, including specific and efficient target cell transduction, virus delivery via the blood stream, and evasion of pre-existing immunity. With rising frequency, these goals are tackled by generating chimeric viruses containing nucleic acid fragments or proteins from two or more different viruses, thus combining different beneficial features of the parental viruses. These chimeras have boosted the development of virus-based treatment regimens for major inherited and acquired diseases, including cancer. Using adenoviruses as the paradigm and prominent examples from other virus families, we review the technological and functional advances in therapeutic virus chimera development and recent successful applications that can pave the way for future therapies.

  16. Intracellular localization of type 4 adenovirus. II. Cytological and fluorescein-labelled antibody studies.

    PubMed

    BOYER, G S; DENNY, F W; GINSBERG, H S

    1959-01-01

    HeLa cell cultures infected with adenovirus type 4 were studied by light and phase-contrast microscopy and by the fluorescent antibody technique for visualization of intracellular antigen. The findings were correlated with the growth curve of infectious virus, determined from companion cultures. The results indicated that those cells undergoing characteristic structural changes observable by light microscopy were those which contain viral antigen. The distribution of the majority of the antigen within the infected cells corresponded to that of the regularly aligned granules and crystal-like masses seen in the nuclei of cells in stained and in unfixed cultures. The production of infectious virus was closely correlated with the development of the characteristic nuclear changes.

  17. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses.

  18. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses. PMID:23828618

  19. Phylogenetic Analyses of Novel Squamate Adenovirus Sequences in Wild-Caught Anolis Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Jill M.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Glor, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity. PMID:23593364

  20. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  1. Novel bat adenoviruses with an extremely large E3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Yang, Xing-Lou; Ge, Xing-Yi; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Biao; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Bats carry diverse RNA viruses, some of which are responsible for human diseases. Compared to bat-borne RNA viruses, relatively little information is known regarding bat-borne DNA viruses. In this study, we isolated and characterized three novel bat adenoviruses (BtAdV WIV9-11) from Rhinolophus sinicus. Their genomes, which are highly similar to each other but distinct from those of previously sequenced adenoviruses (AdVs), are 37 545, 37 566 and 38 073 bp in size, respectively. An unusually large E3 gene was identified in their genomes. Phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses suggested that these isolates represent a distinct species of the genus Mastadenovirus. Cell susceptibility assays revealed a broad cell tropism for these isolates, indicating that they have a potentially wide host range. Our results expand the understanding of genetic diversity of bat AdVs. PMID:27032099

  2. Conserved primary sequences of the DNA terminal proteins of five different human adenovirus groups.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Brackmann, K; Wold, W S; Cartas, M; Thornton, H; Elder, J H

    1979-09-01

    The 31 human adenoviruses (Ad) from five groups (A-E) whose DNAs are <20% homologous by molecular hybridization. Ad5 (group C) DNA contains a 55,000-dalton protein probably covalently bound to each 5' terminus. This covalently bound protein may be analogous to polypeptides found in other viral and nonviral systems that are covalently bound to genomic DNAs or RNAs and that are thought to function in DNA or RNA replication. Because of the importance of proteins linked to nucleic acids, we have investigated whether DNAs from all five groups of human adenoviruses have terminal proteins, as well as the peptide relationships among the different terminal proteins. We show here that DNAs from Ad12, 7, 2, 19, and 4, representing Ad groups A-E, respectively, all contain covalently bound proteins of about 55,000 daltons. To investigate the peptide relatedness among the terminal proteins, we prepared microgram quantities of covalently bound protein from Ads in groups A-E and compared their chymotryptic and tryptic (125)I-labeled peptide maps. We find that the covalently bound protein maps of the five Ad groups are highly related and possibly identical. On the other hand, the tryptic and chymotryptic peptide maps of the major virion protein II and the core proteins V and VII of groups B, C, and E Ads show considerable heterology. Assuming that the covalently bound protein is virally coded, the conserved primary sequence of these proteins suggests a major functional role for the protein in Ad replication. Because the genetic origin of the Ad covalently bound proteins is not established, our data are also consistent with the possibility that the protein is coded by a cellular gene.

  3. Reassessing culture media and critical metabolites that affect adenovirus production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun Fang; Voyer, Robert; Tom, Roseanne; Kamen, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus production is currently operated at low cell density because infection at high cell densities still results in reduced cell-specific productivity. To better understand nutrient limitation and inhibitory metabolites causing the reduction of specific yields at high cell densities, adenovirus production in HEK 293 cultures using NSFM 13 and CD 293 media were evaluated. For cultures using NSFM 13 medium, the cell-specific productivity decreased from 3,400 to 150 vp/cell (or 96% reduction) when the cell density at infection was increased from 1 to 3 x 10(6) cells/mL. In comparison, only 50% of reduction in the cell-specific productivity was observed under the same conditions for cultures using CD 293 medium. The effect of medium osmolality was found critical on viral production. Media were adjusted to an optimal osmolality of 290 mOsm/kg to facilitate comparison. Amino acids were not critical limiting factors. Potential limiting nutrients including vitamins, energy metabolites, bases and nucleotides, or inhibitory metabolites (lactate and ammonia) were supplemented to infected cultures to further investigate their effect on the adenovirus production. Accumulation of lactate and ammonia in a culture infected at 3 x 10(6) cells/mL contributed to about 20% reduction of the adenovirus production yield, whereas nutrient limitation appeared primarily responsible for the decline in the viral production when NSFM 13 medium was used. Overall, the results indicate that multiple factors contribute to limiting the specific production yield at cell densities beyond 1 x 10(6) cells/mL and underline the need to further investigate and develop media for better adenoviral vector productions.

  4. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  5. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  6. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  7. A novel and simple method for construction of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rong; Li, Chunhua; Jiang, Sijing; Ma, Lixin

    2006-07-19

    Recombinant adenoviruses have been widely used for various applications, including protein expression and gene therapy. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach to an efficient and robust construction of recombinant adenoviral genomes based on the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) strategy. The production of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based vectors was greatly facilitated by the use of the MAGIC procedure and the development of the Adeasy adenoviral vector system. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid can be generated by a direct and seamless substitution, which replaces the stuff fragment in a full-length adenoviral genome with the gene of interest in a small plasmid in Escherichia coli. Recombinant adenoviral plasmids can be rapidly constructed in vivo by using the new method, without manipulations of the large adenoviral genome. In contrast to other traditional systems, it reduces the need for multiple in vitro manipulations, such as endonuclease cleavage, ligation and transformation, thus achieving a higher efficiency with negligible background. This strategy has been proven to be suitable for constructing an adenoviral cDNA expression library. In summary, the new method is highly efficient, technically less demanding and less labor-intensive for constructing recombinant adenoviruses, which will be beneficial for functional genomic and proteomic researches in mammalian cells.

  8. History of the restoration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live oral (Adenovirus Vaccine) in the context of the Department of Defense acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Charles H; Snyder, Clifford E

    2013-03-15

    Respiratory pathogens cause morbidity and mortality in US military basic trainees. Following the influenza pandemic of 1918, and stimulated by WWII, the need to protect military personnel against epidemic respiratory disease was evident. Over several decades, the US military elucidated etiologies of acute respiratory diseases and invented and deployed vaccines to prevent disease caused by influenza, meningococcus, and adenoviruses. In 1994, the Adenovirus Vaccine manufacturer stopped its production. By 1999, supplies were exhausted and adenovirus-associated disease, especially serotype 4-associated febrile respiratory illness, returned to basic training installations. Advisory bodies persuaded Department of Defense leaders to initiate restoration of Adenovirus Vaccine. In 2011, after 10 years of effort by government and contractor personnel and at a cost of about $100 million, the Adenovirus Vaccine was restored to use at all military basic training installations. Disease and adenovirus serotype 4 isolation rates have fallen dramatically since vaccinations resumed in October 2011 and remain very low. Mindful of the adage that "The more successful a vaccine is, the more quickly the need for it will be forgotten.", sustainment of the supply of the Adenovirus Vaccine may be a challenge, and careful management will be required for such sustainment. PMID:23291475

  9. Adenovirus-mediated RNA interference against foot-and-mouth disease virus infection both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizao; Liu, Mingqiu; Jiao, Ye; Yan, Weiyao; Wei, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiulian; Fei, Liang; Liu, Yang; Zuo, Xiaoping; Yang, Fugui; Lu, Yonggan; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2006-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is responsible for the heavy economic losses in stockbreeding each year. Because of the limited effectiveness of existing vaccines and antiviral drugs, the development of new strategies is needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective means of suppressing virus replication in vitro. Here we demonstrate that treatment with recombinant, replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) expressing short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) directed against either structural protein 1D (Ad5-NT21) or polymerase 3D (Ad5-POL) of FMDV totally protects swine IBRS-2 cells from homologous FMDV infection, whereas only Ad5-POL inhibits heterologous FMDV replication. Moreover, delivery of these shRNAs significantly reduces the susceptibility of guinea pigs and swine to FMDV infection. Three of five guinea pigs inoculated with 10(6) PFU of Ad5-POL and challenged 24 h later with 50 50% infectious doses (ID50) of homologous virus were protected from the major clinical manifestation of disease: the appearance of vesicles on the feet. Two of three swine inoculated with an Ad5-NT21-Ad5-POL mixture containing 2 x 10(9) PFU each and challenged 24 h later with 100 ID50 of homologous virus were protected from the major clinical disease, but treatment with a higher dose of adenovirus mixture cannot promote protection of animals. The inhibition was rapid and specific because treatment with a control adenovirus construct (Ad5-LacZ) expressing Escherichia coli galactosidase-specific shRNA showed no marked antiviral activity. Our data highlight the in vivo potential of RNAi technology in the case of FMD. PMID:16537624

  10. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  11. [Investigation of adenovirus isolation frequency from the stool samples of patients suspected with acute flaccid paralysis].

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, Fatma; Coşgun, Yasemin; Salman Atak, Tunca; Karademir, Hülya; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses (AdVs) generally cause upper respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis/epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia, they can lead to the involvement of central nervous system. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a type of seizure, characterized by rapid and sudden onset of extreme weakness in hands and feet, including (less frequently) weakness of respiratory and swallowing, representing with decreased muscle tone, especially in children below 15-year-old. The major viral cause of AFP is polioviruses, however non-polio enteroviruses, mumps virus, rabies virus and flaviviruses can also be responsible for AFP. The data of some recent studies have pointed out the probable aetiological role of AdVs in AFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of AdVs from stool samples of AFP-suspected patients and their contacts. A total of 6130 stool samples from patients (age range: 0-15 years) prediagnosed as AFP (n= 3185) and their contacts (n= 2945), which were sent to our laboratory from the health care centers located at different regions of Turkey for the monitorization of poliomyelitis as part of national AFP surveillance programme, between 2000-2014, have been retrospectively evaluated in terms of adenovirus isolation frequency. Samples were analyzed according to the algorithm recommended by World Health Organization and inoculated in Hep-2, RD, and L20B cell lines for cultivation. Apart from enteroviruses, in case of the presence of characteristic cytopathic effects for AdVs observed in L20B cells were confirmed by a commercial Adeno agglutination kit (Diarlex Adeno; Orion Diagnostica, Finland). It was noted that AdVs have been isolated from 1.6% (97/6130) of the samples, and out of positive samples 76.3% (74/97) were from AFP-suspected cases, while 23.7% (23/97) were from their contacts. Accordingly the frequencies of AdVs from AFP-suspected cases and their contacts were found as 2.3% (74/3185) and 0.8% (23

  12. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, Sean D; Berk, Arnold J

    2013-09-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called "infectious genome titration" in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity.

  13. [Comparison of methods of detection of bovine adenovirus serotype 3 in infected culture of calf kidney cells (MDBK)].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhnaia, A N; Trifonov, V D; Zil'berman, M I; Zalmanzon, E S; Kaledin, A S

    1988-10-01

    The comparative study of the dynamics of the main antigen (hexon) and viral DNA of the bovine adenovirus type 3 accumulation in the established cell line MDBK under the conditions of single- or multistep cycle of infection has been undertaken. The quantitative immunoelectrophoresis and immunoenzyme assay detected the viral antigens on the late stages of infection in the period of cellular monolayer degradation. The immunofluorescence reaction and histochemical immunoenzyme method detected the antigen in the infected cells concurrently with the primary expression of the viral cytopathic effect. The reaction of the spot molecular hybridization with the [32P]-DNA probes detected the viral DNA considerably earlier than the antigen was detected by the immunological methods, before the appearance of degenerative changes in the infected cells. Preference of the immunoenzyme assay and DNA-probes in diagnosis of the virus are discussed.

  14. Hemorrhagic enteritis by adenovirus-like particles in turkeys: a possible pathogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Carranza, J; Sierra, M A; Carrasco, L; Hervás, J; Blanco, A; Fernández, A

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an outbreak of hemorrhagic enteritis due to adenovirus in turkeys in Spain. Diagnosis of the disease was confirmed by histopathological examination and the observation of adenovirus in spleen mononuclear cells and intestinal infiltrate. Evidence was also found of intravascular coagulation, which may give rise to the bleeding considered characteristic of this disease.

  15. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  16. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  17. Comparison of throat swab and nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens for rapid detection of adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie

    2015-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and throat swab (TS) specimens from individual patients were compared with regard to usefulness for adenovirus detection. In 153 adenovirus-infected patients, rapid test sensitivities with NPAs (90.8%) were nearly equivalent to those with TSs (91.5%) based on real-time polymerase chain reaction standards, indicating that NPAs are equally useful.

  18. Interaction between HeLa cells and adenovirus type 2 virions neutralized by different antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C E; Svensson, U K; Everitt, E

    1985-01-01

    Three adenovirus type 2-specified immunogens elicited neutralizing antibodies when injected into rabbits; these were the fiber, the hexon, and the penton base. Adenovirus type 2 virions, neutralized by antihexon- or anti-penton base antisera, attached to HeLa cells to the same extent as untreated control virus, and after attachment, neutralized viruses also became sensitive to DNase treatment. A fraction of 75 to 80% of the attached antibody-treated virions penetrated the plasma membrane, which should be compared with an 84 to 88% penetration level in the control series. A majority of the antihexon-neutralized virions was found in intracellular vesicles, as revealed with an electron microscope, but in the case of anti-penton base neutralization, a maximum of 50% of the virions was retained within vesicles, and ca. 30% was free in the cytoplasmic compartment. A value greater than 45% was never obtained for neutralization with a monospecific anti-penton base antiserum, which could imply the existence of alternative pathways for virus penetration into HeLa cells--one of these being sensitive to treatment with anti-penton base antiserum. Antisera containing antifiber specificities efficiently aggregated virions, and the aggregation data mirrored the degree of neutralization. Antifiber-neutralized virions attached to cells to a three- to five times greater extent than untreated control virus, but the former virions had a reduced ability to become sensitive to DNase treatment. Around 15% of the attached antifiber-treated virions was found as large aggregates inside multivesicular bodies or lysosomes. Images PMID:4068145

  19. [Morphogenetic study of human adenovirus type 41 in 293TE cells].

    PubMed

    Song, Jing-Dong; Wang, Min; Zou, Xiao-Hui; Qu, Jian-Guo; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Hong, Tao

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the morphogenetic process of human adenovirus type 41 (HAdV-41), 293TE cells were infected with purified wild-type HAdV-41, and ultrathin sections of infected cells were prepared and observed under a transmission electron microscope. Results showed that HAdV-41 entered host cells mainly through three ways: non-clathrin-coated pit, clathrin-coated pit, and direct penetration of plasma membrane. In addition, cell microvilli might help HAdV-41 enter cells. After entering into cells, HAdV-41 virus particles could be found in vacuoles or lysosomes or be in a free state in cytoplasm. Only free virus particles could be found near nuclear pores (NP), suggesting that the virus needed to escape from lysosomes for effective infection and viral nucleoprotein entered the nucleus through NP. Progeny viruses were as-sembled in the nucleus. Three types of inclusion bodies, which were termed as fibrillous inclusion body, condense inclusion body, and stripped condense inclusion body, were involved in HAdV-41 morphogenesis. In the late phase of viral replication, the membrane integrity of the infected cells was lost and viral particles were released extracellularly. This study reveals the partial process of HAdV-41 morphogenesis and provides more biological information on HAdV-41. PMID:24923169

  20. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Martin, Sterling C. T.; Readler, James M.; Kotha, Poornima L.N.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Excoffon, Katherine J.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ–domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR. PMID:25622559

  1. Potent antitumor activity of oncolytic adenovirus expressing Beclin-1 via induction of autophagic cell death in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Li, Lu; Meng, Haitao; Qian, Qijun

    2013-01-01

    An attractive strategy among adenovirus-based oncolytic systems is to design adenoviral vectors to express pro-apoptotic genes, in which this gene-virotherapy approach significantly enhances tumor cell death by activating apoptotic pathways. However, the existence of cancer cells with apoptotic defects is one of the major obstacles in gene-virotherapy. Here, we investigated whether a strategy that combines the oncolytic effects of an adenoviral vector with simultaneous expression of Beclin-1, an autophagy gene, offers a therapeutic advantage for leukemia. A Beclin-1 cDNA was cloned in an oncolytic adenovirus with chimeric Ad5/11 fiber (SG511-BECN). SG511-BECN treatment induced significant autophagic cell death, and resulted in enhanced cell killing in a variety of leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic blasts. SG511-BECN effects were seen in chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with resistance to imatinib or chemotherapy, but exhibited much less cytotoxicity on normal cells. The SG511-BECN-induced autophagic cell death could be partially reversed by RNA interference knockdown of UVRAG, ATG5, and ATG7. We also showed that SG511-BECN strongly inhibited the growth of leukemic progenitors in vitro. In murine leukemia models, SG511-BECN prolonged the survival and decreased the xenograft tumor size by inducing autophagic cell death. Our results suggest that infection of leukemia cells with an oncolytic adenovirus overexpressing Beclin-1 can induce significant autophagic cell death and provide a new strategy for the elimination of leukemic cells via a unique mechanism of action distinct from apoptosis. PMID:23765161

  2. The adenovirus E4 11 k protein binds and relocalizes the cytoplasmic P-body component Ddx6 to aggresomes

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, Amy E.; Hearing, Patrick; Ketner, Gary

    2011-08-15

    The adenovirus E4 11 k protein, product of E4 ORF3, is required in infection for processes including normal accumulation of viral late mRNAs. 11 k restructures both the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells by relocalizing specific host cell target proteins, most strikingly components of nuclear PML oncogenic domains. It is likely that in many cases relocalization inactivates target proteins to produce 11 k's effects, although the mechanism and targets for stimulation of late mRNA accumulation is unknown. We have identified a new set of proteins relocalized by 11 k: at least five protein components of cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies (p-bodies) are found in 11 k-induced cytoplasmic aggresomes, sites where proteins are inactivated or destroyed. One of these p-body proteins, RNA helicase Ddx6, binds 11 k, suggesting a mechanism for relocalization. Because p-bodies are sites for mRNA degradation, their modification by 11 k may provide an explanation for the role of 11 k in viral late mRNA accumulation.

  3. Seasonal variability in cadmium, lead, copper, zinc and iron concentrations in the three major fish species, Oreochromis niloticus, Lates niloticus and Rastrineobola argentea in Winam Gulf, Lake Victoria: impact of wash-off into the lake.

    PubMed

    Ongeri, David M K; Lalah, Joseph O; Wandiga, Shem O; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Michalke, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    Trace metals Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe) were analyzed in edible portions of three main finfish species namely Lates niloticus, Oreochromis niloticus and Rastrineobola argentea sampled from various beaches of Winam Gulf, Lake Victoria, Kenya, in order to determine any seasonal and site variations and the results showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn and Fe during the wet season compared to the dry season for all the three species indicating the impact of wash-off into the lake during the rainy periods. The overall mean concentrations of the heavy metals (in μg/g dry weight) in all combined samples ranged from 0.17-0.40 (Cd), 0.47-2.53 (Pb), 2.13-8.74 (Cu), 28.9-409.3 (Zn) and 31.4-208.1 (Fe), respectively. It was found that consumption of Rastrineobola argentea can be a significant source of heavy metals especially Zn, to humans, compared with Lates niloticus and Oreochromis niloticus, if only the muscle parts of the latter two are consumed.

  4. Interactions of human lacrimal and salivary cystatins with adenovirus endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Ruzindana-Umunyana, A; Weber, J M

    2001-09-01

    Over 100 serotypes of adenoviruses have been implicated in a variety of human and domesticated animal pathologies and some serotypes are widely used as gene transfer vectors. Aside from the limited use of vaccines for specific serotypes, little effort has been expended in the development of antivirals. The objective here was to study the effect of cystatins from human saliva (CS) and tears (CT), two points of viral entry, on adenain, the adenovirus type 2 encoded proteinase, which is absolutely required for infectivity. Two molecular weight species (13 and 14.5 kDa) were purified from both fluids at a yield of 5 mg/l. In vitro adenain activity was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 5 CS:1 adenain and 3 CT:1 adenain. By comparison, papain was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 2 CS:1 papain and 1.5 CT:1 papain. Adenain differed from papain in response to CS and chicken egg white (CEW) cystatin in being stimulated at low concentrations, and in being inhibited only at very high concentrations of cystatins. The presence of cleavage consensus sites specific to adenain in the human cystatins could drive the adenain-cystatin interaction predominantly in the substrate pathway direction. However, we found that the cystatins could only be digested after denaturation and by highly active fresh enzyme preparations. Our experiments designed to test the nature of the interaction between adenain and cystatins suggest a docking model for the adenain-human cystatin interaction, similar to that proposed for papain and CEW. At equilibrium the dissociation constant, K(d), between adenain and CT was 1.2 nM. The kinetic parameters determined here suggest a simple reversible mechanism for the inhibition of adenain by human cystatins. We conclude that the cystatins present in tears and saliva are unlikely to play a significant role in inhibiting adenovirus infections.

