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Sample records for adenylate cyclase stimulation

  1. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  2. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  3. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  4. Sweet tastants stimulate adenylate cyclase coupled to GTP-binding protein in rat tongue membranes.

    PubMed

    Striem, B J; Pace, U; Zehavi, U; Naim, M; Lancet, D

    1989-05-15

    Sucrose and other saccharides, which produce an appealing taste in rats, were found to significantly stimulate the activity of adenylate cyclase in membranes derived from the anterior-dorsal region of rat tongue. In control membranes derived from either tongue muscle or tongue non-sensory epithelium, the effect of sugars on adenylate cyclase activity was either much smaller or absent. Sucrose enhanced adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-related manner, and this activation was dependent on the presence of guanine nucleotides, suggesting the involvement of a GTP-binding protein ('G-protein'). The activation of adenylate cyclase by various mono- and di-saccharides correlated with their electrophysiological potency. Among non-sugar sweeteners, sodium saccharin activated the enzyme, whereas aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone did not, in correlation with their sweet-taste effectiveness in the rat. Sucrose activation of the enzyme was partly inhibited by Cu2+ and Zn2+, in agreement with their effect on electrophysiological sweet-taste responses. Our results are consistent with a sweet-taste transduction mechanism involving specific receptors, a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein and the cyclic AMP-generating enzyme adenylate cyclase.

  5. Stimulation of intestinal mucosal adenyl cyclase by cholera enterotoxin and prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Daniel V.; Field, Michael; Johnson, Judith; Henderson, Antonia; Gershon, Elaine

    1971-01-01

    The effects of several prostaglandins (PG) and a highly purified preparation of cholera enterotoxin (CT) on intestinal mucosal adenyl cyclase activity and the effect of CT on intestinal mucosal cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate concentration were determined in guinea pig and rabbit small intestine and were correlated with the effects of the same agents on ion transport. Adenyl cyclase activity, measured in a crude membrane fraction of the mucosa, was found at all levels of the small intestine with the highest activity per milligram protein in the duodenum. The prostaglandins, when added directly to the assay, increased adenyl cyclase activity; the greatest effect (2-fold increase) was obtained with PGE1 (maximal effect at 0.03 mM) and PGE2. The prostaglandins also increased short-circuit current (SCC) in isolated guinea pig ileal mucosa, with PGE1 and PGE2 again giving the greatest effects. The prior addition of theophylline (10 mM) reduced the subsequent SCC response to PGE1 and vice versa. It was concluded, therefore, that the SCC response to PGE1, like the response to theophylline, represented active Cl secretion. CT increased adenyl cyclase activity in guinea pig and rabbit ileal mucosa when preincubated with the mucosa from 1 to 2.5 hr in vitro or for 2.5 hr in vivo but not when added directly to the assay. The increments in activity caused by PGE1 and NaF were the same in CT-treated and control mucosa. Cyclic 3′,5′-AMP concentration in rabbit ileal mucosa was increased 3.5-fold after a 2 hr preincubation with CT in vitro. Phosphodiesterase activity in the crude membrane fraction of the mucosa was unaffected by either CT or PGE1. A variety of other agents including insulin, glucagon, parathormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, L-thyroxine, thyrocalcitonin, vasopressin, and epinephrine all failed to change adenyl cyclase activity. It is concluded that CT and certain prostaglandins produce small intestinal fluid secretion by increasing mucosal adenyl

  6. Endotoxic lipopolysaccharides stimulate steroidogenesis and adenylate cyclase in adrenal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J; Cook, G H

    1975-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcesens and Salmonella typhosa stimulated steroid production in Y-1 adrenal tumor cells in culture with a latent period of 3-4 h. Lipid A, derived from Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, also stimulated steroidogenesis. Lipopolysaccharides and lipid A also stimulate adenylate cyclase activity and cause rounding of the cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharides do not stimulate steroidogenesis in receptor-deficient adrenal tumor cells (OS-3) or Leydig tumor cells (I-10). This tends to rule out contamination by enterotoxin to which these lines respond. Although both hormone and lipopolysaccharide responses are lost in these lines, there was no interaction between these sites as judged by the failure of lipopolysaccharides to block, during their latency, the response to corticotropin in Y-1 cells. The possibility that the lipopolysaccharide effect is one on membrane conformation is discussed.

  7. Characterization of the dopamine stimulated adenylate cyclase in the pedal ganglia of Mytilus edulis: interactions with etorphine, beta-endorphin, DALA, and methionine enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Catapane, E J; Kream, R M

    1981-03-01

    The dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was studied both in vivo and in vitro in the central nervous system of the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis. Dopamine, epinine, and apomorphine stimulated the enzyme system. Fluphenazine, haloperidol, chlorpromaxine, and to a lesser extent BOL inhibited the dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Etorphine, beta-endorphine, DALA, and methionine enkephalin depressed cyclic AMP levels. This phenomena was naloxone reversible. In addition, the opioids inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine. This phenomena was also naloxone reversible. The study demonstrates an interaction among dopamine, the opioids, and cyclic AMP. PMID:6286125

  8. Reduced basal and stimulated (isoprenaline, Gpp(NH)p, forskolin) adenylate cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease correlated with histopathological changes.

    PubMed

    Ohm, T G; Bohl, J; Lemmer, B

    1991-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an adenylate cyclase borne second messenger involved in basic metabolic events. The beta-adrenoceptor sensitive adenylate cyclase was studied in post-mortem hippocampi of controls and Alzheimer patients. Virtually identical subsets of each hippocampus homogenate were stimulated by 100 mumol isoprenaline, Gpp(NH)p and forskolin, respectively, in presence of an ATP-regenerating system. The determination of cAMP formed was carried out by means of a radioassay. The observed significant 50% reduction in basal as well as in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease is negatively correlated with semiquantitative evaluations of amyloid plaques (P less than 0.05) but not with neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles or neuropil threads. This reduction in enzyme activity is obviously not due to simple cell loss alone. It is likely that the crucial point of the observed functional disturbance is at the level of the catalytic unit of the adenylate cyclase, since the same degree of reduction is maintained at all steps of the signal cascade. PMID:2054615

  9. Persistent stimulation of adenylate cyclase and urea transport by an AVP photolabel

    SciTech Connect

    Eggena, P.; Ma, C.L.; Fahrenholz, F.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a photoaffinity label for arginine vasopressin receptors, (Phe2, Phe(p-N3)3)AVP (N3-AVP), on urea permeability and adenylate cyclase activity have been investigated in the toad urinary bladder. This compound, when activated by ultraviolet light, induced a maximal and persistent increase in the urea permeability of the intact bladder and a persistent increase in the adenylate cyclase activity of toad bladder epithelial cell homogenates. Covalent attachment of the analogue to target tissue during photolysis was equivalent at 4 and 20 degrees C. Bladders exposed to N3-AVP in the presence of AVP during photolysis were substantially less permeable to urea than controls that had been exposed to N3-AVP alone. These findings constitute further evidence in support of the previous suggestion that N3-AVP binds covalently to AVP receptors and, in addition, demonstrates that N3-AVP evokes a persistent increase in adenylate cyclase activity which, in turn, triggers a persistent increase in bladder permeability to urea.

  10. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  11. Adenyl cyclase and interleukin 6 are downstream effectors of parathyroid hormone resulting in stimulation of bone resorption.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, E M; Shaw, S M; Gornik, S A; Banks, M A

    1995-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone and other bone resorptive agents function, at least in part, by inducing osteoblasts to secrete cytokines that stimulate both differentiation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts. We previously identified two potentially important cytokines by demonstrating that parathyroid hormone induces expression by osteoblasts of IL-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor without affecting levels of 14 other cytokines. Although parathyroid hormone activates multiple signal transduction pathways, induction of IL-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor is dependent on activation of adenyl cyclase. This study demonstrates that adenyl cyclase is also required for stimulation of osteoclast activity in cultures containing osteoclasts from rat long bones and UMR106-01 rat osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. Since the stimulation by parathyroid hormone of both cytokine production and bone resorption depends on the same signal transduction pathway, we hypothesized that IL-6 might be a downstream effector of parathyroid hormone. We found that addition of exogenous IL-6 mimics the ability of parathyroid hormone to stimulate bone resorption. More importantly, an antibody directed against the IL-6 receptor blocks moderate stimulation of osteoclast activity induced by the hormone. Interestingly, strong stimulation of resorption overcomes this dependence on IL-6. Thus, parathyroid hormone likely induces multiple, redundant cytokines that can overcome the IL-6 requirement associated with moderate stimulation. Taken together with studies showing that many other bone resorptive agents also stimulate IL-6 production, our results suggest that IL-6 may be a downstream effector of these agents as well as of parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:7657797

  12. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, R G; Van Haastert, P J

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular or intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a heterodimer and are activated by G-proteins. In contrast, membrane-bound guanylate cyclases have only one transmembrane spanning region and one cyclase domain, and are activated by extracellular ligands to form a homodimer. In the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum, membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity is induced after cAMP stimulation; a G-protein-coupled cAMP receptor and G-proteins are essential for this activation. We have cloned a Dictyostelium gene, DdGCA, encoding a protein with 12 transmembrane spanning regions and two cyclase domains. Sequence alignment demonstrates that the two cyclase domains are transposed, relative to these domains in adenylate cyclases. DdGCA expressed in Dictyostelium exhibits high guanylate cyclase activity and no detectable adenylate cyclase activity. Deletion of the gene indicates that DdGCA is not essential for chemotaxis or osmo-regulation. The knock-out strain still exhibits substantial guanylate cyclase activity, demonstrating that Dictyostelium contains at least one other guanylate cyclase. PMID:11237875

  13. Glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase detects a selective perturbation of the inner half of the liver plasma-membrane bilayer achieved by the local anaesthetic prilocaine.

    PubMed

    Houslay, M D; Dipple, I; Rawal, S; Sauerheber, R D; Esgate, J A; Gordon, L M

    1980-07-15

    Prilocaine can increase the fluidity of rat liver plasma membranes, as indicated by a fatty acid spin-probe. This led to the activation of the membrane-bound fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, but not the Lubrol-solubilized activity, suggesting that increased lipid fluidity can activate the enzyme. With increasing prilocaine concentrations above 10 mM, the membrane-bound fluoride-stimulated activity was progressively inhibited, even though bilayer fluidity continued to increase and the activity of the solubilized enzyme remained unaffected. Glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively inhibited by increasing prilocaine concentrations. Prilocaine (10 mM) had no effect on the lipid phase separation occurring at 28 degrees C and attributed to those lipids in the external half of the bilayer, as indicated by Arrhenius plots of both glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and the order parameter of a fatty acid spin-probe. However, 10 mM-prilocaine induced a lipid phase separation at around 11 degrees C that was attributed to the lipids of the internal (cytosol-facing) half of the bilayer. It is suggested that prilocaine (10 mM) can selectively perturb the inner half of the bilayer of rat liver plasma membranes owing to its preferential interaction with the acidic phospholipids residing there.

  14. Digitonin effects on photoreceptor adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Bitensky, M W; Gorman, R E; Miller, W H

    1972-03-24

    Adenylate cyclase is described in a number of photoreceptor membranes. Vertebrate rod outer segments contain light-regulated cyclase, and light regulation is abolished by digitonin. Disruption of microvilli in cone and rhabdomphotoreceptors is also associated with loss of light regulation and retention of full enzymic activity. The data suggest that inhibitory constraint provides regulation in cyclase systems and that disruption of membrane structure uncouples catalytic and regulatory elements.

  15. In vitro adenylate cyclase-stimulating activity predicts the occurrence of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, E C; Insogna, K L; Brownstein, D G; Bander, N H; Broadus, A E

    1988-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed as potential mediators of the syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), but to date no firm cause-and-effect relationship has been established. We attempted to establish such a relationship by determining whether the presence or absence of adenylate cyclase-stimulating activity (ACSA) in the media of cultured tumor cells predicted the occurrence of the syndrome of HHM when these cell lines were grown in nude mice in vivo. Conditioned media from 35 human renal carcinoma cell lines were surveyed for ACSA in the PTH-sensitive rat osteosarcoma 17/2.8 cell assay. 12 lines were positive (mean, 13.7-fold stimulation, range, 3.0 to 44.0), and 23 lines were negative (mean, 1.2-fold stimulation, range, 0.9 to 1.5). We were successful in establishing five of the positive and six of the negative lines in three to five nude mice per line. Mice implanted with the positive lines uniformly became hypercalcemic (mean serum calcium, 15.8 mg/dl), whereas mice implanted with the negative lines uniformly remained normocalcemic (mean serum calcium, 9.5 mg/dl), in spite of comparable mean tumor size. Acid-urea tumor extracts from each of four hypercalcemic animals contained potent in vitro ACSA (mean, 15.9-fold stimulation), while 5/5 extracts from normocalcemic animals did not (mean, 1.4-fold stimulation). Our study demonstrates that in this model system in vitro ACSA is a reliable predictive marker for HHM in vivo. Whether the protein responsible for this activity is also the mediator of the bone resorption seen in HHM remains to be demonstrated. Images PMID:3343341

  16. Changes in lipid composition and isoproterenol- and ethanol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in aging Fischer rat bladders.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, M A; Pontari, M; Nishimoto, T; Weiss, R M

    1990-07-01

    In the aging rat bladder dome, changes are noted in membrane composition and in the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme, adenylate cyclase (AC). When bladder domes from 22 day and 22 to 24 month Fischer rats are compared, changes in composition include: a 25% decrease in percentage of protein [(milligrams of protein per milligram of wet weight) x 100]; an approximately 40% decrease in both the total phospholipid content and in the content of the major phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine; and a 69% increase in the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio. These changes are indicative of a more rigid lipid bilayer in the aged rat bladder. Changes in AC with aging include a decrease in basal and forskolin-activated AC and a loss of the ability of isoproterenol to activate AC in the aged (22-24 month) rat bladder dome homogenate. Activation by isoproterenol (ISO; 3 microM) is 55 and 72% over 5' guanylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p; 1 microM] controls in 22 day and 90 day rat bladder dome homogenates, respectively. Activation by AC by NaF and Gpp(NH)p does not decline with aging. Ethanol, an agent that increases membrane fluidity, stimulates AC to a much greater extent in homogenates from the 22 month than from the 22 day or 90 day rat bladder dome. The ethanol-induced activation occurs not only in basal AC but also in Gpp(NH)p- and ISO-plus Gpp(NH)p-activated AC. The observed changes in AC with aging in part may reflect changes in the membrane lipid environment. PMID:2366184

  17. Diuretics and the renal adenylate cyclase system

    PubMed Central

    Dawborn, J.K.; Macneil, S.; Martin, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    1 The relationship between the diuretic effectiveness and the effect on the renal adenylate cyclase of three diuretics, acetazolamide, frusemide and ethacrynic acid, was examined. The hypothesis that acetazolamide and parathyroid hormone (PTH), inhibit renal carbonic anhydrase by a cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP)-dependent mechanism was also tested. 2 In vitro, acetazolamide, frusemide and ethacrynic acid at high concentrations (10-3M) all produced some inhibition of basal and stimulated rat kidney plasma membrane adenylate cyclase. The effect of acetazolamide was much less than that of frusemide and ethacrynic acid. These plasma membrane effects were reproduced in studies of cyclic AMP formation in isolated kidney tubules of rats. 3 Intravenous injections of acetazolamide did not change the total cyclic AMP content of the kidneys of rats killed by microwave irradiation. 4 Acetazolamide produced a diuresis in the rat and a slight inhibition of the antidiuretic effect of Pitressin. Frusemide produced a diuresis and greatly reduced the antidiuretic response to Pitressin. Ethacrynic acid was ineffective as a diuretic in the rat and actually enhanced the antidiuretic response to Pitressin. 5 In investigating the possible influence of diuretics and PTH on the activity and state of phosphorylation of carbonic anhydrase it was found that: there was no correlation between the ability of diuretics to inhibit carbonic anhydrase activity and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase phosphorylation; neither PTH nor cyclic AMP (in the presence of adenosine triphosphate, Mg2+, K+ and incubation at 37°C) inhibited rat cortex homogenate carbonic anhydrase activity. 6 It seems unlikely that any of the tested diuretics exerts its pharmacological effect by means of changes in kidney cyclic AMP metabolism. PMID:202362

  18. What is the possible contribution of Ca2+-stimulated adenylate cyclase to acquisition, consolidation and retention of an associative olfactory memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dudai, Y; Corfas, G; Hazvi, S

    1988-01-01

    We have quantitatively analyzed the effect of the mutation rut, which lesions a Ca2+-stimulated subpopulation (or functional state) of adenylate cyclase, on acquisition, consolidation and retention of an olfactory associative memory in Drosophila. The classical conditioning paradigm developed by Tully and Quinn (1985) was employed. Our data indicate that rut reduces acquisition and short-term memory in this paradigm, yet does not abolish consolidation of residual memory into an anesthesia-resistant form. Assuming that the rut behavioral defect is not due to altered neuroanatomy, the data also suggest that the adenylate cyclase activity lesioned by rut is only one of the molecular processes required for acquisition and short-term memory. These different postulated processes seem to act in parallel but are probably recruited sequentially; the mechanism involving rut+ gene product is necessary for response prior to other mechanisms which do not require rut+. It is also suggested, on the basis of the present results combined with previous data, that processes which do not require Ca2+-activated cyclase can not fulfill the partial role of this enzyme during acquisition but can partially compensate for its absence in later phases of memory formation. PMID:3127581

  19. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  20. Alteration with dietary state of the activity and zonal distribution of adenylate cyclase stimulated by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin in microdissected rat liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Zierz, S; Jungermann, K

    1984-12-17

    Adenylate cyclase activated by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin was measured in liver homogenates and microdissected periportal and perivenous tissue of fed and fasted rats. A radiochemical microtest, more sensitive by 2-3 orders of magnitude as compared with the usual assay, was established for the determination of the activity in liver samples corresponding to 200-600 ng dry weight. In liver homogenates from fasted as compared to fed animals the glucagon-stimulated and fluoride-stimulated activity was increased by 1.65-fold, while the basal and the forskolin-stimulated activity remained the same. In microdissected tissue of both fed and fasted animals the activity was stimulated in about 60% of the samples by glucagon, fluoride and forskolin (responsive samples). However, in about 40% of the microdissected tissue samples the activity could not be stimulated by any of the above activators (non-responsive samples). In responsive microdissected tissue of fasted as compared to fed animals, the glucagon-stimulated and fluoride stimulated activity but not the basal and the forskolin-activated activity was increased by 2-3-fold. In responsive microdissected samples of fed animals neither the basal nor the stimulated activities showed a significant periportal to perivenous gradient. In samples of fasted animals, however, a zonal gradient was observed for the glucagon-stimulated activity exhibiting a 1.5-fold higher rate in the perivenous zone.

  1. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 attenuates adenylate cyclase sensitization after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Fujiwara, Yoko; Shibata, Katsushi; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-02-19

    Cellular adaptations to chronic opioid treatment result in enhanced responsiveness of adenylate cyclase and an increase in forskolin- or agonist-stimulated cAMP production. It is, however, not known whether chaperone molecules such as heat shock proteins contribute to this adenylate cyclase sensitization. Here, we report that treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), led to effective attenuation of morphine-induced adenylate cyclase sensitization. In SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, morphine significantly increased RNA transcript and protein levels of type I adenylate cyclase, leading to sensitization. Whole-genome tiling array analysis revealed that cAMP response element-binding protein, an important mediator for cellular adaptation to morphine, associated with the proximal promoter of Hsp90AB1 not only in SK-N-SH cells but also in rat PC12 and human embryonic kidney cells. Hsp90AB1 transcript and protein levels increased significantly during morphine treatment, and co-application of geldanamycin (0.1-10 nM) effectively suppressed the increase in forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activation by 56%. Type I adenylate cyclase, but not Hsp90AB1, underwent significant degradation during geldanamycin treatment. These results indicate that Hsp90 is a new pharmacological target for the suppression of adenylate cyclase sensitization induced by chronic morphine treatment.

  2. Interactions between lysergic acid diethylamide and dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hungen, K V; Roberts, S; Hill, D F

    1975-08-22

    Investigations were carried out on the interactions of the hallucinogenic drug, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD), and other serotonin antagonists with catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in cell-free preparations from different regions of rat brain. In equimolar concentration, D-LSD, 2-brono-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), or methysergide (UML) strongly blocked maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by either norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from cerebral cortices of young adult rats. D-LSD also eliminated the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of equimolar concentrations of norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from rat hippocampus. The effects of this hallucinogenic agent on adenylate cyclase activity were most striking in particulate preparations from corpus striatum. Thus, in 10 muM concentration, D-LSD not only completely eradicated the response to 10 muM dopamine in these preparations but also consistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. L-LSD (80 muM) was without effect. Significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase was produced by 0.1 muM D-LSD. Activation of striatal adenylate cyclase of either D-LSD or dopamine was strongly blocked by the dopamine-blocking agents trifluoperazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, and haloperidol. The stimulatory effects of D-LSD and dopamine were also inhibited by the serotonin-blocking agents, BOL, 1-methyl-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (MLD), and cyproheptadine, but not by the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent, propranolol. However, these serotonin antagonists by themselves were incapable of stimulating adenylate cyclase activity in the striatal preparations. Several other hallucinogens, which were structurally related to serotonin, were also inactive in this regard, e.g., mescaline, N,N-dimethyltryptamine, psilocin and bufotenine. Serotonin itself produced a small stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in striatal preparations and

  3. Stimulation of the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide induces hypophagia and thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Jon M.; Boisvert, Joanne P.; Hourigan, Allison E.; Mueller, Christopher R.; Yi, Sun Shin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) regulate energy homeostasis by integrating and utilizing behavioral and metabolic mechanisms. The VMN heavily express pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) type I receptors (PAC1R). Despite the receptor distribution, most PACAP experiments investigating affects on feeding have focused on intracerebroventricular administration or global knockout mice. To identify the specific contribution of PACAP signaling in the VMN, we injected PACAP directly into the VMN and measured feeding behavior and indices of energy expenditure. Following an acute injection of PACAP, nocturnal food intake was significantly reduced for 6 h after injections without evidence of malaise. In addition, PACAP-induced suppression of feeding also occurred following an overnight fast and could be blocked by a specific PAC1R antagonist. Metabolically, VMN-specific injections of PACAP significantly increased both core body temperature and spontaneous locomotor activity with a concurrent increase in brown adipose uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression. To determine which signaling pathways were responsive to PACAP administration into the VMN, we measured mRNA expression of well-characterized hypothalamic neuropeptide regulators of feeding. One hour after PACAP administration, expression of pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA was significantly increased in the arcuate nuclei (ARC), with no changes in neuropeptide Y and agouti-related polypeptide mRNA levels. This suggests that PAC1R expressing VMN neurons projecting to pro-opiomelanocortin neurons contribute to hypophagia by involving melanocortin signaling. While the VMN also abundantly express PACAP protein, the present study demonstrates that PACAP input to the VMN can influence the control of energy homeostasis. PMID:21957159

  4. Changed sensitivity of adenylate cyclase signaling system to biogenic amines and peptide hormones in tissues of starving rats.