  5. [Sociological aspects of late fatherhood].

    PubMed

    Bessin, M

    2006-09-01

    Starting from a sociological research on late parenthood, the article shows quantitative and qualitative lessons on the subject--in particular concerning the fathers' perspective. Late parenthood has declined over the 20th Century, to increase again since 1980. The further exploitation of the survey EHF 99 shows the processes and the socio-demographic of late fatherhood, over three generations. This phenomenon is tightly related to the multiple descents and family recombinings. We also observe in these configurations major age differences between spouses and late relationship. The social bipolarity of this phenomenon appears clearly as far as late motherhood is concerned, but is less clear concerning fatherhood, since more blue collars and non qualified men are concerned. This difference is due to the important role played by migrants in this phenomenon. A qualitative survey conducted on the basis of biographic interviews has underlined the gendered logics of late family founding. These logics are linked to the discrepancies due to man/woman differences regarding their respective calendar of fertility and to their attitude towards work. The interviews which provide an analysis of the biographical processes of late parenthood are organised according to postponement or renewal logics, in the form of refoundation or repetition. They are linked to self-introspection and to the negotiations at work within a couple.

  6. Transductional targeting of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JN; Everts, M; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy approaches will derive considerable benefit from adenovirus (Ad) vectors capable of self-directed localization to neoplastic disease or immunomodulatory targets in vivo. The ablation of native Ad tropism coupled with active targeting modalities has demonstrated that innate gene delivery efficiency may be retained while circumventing Ad dependence on its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and Ad receptor. Herein, we describe advances in Ad targeting that are predicated on a fundamental understanding of vector/cell interplay. Further, we propose strategies by which existing paradigms, such as nanotechnology, may be combined with Ad vectors to form advanced delivery vehicles with multiple functions. PMID:16439993

  7. The Adenovirus Type 5 E1B-55K Oncoprotein Actively Shuttles in Virus-Infected Cells, Whereas Transport of E4orf6 Is Mediated by a CRM1-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dosch, Tanja; Horn, Florian; Schneider, Grit; Krätzer, Friedrich; Dobner, Thomas; Hauber, Joachim; Stauber, Roland H.

    2001-01-01

    The E1B-55K and E4orf6 proteins of adenovirus type 5 are involved in viral mRNA export. Here we demonstrate that adenovirus infection does not inhibit the function of the E1B-55K nuclear export signal and that E1B-55K also shuttles in infected cells. Even during virus infection, E1B-55K was exported by the leptomycin B-sensitive CRM1 pathway, whereas E4orf6 transport appeared to be mediated by an alternative mechanism. Our results strengthen the potential role of E1B-55K as the “driving force” for adenoviral late mRNA export. PMID:11356976

  8. A heparan sulfate-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus, Ad5.pk7-Δ24, for the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ranki, T; Kanerva, A; Ristimäki, A; Hakkarainen, T; Särkioja, M; Kangasniemi, L; Raki, M; Laakkonen, P; Goodison, S; Hemminki, A

    2012-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) that replicate in tumor but less in normal cells are promising anticancer agents. A major determinant of their potency is their capacity for infecting target cells. The primary receptor for serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5), the most widely used serotype in gene therapy, is the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). CAR is expressed variably and often at low levels in various tumor types including advanced breast cancer. We generated a novel p16/retinoblastoma pathway-dependent CRAd, Ad5.pK7-Δ24, with a polylysine motif in the fiber C-terminus, enabling CAR-independent binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Ad5.pK7-Δ24 mediated effective oncolysis of all breast cancer cell lines tested. Further, we utilized noninvasive, fluorescent imaging for analysis of antitumor efficacy in an orthotopic model of advanced hormone refractory breast cancer. A therapeutic benefit was seen following both intratumoral and intravenous delivery. Murine biodistribution similar to Ad5, proven safe in trials, suggests feasibility of clinical safety testing. Interestingly, upregulation of CAR was seen in low-CAR M4A4-LM3 breast cancer cells in vivo, which resulted in better than expected efficacy also with an isogenic CRAd with an unmodified capsid. These results suggest utility of Ad5.pK7-Δ24 and the orthotopic model for further translational studies. PMID:16900223

  9. Protective MCMV immunity by vaccination of the salivary gland via Wharton's duct: replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes elicits protection similar to that of MCMV.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Zhang, Fangfang; Wang, Ruixue; London, Lucille; London, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    Salivary glands, a major component of the mucosal immune system, confer antigen-specific immunity to mucosally acquired pathogens. We investigated whether a physiological route of inoculation and a subunit vaccine approach elicited MCMV-specific and protective immunity. Mice were inoculated by retrograde perfusion of the submandibular salivary glands via Wharton's duct with tcMCMV or MCMV proteins focused to the salivary gland via replication-deficient adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes (gB, gH, IE1; controls: saline and replication deficient adenovirus without MCMV inserts). Mice were evaluated for MCMV-specific antibodies, T-cell responses, germinal center formation, and protection against a lethal MCMV challenge. Retrograde perfusion with tcMCMV or adenovirus expressed MCMV proteins induced a 2- to 6-fold increase in systemic and mucosal MCMV-specific antibodies, a 3- to 6-fold increase in GC marker expression, and protection against a lethal systemic challenge, as evidenced by up to 80% increased survival, decreased splenic pathology, and decreased viral titers from 10(6) pfu to undetectable levels. Thus, a focused salivary gland immunization via a physiological route with a protein antigen induced systemic and mucosal protective immune responses. Therefore, salivary gland immunization can serve as an alternative mucosal route for administering vaccines, which is directly applicable for use in humans.

  10. A duplex real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology for simultaneous detection and differentiation of canine adenovirus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Dowgier, Giulia; Mari, Viviana; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Cirone, Francesco; Lucente, Maria Stella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Canine adenoviruses are a major cause of disease in dogs, coyotes, red foxes and wolves, as well as in other carnivores and marine mammals. Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) cause infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) and infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB), respectively. In this study, a duplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection and characterisation of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 was developed by using a single primer pair and virus-specific probes. The assay was validated testing standard DNAs produced on purpose and clinical samples of various matrices known to be positive for CAdV-1, CAdV-2 or both viruses. Precise calculation of DNA loads in samples containing a wide range of viral amounts was allowed by generating a standard curve for absolute quantification. The assay was proven to be highly specific, since no cross-reactions with the different CAdV type was observed, and sensitive, being able to detect less than 10 copies of CAdV-1/CAdV-2 DNA. The low intra-assay and interassay coefficient of variations demonstrated a high repeatability, thus confirming the potential use of this assay for quantitative detection of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 for rapid diagnosis and epidemiological investigations.

  11. A duplex real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology for simultaneous detection and differentiation of canine adenovirus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Dowgier, Giulia; Mari, Viviana; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Cirone, Francesco; Lucente, Maria Stella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Canine adenoviruses are a major cause of disease in dogs, coyotes, red foxes and wolves, as well as in other carnivores and marine mammals. Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) cause infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) and infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB), respectively. In this study, a duplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection and characterisation of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 was developed by using a single primer pair and virus-specific probes. The assay was validated testing standard DNAs produced on purpose and clinical samples of various matrices known to be positive for CAdV-1, CAdV-2 or both viruses. Precise calculation of DNA loads in samples containing a wide range of viral amounts was allowed by generating a standard curve for absolute quantification. The assay was proven to be highly specific, since no cross-reactions with the different CAdV type was observed, and sensitive, being able to detect less than 10 copies of CAdV-1/CAdV-2 DNA. The low intra-assay and interassay coefficient of variations demonstrated a high repeatability, thus confirming the potential use of this assay for quantitative detection of CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 for rapid diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. PMID:27040113

  12. Biology of E1-Deleted Adenovirus Vectors in Nonhuman Primate Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zoltick, Philip W.; Chirmule, Narendra; Schnell, Michael A.; Gao, Guang-ping; Hughes, Joseph V.; Wilson, James M.

    2001-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have been studied as vehicles for gene transfer to skeletal muscle, an attractive target for gene therapies for inherited and acquired diseases. In this setting, immune responses to viral proteins and/or transgene products cause inflammation and lead to loss of transgene expression. A few studies in murine models have suggested that the destructive cell-mediated immune response to virally encoded proteins of E1-deleted adenovirus may not contribute to the elimination of transgene-expressing cells. However, the impact of immune responses following intramuscular administration of adenovirus vectors on transgene stability has not been elucidated in larger animal models such as nonhuman primates. Here we demonstrate that intramuscular administration of E1-deleted adenovirus vector expressing rhesus monkey erythropoietin or growth hormone to rhesus monkeys results in generation of a Th1-dependent cytotoxic T-cell response to adenovirus proteins. Transgene expression dropped significantly over time but was still detectable in some animals after 6 months. Systemic levels of adenovirus-specific neutralizing antibodies were generated, which blocked vector readministration. These studies indicate that the cellular and humoral immune response generated to adenovirus proteins, in the context of transgenes encoding self-proteins, hinders long-term transgene expression and readministration with first-generation vectors. PMID:11333904

  13. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  14. Cryo-EM visualization of an exposed RGD epitope on adenovirus that escapes antibody neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, P L; Chiu, C Y; Huang, S; Muir, T; Zhao, Y; Chait, B; Mathias, P; Nemerow, G R

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of the adenovirus penton base protein with alpha v integrins promotes virus entry into host cells. The location of the integrin binding sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) on human type 2 adenovirus (Ad2) was visualized by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image reconstruction using a mAb (DAV-1) which recognizes a linear epitope, IRGDTFATR. The sites for DAV-1 binding corresponded to the weak density above each of the five 22 A protrusions on the adenovirus penton base protein. Modeling of a Fab fragment crystal structure into the adenovirus-Fab cryo-EM density indicated a large amplitude of motion for the Fab and the RGD epitope. An unexpected finding was that Fab fragments, but not IgG antibody molecules, inhibited adenovirus infection. Steric hindrance from the adenovirus fiber and a few bound IgG molecules, as well as epitope mobility, most likely prevent binding of IgG antibodies to all five RGD sites on the penton base protein within the intact virus. These studies indicate that the structure of the adenovirus particle facilitates interaction with cell integrins, whilst restricting binding of potentially neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9135136

  15. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Wevers, Diana; Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Boesch, Christophe; Robbins, Martha M; Head, Josephine; Ludwig, Carsten; Kühn, Joachim; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2010-11-05

    Adenoviruses (AdV) broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL), preterminal protein (pTP) and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2-10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B). Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  16. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  17. Detection of adenovirus using PCR and molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    1999-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a molecular beacon probe were used for the detection of Adenovirus. A 307 bp DNA fragment from a conserved region of the hexon gene was amplified. The specific molecular beacon was characterized with respect to its efficiency of quenching, and signal to noise ratio by spectrofluorometric analysis of its hybridization with virus specific complementary single stranded oligonucleotide target. Amplification was carried out in the presence of the molecular beacon probe, and the amplified target was detected by measurement of fluorescence signal in the post PCR sample. Separately, a 32P-labeled linear probe (having the same sequence as that of molecular beacon probe) was liquid-phase hybridized with the product of PCR performed in the absence of the molecular beacon. The virus specific target was then detected by electrophoresis of the hybridized product in a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and subsequent autoradiographic analysis. The detection limit of adenovirus by PCR in the presence of the molecular beacon probe was found to be similar to that obtained by labeled linear probe hybridization following PCR.

  18. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  19. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of the antisense chk2 selectively inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Zhou, J; Gao, Q; Huang, X; Li, K; Zhuang, L; Huang, M; Xu, G; Wang, S; Lu, Y; Ma, D

    2006-10-01

    Screening and identifying molecules target to checkpoint pathways has fostered the development of checkpoint-based anticancer strategies. Among these targets, inhibition of chk2 may induce cell death for tumors whose growth depends on enhanced chk2 activity. However, improvement of the potency and specificity of such therapeutics remains a major challenge. To resolve this problem, we constructed M3, a novel recombinant adenovirus with a 27-bp deletion in E1A CR2 region by which to realize tumor-specific replication, and an 829-bp of antisense chk2 fragment inserted into the E3 coding region. In this design, M3 exploited the native adenovirus E3 promoters to express antisense chk2 cDNA in a viral replication-dependent fashion, and preferentially silenced the chk2 gene in tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed that downregulated chk2 expression induced by M3 infection was tumor-specific and virus replication-dependent. Furthermore, systemic administration of M3 combined with a low dose of cisplatin cured 75% (9/12) of orthotopic hepatic carcinoma mouse models that were otherwise resistant to cisplatin. Our results indicated that the upcoming development in this field would improve the antitumor efficacy and maximize the synergistic effect of oncolytic viruses administered with traditional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:16741520

  20. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  1. Modified recombinant adenoviruses increase porcine circovirus 2 capsid protein expression and induce enhanced immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, D L; Huang, Y; Chang, L L; DU, Q; Chen, Y; Wang, T T; Luo, X M; Zhao, X M; Tong, D W

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary viral pathogen of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) and vaccination is an important method to prevent and control the disease. The expression of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) in adenovirus vector system has been investigated, but the poor immune responses limit its application. In this study, transcriptional enhancer element largest intron of the human cytomegalovirus (Intron A) and woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) were applied to increase the immunogenicity of PCV2 Cap adenovirus-based vaccine. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) analysis showed that modified adenoviruses with Intron A and WPRE alone or both could significantly increase the expression of Cap compared to the unmodified adenoviruses. Furthermore, the humoral and cellular immune responses of the constructed recombinant adenoviruses were evaluated in mice. Indirect ELISA, virus neutralizing test and western blot showed that modified adenoviruses elicited higher humoral immune responses than unmodified adenovirus, and Intron A-WPRE-modified virus immunized group had better immune response than the others. Besides, the results of lymphocyte proliferation response and cytokines release assay showed that enhanced cellular immune responses were induced by modified adenoviruses. These results demonstrated that Intron A and WPRE significantly improved the expression of the Cap protein in adenovirus vector system and enhanced the immune responses in mice, making the adenovirus vector system more applicable against PCV2. PMID:27640437

  2. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing.

  3. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  4. Modulation of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Haddad, I Y; Sorscher, E J; Garver, R I; Hong, J; Tzeng, E; Matalon, S

    1997-05-01

    We assessed the role of .NO in recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo. NIH3T3 fibroblasts, stably transfected with the human inducible nitric oxide synthase, but lacking tetrahydrobiopterin (NIH3T3/iNOS [inducibile nitric oxide synthase]), were infected with replication-deficient adenovirus (E1-deleted), containing either the luciferase or the Lac Z reporter genes (AdCMV-Luc and AdCMV-Lac Z; 1-10 plaque forming units [pfu]/cell). Incubation of infected cells with sepiapterin (50 microM), a precursor of tetrahydrobiopterin, progressively increased nitrate/nitrite levels in the medium and decreased both luciferase and beta-galactosidase protein expression to approximately 60% of their corresponding control values, 24 h later. NIH3T3/iNOS cells had normal ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) levels and did not release LDH(lactic dehydrogenase) into the medium. Pretreatment of these cells with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 1 mM), an inhibitor of iNOS, prevented the sepiapterin-mediated induction of .NO and restored gene transfer to baseline values. Incubation of NIH3T3/iNOS with 8-bromo-cGMP (400 microM) in the absence of sepiapterin, or exposure of AdCMV-Luc to large concentrations of .NO, did not alter the efficacy of gene transfer. .NO produced by NIH3T3/iNOS cells also suppressed beta-galactosidase expression in NIH3T3 cocultured cells stably transfected with beta-galactosidase gene, suggesting .NO inhibited gene expression at either the transriptional or posttranscriptional levels. To investigate the effects of inhaled .NO on gene transfer in vivo, CD1 mice received an intratracheal instillation of AdCMV-Luc (4 x 10(9) pfu in 80 microl of saline) and exposed to .NO (25 ppm in room air) for 72 h. At that time, no significant degree of lung inflammation was detected by histological examination. However, lung luciferase activity decreased by 53% as compared with air breathing controls (P < 0.05; n > or = 8). We concluded that

  5. Titration of adenovirus by counting cells containing virus-induced inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Weber, J

    1972-05-01

    A new method for the titration of adenovirus types 2 and 12 based on the enumeration of viral inclusions in infected cells was devised and evaluated. The technique gave virus titers comparable to those obtained by the plaque assay procedure.

  6. Adenovirus fiber disrupts CAR-mediated intercellular adhesion allowing virus escape.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert W; Freimuth, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Ganske, Ingrid; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    Adenovirus binds its receptor (CAR), enters cells, and replicates. It must then escape to the environment to infect a new host. We found that following infection, human airway epithelia first released adenovirus to the basolateral surface. Virus then traveled between epithelial cells to emerge on the apical surface. Adenovirus fiber protein, which is produced during viral replication, facilitated apical escape. Fiber binds CAR, which sits on the basolateral membrane where it maintains tight junction integrity. When fiber bound CAR, it disrupted junctional integrity, allowing virus to filter between the cells and emerge apically. Thus, adenovirus exploits its receptor for two important but distinct steps in its life cycle: entry into host cells and escape across epithelial barriers to the environment.

  7. [Downregulation of Human Adenovirus DNA Polymerase Gene by Modified siRNAs].

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Chernolovskaya, E L; Zenkova, M A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses, in particular D8, D19, and D37, cause ocular infections. Currently, there is no available causally directed treatment, which efficiently counteracts adenoviral infectious diseases. In our previous work, we showed that gene silencing by means of RNA interference is an effective approach for downregulation of human species D adenoviruses replication. In this study, we compared the biological activity of siRNAs and their modified analogs targeting human species D adenoviruses DNA polymerase. We found that one of selectively 2'-O-methyl modified siRNAs mediates stable and long-lasting suppression of the target gene (12 days post transfection). We suppose that this siRNA can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against human species D adenoviruses.

  8. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  9. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  10. Quantitative detection of human adenoviruses in wastewater and combined sewer overflows influencing a Michigan river.

    PubMed

    Fong, Theng-Theng; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Xagoraraki, Irene; Rose, Joan B

    2010-02-01

    Enteric viruses are important pathogens found in contaminated surface waters and have previously been detected in waters of the Great Lakes. Human adenoviruses were monitored because of their high prevalence and persistence in aquatic environments. In this study, we quantified adenoviruses in wastewater, surface water, and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) by real-time PCR. Between August 2005 and August 2006, adenovirus concentrations in raw sewage, primary-treated effluent, secondary-treated effluent, and chlorinated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in Michigan were examined. CSO samples (n = 6) were collected from a CSO retention basin in Grand Rapids, MI. Adenoviruses were detected in 100% of wastewater and CSO discharge samples. Average adenovirus DNA concentrations in sewage and CSOs were 1.15 x 10(6) viruses/liter and 5.35 x 10(5) viruses/liter, respectively. Adenovirus removal was <2 log(10) (99%) at the wastewater treatment plant. Adenovirus type 41 (60% of clones), type 12 (29%), type 40 (3%), type 2 (3%), and type 3 (3%) were isolated from raw sewage and primary effluents (n = 28). Six of 20 surface water samples from recreational parks at the lower Grand River showed virus concentrations above the real-time PCR detection limit (average, 7.8 x 10(3) viruses/liter). This research demonstrates that wastewater effluents and wastewater-impacted surface waters in the lower Grand River in Michigan contain high levels of viruses and may not be suitable for full-body recreational activities. High concentrations of adenovirus in these waters may be due to inefficient removal during wastewater treatment and to the high persistence of these viruses in the environment.

  11. Transgene delivery to cultured keratinocytes via replication-deficient adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Vincent P; Aneskievich, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Transient transgene expression can facilitate investigation of that gene-product function or effect on keratinocyte biology. Several chemical and biologic delivery systems are available, and among them adenoviruses offer particular advantages in efficiency and transgene capacity. Here we describe the advantages of bicistronic adenovirus and inclusion of the polycation hexadimethrine bromide to aid in the detection of positively transduced cells and enhance transduction efficiency. PMID:24281865

  12. Major Advisor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatwin, Marshall

    This paper describes a computer program, Major Advisor (MA), which helps students identify college majors. Used in conjunction with career counseling and advising, MA provides information to students who are developing their educational plans. The program matches students' personal preferences and the requirements/characteristics of 130 common…

  13. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  14. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  15. Current issues and future directions of oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2010-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy.

  16. Current Issues and Future Directions of Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy. PMID:19935777

  17. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  18. Adenovirus Membrane Penetration: Tickling the Tail of a Sleeping Dragon

    PubMed Central

    Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    As is the case for nearly every viral pathogen, non-enveloped viruses (NEV) must maintain their integrity under potentially harsh environmental conditions while retaining the ability to undergo rapid disassembly at the right time and right place inside host cells. NEVs generally exist in this metastable state until they encounter key cellular stimuli such as membrane receptors, decreased intracellular pH, digestion by cellular proteases, or a combination of these factors. These stimuli trigger conformational changes in the viral capsid that exposes a sequestered membrane-perturbing protein. This protein subsequently modifies the cell membrane in such a way as to allow passage of the virion and accompanying nucleic acid payload into the cell cytoplasm. Different NEVs employ variations of this general pathway for cell entry (1), however this review will focus on significant new knowledge obtained on cell entry by human adenovirus(HAdV). PMID:25798531

  19. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  20. [Is there a risk of zoonotic disease due to adenoviruses?].

    PubMed

    Loustalot, Fabien; Creyssels, Sophie; Salinas, Sara; Benkõ, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; Mennechet, Franck J D; Kremer, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Every year brings another round of zoonotic viral infections. Usually they fall under the radar, but the occasional lethal epidemic brings another scare to the public and new urgency to the medical community. The types of these viruses (DNA vs. RNA genomes, enveloped vs. proteinaceous) as well as the preceding host(s) vary. Over the last 20 years, bats have been identified as an enigmatic carrier for several pathogens that have jumped the species barrier and infected humans. Factors that favour the emergence of zoonotic pathogens include the increasing overlap of the human and animal habitats, cultural activities, and the host reservoir. In this context, we asked whether bat and/or nonhuman primate adenoviruses are a risk for human health. PMID:26672663

  1. Adenovirus membrane penetration: Tickling the tail of a sleeping dragon.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Christopher M; Nemerow, Glen R

    2015-05-01

    As is the case for nearly every viral pathogen, non-enveloped viruses (NEV) must maintain their integrity under potentially harsh environmental conditions while retaining the ability to undergo rapid disassembly at the right time and right place inside host cells. NEVs generally exist in this metastable state until they encounter key cellular stimuli such as membrane receptors, decreased intracellular pH, digestion by cellular proteases, or a combination of these factors. These stimuli trigger conformational changes in the viral capsid that exposes a sequestered membrane-perturbing protein. This protein subsequently modifies the cell membrane in such a way as to allow passage of the virion and accompanying nucleic acid payload into the cell cytoplasm. Different NEVs employ variations of this general pathway for cell entry (Moyer and Nemerow, 2011, Curr. Opin. Virol., 1, 44-49), however this review will focus on significant new knowledge obtained on cell entry by human adenovirus (HAdV).

  2. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors.

  3. CEACAM6 attenuates adenovirus infection by antagonizing viral trafficking in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohe; Gangeswaran, Rathi; Zhao, Xingbo; Wang, Pengju; Tysome, James; Bhakta, Vipul; Yuan, Ming; Chikkanna-Gowda, C.P.; Jiang, Guozhong; Gao, Dongling; Cao, Fengyu; Francis, Jennelle; Yu, Jinxia; Liu, Kangdong; Yang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yunhan; Zang, Weidong; Chelala, Claude; Dong, Ziming; Lemoine, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The changes in cancer cell surface molecules and intracellular signaling pathways during tumorigenesis make delivery of adenovirus-based cancer therapies inefficient. Here we have identified carcinoembryonic antigen–related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) as a cellular protein that restricts the ability of adenoviral vectors to infect cancer cells. We have demonstrated that CEACAM6 can antagonize the Src signaling pathway, downregulate cancer cell cytoskeleton proteins, and block adenovirus trafficking to the nucleus of human pancreatic cancer cells. Similar to CEACAM6 overexpression, treatment with a Src-selective inhibitor significantly reduced adenovirus replication in these cancer cells and normal human epithelial cells. In a mouse xenograft tumor model, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CEACAM6 also significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of an oncolytic adenovirus. We propose that CEACAM6-associated signaling pathways could be potential targets for the development of biomarkers to predict the response of patients to adenovirus-based therapies, as well as for the development of more potent adenovirus-based therapeutics. PMID:19411761

  4. Comparative investigations for adenovirus recognition and quantification: Plastic or natural antibodies?

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Pocock, Jack; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-12-15

    Comparative and comprehensive investigations for adenovirus recognition and detection were conducted using plastic and natural antibodies to compare three different strategies. The implementation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technology for specific and sensitive recognition of viruses with the combination of biosensors was reported. Plastic antibodies (MIPs nanoparticles) were produced for adenovirus by employing a novel solid phase synthesis method. MIP receptors were then characterised using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques prior to immobilisation on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor as affinity receptor for adenovirus detection. Two different templates were also imprinted as control MIPs (vancomycin-MIP and MS2-MIP). The specific recognition of adenovirus was investigated in the concentration range of 0.01-20 pM and the limit of detection was achieved as 0.02 pM. As an alternative to MIP receptors, direct and sandwich assays were developed for adenovirus quantification using natural antibodies. The detection limit of direct and sandwich assays were found as 0.3 pM and 0.008 pM, respectively. The kinetic data analyses were performed for three different adenovirus recognition methods and cross-reactivity studies were also conducted using MS2 phage as control virus and an excellent specificity was achieved with all assays types. This work confirmed the suitability of the MIPs SPR sensor for the detection of viruses. PMID:26264266

  5. Particle Tracking of Intracellular Trafficking of Octaarginine-modified Liposomes: A Comparative Study With Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Hidetaka; Enoto, Kaoru; Masuda, Tomoya; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tomomi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It is previously reported that octaarginine (R8)-modified liposome (R8-Lip) was taken up via macropinocytosis, and subsequently delivered to the nuclear periphery. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips, comparing with that for adenovirus. Treatment with microtubule-disruption reagent (nocodazole) inhibited the transfection activity of plasmid DNA (pDNA)-encapsulating R8-Lip more extensively than that of adenovirus. The directional transport of R8-Lips along green fluorescent protein (GFP)–tagged microtubules was observed; however, the velocity was slower than those for adenovirus or endosomes that were devoid of R8-Lips. These directional motions were abrogated in R8-Lips by nocodazole treatment, whereas adenovirus continued to undergo random motion. This finding suggests that the nuclear access of R8-Lip predominantly involves microtubule-dependent transport, whereas an apparent diffusive motion is also operative in nuclear access of adenovirus. Furthermore, quantum dot-labeled pDNA underwent directional motion concomitantly with rhodamine-labeled lipid envelopes, indicating that the R8-Lips were subject to microtubule-dependent transport in the intact form. Dual particle tracking of carriers and endosomes revealed that R8-Lip was directionally transported, associated with endosomes, whereas this occurs after endosomal escape in adenovirus. Collectively, the findings reported herein indicate that vesicular transport is a key factor in the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips. PMID:20216528

  6. Adenovirus type 5 interactions with human blood cells may compromise systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mark; Onion, David; Green, Nicky K; Aslan, Kriss; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Phipps, Sue; Hale, Sarah; Mautner, Vivien; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2006-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenovirus vectors requires that the virus is not inactivated in the bloodstream. Serum neutralizing activity is well documented, but we show here that type 5 adenovirus also interacts with human blood cells. Over 90% of a typical virus dose binds to human (but not murine) erythrocytes ex vivo, and samples from a patient administered adenovirus in a clinical trial showed that over 98% of viral DNA in the blood was cell associated. In contrast, nearly all viral genomes in the murine bloodstream are free in the plasma. Adenovirus bound to human blood cells fails to infect A549 lung carcinoma cells, although dilution to below 1.7 x 10(7) blood cells/ml relieves this inhibition. Addition of blood cells can prevent infection by adenovirus that has been prebound to A549 cells. Adenovirus also associates with human neutrophils and monocytes ex vivo, particularly in the presence of autologous plasma, giving dose-dependent transgene expression in CD14-positive monocytes. Finally, although plasma with a high neutralizing titer (defined on A549 cells) inhibits monocyte infection, weakly neutralizing plasma can actually enhance monocyte transduction. This may increase antigen presentation following intravenous injection, while blood cell binding may both decrease access of the virus to extravascular targets and inhibit infection of cells to which the virus does gain access. PMID:16580883

  7. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  8. Adenovirus-Mediated Efficient Gene Transfer into Cultured Three-Dimensional Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell–based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured “mini-gut” organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D “mini-gut” organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids. PMID:24695466

  9. [Anti-adenovirus activity of a substance and medical form of ribamydil in cell culture].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L N; Diachenko, N S; Zhovnovataia, V L

    2009-01-01

    The inhibiting effect of ribamydil on adenovirus reproduction was studied under the determination of the number of cells with virus- induced DNA-containing intranucleus inclusion bodies and hexone antigen, the synthesis of adenovirus proteins and the infection virus by t he investigation. EC50 of ribamydil substance is 4-8 microg/ml, but complete suppression of adenovirus genome expression was found when adding ribamydil after the virus adsorption, in concentrations of 125-500 microg/ml. The original effect of ribamydil on the expression of adenovirus genome was found under its effect in concentration of 31 microg/ml. Intranucleus virus-induced inclusion bodies of the early type only were found under these conditions. Synthesis of the structural virus polypeptides, including hexone polypeptide (II) and non-structural polypeptide 100K, taking part in hexone trimerization, proceed intensively but without formation of immunologically active hexone. The inhibiting effect of officinal form of ribamydil was less expressed as compared with the substance (EC50: 62 microg/ml). The work results prove that the therapeutic effect of ribamydil (ribavirin) under treatment of adenovirus infections may be achieved in case when it is used in a dose excluding the expression of the adenovirus genome.

  10. A novel Golgi protein (GOLPH2)-regulated oncolytic adenovirus exhibits potent antitumor efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yigang; Zhao, Hongfang; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Chen, Kan; Huang, Fang; Zhou, Xiumei; Cui, Caixia; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Golgi apparatus is the organelle mainly functioning as protein processing and secretion. GOLPH2 is a resident Golgi glycoprotein, usually called GP73. Recent data displayed that GOLPH2 is a superb hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) marker candidate, and even its specificity is better than liver cancer marker AFP. Oncolytic adenoviruses are broadly used for targeting cancer therapy due to their selective tumor-killing effect. However, it was reported that traditionally oncolytic adenovirus lack the HCC specificity. In this study, a novel dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 targeting HCC was first constructed based on our cancer targeted gene-viral therapeutic strategy. To verify the targeting and effectiveness of GOLPH2-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 in HCC, the anticancer capacity was investigated in HCC cell lines and animal model. The results proved that the novel GOLPH2-regulated GD55 conferred higher adenovirus replication and infectivity for liver cancer cells than oncolytic adenovirus ZD55. The GOLPH2-regulated GD55 exerted a significant grow-suppressing effect on HCC cells in vitro but little damage to normal liver cells. In animal experiment, antitumor effect of GD55 was more effective in HCC xenograft of nude mice than that of ZD55. Thus GOLPH2-regulated GD55 may be a promising oncolytic virus agent for future liver cancer treatment. PMID:25980438

  11. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia.

  12. Expression of the primary coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is downregulated during skeletal muscle maturation and limits the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Pari, G; Karpati, G; Holland, P C

    1999-04-10

    Skeletal muscle fibers are infected efficiently by adenoviral vectors only in neonatal animals. This lack of tropism for mature skeletal muscle may be partly due to inefficient binding of adenoviral particles to the cell surface. We evaluated in developing mouse muscle the expression levels of two high-affinity receptors for adenovirus, MHC class I and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The moderate levels of MHC class I transcripts that were detected in quadriceps, gastrocnemius, and heart muscle did not vary between postnatal day 3 and day 60 adult tissue. A low level of CAR expression was detected on postnatal day 3 in quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles, but CAR expression was barely detectable in adult skeletal muscle even by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, CAR transcripts were moderately abundant at all stages of heart muscle development. Ectopic expression of CAR in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells increased their transducibility by adenovirus at all multiplicities of infection (MOIs) tested as measured by lacZ reporter gene activity following AVCMVlacZ infection, with an 80-fold difference between CAR-expressing cells and control C2C12 cells at an MOI of 50. Primary myoblasts ectopically expressing CAR were injected into muscles of syngeneic hosts; following incorporation of the exogenous myoblasts into host myofibers, an increased transducibility of adult muscle fibers by AVCMVlacZ was observed in the host. Expression of the lacZ reporter gene in host myofibers coincided with CAR immunoreactivity. Furthermore, sarcolemmal CAR expression was markedly increased in regenerating muscle fibers of the dystrophic mdx mouse, fibers that are susceptible to adenovirus transduction. These analyses show that CAR expression by skeletal muscle correlates with its susceptibility to adenovirus transduction, and that forced CAR expression in mature myofibers dramatically increases their susceptibility to adenovirus transduction.

  13. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Early Region 1A Effects on the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Pretto, Carla D.; Castro Jorge, Luiza A.

    2016-01-01

    metalloproteinases in brains of infected mice. We investigated whether the major transcriptional regulator of adenoviruses, E1A protein, is responsible for any of the specific phenotypes that result from MAV-1 infection. For some of the functions assayed, an E1A mutant virus behaved like wild-type virus. However, expression of mRNA for one matrix metalloproteinase was higher in the virus lacking E1A protein production. This highlights the complex nature of encephalitis and suggests that E1A may have transcriptional effects on host genes important for the development of encephalitis. PMID:27303733

  14. Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis-Causing Adenoviruses Induce MUC16 Ectodomain Release To Infect Ocular Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenoviruses (HAdV), species D in particular (HAdV-D), are frequently associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Although the infection originates at the ocular surface epithelium, the mechanisms by which HAdV-Ds bypass the membrane-associated mucin (MAM)-rich glycocalyx of the ocular surface epithelium to trigger infection and inflammation remain unknown. Here, we report that an EKC-causing adenovirus (HAdV-D37), but not a non-EKC-causing one (HAdV-D19p), induces ectodomain release of MUC16—a MAM with barrier functions at the ocular surface—from cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. HAdV-D37, but not HAdV-D19p, is also found to decrease the glycocalyx barrier function of corneal epithelial cells, as determined by rose bengal dye penetrance assays. Furthermore, results from quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of viral genomic DNA using primers specific to a conserved region of the E1B gene show that, in comparison to infection by HAdV-D19p, infection by HAdV-D37 is significantly increased in corneal epithelial cells. Collectively, these results point to a MUC16 ectodomain release-dependent mechanism utilized by the EKC-causing HAdV-D37 to initiate infection at the ocular surface. These findings are important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Similar MAM ectodomain release mechanisms may be prevalent across other mucosal epithelia in the body (e.g., the airway epithelium) that are prone to adenoviral infection. IMPORTANCE Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses that cause infections across all mucosal tissues in the body. At the ocular surface, HAdVs cause keratoconjunctivitis (E. Ford, K. E. Nelson, and D. Warren, Epidemiol Rev 9:244–261, 1987, and C. M. Robinson, D. Seto, M. S. Jones, D. W. Dyer, and J. Chodosh, Infect Genet Evol 11:1208–1217, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.031)—a highly contagious infection that accounts for nearly 60% of

  15. Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis-Causing Adenoviruses Induce MUC16 Ectodomain Release To Infect Ocular Surface Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Menon, Balaraj B; Zhou, Xiaohong; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James; Gipson, Ilene K

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV), species D in particular (HAdV-D), are frequently associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Although the infection originates at the ocular surface epithelium, the mechanisms by which HAdV-Ds bypass the membrane-associated mucin (MAM)-rich glycocalyx of the ocular surface epithelium to trigger infection and inflammation remain unknown. Here, we report that an EKC-causing adenovirus (HAdV-D37), but not a non-EKC-causing one (HAdV-D19p), induces ectodomain release of MUC16-a MAM with barrier functions at the ocular surface-from cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. HAdV-D37, but not HAdV-D19p, is also found to decrease the glycocalyx barrier function of corneal epithelial cells, as determined by rose bengal dye penetrance assays. Furthermore, results from quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of viral genomic DNA using primers specific to a conserved region of the E1B gene show that, in comparison to infection by HAdV-D19p, infection by HAdV-D37 is significantly increased in corneal epithelial cells. Collectively, these results point to a MUC16 ectodomain release-dependent mechanism utilized by the EKC-causing HAdV-D37 to initiate infection at the ocular surface. These findings are important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Similar MAM ectodomain release mechanisms may be prevalent across other mucosal epithelia in the body (e.g., the airway epithelium) that are prone to adenoviral infection. IMPORTANCE Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses that cause infections across all mucosal tissues in the body. At the ocular surface, HAdVs cause keratoconjunctivitis (E. Ford, K. E. Nelson, and D. Warren, Epidemiol Rev 9:244-261, 1987, and C. M. Robinson, D. Seto, M. S. Jones, D. W. Dyer, and J. Chodosh, Infect Genet Evol 11:1208-1217, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.031)-a highly contagious infection that accounts for nearly 60% of conjunctivitis cases

  16. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  18. Structural Analysis of Adenovirus VAI RNA Defines the Mechanism of Inhibition of PKR

    PubMed Central

    Launer-Felty, Katherine; Wong, C. Jason; Cole, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is activated by dsRNA produced during virus replication and plays a major role in the innate immunity response to virus infection. In response, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade PKR. Adenovirus virus-associated RNA-I (VAI) is a short, noncoding transcript that functions as an RNA decoy to sequester PKR in an inactive state. VAI consists of an apical stem-loop, a highly structured central domain, and a terminal stem. Chemical probing and mutagenesis demonstrate that the central domain is stabilized by a pseudoknot. A structural model of VAI was obtained from constraints derived from chemical probing and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. VAI adopts a flat, extended conformation with the apical and terminal stems emanating from a protuberance in the center. This model reveals how the apical stem and central domain assemble to produce an extended duplex that is precisely tuned to bind a single PKR monomer with high affinity, thereby inhibiting activation of PKR by viral dsRNA. PMID:25650941

  19. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration.

  20. A real-time PCR method to rapidly titer adenovirus stocks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Maria A; Lichtenstein, Drew L; Krajcsi, Peter; Wold, William S M

    2007-01-01

    A critical step in working with adenovirus (Ad) and its vectors is the accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and rapid measurement of the amount of virus present in a stock. Titration methods fall into one of two categories: determination of either the infectious or the particle (infectious plus noninfectious) titer. Determining the infectious titer of a virus stock by plaque assay has important limitations, including cell line-, researcher-, and laboratory-dependent variation in titer, and the length of time required to perform the assay (2-4 wk). A major drawback of particle titration methods is the lack of consistent correlation between the resultant titer and the infectious titer. To overcome these problems, a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed that detects encapsidated full-length genomes. Importantly, there is a linear correlation between the titer determined by the realtime PCR assay and the infectious titer determined by a plaque assay. This chapter provides step-by-step guidance for preparing viral DNA, conducting the real-time PCR assay, and using the resultant data to calculate a viral titer.

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  2. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration. PMID:26720514

  3. Role of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and viral load of adenovirus and enterovirus in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mirnalini; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta; Talwar, Kewal Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) and adenoviruses (AdVs) are two important etiological agents of viral myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Both these viruses share a common receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), for their infection. However, the role of viral load and CAR expression in disease severity has not yet been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to determine viral load of EV and AdV in DCM patients and correlate them with the level of CAR expression in these patients. Sixty-three DCM cases and 30 controls, each of whom died of heart disease other than DCM and non-cardiac disease respectively, were included. Viral load was determined by TaqMan real-time PCR using primers and probes specific for the AdV hexon gene and the 5'UTR region of EV. The CAR mRNA level was semi-quantitated by RT-PCR, and antigen expression was studied by immunohistochemistry. A significantly high AdV load (p < 0.05) and CAR expression (p < 0.05) were observed in DCM cases versus controls, whereas the EV load showed no significant difference. The data suggests a clinical threshold of 128 AdV copies/500 ng of DNA for DCM, with 66.7 % sensitivity and 65 % specificity. A positive correlation between AdV load and CAR expression (p < 0.001) was also observed in DCM cases. The high adenoviral load and increased CAR expression in DCM and their association with adverse disease outcome indicates role of both virus and receptor in disease pathogenesis. Thus, the need for targeting both the virus and the receptor for treatment of viral myocarditis and early DCM requires further confirmation with larger studies.

  4. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity in rats bearing human adenovirus type 12-induced primary retinoblastoma-like tumor in the eye.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P

    1981-01-01

    Using an animal model of retinoblastoma in inbred rats and cultured human adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells (RAO 188), complement-dependent cytotoxicity was determined by measuring release of 3H-uridine labelled RNA. Sera from rats in which tumors did not grow after adenovirus type 12 inoculation had higher cytotoxicity against RAO 188 cells than sera from rats bearing primary adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor. These results showed that the rat which could raise antibodies against adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells did not allow the tumor growth in the eye after virus inoculation.

  5. Creation and repair of specific DNA double-strand breaks in vivo following infection with adenovirus vectors expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, A L; Munz, P L; Falck-Pedersen, E; Young, C S

    2000-01-01

    To study DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO endonuclease gene, or its recognition site, was cloned into the adenovirus E3 or E1 regions. Analysis of DNA from human A549 cells coinfected with the E3::HO gene and site viruses showed that HO endonuclease was active and that broken viral genomes were detectable 12 h postinfection, increasing with time up to approximately 30% of the available HO site genomes. Leftward fragments of approximately 30 kbp, which contain the packaging signal, but not rightward fragments of approximately 6 kbp, were incorporated into virions, suggesting that broken genomes were not held together tightly after cleavage. There was no evidence for DSB repair in E3::HO virus coinfections. In contrast, such evidence was obtained in E1::HO virus coinfections of nonpermissive cells, suggesting that adenovirus proteins expressed in the permissive E3::HO coinfection can inhibit mammalian DSB repair. To test the inhibitory role of E4 proteins, known to suppress genome concatemer formation late in infection (Weiden and Ginsberg, 1994), A549 cells were coinfected with E3::HO viruses lacking the E4 region. The results strongly suggest that the E4 protein(s) inhibits DSB repair.