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2007-07-01

    In the myocardium and skeletal muscles of rats deprived of food for 2 days, basal activity of adenylate cyclase decreased, while the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase signaling system to the stimulating effects of non-hormonal agents (guanine nucleotides and NaF) and beta-agonist isoproterinol modulating adenylate cyclase through stimulating G proteins increased. In starving organism, the regulatory effects of hormones realizing their effects through inhibitory G proteins (somatostatin in the myocardium and bromocryptin in the brain) weakened. Their inhibitory effects on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and stimulating effects on binding of guanosine triphosphate decreased. In the brain of starving rats, the differences in the sensitivity of the adenylate cyclase signaling system to hormones and nonhormonal agents were less pronounced than in the muscle tissues, which attested to tissue-specific changes in the functional state of this system under conditions of 2-day starvation.

  5. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    PubMed

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  6. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that

  7. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  8. Alterations in adipocyte adenylate cyclase activity in morbidly obese and formerly morbidly obese humans.

    PubMed

    Martin, L F; Klim, C M; Vannucci, S J; Dixon, L B; Landis, J R; LaNoue, K F

    1990-08-01

    Studies examining animal models of genetic obesity have identified defects in adipocyte hormone-stimulated lipolysis that involve the adenylate cyclase transmembrane signaling system, specifically those components that decrease adenylate cyclase activity. To determine whether obese people demonstrate alterations in adenylate cyclase activity that could contribute to the maintenance of obesity by inhibiting lipolysis, we examined human adipocytes from patients who were lean, obese, or formerly obese. Fat samples were obtained from the lower abdomen of 14 women who were morbidly obese (obese group), from 10 women who were formerly morbidly obese and had lost weight after gastric stapling (postobese group), and from 10 similarly aged women of normal weight (controls). Adipocyte adenylate cyclase activity was determined under ligand-free (no stimulatory or inhibitory influences present), hormone-stimulated (isoproterenol, 10(-6) mmol/L), and maximal (cells stimulated with 10 mumol/L forskolin) conditions by measuring cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels by radioimmunoassay. The activity of adenylate cyclase was significantly different (p less than 0.01) in the three groups. Adipocytes from obese women had lower levels of cyclase activity under both ligand-free (5% vs 16% of maximal) and hormone-stimulated conditions (76% vs 100% of maximal) than adipocytes from normal women. Postobese women had levels of hormone-stimulated cAMP identical to those of normal women but still had abnormal ligand-free levels (under 5%). These results suggest the presence of an alteration in adipocyte adenylate cyclase regulation in morbidly obese women that is not entirely corrected when weight is lost after food intake is reduced by gastric stapling. This alteration in ligand-free cAMP activity may contribute to the development and maintenance of obesity. PMID:2166354

  9. Stimulation of Synthesis and Release of Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) from Intestinal Smooth Muscle Cells by Substance P and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide (PACAP)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qudah, M.; Alkahtani, R.; Akbarali, H.I.; Murthy, K.S.; Grider, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin present in the intestine where it participates in survival and growth of enteric neurons, augmentation of enteric circuits, and stimulation of intestinal peristalsis and propulsion. Previous studies largely focused on the role of neural and mucosal BDNF. The expression and release of BDNF from intestinal smooth muscle and the interaction with enteric neuropeptides has not been studied in gut. Methods The expression and secretion of BDNF from smooth muscle cultured from rabbit longitudinal intestinal muscle in response to substance P and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) was measured by western blot and ELISA. BDNF mRNA was measured by rt-PCR. Key Results The expression of BNDF protein and mRNA was greater in smooth muscle cells from the longitudinal muscle than from circular muscle layer. PACAP and substance P increased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. PACAP and substance P also stimulated the secretion of BDNF from cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. Chelation of intracellular calcium with BAPTA prevented substance P-induced increase in BDNF mRNA and protein expression as well as substance P-induced secretion of BDNF. Conclusions & Inferences Neuropeptides known to be present in enteric neurons innervating the longitudinal layer increase the expression of BDNF mRNA and protein in smooth muscle cells and stimulate the release of BDNF. Considering the ability of BDNF to enhance smooth muscle contraction, this autocrine loop may partially explain the characteristic hypercontractility of longitudinal muscle in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26088546

  10. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma {times} glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard (({sup 3}H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. ({sup 3}H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 {mu}M atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties.

  11. Inhibition of hormonally regulated adenylate cyclase by the beta gamma subunit of transducin.

    PubMed Central

    Bockaert, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Guillon, G; Chabre, M

    1985-01-01

    Transducin (T), the GTP-binding protein of the retina activates the cGMP phosphodiesterase system, and presents analogies with the proteins GS and Gi which respectively mediate adenylate cyclase activation and inhibition by hormone receptors. These proteins are all comprised of an alpha subunit carrying the GTP-binding site and a beta gamma subunit made of two peptides. The beta peptide (35 kd) appears similar in the three proteins. We demonstrate here that purified T beta gamma inhibits adenylate cyclase from human platelet membranes. This inhibition was observed when adenylate cyclase was stimulated by GTP, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), NaF and forskolin, but not when stimulated by GTP(gamma)S. In the presence of GTP and forskolin, the T beta gamma-induced maximal inhibition was not additive with the alpha 2-receptor-induced adenylate cyclase inhibition mediated by Gi. Both inhibitions were suppressed at high Mg2+ concentrations, which as also known to dissociate T beta gamma from T alpha-GDP. This suggests that these adenylate cyclase inhibitions are due to the formation of inactive complexes of GS alpha-GDP with T beta gamma or Gi beta gamma. T beta gamma-induced inhibition did not require detergent and could be suppressed by simple washing. T beta gamma effects are dependent on its concentration rather than on its total amount. This suggests that T beta gamma can operate in solution with no integration into the membrane. Similar inhibitory effects of T beta gamma are observed on adenylate cyclase from anterior pituitary and lymphoma S49 cell lines. PMID:3861319

  12. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  13. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  14. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, P J; Baresi, L A; Morley, J E

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the beta-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the beta-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. beta-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using [125I]iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed beta 1- and beta 2-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the beta 1-adrenergic subtype. This BAT beta-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial beta-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. In contrast, food deprivation did not alter BAT beta-adrenergic receptor density. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. The ratio of isoproterenol-stimulated to forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity decreased in the sucrose-fed and cold-exposed rats but not in the food-deprived rats. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability. PMID:2827501

  15. Properties of Adenyl Cyclase from Human Jejunal Mucosa during Naturally Acquired Cholera and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lincoln C.; Rohde, Jon E.; Sharp, Geoffrey W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The enterotoxin of Vibrio cholerae causes copious fluid production throughout the lenght of the small intestine. As this is thought to be mediated by stimulation of adenyl cyclase, a study has been made of the activity and properties of this enzyme in jejunal biopsy tissue taken from patients during the diarrheal phase of cholera and after recovery. Adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was increased more than twofold relative to the enzyme in convalescence. Under both conditions stimulation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and by fluoride was observed. The responsiveness to PGE1 was not altered in cholera; the total activity of the fluoride-stimulated enzyme was similar, a finding that suggests cholera toxin stimulates pre-existing enzyme in the intestinal cell. The enzymes during cholera and convalescence were similar in all other properties examined. Optimal Mg++ concentration was 10 mM; Mn++ at 5 mM stimulated the enzyme but could not replace Mg++ except in the presence of 10 mM fluoride. Calcium was markedly inhibitory at concentrations greater than 10-4 M. The pH optimum was 7.5 and the Michaelis constant (Km) for ATP concentration approximated 10-4 M. Thus the interaction of cholera toxin with human intestinal adenyl cyclase does not alter the basic properties of the enzyme. When biopsy specimens were maintained intact in oxygenated Ringer's solution at 0°C, no loss of activity was observed at 1½ and 3 hr. In contrast, when the cells were homogenized, rapid loss of activity, with a half-life of 90 min was seen even at 0°C. Consequently for comparative assays of human jejunal adenyl cyclase, strict control of the experimental conditions is required. It was under such conditions that a twofold increase in basal adenyl cyclase activity during cholera was observed. Images PMID:4335441

  16. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  17. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  18. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  19. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explain observed abnormalities of phosphorylase activation and sarcoplasmic reticulum function. PMID:6271806

  20. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D.; Jensen, Tricia M.; Lyuksyutova, Anna I.; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset. PMID:24982160

  1. Molecular cloning of an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that constitutively activates adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Eggerickx, D; Denef, J F; Labbe, O; Hayashi, Y; Refetoff, S; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M; Libert, F

    1995-01-01

    A human gene encoding an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor named ACCA (adenylate cyclase constitutive activator) was isolated from a genomic library using as a probe a DNA fragment obtained by low-stringency PCR. Human ACCA (hACCA) is a protein of 330 amino acids that exhibits all the structural hallmarks of the main family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Expression of hACCA resulted in a dramatic stimulation of adenylate cyclase, similar in amplitude to that obtained with other Gs-coupled receptors fully activated by their respective ligands. This stimulation was obtained in a large variety of stable cell lines derived from various organs, and originating from different mammalian species. hACCA was found to be the human homologue of a recently reported mouse orphan receptor (GPCR21). The mouse ACCA (mACCA) was therefore recloned by PCR, and expression of mACCA in Cos-7 cells demonstrated that the mouse receptor behaved similarly as a constitutive activator of adenylate cyclase. It is not known presently whether the stimulation of adenylate cyclase is the result of a true constitutive activity of the receptor or, alternatively, is the consequence of a permanent stimulation by a ubiquitous ligand. The tissue distribution of mACCA was determined by RNase protection assay. Abundant transcripts were found in the brain, whereas lower amounts were detected in testis, ovary and eye. Various hypotheses concerning the constitutive activity of ACCA and their potential biological significance are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7639700

  2. Defective responsiveness of adenylate cyclase to forskolin in the Drosophila memory mutant rutabaga.

    PubMed

    Dudai, Y; Sher, B; Segal, D; Yovell, Y

    1985-12-01

    The Drosophila memory mutant rutabaga (rut) has been previously shown to have a defective subpopulation (or functional state) of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. We report here that the reduced adenylate cyclase activity is also associated with a defective responsiveness of the enzyme to forskolin. Forskolin activation isotherms of the enzyme in normal membranes reveal low- and high-affinity forskolin-interacting components; the residual enzyme in the mutant shows a smaller proportion of the high-affinity response. In addition, in mutant membrane preparations, forskolin fails to shift the Km of the enzyme for free Mg2+ and for MgATP, in contrast to the situation in the normal tissue. The defect in the responsiveness to forskolin in rut is even more pronounced in a Lubrol-solubilized enzyme preparation, and is due to intrinsic properties of the cyclase system rather than to the absence (or presence) of a soluble, or detergent solubilized, factor in rut. The reduced forskolin responsiveness maps to the X chromosomal segment 12F5-6 to 13A1-5, within the region previously reported to span the locus that controls both the abortive memory and the lack of Ca2+-stimulation of adenylate cyclase in rut17. The possible relevance of the findings to postulated molecular mechanisms of short-term memory formation is discussed. PMID:3935769

  3. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  4. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  5. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation. PMID:24646224

  6. Isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain possess adenylate cyclase activity which can be augmented by various receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Hervé, D; Blanc, G; Tassin, J P; Glowinski, J

    1988-01-01

    Isolated neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain were found to contain a high specific activity of adenylate cyclase (61 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein) compared to the pelleted starting homogenate (5 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein). Forskolin at 10(-4) M increased adenylate cyclase activity in both the pelleted homogenate and growth cone fraction by 70 and 217 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein, respectively, over basal levels. The incremental effect of forskolin was 3-fold greater in the growth cone fraction than in the pelleted homogenate. However, relative to basal levels in each of the two fractions, forskolin increased adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction by only approx. 5-fold compared to 15-fold in the pelleted homogenate. Dopamine (10(-4) M), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (10(-6) M) and isoproterenol (10(-5) M) also augmented adenylate cyclase activity in the two fractions. In the growth cone fraction, dopamine and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide produced a stimulation over basal levels by approx. 20 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein while isoproterenol produced a stimulation of approx. 10 pmol cAMP/min/mg protein. The incremental effects of these receptor agonists in the growth cone fraction are approx. 5-fold greater than in the pelleted homogenate. The dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction could be blocked by the compound SCH23390, a selective D1 receptor antagonist. At saturating concentrations, all combinations of dopamine, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and isoproterenol were found to be completely additive on adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Non-co-ordinate development of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase in chick heart.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R W; Galper, J B; Neer, E J; Smith, T W

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the properties of beta-adrenergic receptors and of their interaction with adenylate cyclase in the chick myocardium during embryogenesis. Between 4.5 and 7.5 days in ovo the number of receptors determined by (-)-[3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) binding is constant at approx. 0.36 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. By day 9 the density decreases significantly to 0.22 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. At day 12.5--13.5 the number was 0.14--0.18 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. This number did not change further up to day 16. The same results were obtained with guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) added to the assay mixtures. There was no significant change in receptor affinity for the antagonist [3H]DHA between days 5.5 and 13. Despite the decrease in numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors, there was no change in basal, p[NH]ppG-, isoprenaline- or isoprenaline-plus-p[NH]ppG-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity between days 3 and 12 of development. We conclude that beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase are not co-ordinately regulated during early embryonic development of the chick heart. Some of the beta-adrenergic receptors present very early in the ontogeny of cardiac tissue appear not to be coupled to adenylate cyclase since their loss is not reflected in decreased activation of the enzyme. PMID:6289805

  8. Ontogeny of fetal adenylate cyclase; mechanisms for regulation of beta-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Maier, J A; Roberts, J M; Jacobs, M M

    1989-11-01

    Transmembrane second messenger signalling systems regulate differentiation, growth and homeostatic responses during fetal development. The beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase system is the best studied of these and has been used as a model to investigate the control of developmental processes. In tissues such as lung, heart and parotid, beta-adrenergic responsiveness of adenylate cyclase increases during development. In the developing fetal lung beta-receptor concentration increases during gestation or after glucocorticoid treatment, but cannot fully explain enhanced adrenergic responsiveness. To probe developmental and hormonal effects on beta-receptor function, we asked if advancing gestation or glucocorticoid treatment alters beta-receptor-Gs interactions in fetal rabbit lung membrane particulates. Before 25 days gestation, 1-isoproterenol competes for 3H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA), a radiolabelled beta-antagonist, with a single low affinity, later in gestation, high and low affinities of isoproterenol for the beta-receptor are present which can be shifted to the lower affinity by addition of guanyl nucleotide. High affinity binding is precociously induced in 25 days--fetal lung particulates as early as 3 h after maternal betamethasone treatment, but beta-adrenoreceptor concentration in treated fetuses was increased over controls only after 24 h of treatment. Cholera toxin catalyzed ADP ribosylation of membrane particulates showed cholera toxin substrate (Gs) was not altered by glucocorticoid treatment. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity with isoproterenol (100mM) and GTP (100mM) resulted in no incremental increase over that produced by GTP (100mM) alone in glucocorticoid treated or control particulates, either early or late in gestation. These data demonstrate that beta-receptor-Gs interactions are not sufficient to produce full agonist responses. Although both beta-adrenergic receptors and Gs are present in fetal rabbit lung early in gestation, interaction

  9. Adenylate cyclase in Arthrospira platensis responds to light through transcription.

    PubMed

    Kashith, M; Keerthana, B; Sriram, S; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-08-19

    Cyclic 3',5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, but its role in higher plants was in doubt due to its very low concentration. In this study we wanted to look at the flux of cAMP in response to light in algae, considered to be the more primitive form of photosynthetic organisms. While it did not fluctuate very much in the tested green algae, in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis its level was closely linked to exposure to light. The expression from cyaC, the major isoform of adenylate cyclase was strongly influenced by exposure of the cells to light. There was about 300 fold enhancement of cyaC transcripts in cells exposed to light compared to the transcripts in cells in the dark. Although post-translational regulation of adenylate cyclase activity has been widely known, our studies suggest that transcriptional control could also be an important aspect of its regulation in A. platensis. PMID:27311855

  10. The Effects of Thrombin on Adenyl Cyclase Activity and a Membrane Protein from Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, G. N.; Baenziger, Nancy Lewis; Chase, Lewis R.; Majerus, Philip W.

    1972-01-01

    Washed human platelets were incubated with 0.1-1.0 U/ml human thrombin and the effects on adenyl cyclase activity and on a platelet membrane protein (designated thrombin-sensitive protein) were studied. Adenyl cyclase activity was decreased 70-90% when intact platelets were incubated with thrombin. The T½ for loss of adenyl cyclase activity was less than 15 sec at 1 U/ml thrombin. There was no decrease of adenyl cyclase activity when sonicated platelets or isolated membranes were incubated with these concentrations of thrombin. Loss of adenyl cyclase activity was relatively specific since the activities of other platelet membrane enzymes were unaffected by thrombin. Prior incubation of platelets with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), prostaglandin E1, or theophylline protected adenyl cyclase from inhibition by thrombin. Incubation of intact but not disrupted platelets with thrombin resulted in the release of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane. The rapid release of this protein (T½ < 15 sec) at low concentrations of thrombin suggested that removal of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane is an integral part of the platelet release reaction. This hypothesis is supported by the parallel effects of thrombin on adenyl cyclase activity and thrombin-sensitive protein release in the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E1, and theophylline at varying concentrations of thrombin. Images PMID:4331802

  11. Beta 1-adrenergic regulation of the GT1 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal cell lines: stimulation of GnRH release via receptors positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Choi, A L; Weiner, R I

    1992-09-01

    The release of GnRH evoked by norepinephrine (NE) was studied in GT1 GnRH neuronal cell lines in superfusion and static cultures. GnRH release from static cultured GT1-7 cells was stimulated by NE in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mimicked by the nonsubtype-selective beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and blocked by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and the beta 1-adrenergic subtype-specific antagonist CGP 20712A. However, the stimulation of GnRH release by NE was not affected by the beta 2-, alpha-, alpha 1-, or alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists ICI 118.551, phentolamine, prazosin, or yohimbine, respectively. Superfusion of GT1-1 cells with NE for 60-100 min resulted in rapid and sustained increases in GnRH secretion. The NE-stimulated GnRH release showed a higher amplitude and longer duration than the spontaneous GnRH pulses characteristic of GT1-1 cells. In parallel to the stimulation of GnRH release, NE also rapidly increased (first observed at 60 sec) the intracellular concentration of cAMP in isobutylmethylxanthine-pretreated GT1-1 and GT1-7 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. The stimulation of intracellular cAMP concentration was also mimicked by isoproterenol and blocked by propranolol and CGP 20712A. In addition, GT1 cells express beta 1- but not beta 2-adrenergic receptor mRNA, as probed by Northern blot analysis. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of NE on GnRH neurons. The pharmacological evidence and the mRNA analysis are consistent with NE acting through a beta 1-adrenergic receptor positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

  12. Effects of Ca++ and Prostaglandin E1 on Vasopressin Activation of Renal Adenyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Marumo, Fumiaki; Edelman, Isidore S.

    1971-01-01

    Adenyl cyclase activity was assayed in crude homogenates of the renal cortex, medulla, and papilla of the golden hamster. The specific activity (moles C-AMP/unit of time per mg protein of tissue) of the enzyme under basal conditions, was greatest in papilla, somewhat lower in medulla, and least in cortex. On an absolute scale, the sensitivity to vasopressin was greater in the medullary and papillary than in the cortical homogenates. In addition, at concentrations of 0.1-1.0 mm, CaCl2 inhibited the enzyme in the order papilla > medulla > cortex. These results imply the existence of distinct differences in the composition of the adenyl cyclase-receptor complex in various parts of the kidney. We proposed that Ca++ inhibits the core enzyme directly since at the minimally inhibitory concentration (0.1 mm), CaCl2 reduced to an equivalent extent (a) basal activity, (b) the response to graded doses of vasopressin (0.5 to 50.0 mU/ml) and (c) the response to maximal stimulatory concentrations of NaF (10 mm). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 = 10−7m) had no effect on either basal adenyl-cyclase activity or the response to 10 mm NaF in medullary and papillary homogenates. 7-Oxa-13-prostynoic acid (10−4m) similarly had no effect under basal conditions or on stimulation with NaF in medullary homogenates. Both fatty acids, however, inhibited the enzymic response to vasopressin, particularly at low concentrations of the peptide. The straight-chain fatty acid, 11-eicosanoic acid (10−7m), was inactive on basal activity or on the response to vasopressin. The possibility that PGE1 modifies the coupling mechanism between the core enzyme and the hormone-specific receptor is discussed. PMID:4329002

  13. Adenylate cyclase activity in fish gills in relation to salt adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Guibbolini, M.E.; Lahlou, B.

    1987-07-06

    The influence of salt adaptation on specific adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P) - ATP into (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P) - cAMP) was investigated in gill plasma membranes of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) adapted to various salinities (deionized water, DW; fresh water, FW; 3/4 sea water, 3/4 SW; sea water, SW) and in sea water adapted- mullet (Mugil sp.). Basal activity declined by a factor of 2 in trout with increasing external salinity (pmoles cAMP/mg protein/10 min: 530 in DW, 440 in FW, 340 in 3/4 SW; 250 in SW) and was very low in SW adapted-mullet: 35. The Km for ATP was similar (0.5 mM) in both FW adapted- and SW adapted- trout in either the absence (basal activity) or in the presence of stimulating agents (isoproterenol; NaF) while the Vm varied. Analysis of stimulation ratios with respect to basal levels of the enzyme showed that hormones and pharmacological substances (isoproterenol, NaF) display a greater potency in high salt than in low salt adapted- fish gills. In contrast, salt adaptation did not have any effect on the regulation of adenylate cyclase by PGE/sub 1/. These results are interpreted in relation to the general process of osmoregulation. 27 references, 6 figures.