  6. Deletion of the gene encoding the adenovirus 5 early region 1b 21,000-molecular-weight polypeptide leads to degradation of viral and host cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Pilder, S; Logan, J; Shenk, T

    1984-01-01

    The adenovirus 5 mutant H5dl337 lacks 146 base pairs within early region 1B. The deletion removes a portion of the region encoding the E1B 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide, but does not disturb the E1B-55K/17K coding region. The virus is slightly defective for growth in cultured HeLa cells, in which its final yield is reduced ca. 10-fold compared with wild-type virus. The mutant displays a striking phenotype in HeLa cells. The onset of cytopathic effect is dramatically accelerated, and both host cell and viral DNAs are extensively degraded late after infection. This defect has been described previously for a variety of adenovirus mutants and has been termed a cytocidal (cyt) phenotype. H5dl337 serves to map this defect to the loss of E1B-21K polypeptide function. In addition to its defect in the productive growth cycle, H5dl337 is unable to transform rat cells at normal efficiency. Images PMID:6492257

  7. Identification of human adenovirus early region 1 products by using antisera against synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted carboxy termini.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, S P; Rowe, D T; Tremblay, M L; McDermott, M; Branton, P E

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic peptides were prepared which corresponded to the carboxy termini of the human adenovirus type 5 early region 1B (E1B) 58,000-molecular-weight (58K) protein (Tyr-Ser-Asp-Glu-Asp-Thr-Asp) and of the E1A gene products (Tyr-Gly-Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Pro). Antisera raised against these peptides precipitated polypeptides from adenovirus type 5-infected KB cells; serum raised against the 58K carboxy terminus was active against the E1B 58K phosphoprotein, whereas serum raised against the E1A peptide immunoprecipitated four major and at least two minor polypeptides. These latter proteins migrated with apparent molecular weights of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, 45K, 37.5K, and 35K, and all were phosphoproteins. By using tryptic phosphopeptide analysis, the four major species (52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K) were found to be related, as would be expected if all were products of the E1A region. The ability of the antipeptide sera to precipitate these viral proteins thus confirmed that the previously proposed sequence of E1 DNA and mRNA and the reading frame of the mRNA are correct. Immunofluorescent-antibody staining with the antipeptide sera indicated that the 58K E1B protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, especially in the perinuclear region. The E1A-specific serum also stained both discrete patches in the nucleus and diffuse areas of the cytoplasm. These data suggest that both the 58K protein and the E1A proteins may function in or around the nucleus. These highly specific antipeptide sera should allow for a more complete identification and characterization of these important viral proteins. Images PMID:6343626

  8. Organization of early region 1B of human adenovirus type 2: identification of four differentially spliced mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U

    1985-01-01

    The mRNAs from early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 have been studied by Northern blot, S1 nuclease, and cDNA analysis. Two novel mRNAs, designated 14S and 14.5S, have been observed in addition to the previously identified 9S, 13S, and 22S mRNAs. They are 1.26 and 1.31 kilobases long and differ from the 13S and 22S mRNAs in being composed of three exons instead of two. Their two terminal exons are the same as those present in the 13S mRNA, whereas the middle exon is unique to each of the two novel mRNA species. The structures of the 14S and 14.5S mRNAs allow the prediction of their coding capacities: both mRNA species, like the 22S and 13S mRNAs, contain an uninterrupted translational reading frame encoding a 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide. The 14S mRNA can, in addition, encode a 16.5K polypeptide which shares N-terminal and C-terminal sequences with the 55K polypeptide, known to be encoded by the 22S mRNA. The 14.5S mRNA species encodes a hypothetical 9.2K polypeptide which has the same N terminus as the 55K polypeptide but a unique C terminus. The two mRNAs differ in their kinetics of appearance; the 14.5S mRNA is preferentially expressed late after infection in contrast to the 14S mRNA, which is present in approximately equal amounts early and late after infection. Taken together with previously published information the results suggest that early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 encodes five proteins in addition to virion polypeptide IX. These have predicted molecular weights of 55,000, 21,000, 16,500, 9,200, and 8,100. Images PMID:3989911

  9. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  10. Early diagnosis of adenovirus infection and treatment with cidofovir after bone marrow transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Berrebi, D; Houhou, N; Freymuth, F; Faye, A; Duval, M; Mougenot, J F; Peuchmaur, M; Vilmer, E

    2001-03-01

    Adenovirus infection remains an important cause of mortality after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Currently no efficient antiviral treatment is known. Thus, testing new modalities of early diagnosis and treatment is a crucial objective. Adenovirus infection is defined by the combination of symptoms and the isolation of virus from the source of clinical symptoms. The involvement of two or more organs and the presence of virus in blood cultures define disseminated disease. Seven children with a median age of 7 years received bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. All received an unrelated graft without T cell depletion. Adenovirus was sought in blood, urine and biopsy specimens using PCR and culture. Analysis of biopsy specimens included systematic immunohistochemistry. Cidofovir treatment was initiated as soon as biopsy revealed the histopathological signs of adenovirus. Cidofovir was given at 5 mg/kg once weekly for 3 weeks then every 2 weeks. Six patients had diarrhoea and one patient had cystitis. Adenovirus infection and disseminated disease were diagnosed in four cases and three cases, respectively. In six cases, serotype A31 was isolated from gastrointestinal biopsy and in two cases serotypes B2 and C6 were detected in blood and urine. Cidofovir treatment was associated with clinical improvement of diarrhoea, cystitis and fever in five patients, in whom the virus became undetectable in cultures and PCR analyses despite the persistence of immunodeficiency. The median follow-up was 360 days after BMT (240-570). One child died of invasive aspergillosis and another of disseminated adenovirus after interruption of cidofovir therapy. Further studies in immunocompromised patients will be needed to extend these promising results concerning the role of cidofovir in adenovirus infection.

  11. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  12. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  13. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  14. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 long fiber.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L; Fox, Gavin C; Langlois, Patrick; van Raaij, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    Avian adenovirus CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan virus, fowl adenovirus type 1) incorporates two different homotrimeric fiber proteins extending from the same penton base: a long fiber (designated fiber 1) and a short fiber (designated fiber 2). The short fibers extend straight outwards from the viral vertices, whilst the long fibers emerge at an angle. In contrast to the short fiber, which binds an unknown avian receptor and has been shown to be essential to the invasiveness of this virus, the long fiber appears to be unnecessary for infection in birds. Both fibers contain a short N-terminal virus-binding peptide, a slender shaft domain and a globular C-terminal head domain; the head domain, by analogy with human adenoviruses, is likely to be involved mainly in receptor binding. This study reports the high-resolution crystal structure of the head domain of the long fiber, solved using single isomorphous replacement (using anomalous signal) and refined against data at 1.6 A (0.16 nm) resolution. The C-terminal globular head domain had an anti-parallel beta-sandwich fold formed by two four-stranded beta-sheets with the same overall topology as human adenovirus fiber heads. The presence in the sequence of characteristic repeats N-terminal to the head domain suggests that the shaft domain contains a triple beta-spiral structure. Implications of the structure for the function and stability of the avian adenovirus long fiber protein are discussed; notably, the structure suggests a different mode of binding to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor from that proposed for the human adenovirus fiber heads.

  15. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  16. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  17. The Dual Nature of Nek9 in Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Richard; Radko, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To successfully replicate in an infected host cell, a virus must overcome sophisticated host defense mechanisms. Viruses, therefore, have evolved a multitude of devices designed to circumvent cellular defenses that would lead to abortive infection. Previous studies have identified Nek9, a cellular kinase, as a binding partner of adenovirus E1A, but the biology behind this association remains a mystery. Here we show that Nek9 is a transcriptional repressor that functions together with E1A to silence the expression of p53-inducible GADD45A gene in the infected cell. Depletion of Nek9 in infected cells reduces virus growth but unexpectedly enhances viral gene expression from the E2 transcription unit, whereas the opposite occurs when Nek9 is overexpressed. Nek9 localizes with viral replication centers, and its depletion reduces viral genome replication, while overexpression enhances viral genome numbers in infected cells. Additionally, Nek9 was found to colocalize with the viral E4 orf3 protein, a repressor of cellular stress response. Significantly, Nek9 was also shown to associate with viral and cellular promoters and appears to function as a transcriptional repressor, representing the first instance of Nek9 playing a role in gene regulation. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of virus-host interactions and identify a new role for the cellular protein Nek9 during infection, suggesting a role for Nek9 in regulating p53 target gene expression. IMPORTANCE In the arms race that exists between a pathogen and its host, each has continually evolved mechanisms to either promote or prevent infection. In order to successfully replicate and spread, a virus must overcome every mechanism that a cell can assemble to block infection. On the other hand, to counter viral spread, cells must have multiple mechanisms to stifle viral replication. In the present study, we add to our understanding of how the human adenovirus is able to circumvent cellular roadblocks

  18. Late-Glacial to Late-holocene Shifts in Global Precipitation Delta(sup 18)O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasechko, S.; Lechler, A.; Pausata, F.S.R.; Fawcett, P.J.; Gleeson, T.; Cendon, D.I.; Galewsky, J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Risi, C.; Sharp, Z. D.; Welker, J. M.; Werner, M.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructions of Quaternary climate are often based on the isotopic content of paleo-precipitation preserved in proxy records. While many paleo-precipitation isotope records are available, few studies have synthesized these dispersed records to explore spatial patterns of late-glacial precipitation delta(sup 18)O. Here we present a synthesis of 86 globally distributed groundwater (n 59), cave calcite (n 15) and ice core (n 12) isotope records spanning the late-glacial (defined as 50,000 to 20,000 years ago) to the late-Holocene (within the past 5000 years). We show that precipitation delta(sup 18)O changes from the late-glacial to the late-Holocene range from -7.1% (delta(sup 18)O(late-Holocene) > delta(sup 18)O(late-glacial) to +1.7% (delta(sup 18)O(late-glacial) > delta(sup 18)O(late-Holocene), with the majority (77) of records having lower late-glacial delta(sup 18)O than late-Holocene delta(sup 18)O values. High-magnitude, negative precipitation delta(sup 18)O shifts are common at high latitudes, high altitudes and continental interiors.

  19. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  20. Lesions and transmission of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in black-tailed deer fawns.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Lehmkuhl, H D; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1999-03-01

    Adenovirus infection was the cause of an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California during the latter half of 1993. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. To study transmission of adenovirus infection in deer and susceptibility of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) fawns to adenovirus infection, six 3-6-month-old black-tailed fawns were divided into two treatment groups. One group was inoculated intravenously and the other group was inoculated through the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and mouth with purified adenovirus. Each treatment group also included two additional fawns (four total) that were not inoculated but were exposed to inoculated animals (contact animals). One fawn served as a negative control. Between 4 and 16 days postinoculation, 8/10 fawns developed systemic or localized infection with lesions identical to lesions seen in animals with natural disease that died during the epizootic. Transmission was by direct contact, and the route of inoculation did not affect the incubation period or the distribution of the virus (systemic or the localized infection). Immunohistochemical analysis using polyclonal antiserum against bovine adenovirus type 5 demonstrated staining in endothelial cells of vessels in numerous tissues in animals with systemic infection and endothelial staining only in vessels subtending necrotic foci in the upper alimentary tract in animals with the localized form of the disease. All inoculated or exposed animals had staining in the tonsillar epithelium. Transmission electron microscopic examination of lung and ileum from two fawns with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy demonstrated endothelial necrosis and

  1. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract.

  2. Occurrence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and adenoviruses in Finnish bathing waters and purified sewage effluents.

    PubMed

    Hokajärvi, Anna-Maria; Pitkänen, Tarja; Siljanen, Henri M P; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Torvinen, Eila; Siitonen, Anja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-03-01

    A total of 50 Finnish bathing water samples and 34 sewage effluent samples originating from 17 locations were studied in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Campylobacter were present in 58% and adenoviruses in 12% of all bathing water samples; 53% of all sewage effluent samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. and 59% for adenoviruses. C. jejuni was the most common Campylobacter species found and human adenovirus serotype 41 was the most common identified adenovirus type. Bathing water temperature displayed a significant negative relationship with the occurrence of Campylobacter. One location had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of C. coli isolates in the bathing water and in sewage effluent, suggesting that sewage effluent was the source of C. coli at this bathing site. The counts of faecal indicator bacteria were not able to predict the presence of Campylobacter spp. or adenoviruses in the bathing waters. Thus the observed common presence of these pathogens in Finnish sewage effluents and bathing waters may represent a public health risk. The low water temperature in Finland may enhance the prevalence of Campylobacter in bathing waters. More attention needs to be paid to minimizing the concentrations of intestinal pathogens in bathing waters.

  3. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  4. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  5. Screening for adenoviruses in haematological neoplasia: High prevalence in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Ambros, Peter F; Pötschger, Ulrike; Chott, Andreas; Jäger, Ulrich; Drach, Johannes; Nader, Alexander; Lion, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Human adenoviruses possess oncogenic capacity which is well documented in mammalian animal models, but their possible implication in human malignancy has remained enigmatic. Following primary infection, adenoviruses can persist in a latent state in lymphocytes where the virus is apparently able to evade immune surveillance. In the present study, we have employed a broad-spectrum adenovirus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to systematically screen more than 200 diagnostic specimens of different lymphoid malignancies including acute lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), various types of malignant lymphoma (n=100) and multiple myeloma (n=11) for the presence of adenoviral sequences. While most entities analysed revealed negative findings in virtually all specimens tested, adenoviral DNA was detected in 15/36 (42%) mantle cell lymphomas investigated. The most prevalent adenoviral species detected was C, and less commonly B. Adenovirus-positive findings in patients with mantle cell lymphoma were made at different sites including bone marrow (n=7), intestine (n=5), lymph nodes (n=2) and tonsillar tissue (n=1). The presence of adenoviral sequences identified by PCR was confirmed in individual cells by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). The frequent observation of adenoviruses in mantle cell lymphoma is intriguings, and raises questions about their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this lymphoid malignancy. PMID:24246703

  6. Characterizing clearance of helper adenovirus by a clinical rAAV1 manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barbara A; Quigley, Paulene; Nichols, Gina; Moore, Christine; Pastor, Eric; Price, David; Ament, Jon W; Takeya, Ryan K; Peluso, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV) are being developed as gene therapy delivery vehicles and as genetic vaccines, and some of the most scaleable manufacturing methods for rAAV use live adenovirus to induce production. One aspect of establishing safety of rAAV products is therefore demonstrating adequate and reliable clearance of this helper virus by the vector purification process. The ICH Q5A regulatory guidance on viral safety provides recommendations for process design and characterization of viral clearance for recombinant proteins, and these principles were adapted to a rAAV serotype 1 purification process for clinical vectors. Specific objectives were to achieve overall adenovirus clearance factors significantly greater than input levels by using orthogonal separation and inactivation methods, and to segregate adenovirus from downstream operations by positioning a robust clearance step early in the process. Analytical tools for process development and characterization addressed problematic in-process samples, and a viral clearance validation study was performed using adenovirus and two non-specific model viruses. Overall clearance factors determined were >23 LRV for adenovirus, 11 LRV for BVDV, and >23 LRV for AMuLV.

  7. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV.

  8. Technical aspects of using human adenovirus as a viral water quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Rames, Emily; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Despite dramatic improvements in water treatment technologies in developed countries, waterborne viruses are still associated with many of cases of illness each year. These illnesses include gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis, and respiratory infections. Importantly, outbreaks of viral disease from waters deemed compliant from bacterial indicator testing still occur, which highlights the need to monitor the virological quality of water. Human adenoviruses are often used as a viral indicator of water quality (faecal contamination), as this pathogen has high UV-resistance and is prevalent in untreated domestic wastewater all year round, unlike enteroviruses and noroviruses that are often only detected in certain seasons. Standard methods for recovering and measuring adenovirus numbers in water are lacking, and there are many variations in published methods. Since viral numbers are likely under-estimated when optimal methods are not used, a comprehensive review of these methods is both timely and important. This review critically evaluates how estimates of adenovirus numbers in water are impacted by technical manipulations, such as during adenovirus concentration and detection (including culturing and polymerase-chain reaction). An understanding of the implications of these issues is fundamental to obtaining reliable estimation of adenovirus numbers in water. Reliable estimation of HAdV numbers is critical to enable improved monitoring of the efficacy of water treatment processes, accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, and to ensure microbiological safety of water.

  9. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  10. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  11. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  12. Systemic adenovirus infection associated with high mortality in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Swift, P K; Barr, B C; Horzinek, M C; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Patton, J F; Oliver, M N; Jones, K R; MacLachlan, N J

    1996-03-01

    Seventeen counties in northern California experienced epizootics of high mortality in the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) population during the latter half of 1993. Thirteen deer submitted to the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System as part of this natural die-off had systemic adenovirus infection. Pulmonary edema was present in all 13 deer. Erosions, ulceration, and abscessation of the upper alimentary tract occurred in 7/13 deer. Four of 13 deer had hemorrhagic enteritis. All 13 deer had widespread systemic vasculitis with endothelial intranuclear inclusions. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody directed against bovine adenovirus type 5 bound to antigen in endothelial cells. Adenovirus was identified by transmission electron microscopy within the nuclei of endothelial cells in 6/6 deer examined. An adenovirus was isolated from lung homogenates of one deer that were cultured on black-tailed deer pulmonary artery endothelial cells. With the exception of the intranuclear inclusions evident on histologic evaluation, gross and histologic changes were similar to those described for bluetongue virus infection and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus infection in white-tailed deer. Nine additional deer were emaciated and had pharyngeal abscesses with focal vasculitis, which may represent the chronic affects of previous nonfatal adenovirus infection.

  13. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract. PMID:27486139

  14. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  15. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA.

  16. Construction and identification of recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y L; Xie, H; Lin, H L; Feng, Q; Liu, Y

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study was to construct the recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene expression system for preliminary identification to lay the foundation for the further study of gene therapy. Using the Adeno-X system, the recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAdeno-X green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 small hairpin (1shRNA) was constructed by including the target gene fragment of the TIMP-1shRNA shuttle plasmid pShuttle2-GFP-TIMP-1shRNA and the backbone plasmid pAdeno-X by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEK293A cells to package the recombinant adenovirus rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA. The recombinant adenovirus was identified by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral titer and infection efficiency were detected using GFP. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digestion demonstrated that rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA had been successfully constructed, which has a strong ability to infect the kidney. The TIMP-1shRNA adenovirus expression vector was successfully constructed using homologous recombination methods.

  17. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  18. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  19. The Adenovirus L4-22K Protein Has Distinct Functions in the Posttranscriptional Regulation of Gene Expression and Encapsidation of the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Guimet, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus L4-22K protein is multifunctional and critical for different aspects of viral infection. Packaging of the viral genome into an empty capsid absolutely requires the L4-22K protein to bind to packaging sequences in cooperation with other viral proteins. Additionally, the L4-22K protein is important for the temporal switch from the early to late phase of infection by regulating both early and late gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of these key functions of the L4-22K protein, we focused our studies on the role of conserved pairs of cysteine and histidine residues in the C-terminal region of L4-22K. We found that mutation of the cysteine residues affected the production of infectious progeny virus but did not interfere with the ability of the L4-22K protein to regulate viral gene expression. These results demonstrate that these two functions of L4-22K may be uncoupled. Mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a mutant with a similar phenotype as a virus deficient in the L4-22K protein, where both viral genome packaging and viral gene expression patterns were disrupted. Interestingly, both mutant L4-22K proteins bound to adenovirus packaging sequences, indicating that the paired cysteine and histidine residues do not function as a zinc finger DNA binding motif. Our results reveal that the L4-22K protein controls viral gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and regulates the accumulation of the L4-33K protein, another critical viral regulator, at the level of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:23637408

  20. Gene transfer by adenovirus in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, M F; Ewaskiewicz, J I; Adda, S; Bailey, K; Harris, V; Sosnoski, D; Tomasic, M; Wilson, J; Kotlikoff, M I

    1996-08-01

    We report adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into airway smooth muscle cells in cultured cells and organ-cultured tracheal segments. Incubation of cultured rat tracheal myocytes with virus (5 x 10(8) pfu/ml) for 6 h resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in 94.8 +/- 2.5% of cells (n = 4). Following incubation of thin (less than 200 microns diameter) equine trachealis muscle segments with virus in organ culture (5 x 10(8)-5 x 10(10) pfu/ml) the average expression of the Lac Z gene was approximately 19 +/- 10% (n = 9). Expression was markedly improved, however, in segments from neonatal rats (13-21 days). In two experiments in which the mucosa and serosa were removed, nearly all cells expressed beta-galactosidase, whereas in a third experiment in which the tissue was not dissected, about 40% of cells were stained. Viral infection had no effect on tension development of strips following organ culture. In vitro gene transfer may provide a useful method to alter protein expression and examine the effect of this alteration on excitation/contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  1. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens.