  14. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  15. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  16. Role of Adenylate Cyclase 1 in Retinofugal Map Development

    PubMed Central

    Dhande, Onkar S.; Bhatt, Shivani; Anishchenko, Anastacia; Elstrott, Justin; Iwasato, Takuji; Swindell, Eric C.; Xu, Hong-Ping; Jamrich, Milan; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Feller, Marla B.; Crair, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of topographic maps of the sensory periphery is sensitive to the disruption of adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1) signaling. AC1 catalyzes the production of cAMP in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner, and AC1 mutant mice (AC1−/−) have disordered visual and somatotopic maps. However, the broad expression of AC1 in the brain and the promiscuous nature of cAMP signaling have frustrated attempts to determine the underlying mechanism of AC1-dependent map development. In the mammalian visual system, the initial coarse targeting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) projections to the superior colliculus (SC) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is guided by molecular cues, and the subsequent refinement of these crude projections occurs via an activity-dependent process that depends on spontaneous retinal waves. Here, we show that AC1−/− mice have normal retinal waves but disrupted map refinement. We demonstrate that AC1 is required for the emergence of dense and focused termination zones and elimination of inaccurately targeted collaterals at the level of individual retinofugal arbors. Conditional deletion of AC1 in the retina recapitulates map defects, indicating that the locus of map disruptions in the SC and dorsal LGN of AC1−/− mice is presynaptic. Finally, map defects in mice without AC1 and disrupted retinal waves (AC1−/−;β2−/− double KO mice) are no worse than those in mice lacking only β2−/−, but loss of AC1 occludes map recovery in β2−/− mice during the second postnatal week. These results suggest that AC1 in RGC axons mediates the development of retinotopy and eye-specific segregation in the SC and dorsal LGN. PMID:22102330

  17. Studies on cell migration, adenylate cyclase and membrane-coating granules in the buccal epithelium of the zinc-deficient rabbit, including the influence of isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y

    1988-01-01

    Cell migration was slightly increased; cytochemical reaction deposits of adenylate cyclase and the area density of membrane-coating granules (MCG) were significantly increased. Upon isoproterenol stimulation, the MCG area density was significantly increased, whereas the cell migration rate was unchanged. Thus in zinc deficiency, there may be a simultaneous increase in the production and secretion of MCGs, in adenylate cyclase activity, and in cell migration. The non-significantly increased cell migration rate may not keep pace with the significantly increased cell-production rate, resulting in thickening of the epithelium.

  18. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  19. Isolation of adenylate cyclase-free, beta-adrenergic receptor from turkey erythrocyte membranes by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Vauquelin, G; Geynet, P; Hanoune, J; Strosberg, A D

    1977-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.1] and beta-adrenergic receptor of plasma membranes of turkey erythrocytes were solubilized in an active form by treatment with either NaF or guanylylimidodiphosphate and digitonin. The solubilized enzyme was no longer stimulated by catecholamines, NaF, or guanine nucleotides. The digitonin extract was chromatographed on an alprenolol-agarose derivative. While the bulk of protein and all the adenylate cyclase activity passed unretarded through the column, the receptor was retained. It eluted free of enzyme activity with an alprenolol solution containing 1 M NaCl; the yield was 25-30%. The protein content of the alprenolol eluates was too low to be estimated by the Lowry technique and was assessed by a more sensitive fluorometric method. Under these conditions, the beta-adrenergic receptor was purified approximately 2000-fold in a single step with retention of all its pharmacological properties. These experiments establish that the beta-adrenergic receptor and the adenylate cyclase are independent entities which may be separated on a functional basis. PMID:198798

  20. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  1. Concanavalin A amplifies both beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Hines, D K; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) is a tetrameric plant lectin that disrupts plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interactions and alters plasma membrane fluidity. We used Con A as a probe to explore beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-mediated regulation of cAMP in intact neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Preincubation with Con A, 0.5 micrograms/ml, attenuated 1 microM (-)-norepinephrine (NE)-induced downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors and resulted in a 50% augmentation of cAMP accumulation stimulated by 1 microM NE. Con A also augmented forskolin (1-10 microM)-stimulated cAMP accumulation by an average of 37% (P less than 0.05); however, Con A preincubation had no effect on basal or cholera toxin-stimulated cAMP content. The muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol (1-100 microM) decreased 1 microM NE-stimulated cAMP generation by an average of 32% (n = 7, P less than 0.05); preincubation with Con A further enhanced the inhibitory effect of carbachol by 18% (n = 7, P less than 0.05). Carbachol (1 microM) for 2 h decreased muscarinic cholinergic receptor density in whole cells by 33%; preincubation with Con A prevented this receptor downregulation. Con A pretreatment did not affect (-)-isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell homogenates, suggesting that an intact cytoarchitecture is necessary for Con A to augment cAMP formation. We conclude that Con A, through its modulation of beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor signaling, amplifies both stimulatory and inhibitory adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in intact neonatal ventricular myocytes. These data suggest the possibility that plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interaction is an important regulator of transmembrane signaling because interference with this interaction results in alterations in cAMP accumulation mediated by both beta-adrenergic- and muscarinic cholinergic-adenylate cyclase pathways. PMID:1653274

  2. Oxymetazoline inhibits adenylate cyclase by activation of serotonin-1 receptors in the OK cell, an established renal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T J; Bylund, D B

    1988-07-01

    The nonselective alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline inhibits parathyroid hormone (PTH)-stimulated cAMP production in intact OK cells, an epithelial cell line derived from an American opossum kidney. This inhibition, however, is not blocked by alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonists. After excluding several alternate hypotheses to explain this anomalous activity of oxymetazoline, we hypothesized that oxymetazoline activates a receptor in OK cells that is negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase but distinct from the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. Prior exposure of OK cells to pertussis toxin blocks the inhibitory response to oxymetazoline, suggesting involvement of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein. Screening various compounds for attenuation of PTH-stimulated adenylate cyclase showed that serotonin (5HT) is a potent and fully efficacious agonist. Desensitization of alpha 2-receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP production by epinephrine did not alter the response to either 5HT or oxymetazoline, indicating that these compounds do not produce their effect by activating alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. The 5HT1 receptor-selective antagonist methiothepin, but not ketanserin (5HT2-selective) or ICS-205,930 (5HT3-selective), blocked the response to both 5HT and oxymetazoline. The potency of methiothepin for antagonizing oxymetazoline-induced inhibition of PTH-stimulated cAMP production was not significantly different from its potency for the 5HT-induced effect. These data indicate that OK cells express a 5HT1 receptor that is negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and that oxymetazoline is an agonist at these receptors.

  3. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of guanine nucleotides on arginine-vasotocin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog bladder.

    PubMed

    Mishina, T; Shimada, H; Marumo, F

    1983-11-01

    The effects of arginine-vasotocin and nucleotides on the steady-state kinetics of the adenylate cyclase activity in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) bladder were studied. Arginine-vasotocin stimulated adenylate cyclase more effectively than oxytocin or arginine-vasopressin, with respect to both the maximal hormonal activation ratio relative to basal, and the hormone concentration yielding a half-maximal response (apparent Km). Arginine-vasotocin, GTP and its analogue guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) increased the Vmax of the basal adenylate cyclase activity, but showed no effect of the apparent Km of the system for ATP. In addition, Gpp(NH)p enhanced the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, further increasing the Vmax, while GTP showed no statistically significant effect. Dual effects of GDP were apparent: it was stimulatory at 1 x 10(-5) mol/l and inhibitory at 1 x 10(-3) mol/l, on both the basal and the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate, CTP, UTP and ITP showed no apparent effect on the enzyme activity. Sodium fluoride acted in the same manner as GTP on the adenylate cyclase system, increasing only basal activity. Adenylate cyclase activities exhibited pH optima that were less distinct in the presence than in the absence of Gpp(NH)p. The Arrhenius plot of the temperature experiment showed that a high-energy step was involved for activation by Gpp(NH)p or arginine-vasotocin. When the relative activation ratios by arginine-vasotocin at different ATP concentrations were studied, a distinct activation optimum was shown at 2.5 x 10(-4) mol ATP/l, either in the absence or presence of Gpp(NH)p. The possibility that GTP, GDP nd ATP play a regulatory role in the epithelial cells of the bullfrog bladder by adjusting the responsiveness of the system to a natural hormone, arginine-vasotocin, is discussed. PMID:6606697

  4. Progesterone prevents linkage of rabbit myometrial alpha 2-adrenergic receptors to inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Riemer, R K; Goldfien, A; Roberts, J M

    1989-04-01

    The uterine response to adrenergic stimulation is determined by the hormonal milieu. This response is particularly well characterized in the rabbit. In this species, as in humans, the response of the uterus to sympathetic stimulation is alpha-adrenergically mediated contraction with elevated circulating estrogen. However, with progesterone predominance, similar stimulation inhibits uterine contractions, a response mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors acting through their second message, cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We studied the mechanisms by which sex steroids regulate myometrial adrenergic responses. In this study, we questioned whether part of the effect of sex steroids could be explained by an alteration of the coupling of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We found that in the progesterone-treated rabbit, although alpha 2-receptors are present, they are not linked to inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis. The net synthesis of cyclic adenosine monophosphage in response to endogenous catecholamines is determined by their activation of beta-adrenergic receptors to increase and alpha 2-receptors to decrease cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. Thus the uncoupling of alpha 2-receptors contributes to increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate in myometrium of progesterone-treated animals consistent with the reported predominance of beta-adrenergic contractile responses in this setting.

  5. Effects of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis on human neutrophil interactions with Coccidioides immitis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Hewlett, E L; Friedman, R L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis extract that contained adenylate cyclase toxin produced large increases in human neutrophil cyclic AMP levels and inhibited their oxidative burst, as reflected by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and superoxide release. The adenylate cyclase toxin-containing extract blocked neutrophil-mediated inhibition of N-acetylglucosamine incorporation by arthroconidia of Coccidioides immitis in a dose-dependent fashion but had no effect on neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida glabrata and only a slight inhibitory effect on arthroconidial attachment. Neither purified pertussis toxin nor extracts from Bordetella mutants lacking the adenylate cyclase toxin affected neutrophil-mediated inhibition of arthroconidial N-acetylglucosamine incorporation. These studies indicate that adenylate cyclase toxin, alone or in concert with other B. pertussis-elaborated toxins, blocks neutrophil inhibition of arthroconidia, primarily by affecting neutrophil responses other than attachment or phagocytosis. PMID:2894360

  6. Biochemical mechanisms of myocardial adenylate cyclase subsensitivity to isoproterenol in cardiac hypertrophy of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The responsiveness of the myocardial adenylate cyclase (AC) system in generating cAMP was studied using isoproterenol (a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist), cholera toxin (a guanosinetriphosphatase inhibitor) and forskolin (a catalytic unit activator) in isolated myocytes of age-matched, 14-17 weeks old Wistar Kyoto normotensive rates (WKYs) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We found a reduction in isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP formation in myocytes of SHRs compared with WKYs. This reduction was not due to changes in isoproterenol-receptor interactions. Scatchard plot analysis of (/sup 3/H)CGP 12177 binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in isolated myocytes of WKYs and SHRs revealed to significant differences in the maximum number of binding sites or dissociation constant. There were no significant differences in Ki and IC/sub 50/ calculated from the competitive displacement of (/sup 3/H)CGP 12177 binding by (-) isoproterenol, suggesting no change in the affinity of the beta-adrenergic receptors for isoproterenol. We found no significant differences in forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation between the two groups. This suggest that the reduction in isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP formation observed in myocytes of SHRs is not due to changes in the ability of catalytic unit to convert ATP to cAMP. Interestingly, cholera toxin-stimulated cAMP formation was increased in myocytes of SHRs. One possible explanation for these observations may be increased guanosinetriphosphatase (GTPase) activation by isoproterenol in myocytes of SHRs. The activation of GTPase by isoproterenol in myocytes of SHRs. The activation of GTPase by isoproterenol was measured as the release of Pi from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)GTP. There was an increase in isoproterenol-stimulated GTPase activity in myocytes of SHRs compared with WKYs.

  7. Antagonism of histamine-activated adenylate cyclase in brain by D-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Green, J P; Johnson, C L; Weinstein, H; Maayani, S

    1977-12-01

    D-Lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide are competitive antagonists of the histamine activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); E.C. 4.6.1.1] in broken cell preparations of the hippocampus and cortex of guinea pig brain. The adenylate cyclase is linked to the histamine H2-receptor. Both D-lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide show topological congruency with potent H2-antagonists. D-2-Bromolysergic acid diethylamide is 10 times more potent as an H2-antagonist than cimetidine, which has been the most potent H2-antagonist reported, and D-lysergic acid diethylamide is about equipotent to cimetidine. Blockade of H2-receptors could contribute to the behavioral effects of D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide and D-lysergic acid diethylamide.

  8. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive.

  9. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-11-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine.

  10. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  11. Differential effects of GTP on the coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase from frog and turkey erythrocytes. Application of new methods for the analysis of receptor-effector coupling.

    PubMed

    Limbird, L E; DeLean, A; Hickey, A R; Pike, L J; Lefkowitz, R J

    1979-08-22

    A detailed comparison of the interaction of beta-adrenergic receptors with adenylate cyclase stimulation and modification of this interaction by guanine nucleotides has been made in two model systems, the frog and turkey erythrocyte. Objective analysis of the data was facilitated by the development of new graphical methods which involve the use of logit-logit transformations of percent receptor occupancy versus percent enzyme stimulation plots (coupling curves). Receptor-cyclase coupling in turkey erythrocyte membranes demonstrates a proportional relationship between receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase activation and is unaffected by exogenous guanine nucleotides. By comparison, the proportional relationship of receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase activation observed in frog erythrocyte membranes in the absence of guanine nucleotides is modified by the addition of exogenous guanine nucleotides such that a greater fractional enzyme stimulation is elicited by low receptor occupancy. Methodological criteria crucial for valid comparison of receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase activity are delineated. In addition, the possible molecular mechanisms of receptor-cyclase coupling which might give rise to the coupling curves observed are discussed.

  12. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide requires parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C to entrain circadian rhythms to a predictable phase

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Tsai, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) depend on transcriptional repression by Period (PER)1 and PER2 proteins within single cells and on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling between cells. Because VIP is released by SCN neurons in a circadian pattern, and, after photic stimulation, it has been suggested to play a role in the synchronization to environmental light cycles. It is not known, however, if or how VIP entrains circadian gene expression or behavior. Here, we tested candidate signaling pathways required for VIP-mediated entrainment of SCN rhythms. We found that single applications of VIP reset PER2 rhythms in a time- and dose-dependent manner that differed from light. Unlike VIP-mediated signaling in other cell types, simultaneous antagonism of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities was required to block the VIP-induced phase shifts of SCN rhythms. Consistent with this, VIP rapidly increased intracellular cAMP in most SCN neurons. Critically, daily VIP treatment entrained PER2 rhythms to a predicted phase angle within several days, depending on the concentration of VIP and the interval between VIP applications. We conclude that VIP entrains circadian timing among SCN neurons through rapid and parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities. PMID:21389307

  13. Desensitization of adenylate cyclase in a human keratinocyte cell line by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E.J.; Young, M.J.; Toscano, D.L.; Greenlee, W.F.; Toscano, W.A. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of adenylate cyclase in human keratinocyte cell line SCC 12 is altered after TCDD exposure. TCDD-treated cells show a 50% decrease in isoproterenol - stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. The reduced responsiveness of these cells to isoproterenol was concentration dependent on TCDD. The inactive TCDD analog, 2,7-dibenzo-p-dioxin did not affect isoproterenol activation. Altered hormone stimulation of adenylate cyclase can result from decreased receptor number or affinity, a defect in coupling of receptors via G/sub s/, or modification of the catalytic subunit. To distinguish between these possibilities, enzyme activity was assayed in the presence of different site-specific activators of this enzyme system. Cells exposed to TCDD for 24 hr showed a reduced response to the GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p. Forskolin stimulation was not affected by TCDD treatment. (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol (ICP) binding to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors was examined after TCDD treatment. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ICP was unaffected by TCDD treatment, whereas, the total number of specific ICP-binding sites was reduced from 1080 in control cells to 780 sites per cell in TCDD (10 nM) exposed cells.

  14. Mode of coupling between the beta-adrenergic receptor and adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tolkovsky, A M; Levitzki, A

    1978-09-01

    The mode of coupling of the beta-adrenergic receptor to the enzyme adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes was analyzed in detail. A number of experimental techniques have been used: (1) measurement of the kinetics of cyclase activation to its permanetly active state in the presence of guanylyl imidodiphosphate, as a function of hormone concentrations; (2) measurement of antagonist and agoinst binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor prior and subsequent to the enzyme activation by hormone and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. On the bases of these two approaches, all the models of receptor to enzyme coupling which involve an equilibrium between the enzyme and the receptor can be rejected. The binding and the kinetic data, however, can be fitted by two diametrically opposed models of receptor to enzyme coupling: (a) the precouped enzyme-receptor model where activation of the enzyme occurs, according to the following scheme: formula (see text) where H is the hormone, RE is the precoupled respetor-enzyme complex, k1 and k2 are the rate constants describing hormone binding, and k is the rate constant characterizing the formation of HRE' from the intermediate HRE. According to this model, the activated complex is composed of all of the interacting species. (b) The other model is the collision coupling mechanism: formula (see test) wheere KH is the horome-receptor dissociation constant, k1 is the bimolecular rate constant governing the formation of HRE, and k3 the rate constant governing the activation of the enzyme. In this case the intermediate never accumulates and constitutes only a small fraction of the total receptor and adenylate cyclase concentrations. In order to establish which of the two mechanisms governs the mode of adenylate cyclase activation by its receptor, a diagnostic experiment was performed: Progressive inactivation of the beta receptor by a specific affinity label was found to cause a decrease in the maximal binding capacity of the receptor and a

  15. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  16. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew M; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E; Frenkel, Mogen M; Reilly, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  17. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  18. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide induces a depressive-like phenotype in rats

    PubMed Central

    Seiglie, Mariel P.; Smith, Karen L.; Blasio, Angelo; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a chronic, life-threatening psychiatric condition characterized by depressed mood, psychomotor alterations, and a markedly diminished interest or pleasure in most activities, known as anhedonia. Available pharmacotherapies have limited success and the need for new strategies is clear. Recent studies attribute a major role to the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) system in mediating the response to stress. PACAP knockout mice display profound alterations in depressive-like behaviors and genetic association studies have demonstrated that genetic variants of the PACAP gene are associated with MDD. However, the effects of PACAP on depressive-like behaviors in rodents have not yet been systematically examined. The present study investigated the effects of central administration of PACAP in rats on depressive-like behaviors, using well-established animal models that represent some of the endophenotypes of depression. We used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) to assess the brain reward function, saccharin preference test to assess anhedonia, social interaction to assess social withdrawal, and forced swim test (FST) to assess behavioral despair. PACAP raised the current threshold for ICSS, elevation blocked by the PACAP antagonist PACAP(6-38). PACAP reduced the preference for a sweet saccharin solution, and reduced the time the rats spent interacting with a novel animal. Interestingly, PACAP administration did not affect immobility in the FST. Our results demonstrate a role for the central PACAP/PAC1R system in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors, and suggest that hyperactivity of the PACAP/PAC1R system may contribute to the pathophysiology of depression, particularly the associated anhedonic symptomatology and social dysfunction. PMID:26264905

  19. Insect Stage-Specific Adenylate Cyclases Regulate Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Saada, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed “social motility,” based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  20. Insect stage-specific adenylate cyclases regulate social motility in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Miguel A; Saada, Edwin A; Hill, Kent L

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed "social motility," based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  1. Aluminum: a requirement for activation of the regulatory component of adenylate cyclase by fluoride.

    PubMed Central

    Sternweis, P C; Gilman, A G

    1982-01-01

    Activation of the purified guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory component (G/F) of adenylate cyclase by F- requires the presence of Mg2+ and another factor. This factor, which contaminates commercial preparations of various nucleotides and disposable glass test tubes, has been identified as Al3+. In the presence of 10 mM Mg2+ and 5 mM F-, AlCl3 causes activation of G/F with an apparent activation constant of approximately 1-5 muM. The requirement for Al3+ is highly specific; of 28 other metals tested, only Be2+ promoted activation of G/F by F-. PMID:6289322

  2. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: Characterization and Differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gina M.; Hsia, Hung-Lun J.; Green, Candace S.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2005-01-01

    Bordetella hinzii is a commensal respiratory microorganism in poultry but is increasingly being recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although associated with a variety of disease states, practically nothing is known about the mechanisms employed by this bacterium. In this study, we show by DNA sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR that both commensal and clinical strains of B. hinzii possess and transcriptionally express cyaA, the gene encoding adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) in other pathogenic Bordetella species. By Western blotting, we also found that B. hinzii produces full-length ACT protein in quantities that are comparable to those made by B. pertussis. In contrast to B. pertussis ACT, however, ACT from B. hinzii is less extractable from whole bacteria, nonhemolytic, has a 50-fold reduction in adenylate cyclase activity, and is unable to elevate cyclic AMP levels in host macrophages (nontoxic). The decrease in enzymatic activity is attributable, at least in part, to a decreased binding affinity of B. hinzii ACT for calmodulin, the eukaryotic activator of B. pertussis ACT. In addition, we demonstrate that the lack of intoxication by B. hinzii ACT may be due to the absence of expression of cyaC, the gene encoding the accessory protein required for the acylation of B. pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism. PMID:16267282

  3. Guanine-nucleotide-dependent inhibition of adenylate cyclase of rabbit heart by glucagon.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Z; Tkachuk, V A

    1984-07-16

    The present study demonstrates an inhibitory effect of glucagon on the adenylate cyclase system of rabbit heart. Inhibition was maximal (22-40%) at 0.1-0.01 microM glucagon and required the presence of 0.01-0.1 mM GTP or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate (GuoPP[NH]P). Reduced or no inhibitor effect of glucagon was observed: (a) after limited proteolysis of plasma membrane proteins by trypsin, (b) in the presence of 1 mM Mn2+, (c) in the absence of Na+, and (d) during the first 10 min of incubation if GuoPP[NH]P was the activating ligand. With GTP as the activating ligand, inhibition of cyclase by glucagon occurred without delay. These data are consistent with a mediation of glucagon inhibition by a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein. In the presence of ethanol (0.2 M) or benzyl alcohol (0.05 M), agents which are known to increase the fluidity of biological membranes, glucagon increased the enzyme activity in a guanine-nucleotide-dependent manner. Activation of cyclase in the presence of alcohols was maximal (30-60%) at 0.1-1.0 microM glucagon and 0.01 mM guanine nucleotides. Data suggest that glucagon receptors can interact with both the activatory and inhibitory guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and the physical state of membranes may play a role in determining which interaction will be preferential.