  2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HELA CELLS INFECTED WITH ADENOVIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Carl G.; Hamlin, Alice; Parker, Esther; van Ravenswaay, Theodore

    1956-01-01

    HeLa cells were infected with adenoviruses (types 1–4) and sectioned for electron microscopy after intervals of 20 to 48 hours. Clusters of virus-like particles were found within the nuclei of infected cultures but not in those of uninfected controls. The particles were often arranged in rows as if in crystalline formation. Maximal diameter of particles was approximately 65 mµ, and internal bodies were demonstrated. Lesions of infected cells included target-like structures of the nuclear membrane, large nuclear vacuoles (type 2), and increased numbers of large irregular electron-dense granules in the cytoplasm 48 hours after infection. Examination of infected cultures by light microscopy, using the Feulgen reaction, showed intranuclear inclusion bodies and a cytopathogenic effect consisting of clumping of cells without pyknosis of nuclei. A lipide stain showed numerous cytoplasmic granules that were not identical with the large, irregular, electron-dense granules of the cytoplasm. Practically all the cells showed the viral cytopathogenic effect, but only a minority of cells were found to contain virus-like particles or intranuclear inclusion bodies. PMID:13357696

  3. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    SciTech Connect

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  4. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens. PMID:26944930

  5. Fiber-modified adenoviruses for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongju; Curiel, David T

    2008-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector. To achieve highly efficient and specific gene delivery, it is often necessary to re-direct Ad5 tropism. Because the capsid protein fiber plays an essential role in directing Ad5 infection, our laboratory attempted to re-target Ad5 through fiber modification. We have developed two strategies in this regard. One is a bi-specific adaptor protein strategy, in which the adaptor protein is designed to bind both the Ad5 fiber and an alternative cell-surface receptor. Another is genetic modification, in which alternative targeting motifs are genetically incorporated into the fiber knob domain so that the Ad5 vectors can infect cells through the alternative receptors. In this chapter, we will focus on the genetic fiber modification strategy and provide a detailed protocol for generation of fiber-modified Ad5 vectors. A series of techniques/procedures used in our laboratory will be described, which include the generation of fiber-modified Ad5 genome by homologous recombination in a bacterial system, rescuing the modified Ad5 viruses, virus amplification and purification, and virus titration.

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for acute adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Roggendorf, M; Wigand, R; Deinhardt, F; Frösner, G G

    1982-02-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described for demonstrating antibodies to the hexone antigen of adenoviruses. The antigen-coated, flat-bottomed microtiter plates are incubated sequentially with dilutions of patients' sera (2 h at 37 degrees C) and peroxidase-coupled anti-human IgG (2 h at 37 degrees C). After a final washing, orthophenylenediamine is added to the plates, and the absorbance (A) measured 30 min later. The ELISA was found to be a hundred-fold more sensitive than complement fixation. An evaluation methods for determining antibody concentration is described which correlates the absorbance of sera diluted 10(-3) to the absorbance of a reference serum containing an arbitrary value (100) of antibody. This methods avoids titration of sera and day-to-day assay variations by different background reactions. A significant increase in antibody concentration of acute-phase serum over that of convalescent phase serum is observed. The ability to test sera in a single dilution and the automatic reading of results and their evaluation by computer make this assay suitable for diagnostic laboratories.

  7. Magnesium-dependent interaction of PKR with adenovirus VAI.

    PubMed

    Launer-Felty, Katherine; Wong, C Jason; Wahid, Ahmed M; Conn, Graeme L; Cole, James L

    2010-10-01

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the α-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg(2+). Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg(2+), but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  8. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  9. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests.

  10. Phylogenomic characterization of California sea lion adenovirus-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; Goldstein, Tracey; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Rivera, Rebecca; Waltzek, Thomas B; Salemi, Marco; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-04-01

    Significant adenoviral diversity has been found in humans, but in domestic and wild animals the number of identified viruses is lower. Here we present the complete genome of a recently discovered mastadenovirus, California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1) isolated from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), an important pathogen associated with hepatitis in pinnipeds. The genome of this virus has the typical mastadenoviral structure with some notable differences at the carboxy-terminal end, including a dUTPase that does not cluster with other mastadenoviral dUTPases, and a fiber that shows similarity to a trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi and choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The GC content is low (36%), and phylogenetic analyses placed the virus near the root of the clade infecting laurasiatherian hosts in the genus Mastadenovirus. These findings support the hypothesis that CSLAdV-1 in California sea lions represents a host jump from an unknown mammalian host in which it is endemic.

  11. mRNAs from human adenovirus 2 early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Gilardi, P; Näslund, A; LeMoullec, J M; Pettersson, U; Perricaudet, M

    1984-01-01

    The molecular structure of the mRNAs from early region 4 of human adenovirus 2 has been studied by Northern blot analysis, S1 nuclease analysis, and sequence analysis of cDNA clones. The results make it possible to identify four different splice donor sites and six different splice acceptor sites. The structure of 12 different mRNAs can be deduced from the analysis. The mRNAs have identical 5' and 3' ends and are thus likely to be processed from a common mRNA precursor by differential splicing. The different mRNA species are formed by the removal of one to three introns, and they all carry a short 5' leader segment. The introns appear to serve two functions; they either place a 5' leader segment in juxtaposition with an open reading frame or fuse two open translational reading frames. The early region 4 mRNAs can encode at least seven unique polypeptides. Images PMID:6088804

  12. Falcon adenovirus infection in breeding Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha).

    PubMed

    Dean, Jason; Latimer, Kenneth S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Redig, Patrick T; Wünschmann, Arno

    2006-05-01

    Four female and 3 male Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha) out of a breeding colony of 14 Taita falcons (7 pairs) died during the breeding season after showing lethargy and anorexia for 1 to 2 days. All animals were submitted for necropsy. Gross lesions in the female falcons were characterized by anemia secondary to marked hemorrhage into the ovary and oviduct, serofibrinous effusion into the cardioabdominal cavity and serosal petechiae. In addition, marked necrotizing splenitis and pulmonary hemorrhage were present. Histologically, the female falcons had mild necrotizing hepatitis with numerous intranuclear inclusion bodies and necrotizing splenitis with rare inclusion bodies. There were no gross lesions in the male falcons, and the histological lesions were characterized by urate deposition and rare intranuclear inclusion bodies in the renal tubular epithelial cells. Adenoviral particles were found by electron microscopy in the cloacal contents of the female Taita falcons but not in the male falcons. DNA in situ hybridization revealed widespread aviadenoviral nucleic acid within the nuclei of hepatocytes, renal tubular epithelial cells, and adrenal cells in the female falcons but no aviadenoviral nucleic acid in 1 male falcon and only a low quantity of adenoviral nucleic acid in the liver and kidney of another male Taita falcon. PCR amplified aviadenoviral DNA in the liver and intestine of all Taita falcons. The amplicons were sequenced, and the virus was identified as falcon adenovirus. The deaths of the female and male birds were attributed to the aviadenovirus infection.

  13. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  14. Nedocromil sodium inhibits canine adenovirus bronchiolitis in beagle puppies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K A; Lemen, R J; Weger, N S; Chen, H; Bowers, M C; Witten, M L; Lantz, R C; Bice, D E; Muggenburg, B A

    2000-01-01

    Nedocromil sodium is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to control asthmatic attacks. Our hypothesis is that nedocromil sodium inhibits virus-induced airway inflammation, a common trigger of asthma. We nebulized nedocromil sodium into beagle dogs (n = 10, mean +/- SEM ages: 149 +/- 13 days) before and after inoculation with canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Control dogs (n = 10) received saline aerosols and were either infected with CAV2 (Sal/CAV2, n = 7, mean +/- SEM ages: 140 +/- 11 days) or were not infected (Sal/Sal, n = 3, ages: 143 +/- 0 days). All dogs were anesthetized with choralose (80 mg/kg i.v.), intubated, and mechanically ventilated. Pulmonary function tests and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed using standard techniques. Pulmonary function tests revealed no significant change between the nedocromil sodium and non-nedocromil-treated groups. The percentage of infected bronchioles was quantitated as the number of inflamed airways of 40 bronchioles examined times 100 for each dog. Nedocromil-treated dogs had significantly (p < 0.05) less mucosal inflammation (mean +/- SEM, 39% +/- 5%), epithelial denudation (36% +/- 5%), and BAL neutrophilia (11 +/- 3) than did Sal/CAV2 dogs (51% +/- 6%, 57% +/- 4%, and 33% +/- 8%, respectively). We concluded that pretreatment with nedocromil sodium aerosols attenuated CAV2-induced airway inflammation in these beagle puppies.

  15. Adenovirus type 3 induces platelet activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying-Yu; Yu, Xiu-Nan; Qu, Zhang-Yi; Zhang, Ai-Ai; Xing, Yu-Ling; Jiang, Li-Xin; Shang, Lei; Wang, Ying-Chen

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate platelet activation induced by adenovirus type 3 (HAdV3) in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or whole blood was incubated with or without HAdV at various concentrations. Platelet aggregation, platelet counting, fibrinogen and expression of platelet membrane antigens (CD41a and CD62P) were determined following incubation with HAdV for different periods of time. The results demonstrated that HAdV at the concentrations of 109-1011 vp/ml enhanced adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation, however did not alter the platelet count. Infection with HAdVs also reduced fibrinogen level. P-selectin and CD41a appeared rapidly on the surface after platelets were incubated with HAdVs in vitro for 30 min. In conclusion, HAdVs may induce activation of platelets and lead to a pre-thrombotic state of peripheral blood. This finding may aid in the development of measures to prevent severe HAdV infection.

  16. Phylogenomic evidence for recombination of adenoviruses in wild gorillas.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Robbins, Martha; Gray, Maryke; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Nishuli, Radar; Boji Mungu-Akonkwa, Dieu-Donné; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) of species Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B) are genetically highly diverse and comprise several pathogenic types. AdVs closely related to members of HAdV-B infect African great apes and the evolutionary origin of HAdV-B has recently been determined in ancient gorillas. Genetic evidence for intra- and inter-species recombination has been obtained for AdVs of humans and captive great apes, but evidence from wild great apes is lacking. In this study, potential HAdV-B members of wild Eastern gorillas were analysed for evidence of recombination. One near-complete genome was amplified from primary sample material and sequenced, and from another six individuals genome fragments were obtained. In phylogenomic analysis, their penton base, pVII-pVI, hexon and fiber genes were compared with those of all publicly available HAdV-B full-genome sequences of humans and captive great apes. Evidence for intra-species recombination between different HAdV-B members of wild gorillas as well as between HAdV-B members of chimpanzees and gorillas was obtained. Since zoonotic AdVs have been reported to cause respiratory outbreaks in both humans and monkeys, and humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates thereby increasing the chance of zoonotic transmission, such HAdV-B recombinants might widen the pool of potential human pathogens. PMID:26219820

  17. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting. PMID:23029348

  18. Production of good manufacturing practice-grade cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus to prevent or treat viral infections post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Sili, Uluhan; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Gee, Adrian P; Huls, Helen; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2012-01-01

    Infections with a range of common community viruses remain a major cause of mortality and morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T cells specific for cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenoviruses can safely prevent and infections with these three most common culprits, but the manufacture of individual T cell lines for each virus would be prohibitive in terms of time and cost. We have demonstrated that T cells specific for all three viruses can be manufactured in a single culture using monocytes and EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), both transduced with an adenovirus vector expressing pp65 of CMV, as antigen-presenting cells. Trivirus-specific T cell lines produced from healthy stem cell donors could prevent and treat infections with all three viruses, not only in the designated recipient, but in unrelated, partially-HLA-matched third party recipients. We now provide the details and logistics of T cell manufacture.

  19. Inherited eye disease: cause and late effect.

    PubMed

    Manson, Forbes D C; Trump, Dorothy; Read, Andrew P; Black, Graeme C M

    2005-10-01

    Molecular genetics has provided relatively few insights into late-onset eye disorders, but epidemiological data indicate that genetic factors are important in some late-onset eye disorders that cause major health burdens. Much clinical genetic research is based on the belief that developmental and late-onset disorders are not necessarily the result of defects in different genes, but are often caused by different mutations in the same collection of genes. Thus, mutations that either abolish or radically change gene function might cause early-onset disorders, whereas more-subtle changes in gene expression might underlie late-onset diseases. We present arguments and examples that indicate that this principle might be a fruitful guide to investigating the causes of late-onset eye disorders. PMID:16153893

  20. An adenovirus associated with intestinal impaction and mortality of male eiders (Somateria mollissima) in the Baltic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Kilpi, Mikael; Docherty, D.E.; Myllys, V.

    2003-01-01

    We examined 10 common eider (Somateria mollissima) males found dead in 1998 during a die-off in the northern Baltic Sea off the southwestern coast of Finland. We diagnosed impaction of the posterior small intestine with mucosal necrosis as the cause of death in all 10 and isolated adenoviruses from cloacal samples of six birds. The adenovirus isolates were not neutralized by reference antisera to group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses. Cloacal swabs from 22 apparently healthy eider females nesting at the mortality area were negative for viruses. An adenovirus isolated from one of the eiders caused clinical signs of illness and gastrointestinal pathology in experimentally infected mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings. These findings suggest that the adenovirus contributed to the mortality of common eider males in the Finnish archipelago.

  1. Dynamic change in natural killer cell type in the human ocular mucosa in situ as means of immune evasion by adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yawata, N; Selva, K J; Liu, Y-C; Tan, K P; Lee, A W L; Siak, J; Lan, W; Vania, M; Arundhati, A; Tong, L; Li, J; Mehta, J S; Yawata, M

    2016-01-01

    The most severe form of virus-induced inflammation at the ocular surface is epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), often caused by group D human adenoviruses (HAdVs). We investigated the dynamics and mechanisms of changes in natural killer (NK) cell types in the human ocular mucosal surface in situ over the course of infection. In the acute phase of infection, the mature CD56(dim)NK cells that comprise a major subpopulation in the normal human conjunctiva are replaced by CD56(bright)NK cells recruited to the ocular surface by chemokines produced by the infected epithelium, and NKG2A-expressing CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells become the major subpopulations in severe inflammation. These NK cells attracted to the mucosal surface are however incapable of mounting a strong antiviral response because of upregulation of the inhibitory ligand human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) on infected epithelium. Furthermore, group D HAdVs downregulate ligands for activating NK cell receptors, thus rendering even the mature NKG2A(-)NK cells unresponsive, an immune-escape mechanism distinct from other adenoviruses. Our findings imply that the EKC-causing group D HAdVs utilize these multiple pathways to inhibit antiviral NK cell responses in the initial stages of the infection.

  2. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely. PMID:27621460

  3. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely.

  4. Conditional Lethal Mutants of Adenovirus 2-Simian Virus 40 Hybrids I. Host Range Mutants of Ad2+ND1

    PubMed Central

    Grodzicker, Terri; Anderson, Carl; Sharp, Phillip A.; Sambrook, Joe

    1974-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) grows poorly in monkey cells, although this defect can be overcome by co-infection with simian virus 40 (SV40). The nondefective Ad2-SV40 hybrid virus, Ad2+ND1, replicates efficiently in both human and African green monkey kidney cells, presumably due to the insertion of SV40 sequences into the Ad2 DNA. Several mutants of Ad2+ND1 have been isolated that grow and plaque poorly in monkey cells, although they retain the ability to replicate and plaque efficiently in HeLa cells. One of these mutants (H39) has been examined in detail. Studies comparing the DNA of the mutant with Ad2+ND1 either by the cleavage patterns produced by Escherichia coli R·RI restriction endonuclease digestion or by heteroduplexing reveal no differences. The pattern of protein synthesis of Ad2+ND1 and H39 in monkey cells is quite different with the mutant resembling Ad2, which is defective in the synthesis of late proteins. However, in human cells, the proteins synthesized by H39 and the parent Ad2+ND1 are very similar. The production of SV40 U antigen in H39-infected cells is different from that in Ad2+ND1-infected cells. Finally, the growth of H39 in monkey cells can be complemented by SV40. Images PMID:4364898

  5. Effects of mutations in stem and loop regions on the structure and function of adenovirus VA RNAI.

    PubMed Central

    Mellits, K H; Mathews, M B

    1988-01-01

    Adenovirus virus-associated (VA) RNAI is required for efficient protein synthesis at late times of adenoviral infection, and in some other situations where double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is present. It prevents inhibition of protein synthesis by a dsRNA-activated protein kinase and the secondary structure of VA RNAI is though to be important for its activity. To test this idea and to define structures and sequences responsible for VA RNAI activity, we constructed several mutant VA RNA genes and tested them in a transient expression assay. Activity is unaffected by deletions within a small region near the center of the gene, nt 72-85, but it is greatly diminished by deletion or substitution of sequences on the 3' side of this region. The structures of wild-type and mutant RNAs were examined by nuclease-sensitivity analysis. We propose a model for wild-type VA RNAI which differs from that predicted to be the most stable structure. Surprisingly disruption of the longest duplex region in the molecule is tolerated, provided that adjacent structural elements are not rearranged. However, perturbations of elements located in the center of the structure correlate well with loss of function. Images PMID:3181142

  6. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  7. Characteristics of a human cell line transformed by DNA from human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed

    Graham, F L; Smiley, J; Russell, W C; Nairn, R

    1977-07-01

    Human embryonic kidney cells have been transformed by exposing cells to sheared fragments of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The transformed cells (designated 293 cells) exhibited many of the characteristics of transformation including the elaboration of a virus-specific tumour antigen. Analysis of the polypeptides synthesized in the 293 cells by labelling with 35S-methionine and SDS PAGE showed a variable pattern of synthesis, different in a number of respects from that seen in otheruman cells. On labelling the surface of cells by lactoperoxidase catalysed radio-iodination, the absence of a labelled polypeptide analogous to the 250 K (LETS) glycoprotein was noted. Hybridization of labelled cellular RNA with restriction fragments of adenovirus type 5 DNA indicated transcription of a portion of the adenovirus genome at the conventional left hand end. PMID:886304

  8. Attachment and Detachment Behaviour of Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Margaret; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas; Sommer, Regina; Sidhu, Jatinder

    2015-04-01

    Comparison of transport of virus surrogates to the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Since experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow through soil columns are used. Adenovirus, nanoparticles, PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages were tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Southern Australia. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material, although PRD1 did not mimic the detachment behaviour of adenovirus successfully under high pH conditions. It was also found that the charge of the colloid is not a dominant removal mechanism in this system. Implications from this study could influence how field tests using bacteriophages and nanoparticles are interpreted.

  9. An epizootic of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease in captive black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Woods, L W; Keel, M K; MacLachlan, N J; Porter, C O; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-09-01

    Ten fawns and four adult black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in a captive herd died as a result of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease. Acute, systemic infections were characterized by hemorrhagic enteropathy, pulmonary edema, and occasional ulceration of the upper alimentary tract. Localized infections were limited to the upper alimentary tract and included stomatitis, pharyngitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, and rumenitis. In deer with acute, systemic infections, a diagnosis was made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The serum neutralization test was useful for confirming a diagnosis in animals with prolonged, localized infections. Deer originating from herds with a history of adenovirus infection should not be transferred to other captive herds or released into free-ranging populations because they may serve as carriers of adenovirus.

  10. Analysis of purified Wild type and mutant adenovirus particles by SILAC based quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Ali; Heesom, Kate; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Curiel, David; Ugai, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    We used SILAC (stable isotope labelling of amino acids in cell culture) and high-throughput quantitative MS mass spectrometry to analyse the protein composition of highly purified WT wild type adenoviruses, mutant adenoviruses lacking an internal protein component (protein V) and recombinant adenoviruses of the type commonly used in gene therapy, including one virus that had been used in a clinical trial. We found that the viral protein abundance and composition were consistent across all types of virus examined except for the virus lacking protein V, which also had reduced amounts of another viral core protein, protein VII. In all the samples analysed we found no evidence of consistent packaging or contamination with cellular proteins. We believe this technique is a powerful method to analyse the protein composition of this important gene therapy vector and genetically engineered or synthetic virus-like particles. The raw data have been deposited at proteomexchange, identifer PXD001120. PMID:25096814

  11. Degradation of p53 by adenovirus E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins occurs via a novel mechanism involving a Cullin-containing complex.

    PubMed

    Querido, E; Blanchette, P; Yan, Q; Kamura, T; Morrison, M; Boivin, D; Kaelin, W G; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W; Branton, P E

    2001-12-01

    Although MDM2 plays a major role in regulating the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, other poorly understood MDM2-independent pathways also exist. Human adenoviruses have evolved strategies to regulate p53 function and stability to permit efficient viral replication. One mechanism involves adenovirus E1B55K and E4orf6 proteins, which collaborate to target p53 for degradation. To determine the mechanism of this process, a multiprotein E4orf6-associated complex was purified and shown to contain a novel Cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that is (1) composed of Cullin family member Cul5, Elongins B and C, and the RING-H2 finger protein Rbx1(ROC1); (2) remarkably similar to the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and SCF (Skp1-Cul1/Cdc53-F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes; and (3) capable of stimulating ubiquitination of p53 in vitro in the presence of E1/E2 ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating enzymes. Cullins are activated by NEDD8 modification; therefore, to determine whether Cullin complexes are required for adenovirus-induced p53 degradation, studies were conducted in ts41 Chinese hamster ovary cells that are temperature sensitive for the NEDD8 pathway. E4orf6/E1B55K failed to induce the degradation of p53 at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, our results identify a novel role for the Cullin-based machinery in regulation of p53. PMID:11731475

  12. Degradation of p53 by adenovirus E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins occurs via a novel mechanism involving a Cullin-containing complex

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Blanchette, Paola; Yan, Qin; Kamura, Takumi; Morrison, Megan; Boivin, Dominique; Kaelin, William G.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Branton, Philip E.