  4. Adrenalectomy mediated alterations in adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refai, M.; Chan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Adrenalectomy caused a large increase in the number of ..beta..-adrenergic binding sites on liver plasma membranes as measured by /sup 125/I-iodocyanopindolol (22 and 102 fmol/mg protein for control and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats). Concomitantly an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-yohimbine was also observed (104 and 175 fmol/mg protein for control and adx membranes). Epinephrine-stimulated increase in cyclic AMP accumulation in isolated hepatocytes were greater in cells from ADX rats. This increase in ..beta..-adrenergic mediated action was much less than what may be expected as a result of the increase in the ..beta..-adrenergic binding in ADX membranes. In addition phenoxybenzamine (10 ..mu..M) further augmented this action of epinephrine in both control and ADX cells. To test the hypothesis that the increase in the number of the inhibitory ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in adrenalectomy is responsible for the muted ..beta..-adrenergic response, the authors injected rats with pertussis toxin (PT). This treatment may cause the in vivo ribosylation of the inhibitory binding protein (Ni). Adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in liver plasma membranes prepared from treated and untreated animals was measured. In contrast with control rats, treatment of ADX rats with PT resulted in a significant increase in the basal activity of AC (5.5 and 7.7 pmol/mg protein/min for untreated and treated rats respectively). Isoproterenol (10 ..mu..M), caused AC activity to increase to 6.5 and 8.4 pmol/mg protein/min for membranes obtained from ADX untreated and ADX treated rats respectively. The ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonists had no significant effect on the ..beta..-adrenergic-mediated activation of AC in liver plasma membranes from PT treated control and ADX rats. The authors conclude that the ..beta..-adrenergic activation of AC is attenuated by Ni protein both directly and as a result of activation of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors.

  5. Adenylate cyclase 5 is required for melanophore and male pattern development in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Kottler, Verena A; Künstner, Axel; Koch, Iris; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Langenecker, Tobias; Hoffmann, Margarete; Sharma, Eshita; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) are colorful fish that have attracted the attention of pigmentation researchers for almost a century. Here, we report that the blond phenotype of the guppy is caused by a spontaneous mutation in the guppy ortholog of adenylate cyclase 5 (adcy5). Using double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, we linked the blond phenotype to a candidate region of 118 kb, in which we subsequently identified a 2-bp deletion in adcy5 that alters splicing and leads to a premature stop codon. We show that adcy5, which affects life span and melanoma growth in mouse, is required for melanophore development and formation of male orange pigmentation traits in the guppy. We find that some components of the male orange pattern are particularly sensitive to loss of Adcy5 function. Our work thus reveals a function for Adcy5 in patterning of fish color ornaments.

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  7. The biological role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in growth and feeding behavior in juvenile fish.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Juana Maria; Oliva, Aymé; Morales, Antonio; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda Elisa; Herrera, Fidel; Cabrales, Ania; Pérez, Ever; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2010-11-01

    To date, many technologies have been developed to increase efficiency in aquaculture, but very few successful biotechnology molecules have arrived on the market. In this context, marine biotechnology has an opportunity to develop products to improve the output of fish in aquaculture. Published in vivo studies on the action of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in fish are scarce. Recently, our group, for the first time, demonstrated the biological role of this neuropeptide administrated by immersion baths in the growth and development of larval fish. In this work, we have evaluated the effects of recombinant Clarias gariepinus PACAP administration by intraperitoneal injection on growth performance and feeding behavior in juvenile fish. Our results showed the physiological role of this peptide for growth control in fish, including the juvenile stage, and confirm that its biological functions are well conserved in fish, since C. gariepinus PACAP stimulated growth in juvenile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. In addition, we have observed that the growth-promoting effect of PACAP in juvenile tilapia was correlated with higher GH concentration in serum. With regard to the neuroendocrine regulation of growth control by PACAP, it was demonstrated that PACAP stimulates food intake in juvenile tilapia. In general, PACAP appears to act in the regulation of the growth control in juvenile fish. These findings propose that PACAP is a prominent target with the potential to stimulate fish growth in aquaculture. PMID:20853308

  8. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  9. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  10. Adenylate cyclase 3: a new target for anti-obesity drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Shen, C; Seed Ahmed, M; Östenson, C-G; Gu, H F

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become epidemic worldwide, and abdominal obesity has a negative impact on health. Current treatment options on obesity, however, still remain limited. It is then of importance to find a new target for anti-obesity drug development based upon recent molecular studies in obesity. Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is the third member of adenylyl cyclase family and catalyses the synthesis of cAMP from ATP. Genetic studies with candidate gene and genome-wide association study approaches have demonstrated that ADCY3 genetic polymorphisms are associated with obesity in European and Chinese populations. Epigenetic studies have indicated that increased DNA methylation levels in the ADCY3 gene are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Furthermore, biological analyses with animal models have implicated that ADCY3 dysfunction resulted in increased body weight and fat mass, while reduction of body weight is partially explained by ADCY3 activation. In this review, we describe genomic and biological features of ADCY3, summarize genetic and epigenetic association studies of the ADCY3 gene with obesity and discuss dysfunction and activation of ADCY3. Based upon all data, we suggest that ADCY3 is a new target for anti-obesity drug development. Further investigation on the effectiveness of ADCY3 activator and its delivery approach to treat abdominal obesity has been taken into our consideration. PMID:27256589

  11. Magnesium regulation of the beta-receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. II. Sc3+ as a Mg2 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Maguire, M E

    1982-09-01

    Sc3+ bears the same relationship to Mg2+ as La3+ to Ca2+, a similar ionic radius but increased charge. Therefore, the possibility was investigated that Sc3+ would be a Mg2+ antagonist at Mg2+ sites on the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex of the murine S49 lymphoma cell. Sc3+ is consistently much more potent than La3+ in inhibiting adenylate cyclase regardless of the mode of activation. IC50 values for Sc3+ of 10-30 microM were observed, whereas those for La3+ were about 300 microM. However, Sc3+ does not block the ability of Mg2+ to increase beta-receptor affinity for agonist nor alter agonist affinity by itself. Furthermore, Sc3+ is a weak inhibitor of the beta-receptor-mediated inhibition of Mg2+ influx. In cyc- S49 membranes, in which the catalytic subunit of cyclase cannot interact with the nucleotide-coupling protein(s), Sc3+ is as potent as in wild-type S49 membranes and again more potent than La3+. Substrate kinetics show that Sc3+, like Mg2+, modulates adenylate cyclase activity by affecting the Vmax without altering the Km for substrate. The data suggest that Sc3+ is a specific antagonist of Mg2+ at the Mg2+ site on the catalytic subunit and support the suggestion that there are two distinct sites for Mg2+ with different functions, one site on the coupling protein(s) and one on the catalytic subunit. It was also found that an apparent complex of Sc3+ and F-, ScF4-, is a potent inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, with an IC50 of 3 microM. PMID:6292689

  12. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Linalool from rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) oil inhibits adenylate cyclase in the retina, contributing to understanding its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Lucia de Fatima S; Maia, José Guilherme S; de Parijós, Amanda M; de Souza, Rita Z; Barata, Lauro Euclides S

    2012-01-01

    Rosewood oil (RO) (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) is rich in linalool, a monoterpene alcohol, which has well studied anxiolytic, sedative and anticonvulsant effects. The inhibition of the increases in cAMP protects against seizures in a diversity of models of epilepsy. In this paper, the principal aim was to investigate the effects of RO, (±)-linalool and (-)-linalool) on adenylate cyclase. They were tested in chick retinas and forskolin was used to stimulate the enzyme target. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-imidazolidin-2-one, and the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist 3-isobutyl-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), were used to control the participation of phosphodiesterase and adenosine receptors in the resulting effects, respectively. The cAMP accumulation was measured by enzyme immune assay (EIA). Rosewood oil, (-)-linalool and (±)-linalool inhibited exclusively the cAMP accumulation stimulated by forskolin, even when adenosine receptors were blocked with IBMX. The IC(50) values (in μ m concentration range) calculated from their concentration response-curves were not statistically different, however, the compounds presented a different relative efficacy. These results extend the range of subcellular mechanisms underlying the relaxant action of linalool on the central nervous system.

  15. Circulating kisspeptin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) do not correlate with gonadotropin serum levels.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Purwana, Indri N; Oride, Aki; Mijiddorj, Tselmeg; Sukhbaatar, Unurjargal; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2013-06-01

    Kisspeptins are known to be the principle regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis. In addition, the role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the regulation of pituitary gonadotropins has been elucidated. We measured plasma concentrations of kisspeptin and PACAP and determined whether the levels of these peptides varied in proportion to circulating gonadotropin levels. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were higher in postmenopausal women and in patients with premature ovarian failure (POF) and lower in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) compared with the LH level in normally menstruating women. Similarly, serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels were higher in postmenopausal women and in patients with POF but lower in pregnant women and patients with IHH compared with normally menstruating women. Plasma levels of kisspeptins were significantly higher in pregnant women compared with normally menstruating women. However, no significant differences were observed in postmenopausal women, patients with POF, and patients with IHH. On the other hand, plasma levels of PACAP were significantly lower in pregnant women, patients with POF, and in IHH patients when compared with normally menstruating women. No significant differences were observed in PACAP concentration between postmenopausal women and in normally menstruating women. Our observations suggest that the serum levels of kisspeptins and PACAP did not correlate with variations in serum gonadotropin levels.

  16. Regulation by the quorum sensor from Vibrio indicates a receptor function for the membrane anchors of adenylate cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Stephanie; Bassler, Jens; Schultz, Joachim E

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate cyclases convert intra- and extracellular stimuli into a second messenger cAMP signal. Many bacterial and most eukaryotic ACs possess membrane anchors with six transmembrane spans. We replaced the anchor of the AC Rv1625c by the quorum-sensing receptor from Vibrio harveyi which has an identical 6TM design and obtained an active, membrane-anchored AC. We show that a canonical class III AC is ligand-regulated in vitro and in vivo. At 10 µM, the cholera-autoinducer CAI-1 stimulates activity 4.8-fold. A sequence based clustering of membrane domains of class III ACs and quorum-sensing receptors established six groups of potential structural and functional similarities. The data support the notion that 6TM AC membrane domains may operate as receptors which directly regulate AC activity as opposed and in addition to the indirect regulation by GPCRs in eukaryotic congeners. This adds a completely novel dimension of potential AC regulation in bacteria and vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13098.001 PMID:26920221

  17. Regulation by the quorum sensor from Vibrio indicates a receptor function for the membrane anchors of adenylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Beltz, Stephanie; Bassler, Jens; Schultz, Joachim E

    2016-02-27

    Adenylate cyclases convert intra- and extracellular stimuli into a second messenger cAMP signal. Many bacterial and most eukaryotic ACs possess membrane anchors with six transmembrane spans. We replaced the anchor of the AC Rv1625c by the quorum-sensing receptor from Vibrio harveyi which has an identical 6TM design and obtained an active, membrane-anchored AC. We show that a canonical class III AC is ligand-regulated in vitro and in vivo. At 10 µM, the cholera-autoinducer CAI-1 stimulates activity 4.8-fold. A sequence based clustering of membrane domains of class III ACs and quorum-sensing receptors established six groups of potential structural and functional similarities. The data support the notion that 6TM AC membrane domains may operate as receptors which directly regulate AC activity as opposed and in addition to the indirect regulation by GPCRs in eukaryotic congeners. This adds a completely novel dimension of potential AC regulation in bacteria and vertebrates.

  18. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  19. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1HOP1 Receptor Activation Coordinates Multiple Neurotrophic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor; Lutz, Eve; MacKenzie, Christopher; Schutz, Kristin C.; Dozark, Kate; Braas, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    MAPK and Akt pathways are predominant mediators of trophic signaling for many neuronal systems. Among the vasoactive intestinal peptide/secretin/glucagon family of related peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) binding to specific PAC1 receptor isoforms can engage multiple signaling pathways and promote neuroprotection through mechanisms that are not well understood. Using a primary sympathetic neuronal system, the current studies demonstrate that PACAP activation of PAC1HOP1 receptors engages both MAPK and Akt neurotrophic pathways in an integrated program to facilitate neuronal survival after growth factor withdrawal. PACAP not only stimulated prosurvival ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation but also abrogated SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK signaling in parallel. In contrast to the potent and rapid effects of PACAP in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, PACAP stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a late phase of PAC1HOP1 receptor signaling. From inhibitor and immunoprecipitation analyses, the PACAP/PAC1HOP1 receptor-mediated Akt responses did not represent transactivation mechanisms but appeared to depend on Gαq/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ activity and vesicular internalization pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ-selective inhibitors blocked PACAP-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary neuronal cultures and in PAC1HOP1-overexpressing cell lines; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the receptor effectors attenuated PACAP-mediated Akt activation. Similarly, perturbation of endocytic pathways also blocked Akt phosphorylation. Between ERK and Akt pathways, PACAP-stimulated Akt signaling was the primary cascade that attenuated cultured neuron apoptosis after growth factor withdrawal. The partitioning of PACAP-mediated Akt signaling in endosomes may be a key mechanism contributing to the high spatial and temporal specificity in signal transduction necessary for survival pathways. PMID:20093365

  20. Regulation of uterine adenylate cyclase by magnesium, manganese and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rayford, W.; Sanders, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    The regulation of rat uterine adenylate cyclase (AC) by Mg/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/ was examined during metestrus and proestrus of the estrous cycle and Days 1 and 4 of pseudopregnancy, before and after a mild trauma to the uterus. Mg/sup 2 +/ increased cyclase activity on all days measured. Maximal enzymic activity occurred with 5-10 mM Mg/sup 2 +/ during Day 4 following a mild traumatic stimulus to the uterus. The apparent Ka for Mg/sup 2 +/ was not significantly changed during these days. AC activity as a function of Mn/sup 2 +/ concentration was biphasic. It increased with increasing concentrations of Mn/sup 2 +/ and was maximal at 1.0-2.5 mM during Day 4 following uterine trauma. Higher concentrations of Mn/sup 2 +/ were inhibitory. The apparent Ka for Mn/sup 2 +/ was 0.36 +/- 0.05 mM and was not significantly altered during the days studied. Even though the Ka for Mn/sup 2 +/ was ten-fold lower than that for Mg/sup 2 +/, the Vmaxes shown with both ions were similar. Ca/sup 2 +/ is a potent inhibitor of uterine AC activity. When measured at its I.C./sub 50/, it lowered AC activity as Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations were increased. Ca/sup 2 +/ did not have a significant effect on AC activated by Mn/sup 2 +/. The data showed that Mg/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/ might have important regulatory roles in the activation and inhibition of uterine AC in the rodent.

  1. Region-Specific Disruption of Adenylate Cyclase Type 1 Gene Differentially Affects Somatosensorimotor Behaviors in Mice(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2014-01-01

    Cover FigureRegion-specific adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) loss of function differentially affects both patterning and sensorimotor behaviors in mice. AC1 is expressed at all levels of the somatosensory pathway and plays a major role in refinement and patterning of topographic sensory maps. Cortex-specific AC1 loss of function (CxAC1KO mice) does not affect barrel patterning and activation of specific barrels corresponding to stimulated whiskers and does not impair sensorimotor behaviors. While global (AC1KO) and thalamus-specific (ThAC1KO) AC1 loss of function leads to absence of barrel patterns, selective whisker stimulation activates topographically aligned cortical loci. Despite functional topography of the whisker-barrel cortex, sensorimotor and social behaviors are impaired, indicating the importance of patterning of topographical sensory maps in the neocortex. Adenylate cyclase type I (AC1) is primarily, and, abundantly, expressed in the brain. Intracellular calcium/calmodulin increases regulate AC1 in an activity-dependent manner. Upon stimulation, AC1 produces cAMP and it is involved in the patterning and the refinement of neural circuits. In mice, spontaneous mutations or targeted deletion of the Adcy1 gene, which encodes AC1, resulted in neuronal pattern formation defects. Neural modules in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex, the barrels, which represent the topographic distribution of the whiskers on the snout, failed to form (Welker et al., 1996; Abdel-Majid et al., 1998). Cortex- or thalamus-specific Adcy1 deletions led to different cortical pattern phenotypes, with thalamus-specific disruption phenotype being more severe (Iwasato et al., 2008; Suzuki et al., 2013). Despite the absence of barrels in the "barrelless"/Adcy1 null mice, thalamocortical terminal bouton density and activation of cortical zones following whisker stimulation were roughly topographic (Abdel-Majid et al., 1998; Gheorghita et al., 2006). To what extent does patterning of the

  2. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tlili, Mounira; Rouatbi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Vaudry, David; Wurtz, Olivier; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h) for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM) for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC) and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α) in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders. PMID:26199679

  3. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10766.001 PMID:26650353

  4. Heterogeneity of Bordetella bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase (cyaA) RTX domain.

    PubMed

    Wehmann, Enikő; Khayer, Bernadett; Magyar, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread pathogen, with a broad host range, occasionally including humans. Diverse virulence factors (adhesins, toxins) allow its adaptation to its host, but this property of the adenylate cyclase (cyaA) toxin is not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the repeats-in-toxin domain of B. bronchiseptica cyaA with PCR, followed by restriction fragment length analysis. Of ninety-two B. bronchiseptica strains collected from different hosts and geographic regions, 72 (78.3 %) carried cyaA and four RFLP types (A-D) were established using NarI and SalI. However, in 20 strains, cyaA was replaced with a peptide transport protein operon. A phylogenetic tree based on partial nucleotide sequences of cyaA revealed that group 2 contains strains of specifically human origin, whereas subgroup 1a contains all but one of the strains from pigs. The human strains showed many PCR-RFLP and sequence variants, confirming the clonal population structure of B. bronchiseptica. PMID:25475014

  5. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. PMID:26650353

  6. Heterogeneity of Bordetella bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase (cyaA) RTX domain.

    PubMed

    Wehmann, Enikő; Khayer, Bernadett; Magyar, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread pathogen, with a broad host range, occasionally including humans. Diverse virulence factors (adhesins, toxins) allow its adaptation to its host, but this property of the adenylate cyclase (cyaA) toxin is not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the repeats-in-toxin domain of B. bronchiseptica cyaA with PCR, followed by restriction fragment length analysis. Of ninety-two B. bronchiseptica strains collected from different hosts and geographic regions, 72 (78.3 %) carried cyaA and four RFLP types (A-D) were established using NarI and SalI. However, in 20 strains, cyaA was replaced with a peptide transport protein operon. A phylogenetic tree based on partial nucleotide sequences of cyaA revealed that group 2 contains strains of specifically human origin, whereas subgroup 1a contains all but one of the strains from pigs. The human strains showed many PCR-RFLP and sequence variants, confirming the clonal population structure of B. bronchiseptica.