    2001-01-01

    Although MDM2 plays a major role in regulating the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, other poorly understood MDM2-independent pathways also exist. Human adenoviruses have evolved strategies to regulate p53 function and stability to permit efficient viral replication. One mechanism involves adenovirus E1B55K and E4orf6 proteins, which collaborate to target p53 for degradation. To determine the mechanism of this process, a multiprotein E4orf6-associated complex was purified and shown to contain a novel Cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that is (1) composed of Cullin family member Cul5, Elongins B and C, and the RING-H2 finger protein Rbx1(ROC1); (2) remarkably similar to the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and SCF (Skp1–Cul1/Cdc53–F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes; and (3) capable of stimulating ubiquitination of p53 in vitro in the presence of E1/E2 ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating enzymes. Cullins are activated by NEDD8 modification; therefore, to determine whether Cullin complexes are required for adenovirus-induced p53 degradation, studies were conducted in ts41 Chinese hamster ovary cells that are temperature sensitive for the NEDD8 pathway. E4orf6/E1B55K failed to induce the degradation of p53 at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, our results identify a novel role for the Cullin-based machinery in regulation of p53. PMID:11731475

  13. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections.

  14. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  15. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  16. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections. PMID:25786873

  17. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  18. Late Cenozoic intraplate faulting in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, Abbas; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    The intensity and tectonic origin of late Cenozoic intraplate deformation in eastern Australia is relatively poorly understood. Here we show that Cenozoic volcanic rocks in southeast Queensland have been deformed by numerous faults. Using gridded aeromagnetic data and field observations, structural investigations were conducted on these faults. Results show that faults have mainly undergone strike-slip movement with a reverse component, displacing Cenozoic volcanic rocks ranging in ages from ˜31 to ˜21 Ma. These ages imply that faulting must have occurred after the late Oligocene. Late Cenozoic deformation has mostly occurred due to the reactivation of major faults, which were active during episodes of basin formation in the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and later during the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene. The wrench reactivation of major faults in the late Cenozoic also gave rise to the occurrence of brittle subsidiary reverse strike-slip faults that affected Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Intraplate transpressional deformation possibly resulted from far-field stresses transmitted from the collisional zones at the northeast and southeast boundaries of the Australian plate during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and from the late Miocene to the Pliocene. These events have resulted in the hitherto unrecognized reactivation of faults in eastern Australia.

  19. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  20. Neutrophils Interact with Adenovirus Vectors via Fc Receptors and Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Matthew J.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Muruve, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophils are effectors of the innate immune response to adenovirus vectors. Following the systemic administration of Cy2-labeled AdLuc in mice, flow cytometry and PCR analysis of liver leukocytes revealed that 25% of recruited neutrophils interacted with adenovirus vectors. In vitro, flow cytometry of human neutrophils incubated with Cy2-labeled AdLuc also demonstrated a significant interaction with adenovirus vectors. Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed vector internalization by neutrophils. The AdLuc-neutrophil interaction reduced vector transduction efficiency by more than 50% in coincubation assays in epithelium-derived cells. Adenovirus vector uptake by neutrophils occurred independently of coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) and capsid RGD motifs, since neutrophils do not express CAR and uptake of the RGD-deleted vector AdL.PB* was similar to that of AdLuc. Furthermore, both AdLuc and AdL.PB* activated neutrophils and induced similar degrees of L-selectin shedding. Neutrophil uptake of AdLuc was dependent on the presence of complement and antibodies, since the interaction between AdLuc and neutrophils was significantly reduced when they were incubated in immunoglobulin G-depleted or heat-inactivated human serum. Blocking of complement receptor 1 (CD35) but not complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) significantly reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc. Blocking of FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32), and FcγRIII (CD16) individually or together also reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc, although less than blocking of CD35 alone. Combined CR1 and Fc receptor blockade synergistically inhibited neutrophil-AdLuc interactions close to baseline. These results demonstrate opsonin-dependent adenovirus vector interactions with neutrophils and their corresponding receptors. PMID:16282462

  1. The Utility of a Tissue Slice Model System to Determine Breast Cancer Infectivity by Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Krista; Chu, Quyen D.; Curiel, David T.; Li, Benjamin D.L.; Mathis, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to advances in viral design, oncolytic adenoviruses have emerged as a promising approach for treatment of breast cancer. Tumor tissue slices offer a stringent model system for preclinical evaluation of adenovirus therapies, since the slices retain a morphology and phenotype that more closely resembles the in vivo setting than cell line cultures, and it has been shown to have utility in the evaluation of viral infectivity and replication. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of viral infection and replication using a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus. Methods Breast tumor tissue slices were infected with a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus, and a wild-type adenovirus for comparison. Efficiency of infection was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy, as the viruses used have been modified to express red fluorescent protein. Replication of the viruses was evaluated with quantitative real-time PCR to assay viral E4 genome copy number, a surrogate indicator for the number of virions. The breast tumor tissue slices were evaluated for the expression of CD46 expression by immunohistochemistry. Results Infection and replication of our tropism modified oncolytic virus has been observed in breast cancer tissue slice model system and is comparative to wild-type virus. A qualitative increase in the number of cells showing RFP expression was observed correlating with increasing multiplicity of infection. Higher relative infectivity of the virus was observed in tumor tissue compared with normal breast tissue. Replication of the virus was demonstrated through increases in E4 copy number at 48 and 72 hours after infection in human breast tumor slices. Conclusions We have shown that a tropism modified oncolytic oncolytic adenovirus can infect and replicate in breast cancer tissue slices, which may be an important preclinical indicator for its therapeutic utility. PMID:20691986

  2. Safety evaluation of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine live, oral in military recruits.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Azhar; Mathena, Julie; Albano, Jessica D; Yacovone, Margaret; Collins, Limone

    2016-08-31

    Before the widespread adoption of vaccination, adenovirus type 4 and type 7 were long associated with respiratory illnesses among military recruits. When supplies were depleted and vaccination was suspended in 1999 for approximately a decade, respiratory illnesses due to adenovirus infections resurged. In March 2011, a new live, oral adenovirus vaccine was licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and was first universally administered to military recruits in October 2011, leading to rapid, dramatic elimination of the disease within a few months. As part of licensure, a postmarketing study (Sentinel Surveillance Plan) was performed to detect potential safety signals within 42days after immunization of military recruits. This study retrospectively evaluated possible adverse events related to vaccination using data from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) database. Among 100,000 recruits who received the adenovirus vaccine, no statistically significant greater risk of prespecified medical events was observed within 42days after vaccination when compared with a historical cohort of 100,000 unvaccinated recruits. In an initial statistical analysis of International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, a statistically significant higher risk for 19 other (not prespecified) medical events occurring in 5 or more recruits was observed among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated groups. After case record data abstraction for attribution and validation, two events (psoriasis [21 vs 7 cases] and serum reactions [12 vs 4 cases]) occurred more frequently in the vaccinated cohort. A causal relation of these rare events with adenovirus vaccination could not be established given confounding factors in the DMSS, such as coadministration of other vaccines and incomplete or inaccurate medical information, for some recruits. Prospective surveillance assessing these uncommon, but potentially

  3. Intraductal Delivery of Adenoviruses Targets Pancreatic Tumors in Transgenic Ela-myc Mice and Orthotopic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan Miguel; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p<0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors. PMID:23328228

  4. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  5. Human adenovirus-host cell interactions: comparative study with members of subgroups B and C.

    PubMed Central

    Defer, C; Belin, M T; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Boulanger, P

    1990-01-01

    Host cell interactions of human adenovirus serotypes belonging to subgroups B (adenovirus type 3 [Ad3] and Ad7) and C (Ad2 and Ad5) were comparatively analyzed at three levels: (i) binding of virus particles with host cell receptors; (ii) cointernalization of macromolecules with adenovirions; and (iii) adenovirus-induced cytoskeletal alterations. The association constants with human cell receptors were found to be similar for Ad2 and Ad3 (8 x 10(9) to 9 x 10(9) M-1), and the number of receptor sites per cell ranged from 5,000 (Ad2) to 7,000 (Ad3). Affinity blottings, competition experiments, and immunofluorescence stainings suggested that the receptor sites for adenovirus were distinct for members of subgroups B and C. Adenovirions increased the permeability of cells to macromolecules. We showed that this global effect could be divided into two distinct events: (i) cointernalization of macromolecules and virions into endocytotic vesicles, a phenomenon that occurred in a serotype-independent way, and (ii) release of macromolecules into the cytoplasm upon adenovirus-induced lysis of endosomal membranes. The latter process was found to be type specific and to require unaltered and infectious virus particles of serotype 2 or 5. Perinuclear condensation of the vimentin filament network was observed at early stages of infection with Ad2 or Ad5 but not with Ad3, Ad7, and noninfectious particles of Ad2 or Ad5, obtained by heat inactivation of wild-type virions or with the H2 ts1 mutant. This phenomenon appeared to be a cytological marker for cytoplasmic transit of infectious virions within adenovirus-infected cells. It could be experimentally dissociated from vimentin proteolysis, which was found to be serotype dependent, occurring only with members of subgroup C, regardless of the infectivity of the input virus. Images PMID:2196380

  6. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses. PMID:15542689

  7. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  8. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  9. Application of a Fas Ligand Encoding a Recombinant Adenovirus Vector for Prolongation of Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huang-Ge; Bilbao, Guadalupe; Zhou, Tong; Contreras, Juan Luis; Gómez-Navarro, Jesús; Feng, Meizhen; Saito, Izumu; Mountz, John D.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    An adenovirus vector encoding murine Fas ligand (mFasL) under an inducible control was derived. In vivo ectopic expression of mFasL in murine livers induced an inflammatory cellular infiltration. Furthermore, ectopic expression of mFasL by myocytes did not allow prolonged vector-mediated transgene expression. Thus, ectopic expression of functional mFasL in vector-transduced cells does not appear to confer, by itself, an immunoprivileged site sufficient to mitigate adenovirus vector immunogenicity. PMID:9499110

  10. Sequence-independent autoregulation of the adenovirus type 5 E1A transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, P; Shenk, T

    1985-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene is known to be autoregulated at the level of transcription. Autoregulation was found to be mediated by products of the E1A 13S mRNA, which induced a fivefold increase in E1A transcription rate. Deletion analysis suggested that the autoregulation did not require any specific sequence in the E1A transcriptional control region. This conclusion was reinforced by the demonstration that a cellular alpha-globin gene substituted for the E1A gene on the adenovirus chromosome was also positively regulated by E1A gene products. Images PMID:2943984

  11. Characterization of transgenic mice containing adenovirus early region 3 genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fejer, G; Gyory, I; Tufariello, J; Horwitz, M S

    1994-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (Ad) contain a complex transcription region (E3) which codes for proteins that interact with several arms of the immune system. However, E3 genes are not essential for replication in tissue culture. An E3-encoded 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) glycoprotein (gp19K) binds to the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the endoplasmic reticulum and prevents MHC transport to the cell surface. Three other E3 proteins are involved in the inhibition of apoptosis by tumor necrosis factor alpha. The entire E3 genomic DNA was utilized to produce transgenic mice to study the effect of the E3 proteins on pathogenesis of various infectious agents and to investigate the in vivo synthesis and processing of the multiple E3 mRNAs and proteins. There was basal expression of the E3 promoter in the thymus, kidneys, uterus, and testes and at all levels of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, the E3 promoter of the transgene could be activated in some other organs, including the liver, by infection of these animals with an E3-deficient Ad (Ad7001) which contains a functional E1A region. Transactivation in vivo could also be demonstrated by infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. There appeared to be differential ratios of expression between several of the E3 mRNAs in transgenic lung fibroblasts and primary kidney cells cultured from the transgenic animals. This observation suggested that there was differential mRNA splicing that was organ specific. These transgenic animals should provide a useful model for studying the effects of the E3 proteins on the immune system and on diseases affected either by control of MHC or by selected functions of tumor necrosis factor that are inhibitable by Ad E3 proteins. Images PMID:8057467

  12. Identification of sites in adenovirus hexon for foreign peptide incorporation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongju; Han, Tie; Belousova, Natalya; Krasnykh, Victor; Kashentseva, Elena; Dmitriev, Igor; Kataram, Manjula; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T

    2005-03-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) is one of the most promising vectors for gene therapy applications. Genetic engineering of Ad5 capsid proteins has been employed to redirect vector tropism, to enhance infectivity, or to circumvent preexisting host immunity. As the most abundant capsid protein, hexon modification is particularly attractive. However, genetic modification of hexon often results in failure of rescuing viable viruses. Since hypervariable regions (HVRs) are nonconserved among hexons of different serotypes, we investigated whether the HVRs could be used for genetic modification of hexon by incorporating oligonucleotides encoding six histidine residues (His6) into different HVRs in the Ad5 genome. The modified viruses were successfully rescued, and the yields of viral production were similar to that of unmodified Ad5. A thermostability assay suggested the modified viruses were stable. The His6 epitopes were expressed in all modified hexon proteins as assessed by Western blotting assay, although the intensity of the reactive bands varied. In addition, we examined the binding activity of anti-His tag antibody to the intact virions with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found the His6 epitopes incorporated in HVR2 and HVR5 could bind to anti-His tag antibody. This suggested the His6 epitopes in HVR2 and HVR5 were exposed on virion surfaces. Finally, we examined the infectivities of the modified Ad vectors. The His6 epitopes did not affect the native infectivity of Ad5 vectors. In addition, the His6 epitopes did not appear to mediate His6-dependent viral infection, as assessed in two His6 artificial receptor systems. Our study provided valuable information for studies involving hexon modification. PMID:15731232

  13. Investigation of Adenovirus Occurrence in Pediatric Tumor Entities▿

    PubMed Central

    Kosulin, Karin; Haberler, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Amann, Gabriele; Lang, Susanna; Lion, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) contain genes coding for proteins with transforming potential, and certain AdV serotypes have been shown to induce tumors in rodents. However, data on the possible oncogenicity of AdVs in humans are scarce. We have therefore employed a real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) assay permitting highly sensitive detection of all 51 currently known human AdV serotypes to screen more than 500 tumor specimens derived from 17 different childhood cancer entities including leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. Most tumor entities analyzed showed no evidence for the presence of AdV sequences, but AdV DNA was detected by RQ-PCR in different brain tumors including 25/30 glioblastomas, 22/30 oligodendrogliomas, and 20/30 ependymomas. Nonmalignant counterparts of AdV-positive brain tumors, including specimens of ependymal cells, plexus choroideus, and periventricular white matter, were screened for control purposes and revealed the presence of AdV DNA in most specimens tested. Identification of the AdV types present in positive malignant and nonmalignant brain tissue specimens revealed predominantly representatives of species B and D and, less commonly, C. To exclude contamination as a possible cause of false-positive results, specimens with AdV sequences detectable by PCR were subsequently analyzed by in situ hybridization, which confirmed the PCR findings in all instances. The central nervous system appears to represent a common site of AdV infection with virus persistence, thus providing the first evidence for the possible contribution of AdVs to the multistep process of tumor pathogenesis in brain tissue. PMID:17494079

  14. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  15. Efficient infection of primitive hematopoietic stem cells by modified adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Yotnda, P; Onishi, H; Heslop, H E; Shayakhmetov, D; Lieber, A; Brenner, M; Davis, A

    2001-06-01

    Almost all studies of adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer have made use of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Unfortunately, Ad5 has been ineffective at infecting hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC). Chimeric Ad5/F35 vectors that have been engineered to substitute the shorter-shafted fiber protein from Ad35 can efficiently infect committed hematopoietic cells and we now show highly effective gene transfer to primitive progenitor subsets. An Ad5GFP and Ad5/F35GFP vector was added to CD34(+) and CD34(-)lineage(-) (lin(-)) HPC. Only 5-20% of CD34(+) and CD34(-)lin(-) cells expressed GFP after Ad5 exposure. In contrast, with the Ad5/F35 vector, 30-70% of the CD34(+), 50-70% of the CD34(-)lin(-) and up to 60% of the CD38(-) HPC expressed GFP and there was little evident cellular toxicity. Because of these improved results, we also analyzed the ability of Ad5/F35 virus to infect the hoechst negative 'side population' (SP) of marrow cells, which appear to be among the very earliest multipotent HPC. Between 51% and 80% of marrow SP cells expressed GFP. The infected populations retained their ability to form colonies in two short-term culture systems, with no loss of viability. We also studied the transfer and expression of immunomodulatory genes, CD40L (cell surface expression) and interleukin-2 (secreted). Both were expressed at immunomodulatory levels for >5 days. The ability of Ad5/F35 to deliver transgenes to primitive HPC with high efficiency and low toxicity in the absence of growth factors provides an improved means of studying the consequences of transient gene expression in these cells.

  16. Incorporation of porcine adenovirus 4 fiber protein enhances infectivity of adenovirus vector on dendritic cells: implications for immune-mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Ryan, Ivy; Kim, Julius; Kim, Sojung; Ak, Ferhat; Dodson, Lindzy; Colonna, Marco; Powell, Matthew; Mutch, David; Spitzer, Dirk; Hansen, Ted; Goedegebuure, Simon P; Curiel, David; Hawkins, William

    2015-01-01

    One strategy in cancer immunotherapy is to capitalize on the key immunoregulatory and antigen presenting capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs). This approach is dependent on efficient delivery of tumor specific antigens to DCs, which subsequently induce an anti-tumor T-cell mediated immune response. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5) has been used in human studies for gene delivery, but has limited infection in DCs, which lack the proper receptors. Addition of the porcine fiber knob (PK) from porcine adenovirus type 4 to HAdV5 allows the virus to deliver genetic material via binding to glycosylated surface proteins and bypasses the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor required by wild-type HAdV5. In this study we explored the potential therapeutic applications of an adenovirus with PK-based tropism against cancers expressing mesothelin. Infectivity and gene transfer assays were used to compare Ad5-PK to wild-type HAdV5. Mouse models were used to demonstrate peptide specificity and T-cell responses. We show that the PK modification highly augmented infection of DCs, including the CD141+ DC subset, a key subset for activation of naïve CD8+ T-cells. We also show that Ad5-PK increases DC infectivity and tumor specific antigen expression. Finally, vaccination of mice with the Ad5-PK vector resulted in enhanced T-cell-mediated interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release in response to both mesothelin peptide and a tumor line expressing mesothelin. Ad5-PK is a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy as it improves infectivity, gene transfer, protein expression, and subsequent T-cell activation in DCs compared to wild-type HAdV5 viruses.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  18. Infection by retroviral vectors outside of their host range in the presence of replication-defective adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R M; Wang, M; Steffen, D; Ledley, F D

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is normally limited to cells within a specific host range which express a cognate receptor that is recognized by the product of the env gene. We describe retrovirus infection of cells outside of their normal host range when the infection is performed in the presence of a replication-defective adenovirus (dl312). In the presence of adenovirus, several different ecotropic vectors are shown to infect human cell lines (HeLa and PLC/PRF), and a xenotropic vector is shown to infect murine cells (NIH 3T3). Infectivity is demonstrated by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) staining, selection with G418 for neomycin resistance, and PCR identification of the provirus in infected cells. Infectivity is quantitatively dependent upon both the concentration of adenovirus (10(6) to 10(8) PFU/ml) and the concentration of retrovirus. Infection requires the simultaneous presence of adenovirus in the retrovirus infection medium and is not stimulated by preincubation and removal of adenovirus from the cells before retrovirus infection. The presence of adenovirus is shown to enhance the uptake of fluorescently labeled retrovirus particles into cells outside of their normal host range, demonstrating that the adenovirus enhances viral entry into cells in the absence of the recognized cognate receptor. This observation suggests new opportunities for developing safe retroviral vectors for gene therapy and new mechanisms for the pathogenesis of retroviral disease. PMID:7853530

  19. Canine Adenovirus Vectors for Lung-Directed Gene Transfer: Efficacy, Immune Response, and Duration of Transgene Expression Using Helper-Dependent Vectors†

    PubMed Central

    Keriel, Anne; René, Céline; Galer, Chad; Zabner, Joseph; Kremer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    A major hurdle to the successful clinical use of some viral vectors relates to the innate, adaptive, and memory immune responses that limit the efficiency and duration of transgene expression. Some of these drawbacks may be circumvented by using vectors derived from nonhuman viruses such as canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2). Here, we evaluated the potential of CAV-2 vectors for gene transfer to the respiratory tract. We found that CAV-2 transduction was efficient in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract, and ex vivo in well-differentiated human pulmonary epithelia. Notably, the in vivo and ex vivo efficiency was poorly inhibited by sera from mice immunized with a human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5, a ubiquitous human pathogen) vector or by human sera containing HAd5 neutralizing antibodies. Following intranasal instillation in mice, CAV-2 vectors also led to a lower level of inflammatory cytokine secretion and cellular infiltration compared to HAd5 vectors. Moreover, CAV-2 transduction efficiency was increased in vitro in human pulmonary cells and in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract by FK228, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Finally, by using a helper-dependent CAV-2 vector, we increased the in vivo duration of transgene expression to at least 3 months in immunocompetent mice without immunosuppression. Our data suggest that CAV-2 vectors may be efficient and safe tools for long-term clinical gene transfer to the respiratory tract. PMID:16415025

  20. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  1. Transformation of Hamster Embryo Cells and Tumor Induction in Newborn Hamsters by Simian Adenovirus SV11

    PubMed Central

    Casto, Bruce C.

    1969-01-01

    Simian adenovirus, SV11, readily transformed hamster embryo cell cultures in vitro and produced tumors in vivo when inoculated into newborn hamsters. Foci consisting of small, loosely attached, rounded cells could be seen as early as 7 days postinoculation. Many of these cells contained several nuclei or the nucleus was multilobed. The cells grew without extensive cell to cell contact or formed small chains or clusters when passaged in vitro. This pattern of cell morphology and growth has not been reported with other simian or human adenovirus-transformed cells. Linearity of foci formation with virus dilution was observed when the virus multiplicity was less than 3 plaque-forming units (PFU)/cell. The PFU to focus-forming units ratio for SV11 was found to be 2 × 104 to 4 × 104, which is approximately 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold lower than those reported for simian adenovirus, SA7, and human adenovirus type 12, respectively. Cells transformed by SV11: (i) produced tumors when inoculated into young hamsters, (ii) contained tumor antigen which reacts with serum obtained from hamsters bearing SV11 passaged tumors, and (iii) could be propagated in vitro through an indefinite number of generations. Images PMID:5786181

  2. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV)...

  3. Evaluation of methods using celite to concentrate norovirus, adenovirus and enterovirus from wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteroviruses, noroviruses and adenoviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide. These viruses are shed in the feces of infected individuals and can accumulate in wastewater. Therefore, wastewater is a source of a potentially diverse group of enteric viru...

  4. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  5. Influence of Inorganic Ions and Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, influence of solution chemistries to the transport properties (aggregation and attachment behavior) of human adenovirus (HAdV) was investigated. Results showed isoelectric point (IEP) of HAdV in different salt conditions varied minimally, and it ranged from pH 3.5 ...

  6. Adenovirus Virus-Associated RNA Is Processed to Functional Interfering RNAs Involved in Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Oscar; Razquin, Nerea; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Fortes, Puri

    2006-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing allows sequence-specific control of gene expression. Specificity is guaranteed by small antisense RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Functional miRNAs derive from longer double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules that are cleaved to pre-miRNAs in the nucleus and are transported by exportin 5 (Exp 5) to the cytoplasm. Adenovirus-infected cells express virus-associated (VA) RNAs, which are dsRNA molecules similar in structure to pre-miRNAs. VA RNAs are also transported by Exp 5 to the cytoplasm, where they accumulate. Here we show that small RNAs derived from VA RNAs (svaRNAs), similar to miRNAs, can be found in adenovirus-infected cells. VA RNA processing to svaRNAs requires neither viral replication nor viral protein expression, as evidenced by the fact that svaRNA accumulation can be detected in cells transfected with VA sequences. svaRNAs are efficiently bound by Argonaute 2, the endonuclease of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and behave as functional siRNAs, in that they inhibit the expression of reporter genes with complementary sequences. Blocking svaRNA-mediated inhibition affects efficient adenovirus production, indicating that svaRNAs are required for virus viability. Thus, svaRNA-mediated silencing could represent a novel mechanism used by adenoviruses to control cellular or viral gene expression. PMID:16415015

  7. Relative transport of human adenovirus and MS2 in porous media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent enteric virus found in the water environment by numerous monitoring studies and MS2 is the most common surrogate used for previous virus transport studies. However, the current knowledge on the transport behavior of HAdV in porous med...

  8. Sequential and Simultaneous Applications of UV and Chlorine for Adenovirus Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Rattanakul, Surapong; Oguma, Kumiko; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Adenoviruses are water-borne human pathogens with high resistance to UV disinfection. Combination of UV treatment and chlorination could be an effective approach to deal with adenoviruses. In this study, human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) was challenged in a bench-scale experiment by separate applications of UV or chlorine and by combined applications of UV and chlorine in either a sequential or simultaneous manner. The treated samples were then propagated in human lung carcinoma epithelial cells to quantify the log inactivation of HAdV-5. When the processes were separate, a fluence of 100 mJ/cm(2) and a CT value of 0.02 mg min/L were required to achieve 2 log inactivation of HAdV-5 by UV disinfection and chlorination, respectively. Interestingly, synergistic effects on the HAdV-5 inactivation rates were found in the sequential process of chlorine followed by UV (Cl2-UV) (p < 0.05, ANCOVA) in comparison to the separate processes or the simultaneous application of UV/Cl2. This implies that a pretreatment with chlorine may increase the sensitivity of the virus to the subsequent UV disinfection. In conclusion, this study suggests that the combined application of UV and chlorine could be an effective measure against adenoviruses as a multi-barrier approach in water disinfection.

  9. Severe Infections with Human Adenovirus 7d in 2 Adults in Family, Illinois, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7d, a genomic variant with no reported circulation in the United States, was isolated from 2 adults with severe respiratory infections in Illinois. Molecular typing identified a close relationship with strains of the same genome type isolated from cases of respiratory disease in several provinces of China since 2009. PMID:26982199

  10. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer With an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Interleukin-12 in Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bortolanza, Sergia; Bunuales, Maria; Otano, Itziar; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Perez, Daniel; Prieto, Jesus; Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy resistant to most conventional and experimental therapies, including conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds). The incorporation of immunostimulatory genes such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) in these viruses may overcome some of their limitations, but evaluation of such vectors requires suitable preclinical models. We describe a CRAd in which replication is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activity and alterations of the pRB pathway in cancer cells. Transgenes (luciferase or IL-12) were incorporated into E3 region of the virus using a selective 6.7K/gp19K deletion. A novel permissive model of pancreatic cancer developed in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters was used for in vivo analysis. We show that, in contrast with nonreplicating adenoviruses (NR-Ad), active viral production and enhanced transgene expression took place in vivo. A single intratumor inoculation of the CRAd expressing IL-12 (Ad-DHscIL12) achieved a potent antitumor effect, whereas higher doses of replication-competent adenoviruses carrying luciferase did not. Compared to a standard NR-Ad expressing IL-12, Ad-DHscIL12 was less toxic in hamsters, with more selective tumor expression and shorter systemic exposure to the cytokine. We conclude that the expression of IL-12 in the context of a hypoxia-inducible oncolytic adenovirus is effective against pancreatic cancer in a relevant animal model. PMID:19223865

  11. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sarah R.; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  12. Severe Pediatric Adenovirus 7 Disease in Singapore Linked to Recent Outbreaks across Asia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oon-Tek; Thoon, Koh Cheng; Chua, Hui Ying; Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Chong, Chia Yin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Lin, Raymond Tzer Pin; Cui, Lin; Venkatachalam, Indumathi; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chew, Jonathan; Fong, Raymond Kok Choon; Oh, Helen May Lin; Krishnan, Prabha Unny; Lee, Vernon Jian Ming; Tan, Boon Huan; Ng, Sock Hoon; Ting, Pei Jun; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Khong, Wei Xin

    2015-07-01

    During November 2012-July 2013, a marked increase of adenovirus type 7 (Ad7) infections associated with severe disease was documented among pediatric patients in Singapore. Phylogenetic analysis revealed close genetic links with severe Ad7 outbreaks in China, Taiwan, and other parts of Asia.

  13. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sarah R; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  14. Crystallographic Structure of Porcine Adenovirus Type 4 Fiber Head and Galectin Domains▿

    PubMed Central

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Muñoz, Eva M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Kahn, Richard; Curiel, David T.; Glasgow, Joel N.; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus isolate NADC-1, a strain of porcine adenovirus type 4, has a fiber containing an N-terminal virus attachment region, shaft and head domains, and a C-terminal galectin domain connected to the head by an RGD-containing sequence. The crystal structure of the head domain is similar to previously solved adenovirus fiber head domains, but specific residues for binding the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), CD46, or sialic acid are not conserved. The structure of the galectin domain reveals an interaction interface between its two carbohydrate recognition domains, locating both sugar binding sites face to face. Sequence evidence suggests other tandem-repeat galectins have the same arrangement. We show that the galectin domain binds carbohydrates containing lactose and N-acetyl-lactosamine units, and we present structures of the galectin domain with lactose, N-acetyl-lactosamine, 3-aminopropyl-lacto-N-neotetraose, and 2-aminoethyl-tri(N-acetyl-lactosamine), confirming the domain as a bona fide galectin domain. PMID:20686025

  15. Adenovirus detection in Guthrie cards from paediatric leukaemia cases and controls

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, G M; Kang, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Schiffman, J D; Lorey, F; Buffler, P; Wiemels, J L

    2008-01-01

    Archived neonatal blood cards (Guthrie cards) from children who later contracted leukaemia and matched normal controls were assayed for adenovirus (AdV) C DNA content using two highly sensitive methods. In contrast to a previous report, AdV DNA was not detected at a higher frequency among neonates who later developed leukaemia, when compared with controls. PMID:19002185

  16. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  17. Requirements for Receptor Engagement during Infection by Adenovirus Complexed with Blood Coagulation Factor X

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Angela C.; Parker, Alan L.; Duffy, Margaret R.; Coughlan, Lynda; van Rooijen, Nico; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenoviruses from multiple species bind to coagulation factor X (FX), yet the importance of this interaction in adenovirus dissemination is unknown. Upon contact with blood, vectors based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) binds to FX via the hexon protein with nanomolar affinity, leading to selective uptake of the complex into the liver and spleen. The Ad5:FX complex putatively targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the specific requirements for Ad5:FX-mediated cellular uptake in this high-affinity pathway, specifically the HSPG receptor requirements as well as the role of penton base-mediated integrin engagement in subsequent internalisation. Removal of HS sidechains by enzymatic digestion or competition with highly-sulfated heparins/heparan sulfates significantly decreased FX-mediated Ad5 cell binding in vitro and ex vivo. Removal of N-linked and, in particular, O-linked sulfate groups significantly attenuated the inhibitory capabilities of heparin, while the chemical inhibition of endogenous HSPG sulfation dose-dependently reduced FX-mediated Ad5 cellular uptake. Unlike native heparin, modified heparins lacking O- or N-linked sulfate groups were unable to inhibit Ad5 accumulation in the liver 1h after intravascular administration of adenovirus. Similar results were observed in vitro using Ad5 vectors possessing mutations ablating CAR- and/or αv integrin binding, demonstrating that attachment of the Ad5:FX complex to the cell surface involves HSPG sulfation. Interestingly, Ad5 vectors ablated for αv integrin binding showed markedly delayed cell entry, highlighting the need for an efficient post-attachment internalisation signal for optimal Ad5 uptake and transport following surface binding mediated through FX. This study therefore integrates the established model of αv integrin-dependent adenoviral infection with the high-affinity FX-mediated pathway. This has important implications for mechanisms that define

  18. [Stability of the structure and antigenic determinants of adenovirus type 1 native hexon to proteases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E K; Khil'ko, S N; Grigor'ev, V G; Diachenko, N S; Vantsak, N P

    1986-08-01

    Hexon capsomers of human adenovirus type 1 (h1) labeled by iodine 125 were digested in a native state (trimers) by trypsin, chymotrypsin or papain, and the resulting hydrolysates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In each case, a discrete and temporally stable pattern of relatively large fragments was revealed. The degree of hexon polypeptide hydrolysis was maximal for papain, intermediate for chymotrypsin and minimal for trypsin, the largest fragments in the digest being 32, 40 and 80 kD, respectively. At room temperature, all the electrophoretically discernible hexon proteolytical fragments were held together in structures resembling intact hexon trimers and could be regarded as "hexon cores", of which papain hexon cores were the most stable during SDS-PAGE. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed a complete absence of native hexon antigenicity in thermodenaturated fragments of hexon protease digests, while native trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores could be precipitated by hexon-specific antibodies. The immunoprecipitated material contained all of the hexon fragments found in appropriate hexon cores and retained the structure of the original cores. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores were shown to possess at least part of native Ad h1 hexon antigenic determinants of each of the following specificities: species-specific (epsilon), cross-reactive with hexon of human adenoviruses (h3 and h6), simian adenovirus (sim 16), bovine adenoviruses (bos 3 and bos 7) and avian adenovirus (Aviadenovirus gal 1 or CELO). Thus, the full spectrum of known hexon antigenic determinants (species-specific to intergenus-crossreactive) is at least portly stable against protease attack of native hexon capsomers.

  19. The human membrane cofactor CD46 is a receptor for species B adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-05-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery.

  20. The Human Membrane Cofactor CD46 Is a Receptor for Species B Adenovirus Serotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R.; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F.; Greber, Urs F.; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-01-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:15078926

  1. The human membrane cofactor CD46 is a receptor for species B adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-05-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:15078926

  2. DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS ADENOVIRUS IN TERTIARY TREATED AND UV DISINFECTED WASTEWATER DURING A UV DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An infectious enteric adenovirus was isolated from urban wastewater receiving tertiary treatment and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of UV disinfection (low pressure, high intensity radiation) of total and fecal coliform bac...

  3. Accurate single-day titration of adenovirus vectors based on equivalence of protein VII nuclear dots and infectious particles.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Morral, Nuria; Engel, Daniel A

    2009-08-01

    Protein VII is an abundant component of adenovirus particles and is tightly associated with the viral DNA. It enters the nucleus along with the infecting viral genome and remains bound throughout early phase. Protein VII can be visualized by immunofluorescent staining as discrete dots in the infected cell nucleus. Comparison between protein VII staining and expression of the 72kDa DNA-binding protein revealed a one-to-one correspondence between protein VII dots and infectious viral genomes. A similar relationship was observed for a helper-dependent adenovirus vector expressing green fluorescent protein. This relationship allowed accurate titration of adenovirus preparations, including wild-type and helper-dependent vectors, using a 1-day immunofluorescence method. The method can be applied to any adenovirus vector and gives results equivalent to the standard plaque assay.

  4. Accurate single-day titration of adenovirus vectors based on equivalence of protein VII nuclear dots and infectious particles.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Morral, Nuria; Engel, Daniel A

    2009-08-01

    Protein VII is an abundant component of adenovirus particles and is tightly associated with the viral DNA. It enters the nucleus along with the infecting viral genome and remains bound throughout early phase. Protein VII can be visualized by immunofluorescent staining as discrete dots in the infected cell nucleus. Comparison between protein VII staining and expression of the 72kDa DNA-binding protein revealed a one-to-one correspondence between protein VII dots and infectious viral genomes. A similar relationship was observed for a helper-dependent adenovirus vector expressing green fluorescent protein. This relationship allowed accurate titration of adenovirus preparations, including wild-type and helper-dependent vectors, using a 1-day immunofluorescence method. The method can be applied to any adenovirus vector and gives results equivalent to the standard plaque assay. PMID:19406166

  5. 78 FR 3906 - Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Adenovirus-Based Controls and Calibrators for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Transfer of Genes to the Lung'', and US patent 6,136,594 (HHS Reference E-129-1991/1- US-03), issued... adenovirus vectors containing foreign DNA. Such vectors can be used for gene transfer, therapeutics,...

  6. Regulation of human adenovirus alternative RNA splicing by the adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K proteins.

    PubMed

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-28

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins.

  7. Combination of oncolytic adenovirus and endostatin inhibits human retinoblastoma in an in vivo mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiping; Wei, Fang; Li, Huiming; Ji, Xunda; Li, Shuxia; Chen, Xiafang

    2013-02-01

    There is a critical need for new paradigms in retinoblastoma (RB) treatment that would more efficiently inhibit tumor growth while sparing the vision of patients. Oncolytic adenoviruses with the ability to selectively replicate and kill tumor cells are a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy. Exploration of a novel targeting strategy for RB utilizing combined oncolytic adenovirus and anti-angiogenesis therapy was applied over the course of the current study with positive results. The oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 were constructed. The E1 region was regulated by the E2F-1 promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, respectively. Effects on both replication and promotion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression were observed in the replication-defective adenovirus Ad-EGFP in diverse cancer cell lines, HXO-RB44, Y79, Hep3B, NCIH460, MCF-7 and HLF. The cancer cell death induced by these agents was also explored. The in situ RB model demonstrated that mice with tumors treated with the oncolytic adenovirus and replication-defective adenovirus Ad-endostatin exhibited notable cancer cell death. This anticancer effect was further examined by stereo microscope, and the survival rate of experimental mice was determined. Both Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 replicated specifically in cancer cells in vitro and promoted EGFP expression in Ad-EGFP, although Ad-E2F1 p-E1A demonstrated superior EGFP promotion activity than Ad-TERT p-E1. In Hep3B, NCIH460 and MCF-7 cells, the number of Ad-TERT p-E1 copies was observed to exceed of the number of Ad-E2F1 p-E1A copies by a minimum of 10-fold. Furthermore, Ad-TERT p-E1 demonstrated significantly superior oncolytic effects in the RB mouse model, and Ad-endostatin effectively suppressed tumor growth and extended the overall lifespan of subjects; however, the Ad-E2F1 p-E1A was clearly less effective in attaining these goals. Most notably, the antitumor effect and

  8. Molecular epidemiological study of adenovirus infecting western lowland gorillas and humans in and around Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon).

    PubMed

    Nkogue, Chimène Nze; Horie, Masayuki; Fujita, Shiho; Ogino, Michiko; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mizukami, Keijiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Matsuu, Aya; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamato, Osamu; Ngomanda, Alfred; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-10-01

    Adenoviruses are widespread in human population as well as in great apes, although the data about the naturally occurring adenovirus infections remain rare. We conducted the surveillance of adenovirus infection in wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon), in order to investigate naturally occurring adenovirus in target gorillas and tested specifically a possible zoonotic transmission with local people inhabiting the vicinity of the park. Fecal samples were collected from western lowland gorillas and humans, and analyzed by PCR. We detected adenoviral genes in samples from both gorillas and the local people living around the national park, respectively: the overall prevalence rates of adenovirus were 24.1 and 35.0 % in gorillas and humans, respectively. Sequencing revealed that the adenoviruses detected in the gorillas were members of Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B), HAdV-C, or HAdV-E, and those in the humans belonged to HAdV-C or HAdV-D. Although HAdV-C members were detected in both gorillas and humans, phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus detected in gorillas are genetically distinct from those detected in humans. The HAdV-C constitutes a single host lineage which is compatible with the host-pathogen divergence. However, HAdV-B and HAdV-E are constituted by multiple host lineages. Moreover, there is no evidence of zoonotic transmission thus far. Since the gorilla-to-human transmission of adenovirus has been shown before, the current monitoring should be continued in a broader scale for getting more insights in the natural history of naturally occurring adenoviruses and for the safe management of gorillas' populations.

  9. Molecular epidemiological study of adenovirus infecting western lowland gorillas and humans in and around Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon).

    PubMed

    Nkogue, Chimène Nze; Horie, Masayuki; Fujita, Shiho; Ogino, Michiko; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mizukami, Keijiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Matsuu, Aya; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamato, Osamu; Ngomanda, Alfred; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-10-01

    Adenoviruses are widespread in human population as well as in great apes, although the data about the naturally occurring adenovirus infections remain rare. We conducted the surveillance of adenovirus infection in wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park (Gabon), in order to investigate naturally occurring adenovirus in target gorillas and tested specifically a possible zoonotic transmission with local people inhabiting the vicinity of the park. Fecal samples were collected from western lowland gorillas and humans, and analyzed by PCR. We detected adenoviral genes in samples from both gorillas and the local people living around the national park, respectively: the overall prevalence rates of adenovirus were 24.1 and 35.0 % in gorillas and humans, respectively. Sequencing revealed that the adenoviruses detected in the gorillas were members of Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B), HAdV-C, or HAdV-E, and those in the humans belonged to HAdV-C or HAdV-D. Although HAdV-C members were detected in both gorillas and humans, phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus detected in gorillas are genetically distinct from those detected in humans. The HAdV-C constitutes a single host lineage which is compatible with the host-pathogen divergence. However, HAdV-B and HAdV-E are constituted by multiple host lineages. Moreover, there is no evidence of zoonotic transmission thus far. Since the gorilla-to-human transmission of adenovirus has been shown before, the current monitoring should be continued in a broader scale for getting more insights in the natural history of naturally occurring adenoviruses and for the safe management of gorillas' populations. PMID:27290717

  10. Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Human Adenovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Tonsillar Lymphocytes Isolated from Patients Diagnosed with Tonsillar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Farzaneh; Sandström, Karl; Bondeson, Kåre; Laurell, Göran; Lidian, Adnan; Svensson, Catharina; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Surgically removed palatine tonsils provide a conveniently accessible source of T and B lymphocytes to study the interplay between foreign pathogens and the host immune system. In this study we have characterised the distribution of human adenovirus (HAdV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in purified tonsillar T and B cell-enriched fractions isolated from three patient age groups diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy and chronic/recurrent tonsillitis. HAdV DNA was detected in 93 out of 111 patients (84%), while EBV DNA was detected in 58 patients (52%). The most abundant adenovirus type was HAdV-5 (68%). None of the patients were positive for HCMV. Furthermore, 43 patients (39%) showed a co-infection of HAdV and EBV. The majority of young patients diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy were positive for HAdV, whereas all adult patients diagnosed with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis were positive for either HAdV or EBV. Most of the tonsils from patients diagnosed with either tonsillar hypertrophy or chronic/recurrent tonsillitis showed a higher HAdV DNA copy number in T compared to B cell-enriched fraction. Interestingly, in the majority of the tonsils from patients with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis HAdV DNA was detected in T cells only, whereas hypertrophic tonsils demonstrated HAdV DNA in both T and B cell-enriched fractions. In contrast, the majority of EBV positive tonsils revealed a preference for EBV DNA accumulation in the B cell-enriched fraction compared to T cell fraction irrespective of the patients' age. PMID:27136093

  11. Incidence of Norwalk-like viruses, rotavirus and adenovirus infection in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Subekti, D; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P; Safari, N; Frazier, E; Simanjuntak, C; Komalarini, S; Taslim, J; Campbell, J R; Oyofo, B A

    2002-03-25

    Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs), rotavirus and adenovirus are reportedly responsible from 4 to 42% of non-bacterial acute sporadic gastroenteritis. The incidence of NLVs, adenovirus and rotavirus infections in Indonesia is unclear. A total of 402 symptomatic cases from Indonesian patients with acute gastroenteritis and 102 asymptomatic controls that tested negative for bacteria and parasites were screened for the presence of NLVs, rotavirus and adenovirus using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Rotaclone kits and Adenoclone kits. Specific prototype probes were used to ascertain which NLV prototypes were present in the area. NLVs were detected in 45/218 (21%), rotavirus was detected in 170/402 (42%) and adenovirus was detected in 11/273 (4%) samples examined. Genetic analysis of the RT-PCR products using specific prototype probes for NLVs indicated that the prototypes were 42% Taunton agent and 58% Hawaii/Snow Mountain agent. Comparative data on patients showed that the incidence of rotavirus infections was two times greater than the NLVs infections, and that adenovirus infections were the least prevalent. All of the control samples tested were negative for NLVs and adenoviruses, however 8/70 (11%) of the samples were positive for rotaviruses. The high incidence of enteric viral-related infections is a threat among acute diarrheic patients in Jakarta, Indonesia. PMID:11985965

  12. Viral pollution in the environment and in shellfish: human adenovirus detection by PCR as an index of human viruses.

    PubMed

    Pina, S; Puig, M; Lucena, F; Jofre, J; Girones, R

    1998-09-01

    A study of the presence of human viruses (adenoviruses, enteroviruses, and hepatitis A viruses [HAVs]) in environmental and shellfish samples was carried out by applying DNA and cDNA amplification techniques by PCR. The detection of human adenoviruses by PCR was also examined as a potential molecular test to monitor viral pollution. The samples studied were urban and slaughterhouse sewage, river water, seawater, and shellfish. Enteroviruses were quantified by PFU in Buffalo green monkey kidney cells and fecal coliforms and phages of Bacteroides fragilis HSP40 were also evaluated in some of the samples. The amplification of viral DNA and cDNA has shown a high prevalence of human viruses that would not be detected by the use of classical techniques, such as the quantification of PFU in cell lines. The results of the analysis of slaughterhouse sewage samples together with the test of farm animal feces indicate that the adenoviruses and the HAVs detected in the environment are mostly of human origin. A significative correlation between the detection of human viruses by PCR and the values of bacteriophages of B. fragilis HSP40 in urban raw sewage was observed. Human adenoviruses were the viruses most frequently detected throughout the year, and all the samples that were positive for enteroviruses or HAVs were also positive for human adenoviruses. The results suggest that the detection of adenoviruses by PCR could be used as an index of the presence of human viruses in the environment where a molecular index is acceptable.