  7. Restricting mobility of Gsalpha relative to the beta2-adrenoceptor enhances adenylate cyclase activity by reducing Gsalpha GTPase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel-Seifert, K; Lee, T W; Seifert, R; Kobilka, B K

    1998-01-01

    The beta2-adrenoceptor (beta2AR) activates the G-protein Gsalpha to stimulate adenylate cyclase (AC). Fusion of the beta2AR C-terminus to the N-terminus of Gsalpha (producing beta2ARGsalpha) markedly increases the efficiency of receptor/G-protein coupling compared with the non-fused state. This increase in coupling efficiency can be attributed to the physical proximity of receptor and G-protein. To determine the optimal length for the tether between receptor and G-protein we constructed fusion proteins from which 26 [beta2AR(Delta26)Gsalpha] or 70 [beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha] residues of the beta2AR C-terminus had been deleted and compared the properties of these fusion proteins with the previously described beta2ARGsalpha. Compared with beta2ARGsalpha, basal and agonist-stimulated GTP hydrolysis was markedly decreased in beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha, whereas the effect of the deletion on binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) was relatively small. Surprisingly, deletions did not alter the efficiency of coupling of the beta2AR to Gsalpha as assessed by GTP[S]-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding. Moreover, basal and ligand-regulated AC activities in membranes expressing beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha and beta2AR(Delta26)Gsalpha were higher than in membranes expressing beta2ARGsalpha. These findings suggest that restricting the mobility of Gsalpha relative to the beta2AR results in a decrease in G-protein inactivation by GTP hydrolysis and thereby enhanced activation of AC. PMID:9729456

  8. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  9. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  10. Hemodynamic actions of systemically injected pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to characterize the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP-27 0.1-2.0 nmol/kg, i.v.) in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and (2) to determine the roles of the autonomic nervous system, adrenal catecholamines and endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of PACAP-27-mediated effects on hemodynamic function. PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial blood pressure and hindquarter and mesenteric vascular resistances in saline-treated rats. PACAP-27 also produced pronounced falls in mean arterial blood pressure in rats treated with the ganglion blocker, chlorisondamine (5 mg/kg, i.v.). The hypotensive and vasodilator actions of PACAP-27 were not attenuated by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.), or the NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 50 micromol/kg, i.v.). PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate whereas the hypotensive response produced by the nitrovasodilator, sodium nitroprusside (10 microg/kg, i.v.), was associated with a minimal tachycardia. The PACAP-27-induced tachycardia was unaffected by chlorisondamine, but was virtually abolished by propranolol. These results suggest that the vasodilator effects of PACAP-27 are due to actions in the microcirculation rather than to the release of adrenal catecholamines and that this vasodilation may not involve the release of endothelium-derived NO. These results also suggest that PACAP-27 produces tachycardia by directly releasing norepinephrine from cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals rather than by direct or baroreceptor reflex-mediated increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  11. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-Ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R H; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-06-14

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  12. Reconstitution of beta-adrenergic receptor with components of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Hekman, M; Feder, D; Keenan, A K; Gal, A; Klein, H W; Pfeuffer, T; Levitzki, A; Helmreich, E J

    1984-01-01

    Beta 1-Adrenergic receptor proteins were extracted from turkey erythrocyte membranes with lauroyl sucrose and digitonin and purified by affinity chromatography on a column of alprenolol agarose Affi-gel 10 or 15. The 5000-fold purified receptor is able to couple functionally with the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GS) from either turkey or duck erythrocytes. Functional coupling was achieved by three different approaches. (i) Purified beta-receptor polypeptides were coupled in phospholipid (asolectin) vesicles with GS from a crude cholate or lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes. The detergent was removed and vesicles were formed with SM-2 beads. (ii) Purified beta-receptor was reconstituted with pure, homogeneous GS in asolectin vesicles. (iii) Purified beta-receptors were either coupled in asolectin vesicles with a mixture of pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS and a lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes, or with pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS alone. The decay of activity was measured on addition of GTP and hormone. In (ii) and (iii), the detergent was removed and vesicles were formed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 columns. In each of the three different experimental conditions, the beta-receptor was activated with l-isoproterenol and activation was blocked with d,l-propranolol. Activated GS were measured separately by means of their capacity to activate a crude Lubrol PX-solubilized adenylate cyclase preparation from rabbit myocardial membrane. The kinetics of GS activation by purified beta-receptors occupied by l-isoproterenol was first order and activation was linearly dependent on receptor concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:6098472

  13. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide prevents contrast-induced nephropathy in a novel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Altaf-M; Maderdrut, Jerome L; Li, Min; Toliver, Herman L; Coy, David H; Simon, Eric E; Batuman, Vecihi

    2013-01-01

    We determined whether pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP38) prevents contrast-induced nephropathy using human renal proximal tubule epithelial (HK-2) cells and homozygous endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient (eNOS−/−) mice as a novel in vivo model. Cultured HK-2 cells were pretreated with 10−9–10−6 mol/L PACAP or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) for 1 h, and then exposed to ionic (Urografin) or nonionic (iohexol) contrast media at 50 mg iodine/mL for 24 h. Male eNOS−/− mice received Urografin (1.85 g iodine/kg) intravenously after water deprivation for 24 h, and PACAP38 (10 μg) intraperitoneally 1 h before and 12 h after Urografin injection. Urografin and iohexol increased lactate dehydrogenase and kidney injury molecule 1 in the culture medium, induced apoptosis, and inhibited cell proliferation in HK-2 cell cultures. PACAP38 and VIP reduced these changes in a dose-dependent manner. PACAP38 was more potent than VIP. In eNOS−/− mice, Urografin raised serum creatinine and cystatin C levels, caused renal tubule damage, induced apoptosis, and promoted neutrophil influx. Urografin also increased kidney protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and kidney mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines, kidney injury biomarkers, and enzymes responsible for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. PACAP38 significantly reduced these Urografin-induced changes in eNOS−/− mice. This study shows that both Urografin and iohexol are toxic to HK-2 cells, but Urografin is more toxic than iohexol. Urografin causes acute kidney injury in eNOS−/− mice. PACAP38 protects HK-2 cells and mouse kidneys from contrast media and is a potential therapeutic agent for contrast-induced nephropathy. PMID:24400164

  14. Quantification of the Adenylate Cyclase Toxin of Bordetella pertussis In Vitro and during Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Joshua C.; Gray, Mary C.; Warfel, Jason M.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Jones, Tara F.; Day, Shandra R.; Bowden, James; Poulter, Melinda D.; Donato, Gina M.; Merkel, Tod J.

    2013-01-01

    Whooping cough results from infection of the respiratory tract with Bordetella pertussis, and the secreted adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is essential for the bacterium to establish infection. Despite extensive study of the mechanism of ACT cytotoxicity and its effects over a range of concentrations in vitro, ACT has not been observed or quantified in vivo, and thus the concentration of ACT at the site of infection is unknown. The recently developed baboon model of infection mimics the prolonged cough and transmissibility of pertussis, and we hypothesized that measurement of ACT in nasopharyngeal washes (NPW) from baboons, combined with human and in vitro data, would provide an estimate of the ACT concentration in the airway during infection. NPW contained up to ∼108 CFU/ml B. pertussis and 1 to 5 ng/ml ACT at the peak of infection. Nasal aspirate specimens from two human infants with pertussis contained bacterial concentrations similar to those in the baboons, with 12 to 20 ng/ml ACT. When ∼108 CFU/ml of a laboratory strain of B. pertussis was cultured in vitro, ACT production was detected in 60 min and reached a plateau of ∼60 ng/ml in 6 h. Furthermore, when bacteria were brought into close proximity to target cells by centrifugation, intoxication was increased 4-fold. Collectively, these data suggest that at the bacterium-target cell interface during infection of the respiratory tract, the concentration of ACT can exceed 100 ng/ml, providing a reference point for future studies of ACT and pertussis pathogenesis. PMID:23429530

  15. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Satoko; Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Toyama, Keiko; Shintani, Norihito; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide acting as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, or neurotrophic factor. PACAP is widely expressed throughout the brain and exerts its functions through the PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1). Recent studies reveal that genetic variants of the PACAP and PAC1 genes are associated with mental disorders, and several behavioral abnormalities of PACAP knockout (KO) mice are reported. However, an insufficient number of backcrosses was made using PACAP KO mice on the C57BL/6J background due to their postnatal mortality. To elucidate the effects of PACAP on neuropsychiatric function, the PACAP gene was knocked out in F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J × 129SvEv) for appropriate control of the genetic background. The PACAP KO mice were then subjected to a behavioral test battery. PACAP deficiency had no significant effects on neurological screen. As shown previously, the mice exhibited significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel environment and abnormal anxiety-like behavior, while no obvious differences between genotypes were shown in home cage (HC) activity. In contrast to previous reports, the PACAP KO mice showed normal prepulse inhibition (PPI) and slightly decreased depression-like behavior. Previous study demonstrates that the social interaction (SI) in a resident-intruder test was decreased in PACAP KO mice. On the other hand, we showed that PACAP KO mice exhibited increased SI in Crawley's three-chamber social approach test, although PACAP KO had no significant impact on SI in a HC. PACAP KO mice also exhibited mild performance deficit in working memory in an eight-arm radial maze (RM) and the T-maze (TM), while they did not show any significant abnormalities in the left-right discrimination task in the TM. These results suggest that PACAP has an important role in the regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, anxiety-like behavior and, potentially, working memory. PMID:23060763

  16. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  17. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  18. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  19. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-01-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  20. The Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre.

    PubMed

    Al-Younis, Inas; Wong, Aloysius; Gehring, Chris

    2015-12-21

    Adenylate cyclases (ACs) catalyse the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognised as an important signalling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP7(1-100) is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP7(1-100) generates cAMP in vitro. PMID:26638082

  1. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  2. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  3. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  4. Hypoxia and glucose independently regulate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    We explored the effects of two components of ischemia, hypoxia and glucose deprivation, on the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR)-adenylate cyclase system in a model of hypoxic injury in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. After 2 h of hypoxia in the presence of 5 mM glucose, cell surface beta AR density (3H-CGP-12177) decreased from 54.8 +/- 8.4 to 39 +/- 6.3 (SE) fmol/mg protein (n = 10, P less than 0.025), while cytosolic beta AR density (125I-iodocyanopindolol [ICYP]) increased by 74% (n = 5, P less than 0.05). Upon reexposure to oxygen cell surface beta AR density returned toward control levels. Cells exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation without glucose exhibited similar alterations in beta AR density. In hypoxic cells incubated with 5 mM glucose, the addition of 1 microM (-)-norepinephrine (NE) increased cAMP generation from 29.3 +/- 10.6 to 54.2 +/- 16.1 pmol/35 mm plate (n = 5, P less than 0.025); upon reoxygenation cAMP levels remained elevated above control (n = 5, P less than 0.05). In contrast, NE-stimulated cAMP content in glucose-deprived hypoxic myocytes fell by 31% (n = 5, P less than 0.05) and did not return to control levels with reoxygenation. beta AR-agonist affinity assessed by (-)-isoproterenol displacement curves was unaltered after 2 h of hypoxia irrespective of glucose content. Addition of forskolin (100 microM) to glucose-supplemented hypoxic cells increased cAMP generation by 60% (n = 5; P less than 0.05), but in the absence of glucose this effect was not seen. In cells incubated in glucose-containing medium, the decline in intracellular ATP levels was attenuated after 2 h of hypoxia (21 vs. 40%, P less than 0.05). Similarly, glucose supplementation prevented LDH release in hypoxic myocytes. We conclude that (a) oxygen and glucose independently regulate beta AR density and agonist-stimulated cAMP accumulation; (b) hypoxia has no effect on beta AR-agonist or antagonist affinity; (c) 5 mM glucose attenuates the rate of decline in

  5. Expression of beta 1- and beta 3-adrenergic-receptor messages and adenylate cyclase beta-adrenergic response in bovine perirenal adipose tissue during its transformation from brown into white fat.

    PubMed Central

    Casteilla, L; Muzzin, P; Revelli, J P; Ricquier, D; Giacobino, J P

    1994-01-01

    Possible modifications of the beta-adrenergic effector system during the development of bovine perirenal brown adipose tissue (BAT) in utero and its transformation into white-like adipose tissue after birth were studied. The parameters assessed were the level of expression of beta 1-, beta 2- and beta 3-adrenergic receptor (AR) mRNAs and the response of the plasma-membrane adenylate cyclase to (-)-isoprenaline and to the beta 3-agonist BRL 37344. The beta 3-AR mRNA was found to be expressed very early in utero, i.e. before the third month of foetal life. Then it increased dramatically (9-fold) between month 6 of foetal life and birth. A high beta 3-AR mRNA level was maintained after birth up to an age of 3 months. After conversion of BAT into white-like adipose tissue, i.e. in the adult bovine, the beta 3-AR mRNA expression became small or not detectable, and the beta 1-AR mRNA, which was expressed much less than the beta 3-AR mRNA in foetal life, became predominant. A response of the adenylate cyclase to (-)-isoprenaline was observed in foetal life (3.1-fold stimulation). It decreased after birth (1.8-fold stimulation) and then remained constant until adulthood. A response to BRL 37344 was also observed in foetal life (1.8-fold stimulation). It was maintained after birth, but disappeared in the adult. A possible relationship between the beta-AR expression and the adenylate cyclase response to (-)-isoprenaline on the one hand and the uncoupling-protein expression on the other is discussed. The bovine might represent a good model to understand the transition from brown to white fat in the human. Images Figure 3 PMID:7904157

  6. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology. PMID:9801454

  7. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology.

  8. Adenylate cyclase toxin-mediated delivery of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Masaaki; Konda, Toshifumi

    2016-02-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) of Bordetella pertussis internalizes its catalytic domain into target cells. ACT can function as a tool for delivering foreign protein antigen moieties into immune effector cells to induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. In this study, we replaced the catalytic domain of ACT with an enzymatically active protein moiety, the S1 (ADP-ribosyltransferase) subunit of pertussis toxin (PT). The S1 moiety was successfully internalized independent of endocytosis into sheep erythrocytes. The introduced polypeptide exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in CHO cells and induced clustering typical to PT. The results indicate that ACT can act as a vehicle for not only epitopes but also enzymatically active peptides to mammalian cells.

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-like compounds could modulate the activity of coelomocytes in the earthworm.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Ildiko; Boros, Akos; Engelmann, Peter; Varhalmi, Eszter; Nemeth, Jozsef; Lubics, Andrea; Tamas, Andrea; Kiss, Peter; Reglodi, Dora; Pollak, Edit; Molnar, Laszlo

    2009-04-01

    By means of radioimmunoassay, we studied the concentration of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-like proteins in intact and regenerating earthworms. Transection of animals increased the concentration of PACAP-like compounds in coelomocytes, and a decreasing rostrocaudal gradient was detected in the regenerating animals. Western blot analysis revealed a range of PAC1-receptor proteins with molecular weights from 40 to 80 kDa. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry showed that PAC1 receptors were located on distinct sets of coelomocytes (mainly on amebocytes and on some granulocytes). Based on our results we hypothesize a link between PACAP and coelomocytes, suggesting that PACAP modulates the function of amebocytes and certain granulocytes that play a role in tissue remodeling of regenerating earthworms. PMID:19456404

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in stress-related disorders: data convergence from animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive expression and function of several stress-associated hormones have been implicated in pathological stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Among these, recent evidence has suggested that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has critical roles in central neurocircuits mediating stress-related emotional behaviors. We describe the PACAPergic systems, the data implicating PACAP in stress biology and how altered PACAP expression and signaling may result in psychopathologies. We include our work implicating PACAP signaling within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the consequences of stressor exposure and relatedly, describe more recent studies suggesting that PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) may impact the emotional aspects of chronic pain states. In aggregate, these results are consistent with data suggesting that PACAP dysregulation is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. PMID:25636177

  11. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robin L; Crawford, Natalie M; Grafer, Constance M; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), an ancient molecule highly preserved across species, has been classified as a member of the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide/growth hormone-releasing hormone polypeptide family. PACAP was first identified as a hypothalamic-releasing factor; nevertheless, it has subsequently been determined to have widespread distribution and function, including expression in the pituitary, gonads, placenta, central and peripheral nervous systems, intestinal tract, and adrenal gland. Consistent with its widespread distribution, PACAP has been found to exert pleiotropic effects. Although first described over 20 years ago, only relatively recently has substantial attention turned to evaluating PACAP's role in the reproductive system. This review will focus on our current understanding of the expression pattern and function of PACAP in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  12. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  13. Adenylate cyclase toxin is critical for colonization and pertussis toxin is critical for lethal infection by Bordetella pertussis in infant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, M S; Weiss, A A

    1990-01-01

    Proliferation of Bordetella pertussis in the lungs of infant mice challenged by the intranasal route was examined. The bacteria rapidly proliferated in the lungs of mice challenged with a sublethal dose of a wild-type strain (BP338) or a filamentous hemagglutinin mutant (BPM409) from 500 at day 0 to 10(7) at day 15. The infection cleared in about 40 days. Pertussis toxin-deficient mutant BP357 gave a similar profile; however, the number of bacteria recovered was slightly reduced, suggesting that pertussis toxin is not essential for bacterial growth in the lungs. In contrast, adenylate cyclase toxin mutant BP348 was rapidly cleared from the lungs, with no viable bacteria remaining 10 days postchallenge, suggesting that the adenylate cyclase toxin is a colonization factor required for the bacteria to initiate infection. PMID:2401570

  14. AKAP79, PKC, PKA and PDE4 participate in a Gq-linked muscarinic receptor and adenylate cyclase 2 cAMP signalling complex

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia X.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2014-01-01

    AC2 (adenylate cyclase 2) is stimulated by activation of Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors through PKC (protein kinase C) to generate localized cAMP in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. In the present study, we utilized a sensitive live-cell imaging technique to unravel the proteins that play essential roles in a Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor-mediated cAMP signalling complex. We reveal that, upon agonist binding to the Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor, AKAP79 (A-kinase-anchoring protein 79) recruits PKC to activate AC2 to produce cAMP. The cAMP formed is degraded by PDE4 (phosphodiesterase 4) activated by an AKAP-anchored PKA (protein kinase A). Calcineurin, a phosphatase bound to AKAP79, is not involved in this regulation. Overall, a transient cAMP increase is generated from AC2 by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor activation, subject to sophisticated regulation through AKAP79, PKC, PDE4 and PKA, which significantly enhances acetylcholine-mediated signalling. PMID:23889134

  15. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Springer, Tzvia I; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L

    2014-10-10

    Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD's β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD's β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (Rh) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together, our data provide new structural insights into the β-hairpin's role in stabilizing interactions between CyaA-ACD and N-CaM.

  16. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Impairs the Regulation of Apoptosis in Megakaryocytes by Activating NF-κB: a Proteomic Study*

    PubMed Central

    Di Michele, Michela; Peeters, Karen; Loyen, Serena; Thys, Chantel; Waelkens, Etienne; Overbergh, Lutgart; Hoylaerts, Marc; Van Geet, Christel; Freson, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptor VPAC1 are negative regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet function, but their downstream signaling pathway that inhibits this process still remained unknown. A combined proteomic, transcriptomic, and bioinformatic approach was here used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying PACAP signaling via VPAC1 in megakaryocytes. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and tandem MS were applied to detect differentially expressed proteins in megakaryocytic CHRF cells stimulated with PACAP. The majority of the 120 proteins modulated by PACAP belong to the class of “cell cycle and apoptosis” proteins. The up- or down-regulated expression of some proteins was confirmed by immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis. A meta-analysis of our data and 12 other published studies was performed to evaluate signaling pathways involved in different cellular models of PACAP response. From 2384 differentially expressed genes/proteins, 83 were modulated by PACAP in at least three independent studies and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis further identified apoptosis as the highest scored network with NF-κB as a key-player. PACAP inhibited serum depletion-induced apoptosis of CHRF cells via VPAC1 stimulation. In addition, PACAP switched on NF-κB dependent gene expression since higher nuclear levels of the active NF-κB p50/p65 heterodimer were found in CHRF cells treated with PACAP. Finally, a quantitative real time PCR apoptosis array was used to study RNA from in vitro differentiated megakaryocytes from a PACAP overexpressing patient, leading to the identification of 15 apoptotic genes with a 4-fold change in expression and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis again revealed NF-κB as the central player. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PACAP interferes with the regulation of apoptosis in megakaryocytes, probably via stimulation of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:21972247

  17. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  18. Cell-cycle arrest induced by the bacterial adenylate cyclase toxins from Bacillus anthracis and Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary C.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) and Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT) enter host cells and produce cAMP. To understand the cellular consequences, we exposed J774 cells to these toxins at ng/ml (pM) concentrations, then followed cell number and changes in cell signaling pathways. Under these conditions, both toxins produce a concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation without cytotoxicity. ET and ACT increase the proportion of cells in G1/G0 and reduce S-phase, such that a single addition of ET or ACT inhibits cell division for 3 to 6 days. Treatment with ET or ACT produces striking changes in proteins controlling cell cycle, including virtual elimination of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 and Cyclin D1 and increases in phospho-CREB and p27Kip1. Importantly, PD98059, a MEK inhibitor, elicits a comparable reduction in Cyclin D1 to that produced by the toxins and blocks proliferation. These data show that non-lethal concentrations of ET and ACT impose a prolonged block on the proliferation of J774 cells by impairment of the progression from G1/G0 to S-phase in a process involving cAMP-mediated increases in phospho-CREB and p27Kip1 and reductions in phospho-ERK 1/2 and Cyclin D1. This phenomenon represents a new mechanism by which these toxins affect host cells. PMID:20946259

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide in the rat central nervous system: an immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens

    2002-11-25

    In the present study the localization of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)-expressing cell bodies and PACAP projections were mapped in the adult rat brain and spinal cord by using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry. A widespread occurrence of PACAP-containing cell bodies was found, with the greatest accumulation in several hypothalamic nuclei and in several brainstem nuclei, especially the habenular nuclei, the pontine nucleus, the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB), and the vagal complex. PACAP was also present in cell bodies in the olfactory areas, in neocortical areas, in the hippocampus, in the vestibulo- and cochlear nuclei, in cell bodies of the intermediolateral cell column of the spinal cord and in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, in the subfornical organ, and in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. An intense accumulation of PACAP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerve fibers was observed throughout the hypothalamus, in the amydaloid and extended amygdaloid complex, in the anterior and paraventricular thalamic nuclei, in the intergeniculate leaflet, in the pretectum, and in several brainstem nuclei, such as the parabrachial nucleus, the sensory trigeminal nucleus, and the nucleus of the solitary tract. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were also found in the area postrema, the posterior pituitary and the choroid plexus, and the dorsal and ventral horn of the spinal cord. The widespread distribution of PACAP in the brain and spinal cord suggests that PACAP is involved in the control of many autonomic and sensory functions as well as higher cortical processes.

  20. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  2. Stress tolerance of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylate cyclase fil1 (CYR1) mutant depends on Hsp26.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Cristina R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Silva, Carol L C; Tanghe, An; Neves, Maria J; Thevelein, Johan M; Rosa, Carlos A; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance in yeast is an important phenotype from an industrial point of view. It hampers optimal use of frozen dough applications as well as high gravity brewing fermentations because these applications require stress-tolerant yeast strains during active fermentation. Different mutants (e.g. fil1, an adenylate cyclase mutant CYR1(lys1682)) that are affected in this loss of stress resistance have been isolated, but so far the identification of the target genes important for the increased tolerance has failed. Previously we have shown that neither trehalose nor Hsp104 nor STRE-controlled genes are involved in the higher stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant. The contribution of other putative downstream factors of the PKA pathway was investigated and here we show that the small heat-shock protein Hsp26 is required for the high heat stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant, both in stationary phase cells as well as during active fermentation. PMID:20924200

  3. Snf1 Phosphorylates Adenylate Cyclase and Negatively Regulates Protein Kinase A-dependent Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Raffaele; Tripodi, Farida; Gaggini, Marco; Castoldi, Andrea; Reghellin, Veronica; Nonnis, Simona; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Coccetti, Paola

    2015-10-01

    In eukaryotes, nutrient availability and metabolism are coordinated by sensing mechanisms and signaling pathways, which influence a broad set of cellular functions such as transcription and metabolic pathways to match environmental conditions. In yeast, PKA is activated in the presence of high glucose concentrations, favoring fast nutrient utilization, shutting down stress responses, and boosting growth. On the contrary, Snf1/AMPK is activated in the presence of low glucose or alternative carbon sources, thus promoting an energy saving program through transcriptional activation and phosphorylation of metabolic enzymes. The PKA and Snf1/AMPK pathways share common downstream targets. Moreover, PKA has been reported to negatively influence the activation of Snf1/AMPK. We report a new cross-talk mechanism with a Snf1-dependent regulation of the PKA pathway. We show that Snf1 and adenylate cyclase (Cyr1) interact in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, we identify Cyr1 as a Snf1 substrate and show that Snf1 activation state influences Cyr1 phosphorylation pattern, cAMP intracellular levels, and PKA-dependent transcription.