  13. Late Mitochondrial Acquisition, Really?

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely critique of a recent Nature paper by Pittis and Gabaldón that has suggested a late origin of mitochondria in eukaryote evolution. It shows that the inferred ancestry of many mitochondrial proteins has been incorrectly assigned by Pittis and Gabaldón to bacteria other than the aerobic proteobacteria from which the ancestor of mitochondria originates, thereby questioning the validity of their suggestion that mitochondrial acquisition may be a late event in eukaryote evolution. The analysis and approach presented here may guide future studies to resolve the true ancestry of mitochondria. PMID:27289097

  14. The generation and analyses of a novel combination of recombinant adenovirus vaccines targeting three tumor antigens as an immunotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Tsang, Kwong Yok; Palena, Claudia; David, Justin M.; Fantini, Massimo; Kwilas, Anna; Rice, Adrian E.; Latchman, Yvette; Hodge, James W.; Gulley, James L.; Madan, Ravi A.; Heery, Christopher R.; Balint, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of human carcinoma lesions, including heterogeneity in expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), is a well-established phenomenon. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MUC1, and brachyury are diverse TAAs, each of which is expressed on a wide range of human tumors. We have previously reported on a novel adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector gene delivery platform (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]) in which regions of the early 1 (E1), early 2 (E2b), and early 3 (E3) genes have been deleted. The unique deletions in this platform result in a dramatic decrease in late gene expression, leading to a marked reduction in host immune response to the vector. Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA vaccine (ETBX-011) has been employed in clinical studies as an active vaccine to induce immune responses to CEA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We report here the development of novel recombinant Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-brachyury and-MUC1 vaccine constructs, each capable of activating antigen-specific human T cells in vitro and inducing antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccinated mice. We also describe the use of a combination of the three vaccines (designated Tri-Ad5) of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA, Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-brachyury and Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-MUC1, and demonstrate that there is minimal to no “antigenic competition” in in vitro studies of human dendritic cells, or in murine vaccination studies. The studies reported herein support the rationale for the application of Tri-Ad5 as a therapeutic modality to induce immune responses to a diverse range of human TAAs for potential clinical studies. PMID:26374823

  15. Lateness to School Remediation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugwuegbulam, Charles N.; Ibrahim, Haj. Naheed

    2015-01-01

    Primary and secondary school in Nigeria encourage punctuality to school yet a good number of the learners came late to school. This is especially true in the case of day students. Learners who come late to school are usually punished in one way or the other yet the lateness to school phenomenon still persist. Lateness to school behaviour affects…

  16. Molecular identification of adenovirus sequences: a rapid scheme for early typing of human adenoviruses in diagnostic samples of immunocompetent and immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Wölfel, Roman; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2006-09-01

    Precise typing of human adenoviruses (HAdV) is fundamental for epidemiology and the detection of infection chains. As only few of the 51 adenovirus types are associated with life- threatening disseminated diseases in immunodeficient patients, detection of one of these types may have prognostic value and lead to immediate therapeutic intervention. A recently published molecular typing scheme consisting of two steps (sequencing of a generic PCR product closely adjacent to loop 1 of the main neutralization determinant epsilon, and for species HAdV-B, -C, and -D the sequencing of loop 2 [Madisch et al., 2005]) was applied to 119 clinical samples. HAdV DNA was typed unequivocally even in cases of culture negative samples, for example in immunodeficient patients before HAdV causes high virus loads and disseminated disease. Direct typing results demonstrated the predominance of HAdV-1, -2, -5, and -31 in immunodeficient patients suggesting the significance of the persistence of these viruses for the pathogenesis of disseminated disease. In contrast, HAdV-3 predominated in immunocompetent patients and cocirculation of four subtypes was demonstrated. Typing of samples from a conjunctivitis outbreak in multiple military barracks demonstrated various HAdV types (2, 4, 8, 19) and not the suspected unique adenovirus etiology. This suggests that our molecular typing scheme will be also useful for epidemiological investigations. In conclusion, our two-step molecular typing system will permit the precise and rapid typing of clinical HAdV isolates and even of HAdV DNA in clinical samples without the need of time-consuming virus isolation prior to typing.

  17. Risk factors for molecular detection of adenovirus in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Watson, Theresa; MacDonald, David; Song, Xiaoyan; Bromwich, Kira; Campos, Joseph; Sande, Jane; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2012-08-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the use of molecular AdV testing in HSCT at our institution and identify risk factors for AdV viremia and disease, we performed a retrospective cohort study of all HSCT recipients who had undergone AdV polymerase chain reaction testing over a 2-year period. Two cohorts were identified: cohort 1, comprising patients testing positive for AdV (n = 7) and cohort 2, comprising patients testing negative (n = 36). Overall patient characteristics were not statistically significantly different between the 2 cohorts. A comparison of cohort 1 and cohort 2 identified the following medication exposures as risk factors influencing AdV status: preparatory regimens using fludarabine (relative risk [RR], 8.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-64.27; P = .006), melphalan (RR, 3.47; 95% CI, 0.76-15.94: P = .08), and/or cyclophosphamide (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.02-1.4; P = .05), and GVHD prophylaxis with methylprednisone (RR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.01-13.9; P = .04). AdV-positive patients had higher grades of GVHD and higher rates of GVHD of the gastrointestinal tract (RR, 4; 95% CI, 1.18-13.5; P = .03) compared with AdV-negative patients. Four of the 7 AdV-positive patients had concomitant clinical manifestations of disease, including pneumonia, diarrhea, and/or disseminated disease. Clinical outcomes in symptomatic patients included resolution of disease in 2 patients and death in 2 patients. All 7 AdV-positive patients received antiviral therapy, including 1 patient with severe disseminated disease that resolved after administration of liposomal cidofovir. Our study at a large pediatric HSCT center provides important preliminary data for the development of a prospective trial destined to identify specific HCST patient subpopulations that might benefit most from molecular screening and early preemptive therapy. PMID:22281300

  18. Detection of human adenoviruses in organic fresh produce using molecular and cell culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Marti, Elisabet; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of organic fresh produce has increased in recent years due to consumer demand for healthy foods without chemical additives. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has also increased. Contamination of food with enteric viruses is a major concern because the viruses have a low infectious dose and high persistence in the environment. Human adenovirus (HAdV) has been proposed as a good marker of faecal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the plaque assay (PA), real time PCR (qPCR) and integrated cell culture-RT-qPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) for the recovery of HAdV from artificially and naturally contaminated fresh produce. Organic lettuce, strawberries and green onions were selected because these fresh products are frequently associated with foodborne outbreaks. The virus extraction efficiencies from artificially contaminated samples varied from 2.8% to 32.8% depending on the food matrix and the quantification method used. Although the HAdV recoveries determined by qPCR were higher than those determined by PA and ICC-RT-qPCR, PA was defined as the most reproducible method. The qPCR assays were more sensitive than the PA and ICC-RT-qPCR assays; however, this technique alone did not provide information about the viability of the pathogen. ICC-RT-qPCR was more sensitive than PA for detecting infectious particles in fresh produce samples. HAdV genome copies were detected in 93.3% of the analysed naturally contaminated samples, attesting to the common faecal contamination of the fresh produce tested. However, only 33.3% of the total samples were positive for infectious HAdV particles based on ICC-RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this study reported that HAdV can be an efficient viral marker for fresh produce contamination. Good detection of infectious HAdV was obtained with the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays. Thus, we suggest that the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays should be considered when quantitative

  19. Detection of human adenoviruses in organic fresh produce using molecular and cell culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Marti, Elisabet; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of organic fresh produce has increased in recent years due to consumer demand for healthy foods without chemical additives. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has also increased. Contamination of food with enteric viruses is a major concern because the viruses have a low infectious dose and high persistence in the environment. Human adenovirus (HAdV) has been proposed as a good marker of faecal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the plaque assay (PA), real time PCR (qPCR) and integrated cell culture-RT-qPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) for the recovery of HAdV from artificially and naturally contaminated fresh produce. Organic lettuce, strawberries and green onions were selected because these fresh products are frequently associated with foodborne outbreaks. The virus extraction efficiencies from artificially contaminated samples varied from 2.8% to 32.8% depending on the food matrix and the quantification method used. Although the HAdV recoveries determined by qPCR were higher than those determined by PA and ICC-RT-qPCR, PA was defined as the most reproducible method. The qPCR assays were more sensitive than the PA and ICC-RT-qPCR assays; however, this technique alone did not provide information about the viability of the pathogen. ICC-RT-qPCR was more sensitive than PA for detecting infectious particles in fresh produce samples. HAdV genome copies were detected in 93.3% of the analysed naturally contaminated samples, attesting to the common faecal contamination of the fresh produce tested. However, only 33.3% of the total samples were positive for infectious HAdV particles based on ICC-RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this study reported that HAdV can be an efficient viral marker for fresh produce contamination. Good detection of infectious HAdV was obtained with the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays. Thus, we suggest that the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays should be considered when quantitative

  20. Identification and purification of a protein encoded by the human adenovirus type 2 transforming region.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Matsuo, T

    1982-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) transforming genes are located in early regions E1a (map position 1.3 to 4.5) and E1b (map position 4.6 to 11.2). We have identified and purified to near homogeneity a major 20,000-molecular-weight (20K) protein and have shown that it is coded by E1b. Using an Ad2-transformed cell antiserum which contained antibody to E1b-coded proteins, we immunoprecipitated 53K and 19K proteins from the nucleoplasm and 53K, 19K, and 20K proteins from the cytoplasmic S-100 fraction of Ad2 productively infected and Ad2-transformed cells. The 19K protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, whereas the 20K protein was found only in the cytoplasm. The 53K and 19K proteins are known Ad2 E1b-coded proteins. The 20K protein was purified to near homogeneity in 20 to 50% yields by sequential DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified 20K protein shares most of its methionine-labeled tryptic peptides with E1b-53K, as shown by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and therefore is closely related to the 53K protein. The 19K protein does not appear to share tryptic peptides with either 20K or 53K protein. To provide more direct evidence that 20K protein is virus-coded, we translated E1b-specific mRNA in vitro. Both immunoprecipitation analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the translated product identified a 20K protein that has the same tryptic peptides as the 20K protein isolated from infected and from transformed cells. These findings suggest that the Ad2 20K protein is a primary translation product of an Ad2 E1b mRNA. Images PMID:7045392

  1. Identification and purification of a protein encoded by the human adenovirus type 2 transforming region.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Cartas, M A; Matsuo, T

    1982-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) transforming genes are located in early regions E1a (map position 1.3 to 4.5) and E1b (map position 4.6 to 11.2). We have identified and purified to near homogeneity a major 20,000-molecular-weight (20K) protein and have shown that it is coded by E1b. Using an Ad2-transformed cell antiserum which contained antibody to E1b-coded proteins, we immunoprecipitated 53K and 19K proteins from the nucleoplasm and 53K, 19K, and 20K proteins from the cytoplasmic S-100 fraction of Ad2 productively infected and Ad2-transformed cells. The 19K protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, whereas the 20K protein was found only in the cytoplasm. The 53K and 19K proteins are known Ad2 E1b-coded proteins. The 20K protein was purified to near homogeneity in 20 to 50% yields by sequential DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified 20K protein shares most of its methionine-labeled tryptic peptides with E1b-53K, as shown by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and therefore is closely related to the 53K protein. The 19K protein does not appear to share tryptic peptides with either 20K or 53K protein. To provide more direct evidence that 20K protein is virus-coded, we translated E1b-specific mRNA in vitro. Both immunoprecipitation analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the translated product identified a 20K protein that has the same tryptic peptides as the 20K protein isolated from infected and from transformed cells. These findings suggest that the Ad2 20K protein is a primary translation product of an Ad2 E1b mRNA.

  2. Establishment and characterization of hamster cell lines transformed by restriction endonuclease fragments of adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, D T; Branton, P E; Yee, S P; Bacchetti, S; Graham, F L

    1984-01-01

    We have established a library of hamster cells transformed by adenovirus 5 DNA fragments comprising all (XhoI-C, 0 to 16 map units) or only a part (HindIII-G, 0 to 7.8 map units) of early region 1 (E1: 0 to 11.2 map units). These lines have been analyzed in terms of content of viral DNA, expression of E1 antigens, and capacity to induce tumors in hamsters. All cells tested were found to express up to eight proteins encoded within E1A (0 to 4.5 map units) with apparent molecular weights between 52,000 (52K) and 25K. Both G and C fragment-transformed lines expressed a 19K antigen encoded within E1B (4.5 to 11.2 map units), whereas an E1B 58K protein was detected in C fragment-transformed, but not G-fragment-transformed, lines. No clear distinction could be drawn between cells transformed by HindIII-G and by XhoI-C in terms of morphology or tumorigenicity, suggesting that the E1B 58K antigen plays no major role in the maintenance of oncogenic transformation, although possible involvement of truncated forms of 58K cannot be ruled out. Sera were collected from tumor-bearing animals and examined for ability to immunoprecipitate proteins from infected cells. The relative avidity of sera for different proteins was characteristic of the cell line used for tumor induction, and the specificity generally reflected the array of viral proteins expressed by the corresponding transformed cells. However, one notable observation was that even though all transformed lines examined expressed antigens encoded by both the 1.1- and 0.9-kilobase mRNAs transcribed from E1A, tumor sera made against these lines only precipitated products of the 1.1-kilobase message. Thus, two families of E1A proteins, highly related in terms of primary amino acid sequence, appear to be immunologically quite distinct. Images PMID:6690708

  3. Influence of various parameters on benzo(a)pyrene enhancement of adenovirus SA7 transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lubet, R.A.; Nims, R.W.; Kiss, E.; Kouri, R.E.; Putman, D.L.; Schechtman, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Several of the major variable factors in the Syrian hamster embryo/simian adenovirus SA7 (SHE/SA7) viral enhancement assay were identified and the effects of these parameters on assay sensitivity were assessed. The extent of dose-dependent cytotoxicity and enhancement of SA7 transformation of primary SHE target cells by benzo(a)pyrene was examined through analysis of data obtained from 37 assays performed over a 2-year period. The variables analyzed for contribution to assay sensitivity included (a) the number of SA7-induced transformed SHE cell foci enumerated in ten replicate dishes in the negative control condition (background focus count) (range: 26-139); (b) the age of the SHE cell cultures at the time of exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (range: 72-144 hr postseeding); and (c) the source of the pregnant hamsters used to prepare the primary SHE cells (Wilmington colony vs Lakeview colony, Charles River Laboratories, Inc., Wilmington, MA). The benzo(a)pyrene-induced cytotoxicity and enhancement of SA7 transformation responses were found to be independent of each of these variables, within the range of values tested.

  4. Adenovirus-Mediated Over-Expression of Nrf2 Within Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Protected Rats Against Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in the field of cell therapy have led to a renewed interest in treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the early death of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in stressful microenvironment of a recipient tissue is a major problem with this kind of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of a cytoprotective factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), in MSCs could protect rats against AKI. Methods: The Nrf2 was overexpressed in MSCs by recombinant adenoviruses, and the MSCs were implanted to rats suffering from cisplatin-induced AKI. Results: The obtained results showed that transplantation with the engineered MSCs ameliorates cisplatin-induced AKI. Morphologic features of the investigated kidneys showed that transplantation with the MSCs in which Nrf2 had been overexpressed significantly improved the complications of AKI. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the engineered MSCs might be a good candidate to be further evaluated in clinical trials. However, detailed studies must be performed to investigate the possible carcinogenic effect of Nrf2 overexpression. PMID:26236658

  5. Induction of Shock After Intravenous Injection of Adenovirus Vectors: A Critical Role for Platelet-activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhili; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Tian, Jie; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Innate immune responses are a major barrier to safe systemic gene therapy with adenovirus (Ad) vectors. We show that intravenous (IV) injection of rats with Ad5 vectors causes a novel rapid shock reaction that involves hypotension, hemoconcentration, tissue edema, and vasocongestion, with notable pathology in the pancreas and the gastrointestinal system. We show for the first time that this reaction is dependent on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid signaling molecule that is a known shock inducer. Ad upregulated PAF within 5 minutes in vivo, and antagonists of the PAF receptor were able to prevent Ad-induced shock. Ad upregulated PAF via the reticuloendothelial system (RES), because splenectomy or depletion of phagocytes blocked the ability of Ad to induce both PAF and shock. Rats were considerably more sensitive to Ad-induced shock than were mice, but PAF mediated shock in both species. Other Ad-induced innate immune responses such as cytokine induction and thrombocytopenia were not mediated by PAF. In summary, systemic IV injection of Ad stimulates the RES to upregulate PAF within a matter of minutes, which results in shock. The identification of this novel pathway suggests strategies to improve the safety of systemic gene therapy with Ad vectors. PMID:19953082

  6. The oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD in combination with cisplatin exerts a potent anti-osteosarcoma activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Velez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Jauregui, Patricia; Zalacain, Marta; Marrodan, Lucía; Zandueta, Carolina; Vera, Beatriz; Urquiza, Leire; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Julián, Mikel San; Toledo, Gemma; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Torre, Wensceslao; Lecanda, Fernando; Patiño-García, Ana; Alonso, Marta M

    2014-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The presence of metastases and the lack of response to conventional treatment are the major adverse prognostic factors. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment strategies that overcome both of these problems. Our purpose was to elucidate whether the use of the oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy would be effective, in vitro and in vivo, against osteosarcoma. Our results showed that Δ24-RGD exerted a potent antitumor effect against osteosarcoma cell lines that was increased by the addition of cisplatin. Δ24-RGD osteosarcoma treatment resulted in autophagy in vitro that was further enhanced when combined with cisplatin. Of importance, administration of Δ24-RGD and/or cisplatin, in novel orthotopic and two lung metastatic models in vivo resulted in a significant reduction of tumor burden meanwhile maintaining a safe toxicity profile. Together, our data underscore the potential of Δ24-RGD to become a realistic therapeutic option for primary and metastatic pediatric osteosarcoma. Moreover, this study warrants a future clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Δ24-RGD for this devastating disease. PMID:24737304

  7. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  8. Adenovirus Capsid-Based Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Prevents Cocaine from Binding to the Nonhuman Primate CNS Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [11C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in nonhuman primates. Repeat administration of dAd5GNE induced high anti-cocaine titers. Before vaccination, cocaine displaced PE2I from DAT in the caudate and putamen, resulting in 62±4% cocaine occupancy. In contrast, dAd5GNE-vaccinated animals showed reduced cocaine occupancy such that when anti-cocaine titers were >4 × 105, the cocaine occupancy was reduced to levels of <20%, significantly below the 47% threshold required to evoke the subjective ‘high' reported in humans. PMID:23660705

  9. TG1042 (Adenovirus-interferon-γ) in Primary Cutaneous B-cell Lymphomas: A Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dreno, Brigitte; Urosevic-Maiwald, Mirjana; Kim, Youn; Guitart, Joan; Duvic, Madeleine; Dereure, Olivier; Khammari, Amir; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Derbij, Anna; Lusky, Monika; Didillon, Isabelle; Santoni, Anne-Marie; Acres, Bruce; Bataille, Vincent; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Bleuzen, Pascal; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Dummer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Rational While a variety of registered therapies exist for Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma, no such therapy is available for Cutaneous B Cell Thera