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide protects dopaminergic neurons and improves behavioral deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Reglodi, Dóra; Lubics, Andrea; Tamás, Andrea; Szalontay, Luca; Lengvári, István

    2004-05-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide, exerting different actions in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Among others, it has neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PACAP in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were given unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. PACAP-treated animals received 0.1 microg PACAP as a pretreatment. Control animals without PACAP treatment displayed severe hypokinesia at 1 and 10 days postlesion when compared to animals receiving saline only. In only 1 day postlesion, by contrast, PACAP-treated rats showed no hypokinesia. Asymmetrical signs, such as turning, rearing and biased thigmotaxic scanning were observed in all lesioned animals 1 day postlesion. PACAP-treated animals, however, showed better recovery as they ceased to display asymmetrical signs 10 days later and showed markedly less apomorphine-induced rotations. Tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry revealed that control animals had more than 95% loss of the dopaminergic cells in the ipsilateral substantia nigra, while PACAP-treated animals had only approximately 50% loss of dopaminergic cells. In summary, the present results show the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in 6-OHDA-induced lesion of substantia nigra, with less severe acute neurological symptoms and a more rapid amelioration of behavioral deficits.

  5. The effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide on elevated plus maze behavior and hypothermia induced by morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Lipták, Nándor; Dochnal, Roberta; Babits, Anikó; Csabafi, Krisztina; Szakács, Júlia; Tóth, Gábor; Szabó, Gyula

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on morphine withdrawal-induced behavioral changes and hypothermia in male CFLP mice. Elevated plus maze (EPM) and jump tests were used to assess naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced behavior responses. Different doses of subcutaneous (s.c.) naloxone, (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg, respectively) were used to precipitate the emotional and psychical aspects of withdrawal on EPM and 1 mg/kg (s.c.) was used to induce the somatic withdrawal signs such as jumping, and the changes in body temperature. In our EPM studies, naloxone proved to be anxiolytic in mice treated with morphine. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of PACAP alone had no significant effect on withdrawal-induced anxiolysis and total activity at doses of 500 ng and 1 μg. At dose of 500 ng, however, PACAP significantly counteracted the reduced motor activity in the EPM test in mice treated with morphine and diminished the hypothermia and shortened jump latency induced by naloxone in mice treated with morphine. These findings indicate that anxiolytic-like behavior may be mediated via a PACAP-involved pathway and PACAP may play an important role in chronic morphine withdrawal-induced hypothermia as well.

  6. Cloning, tissue distribution and effects of fasting on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in largemouth bass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengjie; Han, Linqiang; Bai, Junjie; Ma, Dongmei; Quan, Yingchun; Fan, Jiajia; Jiang, Peng; Yu, Lingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a wide range of biological functions. We cloned the full-length cDNAs encoding PACAP and PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from the brain of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) and used real-time quantitative PCR to detect PRP-PACAP mRNA expression. The PRP-PACAP cDNA has two variants expressed via alternative splicing: a long form, which encodes both PRP and PACAP, and a short form, which encodes only PACAP. Sequence analysis results are consistent with a higher conservation of PACAP than PRP peptide sequences. The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts was highest in the forebrain, followed by the medulla, midbrain, pituitary, stomach, cerebellum, intestine, and kidney; however, these transcripts were either absent or were weakly expressed in the muscle, spleen, gill, heart, fatty tissue, and liver. The level of PACAP-short transcript expression was significantly higher than expression of the long transcript in the forebrain, cerebella, pituitary and intestine, but lower than that of the long transcript in the stomach. PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts were first detected at the blastula stage of embryogenesis, and the level of expression increased markedly between the muscular contraction stage and 3 d post hatch (dph). The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts decreased significantly in the brain following 4 d fasting compared with the control diet group. The down-regulation effect was enhanced as fasting continued. Conversely, expression levels increased significantly after 3 d of re-feeding. Our results suggest that PRP-PACAP acts as an important factor in appetite regulation in largemouth bass.

  7. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity.

  8. Augmented cystine-glutamate exchange by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide signaling via the VPAC1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Resch, Jon M; Albano, Rebecca; Liu, XiaoQian; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A; Choi, SuJean

    2014-07-28

    In the central nervous system, cystine import in exchange for glutamate through system xc(-) is critical for the production of the antioxidant glutathione by astrocytes, as well as the maintenance of extracellular glutamate. Therefore, regulation of system xc(-) activity affects multiple aspects of cellular physiology and may contribute to disease states. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuronally-derived peptide that has already been demonstrated to modulate multiple aspects of glutamate signaling suggesting PACAP may also target activity of cystine-glutamate exchange via system xc(-) . In the current study, 24-hour treatment of primary cortical cultures containing neurons and glia with PACAP concentration-dependently increased system xc(-) function as measured by radiolabeled cystine uptake. Furthermore, the increase in cystine uptake was completely abolished by the system xc(-) inhibitor, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG), attributing increases in cystine uptake specifically to system xc(-) activity. Time course and quantitative PCR results indicate that PACAP signaling may increase cystine-glutamate exchange by increasing expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system xc(-) . Furthermore, the potentiation of system xc(-) activity by PACAP occurs via a PKA-dependent pathway that is not mediated by the PAC1R, but rather the shared vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor VPAC1R. Finally, assessment of neuronal, astrocytic, and microglial-enriched cultures demonstrated that only astrocyte-enriched cultures exhibit enhanced cystine uptake following both PACAP and VIP treatment. These data introduce a novel mechanism by which both PACAP and VIP regulate system xc(-) activity. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hepatic adenylate cyclase 3 is upregulated by Liraglutide and subsequently plays a protective role in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Li, Z; Liang, S; Li, Y; Yang, L; Lu, M; Gu, H F; Xia, N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have demonstrated that adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) has a protective role in obesity. This gene resides at the pathway with glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Liraglutide is a GLP-1 analog and has independent glucose and body weight (BW)-reducing effects. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether hepatic AC3 activity was regulated by Liraglutide and to further understand the effect of AC3 in reduction of BW and insulin resistance. Subjects: The diabesity and obese mice were induced from db/db and C57BL/6 J mice, respectively, by high-fat diet. Liraglutide (0.1 mg kg−1 per 12 h) was given to the mice twice daily for 12 weeks. C57BL/6 J mice fed with chow diet and obese or diabesity mice treated with saline were used as the controls. Hepatic AC3 gene expression at mRNA and protein levels was analyzed with real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin levels were measured and followed insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was evaluated according to the homeostasis model assessment. Results: After administration of Liraglutide, BW and HOMA-IR in obese and diabesity mice were decreased, whereas hepatic AC3 mRNA and protein expression levels were upregulated. The AC3 gene expression was negatively correlated with BW, HOMA-IR and the area ratio of hepatic fat deposition in the liver. Conclusions: The present study thus provides the evidence that hepatic AC3 gene expression is upregulated by Liraglutide. The reduction of BW and improvement of insulin resistance with Liraglutide may be partially explained by AC3 activation. PMID:26807509

  10. Upregulation of adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) increases the tumorigenic potential of cells by activating the CREB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Il-Ju; Seo, Hyehyun; Park, Jong-Hoon; Suzuki, Hiromu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Kim, In-Hoo; Jeong, Jin Sook; Ju, Mi Ha; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Yeon-Su

    2013-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is a widely expressed membrane-associated protein in human tissues, which catalyzes the formation of cyclic adenosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP). However, our transcriptome analysis of gastric cancer tissue samples (NCBI GEO GSE30727) revealed that ADCY3 expression was specifically altered in cancer samples. Here we investigated the tumor-promoting effects of ADCY3 overexpression and confirmed a significant correlation between the upregulation of ADCY3 and Lauren's intestinal-type gastric cancers. ADCY3 overexpression increased cell migration, invasion, proliferation, and clonogenicity in HEK293 cells; conversely, silencing ADCY3 expression in SNU-216 cells reduced these phenotypes. Interestingly, ADCY3 overexpression increased both the mRNA level and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 by increasing the levels of cAMP and phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). Consistent with these findings, treatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor decreased MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels in ADCY3-overexpressing cells. Knockdown of ADCY3 expression by stable shRNA in human gastric cancer cells suppressed tumor growth in a tumor xenograft model. Thus, ADCY3 overexpression may exert its tumor-promoting effects via the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway. Additionally, bisulfite sequencing of the ADCY3 promoter region revealed that gene expression was reduced by hypermethylation of CpG sites, and increased by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC)-induced demethylation. Our study is the first to report an association of ADCY3 with gastric cancer as well as its tumorigenic potentials. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of ADCY3 is regulated through an epigenetic mechanism. Further study on the mechanism of ADCY3 in tumorigenesis will provide the basis as a new molecular target of gastric cancer. PMID:24113161

  11. Contribution of Bordetella filamentous hemagglutinin and adenylate cyclase toxin to suppression and evasion of interleukin-17-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Michael W; Inatsuka, Carol S; Sheets, Amanda J; Williams, Corinne L; Benaron, David J; Donato, Gina M; Gray, Mary C; Hewlett, Erik L; Cotter, Peggy A

    2012-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica establish respiratory infections with notorious efficiency. Our previous studies showed that the fhaB genes of B. pertussis and B. bronchiseptica, which encode filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), are functionally interchangeable and provided evidence that FHA-deficient B. bronchiseptica induces more inflammation in the lungs of mice than wild-type B. bronchiseptica. We show here that the robust inflammatory response to FHA-deficient B. bronchiseptica is characterized by the early and sustained influx of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-positive neutrophils and macrophages and, at 72 h postinoculation, IL-17-positive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that FHA allows the bacteria to suppress the development of an IL-17-mediated inflammatory response. We also show that the cyaA genes of B. pertussis and B. bronchiseptica, which encode adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), are functionally interchangeable and that ACT, specifically its catalytic activity, is required for B. bronchiseptica to resist phagocytic clearance but is neither required for nor inhibitory of the induction of inflammation if bacteria are present in numbers sufficient to persist during the first 3 days postinoculation. Incubation of bone marrow-derived macrophages with a ΔcyaA strain caused decreased production of IL-1β and increased production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-12, while incubation with a ΔcyaA ΔfhaB strain caused increased production of IL-23. These data suggest that FHA and ACT both contribute to suppress the recruitment of neutrophils and the development of an IL-17-mediated immune response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a microbial pathogen suppressing IL-17-mediated inflammation in vivo as a strategy to evade innate immunity.

  12. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence.

  13. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence. PMID:26483308

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  15. Effects of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and its inactive derivative 1,9-dideoxyforskolin on insect cytochrome P-450 dependent steroid hydroxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Keogh, D P; Mitchell, M J; Crooks, J R; Smith, S L

    1992-01-15

    The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and its pharmacologically inactive derivative 1,9-dideoxyforskolin were found to inhibit in a dose-dependent fashion the ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity associated with wandering stage larvae of Drosophila melanogaster and fat body and midgut from last instar larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. The concentrations of these labdane diterpenes required to elicit a 50% inhibition of the cytochrome P-450 dependent steroid hydroxylase activity in the insect tissues ranged from approximately 5 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-4) M.

  16. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  17. Photo-dynamics and thermal behavior of the BLUF domain containing adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-02-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of the photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure. The typical BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) flavin cofactor absorption and fluorescence photo-cycle dynamics was observed. For fresh samples a reversible concentration dependent protein oligomerization occurred showing up in free flavin binding and protein color center formation with increasing protein concentration. Thermal and temporal irreversible protein unfolding with loss of BLUF domain activity was investigated. Temperature dependent protein melting times and the apparent protein melting temperature were determined. The photodynamic behavior of the NgPAC2 is compared with the behavior of the previously investigated photo-activated cyclase NgPAC1 (nPAC) from the same N. gruberi NEG-M strain.

  18. STC1 interference on calcitonin family of receptors signaling during osteoblastogenesis via adenylate cyclase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Terra, Silvia R; Cardoso, João Carlos R; Félix, Rute C; Martins, Leo Anderson M; Souza, Diogo Onofre G; Guma, Fatima C R; Canário, Adelino Vicente M; Schein, Vanessa

    2015-03-01

    Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are involved in bone formation/remodeling. Here we investigate the effects of STC1 on functional heterodimer complex CALCRL/RAMP1, expression and activity during osteoblastogenesis. STC1 did not modify CALCRL and ramp1 gene expression during osteoblastogenesis when compared to controls. However, plasma membrane spatial distribution of CALCRL/RAMP1 was modified in 7-day pre-osteoblasts exposed to either CGRP or STC1, and both peptides induced CALCRL and RAMP1 assembly. CGRP, but not STC1 stimulated cAMP accumulation in 7-day osteoblasts and in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. Furthermore, STC1 inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation of HEK293 cells, but not in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. However, STC1 inhibited cAMP accumulation in calcitonin receptor (CTR) HEK293 transfected cells stimulated by calcitonin. In conclusion, STC1 signals through inhibitory G-protein modulates CGRP receptor spatial localization during osteoblastogenesis and may function as a regulatory factor interacting with calcitonin peptide members during bone formation.

  19. Identification of a D1 dopamine receptor, not linked to adenylate cyclase, on lactotroph cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schoors, D. F.; Vauquelin, G. P.; De Vos, H.; Smets, G.; Velkeniers, B.; Vanhaelst, L.; Dupont, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. We studied the lactotroph cells of the rat by both in vivo and in vitro pharmacological techniques for the presence of D1-receptors. Both approaches revealed the presence of D2-receptor, stimulated by quinpirole (resulting in an inhibition of prolactin secretion) and blocked by domperidone. 2. Administration of fenoldopam, the most selective D1-receptor agonist currently available, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of prolactin secretion in vivo (after pretreatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine) and in vitro (cultured pituitary cells). This increase was dose-dependently blocked by the selective D1-receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, and although the effect of fenoldopam was less than that obtained by D2-receptor stimulation, these data suggest that a D1-receptor also controls prolactin secretion. 3. In order to detect the location of these dopamine receptors, autoradiographic studies were performed by use of [3H]-SCH 23390 and [3H]-spiperone as markers for D1- and D2-receptors, respectively. Specific binding sites for [3H]-SCH 23390 were demonstrated. Fenoldopam dose-dependently reduced [3H]-SCH 23390 binding, but had no effect on [3H]-spiperone binding. Immunocytochemical labelling of prolactin cells after incubation with [3H]-SCH 23390 revealed that the granulae and hence, D1 binding sites were present on the lactotroph cells. 4. Radioligand binding studies performed on membranes from anterior pituitary cells revealed the presence of the D2-receptor (54 fmol mg-1 protein) with a Kd of 0.58 nM for [3H]-spiperone, but failed to detect D1-receptors. 5. Finally, we studied the effect of dopamine and of fenoldopam on the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of anterior pituitary cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1833020

  20. Interactions between neuropeptide Y and the adenylate cyclase pathway in rat mesenteric small arteries: role of membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, D; Buus, C; Mulvany, M J; Nilsson, H

    1997-01-01

    arteries: a depolarization of arterial smooth muscle which is probably due to activation of non-selective cation channels, and a marked inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity, which in turn inhibits the hyperpolarization produced by cAMP accumulation in these arteries. PMID:9263910

  1. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  2. A baker's yeast mutant (fil1) with a specific, partially inactivating mutation in adenylate cyclase maintains a high stress resistance during active fermentation and growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, P; Ma, P; Versele, M; Gorwa, M F; Colombo, S; Lemaire, K; Bossi, D; Loïez, A; Thevelein, J M

    2000-10-01

    The initiation of fermentation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with a rapid drop in stress resistance. This is disadvantageous for several biotechnological applications, e.g. the preparation of freeze doughs. We have isolated mutants in a laboratory strain which are deficient in fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance ('fil' mutants) using a heat shock selection protocol. We show that the fil1 mutant contains a mutation in the CYR1 gene which encodes adenylate cyclase. It causes a change at position 1682 of glutamate into lysine and results in a tenfold drop in adenylate cyclase activity. The fil1 mutant displays a reduction in the glucose-induced cAMP increase, trehalase activation and loss of heat resistance. Interestingly, the fil1 mutant shows the same growth and fermentation rate as the wild type strain, as opposed to other mutants with reduced activity of the cAMP pathway. Introduction of the fil1 mutation in the vigorous Y55 strain and cultivation of the mutant under pilot scale conditions resulted in a yeast that displayed a higher freeze and drought resistance during active fermentation compared to the wild type Y55 strain. These results show that high stress resistance and high fermentation activity are compatible biological properties. Isolation of fil-type mutations appears a promising avenue for development of industrial yeast strains with improved stress resistance during active fermentation.

  3. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  4. A baker's yeast mutant (fil1) with a specific, partially inactivating mutation in adenylate cyclase maintains a high stress resistance during active fermentation and growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, P; Ma, P; Versele, M; Gorwa, M F; Colombo, S; Lemaire, K; Bossi, D; Loïez, A; Thevelein, J M

    2000-10-01

    The initiation of fermentation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with a rapid drop in stress resistance. This is disadvantageous for several biotechnological applications, e.g. the preparation of freeze doughs. We have isolated mutants in a laboratory strain which are deficient in fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance ('fil' mutants) using a heat shock selection protocol. We show that the fil1 mutant contains a mutation in the CYR1 gene which encodes adenylate cyclase. It causes a change at position 1682 of glutamate into lysine and results in a tenfold drop in adenylate cyclase activity. The fil1 mutant displays a reduction in the glucose-induced cAMP increase, trehalase activation and loss of heat resistance. Interestingly, the fil1 mutant shows the same growth and fermentation rate as the wild type strain, as opposed to other mutants with reduced activity of the cAMP pathway. Introduction of the fil1 mutation in the vigorous Y55 strain and cultivation of the mutant under pilot scale conditions resulted in a yeast that displayed a higher freeze and drought resistance during active fermentation compared to the wild type Y55 strain. These results show that high stress resistance and high fermentation activity are compatible biological properties. Isolation of fil-type mutations appears a promising avenue for development of industrial yeast strains with improved stress resistance during active fermentation. PMID:11075928

  5. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The 'AC to Hly-linking segment' thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  6. Transmembrane segments of complement receptor 3 do not participate in cytotoxic activities but determine receptor structure required for action of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Masin, Jiri; Liskova, Petra M; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Matousek, Tomas; Sebo, Peter; Osicka, Radim

    2016-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis penetrates phagocytes expressing the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18, α(M)β(2) or Mac-1). CyaA translocates its adenylate cyclase (AC) enzyme domain into cell cytosol and catalyzes unregulated conversion of ATP to cAMP, thereby subverting cellular signaling. In parallel, CyaA forms small cation-selective membrane pores that permeabilize cells for potassium efflux, contributing to cytotoxicity of CyaA and eventually provoking colloid-osmotic cell lysis. To investigate whether the single-pass α-helical transmembrane segments of CR3 subunits CD11b and CD18 do directly participate in AC domain translocation and/or pore formation by the toxin, we expressed in CHO cells variants of CR3 that contained artificial transmembrane segments, or lacked the transmembrane segment(s) at all. The results demonstrate that the transmembrane segments of CR3 are not directly involved in the cytotoxic activities of CyaA but serve for maintaining CR3 in a conformation that is required for efficient toxin binding and action. PMID:26802078

  7. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling. PMID:27582064

  8. In vivo and in vitro models of demyelinating disease: activation of the adenylate cyclase system influences JHM virus expression in explanted rat oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beushausen, S; Narindrasorasak, S; Sanwal, B D; Dales, S

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of JHM virus (JHMV) tropism for rat oligodendrocytes, as one of the primary host cells in the central nervous system, is maintained after explanation (S. Beushausen and S. Dales, Virology 141:89-101, 1985). The temporal correlation between onset of resistance to JHMV infection in vivo, completion of myelination, and maturation of the central nervous system can be simulated in vitro by inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation (Beushausen and Dales, Virology, 1985). Stimulation of differentiation through the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels suggests a possible connection between activation of the adenylate cyclase system and coronavirus expression. Chromatographic analysis of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in cytosol extracts prepared from astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed that both glial cell types were deficient in protein kinase I, indicating that expression of coronavirus in differentiated cells was not contingent upon the presence of protein kinase I. However, treatment with N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP) resulted in a severalfold enhancement of the free regulatory subunit (RI) in oligodendrocytes but not in astrocytes. The RII subunit in both neural cell types was relatively unaffected. Rapid increase in RI due to dbcAMP treatment was correlated with inhibition of JHMV expression. Other differentiation inducers, including 8-Br cAMP and forskolin which, by contrast, caused a decrease in detectable RI, also blocked JHMV expression. This apparent anomaly can be attributed to an increased turnover of RI due to destabilization of the molecule which occurs upon site-specific binding of the cyclic nucleotides. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the state of oligodendrocyte differentiation manifested with the modulation of RI regulates JHMV expression. The differentiation process did not affect either virus adsorption or sequestration but appeared to inhibit the

  9. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  10. Long-term morphine treatment enhances proteasome-dependent degradation of G beta in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: correlation with onset of adenylate cyclase sensitization.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Neasta, Jérémie; Uttenweiler-Joseph, Sandrine; Stella, Alexandre; Matondo, Mariette; Corbani, Maïthé; Monsarrat, Bernard; Meunier, Jean-Claude

    2005-08-01

    The initial aim of this study was to identify protein changes associated with long-term morphine treatment in a recombinant human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y clone (sc2) stably overexpressing the human mu-opioid (MOP) receptor. In MOP receptor-overexpressing sc2 cells, short-term morphine exposure was found to be much more potent and efficacious in inhibiting forskolin-elicited production of cAMP, and long-term morphine exposure was shown to induce a substantially higher degree of opiate dependence, as reflected by adenylate cyclase sensitization, than it did in wild-type neuroblastoma cells. Differential proteomic analysis of detergent-resistant membrane rafts isolated from untreated and chronically morphine-treated sc2 cells revealed long-term morphine exposure to have reliably induced a 30 to 40% decrease in the abundance of five proteins, subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as G protein subunits alphai(2), alphai(3), beta(1), and beta(2), and prohibitin. Quantitative Western blot analyses of whole-cell extracts showed that long-term morphine treatment-induced down-regulation of Gbeta but not of the other proteins is highly correlated (r(2) = 0.96) with sensitization of adenylate cyclase. Down-regulation of Gbeta and adenylate cyclase sensitization elicited by long-term morphine treatment were suppressed in the presence of carbobenzoxy-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-norvalinal (MG-115) or lactacystin. Thus, sustained activation of the MOP receptor by morphine in sc2 cells seems to promote proteasomal degradation of Gbeta to sensitize adenylate cyclase. Together, our data suggest that the long-term administration of opiates may elicit dependence by altering the neuronal balance of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylate cyclases, with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway playing a pivotal role. PMID:15901846

  11. X-linked recessive congenital muscle fiber hypotrophy with central nuclei: abnormalities of growth and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Reddy, N B; Barth, P G; Bethlem, J; Krauss, D R; Hibberd, M E; Lawrence, J V; Carter, L S

    1979-10-01

    Muscle cells in cultures established from biopsy specimens of two children with an infantile-fatal form of X-linked recessive muscle fiber smallness with central nuclei showed an unusual ability to proliferate through numerous passages. Ultrastructurally, the cultured muscle fibers appeared very immature even after several weeks. The nuclei were large, the number of ribosomes was greatly increased, the myofibrils remained unstriated, and glycogen was accumulated in large lakes. The plasmalemma bound concanavalin A, alpha-bungarotoxin, and ruthenium red normally, but with tannic acid it did not show the dark binding of mature fibers. Biochemically, in the cultured muscle fibers, beta-adrenergic receptors were quantitatively normal. The level of adenylate cyclase in membranes was less than in cultured normal muscle; this defect could be responsible for impaired control mechanisms resulting in the other abnormalities observed.

  12. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Targets Down Syndrome Candidate Region 1 (DSCR1/RCAN1) to control Neuronal Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Seul; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic peptide involved in a wide range of nervous functions, including development, differentiation, and survival, and various aspects of learning and memory. Here we report that PACAP induces the expression of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1), which is abnormally expressed in the brains of Down syndrome patients. Increased RCAN1 expression is accompanied by activation of the PKA-cAMP response element-binding protein pathways. EMSA and ChIP analyses demonstrate the presence of a functional cAMP response element in the RCAN1 promoter. Moreover, we show that PACAP-dependent neuronal differentiation is significantly disturbed by improper RCAN1 expression. Our data provide the first evidence of RCAN1, a Down syndrome-related gene, as a novel target for control of the neurotrophic function of PACAP. PMID:26157140

  13. A homolog of the vertebrate pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is both necessary and instructive for the rapid formation of associative memory in an invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; László, Zita; Kemenes, Ildikó; Tóth, Gábor; Reglodi, Dóra; Kemenes, György

    2010-10-13

    Similar to other invertebrate and vertebrate animals, cAMP-dependent signaling cascades are key components of long-term memory (LTM) formation in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, an established experimental model for studying evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms of long-term associative memory. Although a great deal is already known about the signaling cascades activated by cAMP, the molecules involved in the learning-induced activation of adenylate cyclase (AC) in Lymnaea remained unknown. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy in combination with biochemical and immunohistochemical methods, recently we have obtained evidence for the existence of a Lymnaea homolog of the vertebrate pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and for the AC-activating effect of PACAP in the Lymnaea nervous system. Here we first tested the hypothesis that PACAP plays an important role in the formation of robust LTM after single-trial classical food-reward conditioning. Application of the PACAP receptor antagonist PACAP6-38 around the time of single-trial training with amyl acetate and sucrose blocked associative LTM, suggesting that in this "strong" food-reward conditioning paradigm the activation of AC by PACAP was necessary for LTM to form. We found that in a "weak" multitrial food-reward conditioning paradigm, lip touch paired with sucrose, memory formation was also dependent on PACAP. Significantly, systemic application of PACAP at the beginning of multitrial tactile conditioning accelerated the formation of transcription-dependent memory. Our findings provide the first evidence to show that in the same nervous system PACAP is both necessary and instructive for fast and robust memory formation after reward classical conditioning.

  14. First report of the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) in crustaceans: conservation of its functions as growth promoting factor and immunomodulator in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Juana María; Carpio, Yamila; Morales, Reynold; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tania; Ramos, Laida; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2013-12-01

    The high conservation of the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) sequence indicates that this peptide fulfills important biological functions in a broad spectrum of organisms. However, in invertebrates, little is known about its presence and its functions remain unclear. Up to now, in non-mammalian vertebrates, the majority of studies on PACAP have focused mainly on the localization, cloning and structural evolution of this peptide. As yet, little is known about its biological functions as growth factor and immunomodulator in lower vertebrates. Recently, we have shown that PACAP, apart from its neuroendocrine role, influences immune functions in larval and juvenile fish. In this work, we isolated for the first time the cDNA encoding the mature PACAP from a crustacean species, the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, corroborating its high degree of sequence conservation, when compared to sequences reported from tunicates to mammalian vertebrates. Based on this, we have evaluated the effects of purified recombinant Clarias gariepinus PACAP administrated by immersion baths on white shrimp growth and immunity. We demonstrated that PACAP improves hemocyte count, superoxide dismutase, lectins and nitric oxide synthase derived metabolites in treated shrimp related with an increase in total protein concentration and growth performance. From our results, PACAP acts as a regulator of shrimp growth and immunity, suggesting that in crustaceans, as in vertebrate organisms, PACAP is an important molecule shared by both the endocrine and the immune systems.

  15. Molecular cloning and mRNA distribution of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide in the lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lee, L T O; Tam, J K V; Chan, D W; Chow, B K C

    2009-04-01

    In this article, we report the isolation of a full-length cDNA clone encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from lungfish Protopterus dolloi. When comparing the deduced amino acid sequences, the lungfish PACAP was found to be highly conserved with other vertebrates; however, the PRP shares only lower levels of sequence identity with known PRP sequences. Consistently in phylogenetic analysis, the lungfish PRP, similar to sturgeon PRP, fails to cluster with other PRPs. In addition to the full-length clone, another cDNA encoding a short precursor that lacks the first 32 amino acids of the PRP was also isolated. Interestingly, similar isoforms were also identified in several nonmammalian vertebrates, and it was suggested that exon skipping of PRP/PACAP transcripts was a mechanism that regulated the expression ratio of PACAP to PRP in nonmammalian vertebrates. By real-time PCR, both long and short PRP/PACAP transcripts were found almost exclusively in the brain, and the short isoform is the more abundant transcript (3.7 times more), indicating that PACAP is the major product produced in lungfish brain. The expression patterns of lungfish and previously studied frog PRP/PACAP suggest that the PRP/PACAP gene in the tetrapod lineage may first express in the central nervous system; in the process of evolution, the functions of these peptides diversified and were later found in other tissues.

  16. Calcium, acylation, and molecular confinement favor folding of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase CyaA toxin into a monomeric and cytotoxic form.

    PubMed

    Karst, Johanna C; Ntsogo Enguéné, V Yvette; Cannella, Sara E; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Debard, Sylvain; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2014-10-31

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, a multidomain protein of 1706 amino acids, is one of the major virulence factors produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA is able to invade eukaryotic target cells in which it produces high levels of cAMP, thus altering the cellular physiology. Although CyaA has been extensively studied by various cellular and molecular approaches, the structural and functional states of the toxin remain poorly characterized. Indeed, CyaA is a large protein and exhibits a pronounced hydrophobic character, making it prone to aggregation into multimeric forms. As a result, CyaA has usually been extracted and stored in denaturing conditions. Here, we define the experimental conditions allowing CyaA folding into a monomeric and functional species. We found that CyaA forms mainly multimers when refolded by dialysis, dilution, or buffer exchange. However, a significant fraction of monomeric, folded protein could be obtained by exploiting molecular confinement on size exclusion chromatography. Folding of CyaA into a monomeric form was found to be critically dependent upon the presence of calcium and post-translational acylation of the protein. We further show that the monomeric preparation displayed hemolytic and cytotoxic activities suggesting that the monomer is the genuine, physiologically active form of the toxin. We hypothesize that the structural role of the post-translational acylation in CyaA folding may apply to other RTX toxins.

  17. Generation of highly selective VPAC2 receptor agonists by high throughput mutagenesis of vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Yung, Stephanie L; Dela Cruz, Fernando; Hamren, Sarah; Zhu, Jian; Tsutsumi, Manami; Bloom, James W; Caudle, Margaret; Roczniak, Steve; Todd, Tracey; Lemoine, Lynn; MacDougall, Margit; Shanafelt, Armen B; Pan, Clark Q

    2003-03-21

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) has a specific receptor PAC1 and shares two receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VPAC2 activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release while VPAC1 activation elevates glucose output. To generate a large pool of VPAC2 selective agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, structure-activity relationship studies were performed on PACAP, VIP, and a VPAC2 selective VIP analog. Chemical modifications on this analog that prevent recombinant expression were sequentially removed to show that a recombinant peptide would retain VPAC2 selectivity. An efficient recombinant expression system was then developed to produce and screen hundreds of mutant peptides. The 11 mutations found on the VIP analog were systematically replaced with VIP or PACAP sequences. Three of these mutations, V19A, L27K, and N28K, were sufficient to provide most of the VPAC2 selectivity. C-terminal extension with the KRY sequence from PACAP38 led to potent VPAC2 agonists with improved selectivity (100-1000-fold). Saturation mutagenesis at positions 19, 27, 29, and 30 of VIP and charge-scanning mutagenesis of PACAP27 generated additional VPAC2 selective agonists. We have generated the first set of recombinant VPAC2 selective agonists described, which exhibit activity profiles that suggest therapeutic utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  18. In vivo control of gluconeogenesis in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp) mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Neves, M J; Terenzi, H F

    1989-01-01

    The rate of cycloheximide-resistant incorporation of carbon from [14C]alanine and [14C]acetate into polysaccharidic material was used to study gluconeogenic activity in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp-1) mutant. The wild-type efficiently utilized alanine and acetate as gluconeogenic substrates, whereas the mutant used acetate efficiently but was unable to use alanine. Cycloheximide-resistant 14C-incorporating activity was sensitive to carbon catabolite effects (repression and inactivation) in the two strains, which suggested that cyclic AMP metabolism was not involved in these regulatory responses. In the wild type, gluconeogenesis was induced by incubation of the cells in the absence of a carbon source. In contrast, cr-1 required supplementation with acetate. This finding suggested that induction of gluconeogenesis in N. crassa could be mediated by metabolites formed in carbon-starved cells. The cr-1 mutant seemed to be deficient in this process and to depend on an exogenous effector to induce gluconeogenesis. Incubation of cr-1 with cyclic AMP partially overcame the acetate requirement for induction of gluconeogenesis. PMID:2522093

  19. Complete protection against P. berghei malaria upon heterologous prime/boost immunization against circumsporozoite protein employing Salmonella type III secretion system and Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid.

    PubMed

    Tartz, Susanne; Rüssmann, Holger; Kamanova, Jana; Sebo, Peter; Sturm, Angelika; Heussler, Volker; Fleischer, Bernhard; Jacobs, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Sterile immunity against malaria can be achieved by the induction of IFNgamma-producing CD8(+) T cells that target infected hepatocytes presenting epitopes of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP). In the present study we evaluate the protective efficacy of a heterologous prime/boost immunization protocol based on the delivery of the CD8(+) epitope of Plasmodium berghei CSP into the MHC class I presentation pathway, by either a type III secretion system of live recombinant Salmonella and/or by direct translocation of a recombinant Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid fusion (ACT-CSP) into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A single intraperitoneal application of the recombinant ACT-CSP toxoid, as well as a single oral immunization with the Salmonella vaccine, induced a specific CD8(+) T cell response, which however conferred only a partial protection on mice against a subsequent sporozoite challenge. In contrast, a heterologous prime/boost vaccination with the live Salmonella followed by ACT-CSP led to a significant enhancement of the CSP-specific T cell response and induced complete protection in all vaccinated mice.

  20. Molecular cloning and mRNA distribution of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide in the lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lee, L T O; Tam, J K V; Chan, D W; Chow, B K C

    2009-04-01

    In this article, we report the isolation of a full-length cDNA clone encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from lungfish Protopterus dolloi. When comparing the deduced amino acid sequences, the lungfish PACAP was found to be highly conserved with other vertebrates; however, the PRP shares only lower levels of sequence identity with known PRP sequences. Consistently in phylogenetic analysis, the lungfish PRP, similar to sturgeon PRP, fails to cluster with other PRPs. In addition to the full-length clone, another cDNA encoding a short precursor that lacks the first 32 amino acids of the PRP was also isolated. Interestingly, similar isoforms were also identified in several nonmammalian vertebrates, and it was suggested that exon skipping of PRP/PACAP transcripts was a mechanism that regulated the expression ratio of PACAP to PRP in nonmammalian vertebrates. By real-time PCR, both long and short PRP/PACAP transcripts were found almost exclusively in the brain, and the short isoform is the more abundant transcript (3.7 times more), indicating that PACAP is the major product produced in lungfish brain. The expression patterns of lungfish and previously studied frog PRP/PACAP suggest that the PRP/PACAP gene in the tetrapod lineage may first express in the central nervous system; in the process of evolution, the functions of these peptides diversified and were later found in other tissues. PMID:19456341

  1. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Somogyi, Csilla Szűcs; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  2. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  3. Photo-dynamics of the BLUF domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.; Kateriya, Suneel

    2011-08-01

    The amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M comprises a BLUF ( blue light sensor using flavin) regulated adenylate cyclase (nPAC). The nPAC gene was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the photo-dynamics of the nPAC protein was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Blue-light exposure of nPAC caused a typical BLUF-type photo-cycle behavior (spectral absorption red-shift, fluorescence quenching, absorption and fluorescence recovery in the dark). Additionally, time-delayed reversible photo-induced one-electron reduction of fully oxidized flavin (Fl ox) to semi-reduced flavin (FlH rad ) occurred. Furthermore, photo-excitation of FlH rad caused irreversible electron transfer to fully reduced anionic flavin (FlH -). A photo-induced electron transfer from Tyr or Trp to flavin (Tyr rad +-Fl rad - or Trp rad +-Fl rad - radical ion-pair formation) is thought to cause H-bond restructuring responsible for BLUF-type photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation enabling photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. Some photo-degradation of Fl ox to lumichrome was observed. A model of the photo-dynamics of nPAC is developed.

  4. Beta-agonist- and prostaglandin E1-induced translocation of the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase: evidence that the kinase may act on multiple adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, R H; Benovic, J L; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1986-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-AR kinase) is a cytosolic enzyme that phosphorylates the beta-adrenergic receptor only when it is occupied by an agonist [Benovic, J. Strasser, R. H., Caron, M. G. & Lefkowitz, R. J. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2797-2801.] It may be crucially involved in the processes that lead to homologous or agonist-specific desensitization of the receptor. Stimulation of DDT1MF-2 hamster smooth muscle cells or S49 mouse lymphoma cells with a beta-agonist leads to translocation of 80-90% of the beta-AR kinase activity from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. The translocation process is quite rapid, is concurrent with receptor phosphorylation, and precedes receptor desensitization and sequestration. It is also transient, since much of the activity returns to the cytosol as the receptors become sequestered. Stimulation of beta-AR kinase translocation is a receptor-mediated event, since the beta-antagonist propranolol blocks the effect of agonist. In the kin- mutant of the S49 cells (lacks cAMP-dependent protein kinase), prostaglandin E1, which provokes homologous desensitization of its own receptor, is at least as effective as isoproterenol in promoting beta-AR kinase translocation to the plasma membrane. However, in the DDT1MF-2 cells, which contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors coupled to phosphatidylinositol turnover, the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine is ineffective. These results suggest that the first step in homologous desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor may be an agonist-promoted translocation of beta-AR kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane and that beta-AR kinase may represent a more general adenylate cyclase-coupled receptor kinase that participates in regulating the function of many such receptors. Images PMID:3018728

  5. Regulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts by sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Poksay, K.S.; Nakada, M.T.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts contain beta-adrenergic receptors (BAR), predominantly of the B/sub 1/ subtype. Incubation of these cells with 2-10 mM sodium butyrate (SB) for 24-48 hr results in a switch in the BAR subtype from B/sub 1/ to B/sub 2/ and promotes a 1.5 to 2.5 fold increase in total BAR number. Other short chain acids were not as effective as SB in promoting changes in BAR. BAR were assayed in membranes prepared from the 3T3-L1 cells using the radiolabeled antagonist (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol and the B/sub 2/ selective antagonist ICI 118.551. BAR subtype switch was confirmed functionally by measuring cellular cAMP accumulation in response to agonists. The structure and amount of the alpha subunits of the guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ were determined by ADP-ribosylation using /sup 32/P-NAD and either cholera toxin or pertussis toxin for labeling of the respective subunits. Preincubation of cells with 5 mM SB for 48 hr resulted in a 2-3 fold increase in the labeling of the alpha subunits of both N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A protein of M/sub r/ = 44,000 showed enhanced labeling by cholera toxin following SB treatment of the cells. These data indicate SB concomitantly regulates expression of BAR subtype and components of the adenylate cyclase in 3T3-L1 cells.

  6. Parabrachial nucleus (PBn) pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the amygdala: implication for the sensory and behavioral effects of pain

    PubMed Central

    Missig, Galen A.; Roman, Carolyn W.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Braas, Karen M.; May, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The intricate relationships that associate pain, stress responses and emotional behavior have been well established. Acute stressful situations can decrease nociceptive sensations and conversely, chronic pain can enhance other pain experiences and heighten the emotional and behavioral consequences of stress. Accordingly, chronic pain is comorbid with a number of behavioral disorders including depression, anxiety abnormalities and associated stress-related disorders including post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) represents a convergence of pathways for pain, stress and emotion, and we have identified pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) immunoreactivity in fiber elements in the lateral capsular division of the CeA (CeLC). The PACAP staining patterns colocalized in part with those for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP); anterograde fiber tracing and excitotoxic lesion studies demonstrated that the CeLC PACAP/CGRP immunoreactivities represented sensory fiber projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBn) along the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract. The same PBn PACAP/CGRP fiber system also projected to the BNST. As in the BNST, CeA PACAP signaling increased anxiety-like behaviors accompanied by weight loss and decreased feeding. But in addition to heightened anxiety-like responses, CeA PACAP signaling also altered nociception as reflected by decreased latency and threshold responses in thermal and mechanical sensitivity tests, respectively. From PACAP expression in major pain pathways, the current observations are novel and suggest that CeA PACAP nociceptive signaling and resulting neuroplasticity via the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract may represent mechanisms that associate chronic pain with sensory hypersensitivity, fear memory consolidation and severe behavioral disorders. PMID:24998751

  7. Optogenetic Modulation of an Adenylate Cyclase in Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrates a Requirement of the Parasite cAMP for Host-Cell Invasion and Stage Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anne; Arroyo-Olarte, Ruben Dario; Imkeller, Katharina; Hegemann, Peter; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection and transmission of the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii depends on its ability to switch between fast-replicating tachyzoite (acute) and quiescent bradyzoite (chronic) stages. Induction of cAMP in the parasitized host cells has been proposed to influence parasite differentiation. It is not known whether the parasite or host cAMP is required to drive this phenomenon. Other putative roles of cAMP for the parasite biology also remain to be identified. Unequivocal research on cAMP-mediated signaling in such intertwined systems also requires a method for an efficient and spatial control of the cAMP pool in the pathogen or in the enclosing host cell. We have resolved these critical concerns by expressing a photoactivated adenylate cyclase that allows light-sensitive control of the parasite or host-cell cAMP. Using this method, we reveal multiple roles of the parasite-derived cAMP in host-cell invasion, stage-specific expression, and asexual differentiation. An optogenetic method provides many desired advantages such as: (i) rapid, transient, and efficient cAMP induction in extracellular/intracellular and acute/chronic stages; (ii) circumvention of the difficulties often faced in cultures, i.e. poor diffusion, premature degradation, steady activation, and/or pleiotropic effects of cAMP agonists and antagonists; (iii) genetically encoded enzyme expression, thus inheritable to the cell progeny; and (iv) conditional and spatiotemporal control of cAMP levels. Importantly, a successful optogenetic application in Toxoplasma also illustrates its wider utility to study cAMP-mediated signaling in other genetically amenable two-organism systems such as in symbiotic and pathogen-host models. PMID:23525100

  8. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally and peripherally administered trout pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the unanaesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, J-C; Lancien, F; Mimassi, N; Conlon, J M

    2009-12-01

    In mammals, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are involved in cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of PACAP, VIP and their receptors in various tissues of teleost fish, including the brain, but little is known about their respiratory and cardiovascular effects. The present study was undertaken to compare the central and peripheral actions of graded doses (25-100 pmol) of trout PACAP and trout VIP on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Compared with vehicle, only intracerebroventricular injection of PACAP significantly (P<0.05) elevated the ventilation frequency and the ventilation amplitude, but both peptides significantly increased the total ventilation (total ventilation). However, the maximum hyperventilatory effect of PACAP was approximately 2.5-fold higher than the effect of VIP at the 100 pmol dose (PACAP, (total ventilation)=+5407+/-921 arbitrary units, a.u.; VIP, (total ventilation)=+2056+/-874 a.u.; means +/- s.e.m.). When injected centrally, only PACAP produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) (100 pmol: +21%) but neither peptide affected heart rate (f(H)). Intra-arterial injections of either PACAP or VIP were without effect on the ventilatory variables. PACAP was without significant action on P(DA) and f(H) while VIP significantly elevated P(DA) (100 pmol: +36%) without changing f(H). In conclusion, the selective central hyperventilatory actions of exogenously administered trout PACAP, and to a lesser extent VIP, suggest that the endogenous peptides may be implicated in important neuroregulatory functions related to the central control of ventilation in trout.

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide enhances saliva secretion via direct binding to PACAP receptors of major salivary glands in mice.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Yuko; Nonaka, Naoko; Takagi, Yoshitoki; Imamura, Eisaku; Narukawa, Masayuki; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shioda, Seiji; Banks, William A; Nakamura, Masanori

    2016-09-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is a common syndrome that is generally treated with artificial saliva; however, no other effective methods have yet been established. Saliva secretion is mainly under the control of the autonomic nervous system. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is recognized as a multifunctional neuropeptide in various organs. In this study, we examined the effect of PACAP on saliva secretion, and detected the distribution of the PACAP type 1 receptor (PAC1R) in major salivary glands, including the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands, in 9-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Intranasal administration of PACAP 38 increased the amount of saliva secreted, which was not inhibited by atropine pretreatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PAC1R was distributed in the three major salivary glands. In the parotid and sublingual glands, PAC1R was detected in striated duct cells, whereas in the submandibular gland, a strong PAC1R immunoreaction was detected in tall columnar epithelial cells in the granular ducts (i.e., pillar cells), as well as in some striated duct cells. PACAP significantly increased the concentration of epidermal growth factor in saliva. These results suggest that PACAP directly regulates saliva secretion by controlling the absorption activity in the ducts, and that pillar cells regulate the function of granular epithelial cells in the granular duct, such as the secretion of growth factors into the saliva. Collectively, these results suggest the possibility of PACAP as a new effective treatment of xerostomia. Anat Rec, 299:1293-1299, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27339371

  10. Bi-directional effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on fear-related behavior and c-Fos expression after fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Edward G; Venkataraman, Archana; Donahue, Rachel J; Carlezon, William A

    2016-02-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is implicated in stress regulation and learning and memory. PACAP has neuromodulatory actions on brain structures within the limbic system that could contribute to its acute and persistent effects in animal models of stress and anxiety-like behavior. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula for infusion of PACAP-38 (0.5, 1, or 1.5 μg) or vehicle followed 30 min later by fear conditioning. Freezing was measured early (1, 4, and 7 days) or following a delay (7, 10, and 13 days) after conditioning. PACAP (1.5 μg) produced a bi-phasic response in freezing behavior across test days: relative to controls, PACAP-treated rats showed a reduction in freezing when tested 1 or 7 days after fear conditioning that evolved into a significant elevation in freezing by the third test session in the early, but not delayed, group. Corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in PACAP-treated rats following fear conditioning, but not at the time of testing (Day 1). Brain c-Fos expression revealed PACAP-dependent alterations within, as well as outside of, areas typically implicated in fear conditioning. Our findings raise the possibility that PACAP disrupts fear memory consolidation by altering synaptic plasticity within neurocircuits normally responsible for encoding fear-related cues, producing a type of dissociation or peritraumatic amnesia often seen in people early after exposure to a traumatic event. However, fear memories are retained such that repeated testing and memory reactivation (e.g., re-experiencing) causes the freezing response to emerge and persist at elevated levels. PACAP systems may represent an axis on which stress and exposure to trauma converge to promote maladaptive behavioral responses characteristic of psychiatric illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:26590791

  11. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP) and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) Regulate Murine Neural Progenitor Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M.; Shutz, Kristin C.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes. PMID:18629655

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulate murine neural progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M; Shutz, Kristin C; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2008-11-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes.

  13. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF.

  14. Two members of a widely expressed subfamily of hormone-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed Central

    Premont, R T; Chen, J; Ma, H W; Ponnapalli, M; Iyengar, R

    1992-01-01

    cDNA encoding a hormone- and guanine nucleotide-stimulated adenylyl cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] (type 6) from rat liver and kidney has been cloned and expressed. This enzyme is stimulated by forskolin, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, and isoproterenol plus GTP but is not stimulated by beta gamma subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. A second form (type 5), which is 75% similar to type 6, has also been cloned. Both types 5 and 6 cDNAs have multiple messages. PCR-based detection of the mRNA for the type 5 and 6 enzymes indicates that both are widely distributed. Homology analyses indicate at least four distinct subfamilies of guanine nucleotide stimulatory protein-regulated adenylyl cyclases. Types 5 and 6 enzymes define one distinct subfamily of mammalian adenylyl cyclases. Diversity of one guanine nucleotide-binding protein-regulated effector may allow different modes of regulation of cell-surface signal transmission. Images PMID:1409703

  15. Increased sensitivity in the interaction of the dopaminergic/adenosinergic system at the level of the adenylate cyclase activity in the striatum of the "weaver" mouse.

    PubMed

    K, Botsakis; V, Tondikidou; N, Panagopoulos; M, Margariti; N, Matsokis; F, Angelatou

    2016-10-01

    The specific antagonistic interaction between dopamine D1 and adenosine A1 receptors (D1/A1), as well as between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2a receptors (D2/A2a) exist not only at the receptor/receptor level, but also at the level of the secondary messengers. In this study, we examined the possible changes in these interactions at the level of cAMP formation in membrane preparation from "weaver" mouse striatum (a genetic model of Parkinson disease), by using specific agonists of these receptors. We also examined in the striatum of the "weaver" mouse the interaction between D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. Our results showed that in the striatum of "weaver" mice: a) the cAMP synthesis induced by D1 receptor activation (SKF 38393), was significantly reduced compared to control mice, while A1 receptor activation (L-PIA) leaded to a more intense inhibition of the D1-induced cAMP-formation compared to the controls, b) the cAMP synthesis which was induced by A2a receptor activation (CGS 21680), was significantly increased compared to the control mice. The specific D2 receptor agonist Quinpirole, added in low concentrations, caused a significant reduction of the A2a-induced cAMP formation, which was not observed in the control mouse. Furthermore, the D1 receptor induced cAMP synthesis was significantly higher in control compared to "weaver" striatum, which was more efficiently downregulated by D2 receptor agonist Quinpirole. These results suggest that the sensitivity to D1 and A2a receptor agonists is altered and that the interaction between D1/A1 and D2/A2a receptors is enhanced in the striatum of the "weaver" mutation, while an uncoupling between D1 and D2 receptors was observed. Since the adenylate cyclase basal activity did not differ between "weaver" and control striatum, the above-mentioned changes seem to be due to alterations in the function of the adenosine/dopamine receptors and their coupling to the G-proteins.

  16. Selective inhibition of responses to nerve growth factor and of microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation by activators of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Greene, L A; Drexler, S A; Connolly, J L; Rukenstein, A; Green, S H

    1986-11-01

    To study the influence of cAMP on cellular responses to nerve growth factor (NGF) and to use elevation of intracellular cAMP to probe the NGF mechanism, cultured PC12 pheochromocytoma cells were exposed to forskolin and cholera toxin. As in other cell types, the latter agents greatly increased PC12 cell cAMP levels. Such treatment also brought about a reversible, dose-dependent suppression of NGF-promoted regeneration of neurites. In support of the role of cAMP in this effect, regeneration blockage by forskolin was potentiated by phosphodiesterase inhibitors. When tested on NGF-stimulated initiation of process outgrowth, cholera toxin and forskolin exerted a dual effect. As in previous studies, these drugs, when applied along with NGF, significantly enhanced the initial formation of short cytoplasmic extensions. However, after approximately 3 d of NGF exposure, at which time such extensions begin to acquire the morphological and ultrastructural features of neurites, these agents suppressed process outgrowth. That is, the neurites were fewer in number, significantly less branched, and much shorter than in control cultures. Such changes also occurred when these drugs were added to cultures that had been pretreated with NGF alone. Whereas forskolin and cholera toxin affect the formation and regeneration of neurites, these drugs did not interfere with the short-latency, transient changes in surface morphology that are triggered by NGF, nor did they inhibit transcription-dependent priming. In contrast, the rapidly occurring NGF-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase was suppressed. Moreover, forskolin and cholera toxin rapidly and selectively blocked the NGF-promoted phosphorylation of a set of microtubule-associated proteins known as chartins. Previous observations have suggested a causal relationship between NGF-induced chartin microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation and the formation and outgrowth of neurites. This is supported by the present data and

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  18. Alterations in the expression of G-proteins and regulation of adenylate cyclase in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells chronically exposed to low-efficacy mu-opioids.

    PubMed

    Ammer, H; Schulz, R

    1993-10-01

    Western-blot analysis of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (mu- and delta-receptors) revealed the presence of the following G-protein subunits: Gi alpha 1, Gi alpha 2, Gs alpha, G(o) alpha, Gz alpha, and G beta, a pattern resembling that observed in central nervous tissue. Chronic treatment of differentiated [all-trans-retinoic acid (10 microM; 6 days)] SH-SY5Y cells with D(-)-morphine (10 microM; 3 days) significantly increased the abundance of all G-protein subunits identified. Co-incubation of morphine-exposed cells together with naloxone (10 microM; 3 days) or the mu-selective opioid antagonist CTOP (10 microM; 3 days), but not with the delta-selective antagonist ICI-174,864 (10 microM; 3 days), completely abolished this effect, suggesting that the increase in G-protein abundance is specifically mediated by mu-receptors. Moreover, the biologically inactive enantiomer L(+)-morphine (10 microM; 3 days) failed to produce a similar effect. G-protein up-regulation developed in a time- and dose-dependent manner and is most likely due to enhanced protein synthesis de novo, since concomitant treatment of the cells with cycloheximide (100 micrograms/ml; 3 days) prevented this effect. Chronic treatment with the low-efficacy mu-selective opioid peptide morphiceptin (10 microM; 3 days), but not with the highly potent mu-agonist DAGO (0.1 microM; 3 days) produced a comparable increase in G-protein abundance. Coincident with quantitative effects on G-protein levels in morphine-tolerant/dependent SH-SY5Y cells, we found elevated levels of basal, forskolin (1 microM)- and prostaglandin-E1 (1 microM)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities. Reconstitution experiments using S49 cyc- lymphoma-cell membranes suggest that this increase is most likely due to elevated levels of functionally intact Gs. Chronic treatment with both morphine and DAGO induces high degrees of tolerance in this cell line. However, the intrinsic activity of G1 was unchanged, as assessed in functional studies

  19. Developmental changes in ANP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activity enhanced by ATP in rat lung membrane fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Charoonroje, P; Tokumitsu, Y; Nomura, Y

    1994-01-01

    1. ANP (atrial natriuretic peptides)- or ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities were compared in adult (2 month old) and neonatal (5-7 day old) rat lung membrane fractions. 2. The enzyme activities of both membranes depended on the incubation time and ATP concentration: although the activities of both membranes were similar after a short incubation time (4 min), those in adult membranes were lower than those of neonatal membranes after longer incubation times (10 and 30 min) or at lower concentrations of ATP. 3. ANP/ATP gamma S-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities, which were much higher than ANP/ATP-stimulated activities, were similar in both membranes. 4. ATPase activity of adult membranes was higher than that of neonatal membranes, suggesting that hydrolysis of ATP leads to a decrease of ANP/ATP-guanylyl cyclase activity in adult membranes. Triton X-100 enhanced and diminished ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities of adult and neonatal membranes, respectively, and thereby abolished the adult/neonatal difference in the membrane response to ATP. 5. ANP-stimulated activities of both membranes were much more activated by pre-incubation with ATP gamma S than those induced by simultaneous addition of ATP gamma S. The former activities were decreased to levels of the latter by Triton X-100. The latter activities were not affected by Triton X-100. 6. The present results suggested that conformation of lung plasma membranes is related to activation of the ANP receptor/guanylyl cyclase system. PMID:7834209

  20. A role for guanylate cyclase C in acid-stimulated duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Rao, S P; Sellers, Z; Crombie, D L; Hogan, D L; Mann, E A; Childs, D; Keely, S; Sheil-Puopolo, M; Giannella, R A; Barrett, K E; Isenberg, J I; Pratha, V S

    2004-01-01

    Luminal acidification provides the strongest physiological stimulus for duodenal HCO3- secretion. Various neurohumoral mechanisms are believed to play a role in acid-stimulated HCO3- secretion. Previous studies in the rat and human duodenum have shown that guanylin and Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin, both ligands of the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase receptor [guanylate cyclase C (GC-C)], are potent stimulators for duodenal HCO3- secretion. We postulated that the GC-C receptor plays an important role in acid-stimulated HCO3- secretion. In vivo perfusion studies performed in wild-type (WT) and GC-C knockout (KO) mice indicated that acid-stimulated duodenal HCO3- secretion was significantly decreased in the GC-C KO animals compared with the WT counterparts. Pretreatment with PD-98059, an MEK inhibitor, resulted in attenuation of duodenal HCO3- secretion in response to acid stimulation in the WT mice with no further effect in the KO mice. In vitro cGMP generation studies demonstrated a significant and comparable increase in cGMP levels on acid exposure in the duodenum of both WT and KO mice. In addition, a rapid, time-dependent phosphorylation of ERK was observed with acid exposure in the duodenum of WT mice, whereas a marked attenuation in ERK phosphorylation was observed in the KO animals despite equivalent levels of ERK in both groups of animals. On the basis of these studies, we conclude that transmembrane GC-C is a key mediator of acid-stimulated duodenal HCO3- secretion. Furthermore, ERK phosphorylation may be an important intracellular mediator of duodenal HCO3- secretion. PMID:12881226

  1. Activation of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Protects against Secretagogue Stimulated Zymogen Activation in Rat Pancreaic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolodecik, Thomas R.; Shugrue, Christine A.; Thrower, Edwin C.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Gorelick, Fred S.

    2012-01-01

    An early feature of acute pancreatitis is activation of zymogens, such as trypsinogen, within the pancreatic acinar cell. Supraphysiologic concentrations of the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK; 100 nM), or its orthologue cerulein (CER), induce zymogen activation and elevate levels of cAMP in pancreatic acinar cells. The two classes of adenylyl cyclase, trans-membrane (tmAC) and soluble (sAC), are activated by distinct mechanisms, localize to specific subcellular domains, and can produce locally high concentrations of cAMP. We hypothesized that sAC activity might selectively modulate acinar cell zymogen activation. sAC was identified in acinar cells by PCR and immunoblot. It localized to the apical region of the cell under resting conditions and redistributed intracellularly after treatment with supraphysiologic concentrations of cerulein. In cerulein-treated cells, pre-incubation with a trans-membrane adenylyl cyclase inhibitor did not affect zymogen activation or amylase secretion. However, treatment with a sAC inhibitor (KH7), or inhibition of a downstream target of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA), significantly enhanced secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation and amylase secretion. Activation of sAC with bicarbonate significantly inhibited secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation; this response was decreased by inhibition of sAC or PKA. Bicarbonate also enhanced secretagogue-stimulated cAMP accumulation; this effect was inhibited by KH7. Bicarbonate treatment reduced secretagogue-stimulated acinar cell vacuolization, an early marker of pancreatitis. These data suggest that activation of sAC in the pancreatic acinar cell has a protective effect and reduces the pathologic activation of proteases during pancreatitis. PMID:22844459

  2. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators: a Novel Treatment Option for Heart Failure Associated with Cardiorenal Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly common scenario and carries a poor prognosis. Clinicians lack tools for primary or secondary heart failure prevention in patients with cardiorenal syndromes. In patients without CKD, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and statins mitigate cardiovascular risk in large part due to salutary effects on the endothelium. In the setting of CKD, use of these therapies is limited by adverse effects of hyperkalemia in pre-dialysis CKD (ACE-I/ARB), or potential increased risk of stroke in end-stage renal disease (statins). The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators are a novel class of medications that promote endothelial and myocardial function with no known risk of hyperkalemia or stroke. In this review, we discuss the evidence emerging from recent clinical trials of sGC stimulators in pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, the diseased pathways involved in cardiorenal syndromes likely to be restored by sGC stimulators, and several strategies for designing future clinical trials of cardiorenal syndromes that might shorten the timeline for discovery and approval of effective cardiovascular therapies in these high-risk patients. PMID:27118234

  3. Extracellular Regulation of Sperm Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclase by a Forward Motility Stimulating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Roy, Debarun; Majumder, Gopal C.; Bhattacharyya, Debdas

    2014-01-01

    Forward motility stimulating factor (FMSF), a glycoprotein isolated from buffalo serum, binds to the surface of the mature sperm cells to promote their progressive motility. This article reports the mode of signal transduction of this extracellular factor in goat sperm. The mechanism was investigated by assaying intracellular second messenger level and forward motility in presence of different pharmacological modulators. Mg++-dependent Forskolin responsive form of transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC) of goat spermatozoa was probed for its involvement in FMSF action. Dideoxyadenosine, a selective inhibitor of tmACs, was used to identify the role of this enzyme in the scheme of FMSF-signaling. Involvement of the α-subunit of G-protein in this regard has been inspected using GTPγS. Participation of protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase was checked using IP20 and genistein, respectively. FMSF promotes tmAC activity in a dose-dependent manner through receptor/G-protein activation to enhance intracellular cAMP and forward motility. Motility boosting effects of this glycoprotein are almost lost in presence of dideoxyadenosine. But, FMSF displayed substantial motility promoting activity when movement of spermatozoa was inhibited with KH7, the specific inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase indicating tmAC to be the primary target of FMSF action. Involvement of cAMP in mediating FMSF action was confirmed by the application of dibutyryl cAMP. Observed motility regulatory effects with IP20 and genistein indicate contribution of PKA and tyrosine kinase in FMSF activity; enhanced phosphorylation of a tyrosine containing ≈50 kDa protein was detected in this regard. FMSF initiates a novel signaling cascade to stimulate tmAC activity that augments intracellular cAMP, which through downstream crosstalk of phosphokinases leads to enhanced forward motility in mature spermatozoa. Thus, this article for the first time describes conventional tmAC-dependent profound activation

  4. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Janusz; Łakomy, Ireneusz Mirosław

    2010-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections) were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  5. Effect of total or partial uterus extirpation on sympathetic uterus-projecting neurons in porcine inferior mesenteric ganglion. B. Changes in expression of neuropeptide Y, galanin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate-cyclase activating peptide, somatostatin and substance P.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, K

    2003-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin (GAL), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), somatostatin (SOM) and substance P (SP) was studied in the neurons of the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) projecting to the uterine horn and uterine cervix after uterus extirpation-induced axotomy in sexually immature gilts. The expression was studied with immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and RT-PCR. Uterus-projecting neurons were identified by retrograde tracing with Fast Blue (FB). Immunohistochemistry revealed that FB-positive (FB+) uterus-projecting neurons in control animals contained only immunoreactivities to NPY (ca. 50%) and GAL (single neurons). Uterus extirpation increased the occurrence of NPY and GAL in FB+ neurons. No other studied neuropeptides were found in axotomized uterus-projecting neurons. Hybridization in situ revealed the reduction of NPY expression and induction of GAL expression in FB+ neurons. RT-PCR detected induction of GAL expression in the IMG after uterus extirpation. The expression level of NPY and SOM was significant and was not affected by axotomy. The expression level of PACAP was very low and did not differ between IMG of control, partially and totally hysterectomized animals. No VIP and SP expression was detected in all ganglia. The presented data show clear axotomy-related changes in the expression of GAL and NPY in the uterus-projecting neurons of the porcine IMG. PMID:12817785

  6. Cloning, tissue distribution and effects of food deprivation on pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) and preprosomatostatin 1 (PPSS 1) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiyu; Volkoff, Hélène

    2009-04-01

    Full-length complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequences encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) and preprosomatostatin 1 (PPSS 1) were cloned from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) hypothalamus using reverse transcription and rapid amplification of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid ends. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction shows that PRP/PACAP mRNA and PPSS 1 mRNA are widely distributed throughout cod brain. During development, PRP/PACAP and PPSS 1 were detected at the 30-somite stage and pre-hatching stage, respectively, and expression levels gradually increased up to the hatched larvae. PPSS 1, but not PRP/PACAP, appeared to be affected by food availability during early development. In juvenile cod, PPSS 1 expression levels increased and remained significantly higher than that of control fed fish throughout 30 days of starvation and during a subsequent 10 days refeeding period. In contrast, PRP/PACAP expression levels were not affected by 30 days of food deprivation, but a significant increase in expression levels was observed during the 10 days refeeding period in the experimental food-deprived group as compared to the control fed group. Our results suggest that PRP/PACAP and PPSS 1 may be involved in the complex regulation of growth, feeding and metabolism during food deprivation and refeeding in Atlantic cod. PMID:19135491

  7. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator IWP-953 Increases Conventional Outflow Facility in Mouse Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Pei; Navarro, Iris D.; Kessler, Marco M.; Bernier, Sylvie G.; Perl, Nicholas R.; Sarno, Renee; Masferrer, Jaime; Hannig, Gerhard; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway regulates aqueous humor outflow and therefore, intraocular pressure. We investigated the pharmacologic effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator IWP-953 on primary human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells and conventional outflow facility in mouse eyes. Methods Cyclic GMP levels were determined in vitro in HEK-293 cells and four HTM cell strains (HTM120/HTM123: predominantly myofibroblast-like phenotype, HTM130/HTM141: predominantly endothelial-like phenotype), and in HTM cell culture supernatants. Conventional outflow facility was measured following intracameral injection of IWP-953 or DETA-NO using a computerized pressure-controlled perfusion system in enucleated mouse eyes ex vivo. Results IWP-953 markedly stimulated cGMP production in HEK-293 cells in the presence and absence of DETA-NO (half maximal effective concentrations: 17 nM, 9.5 μM). Similarly, IWP-953 stimulated cGMP production in myofibroblast-like HTM120 and HTM123 cells, an effect that was greatly amplified by the presence of DETA-NO. In contrast, IWP-953 stimulation of cGMP production in endothelial-like HTM130 and HTM141 cells was observed, but was markedly less prominent than in HTM120 and HTM123 cells. Notably, cGMP was found in all HTM culture supernatants, following IWP-953/DETA-NO stimulation. In paired enucleated mouse eyes, IWP-953 at 10, 30, 60, and 100 μM concentration-dependently increased outflow facility. This effect (89.5%) was maximal at 100 μM (P = 0.002) and in magnitude comparable to DETA-NO at 100 μM (97.5% increase, P = 0.030). Conclusions These data indicate that IWP-953, via modulation of the sGC–cGMP pathway, increases aqueous outflow facility in mouse eyes, suggesting therapeutic potential for sGC stimulators as novel ocular hypotensive drugs. PMID:26998718

  8. Chronic stress increases pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST): roles for PACAP in anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hammack, Sayamwong E.; Cheung, Joseph; Rhodes, Kimberly M.; Schutz, Kristin C.; Falls, William A.; Braas, Karen M.; May, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress has been argued to produce maladaptive anxiety-like behavioral states, and many of the brain regions associated with stressor responding also mediate anxiety-like behavior. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its specific G protein-coupled PAC1 receptor have been associated with many of these stress- and anxiety-associated brain regions, and signaling via this peptidergic system may facilitate the neuroplasticity associated with pathological affective states. Here we investigated whether chronic stress increased transcript expression for PACAP, PAC1 receptor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) in several nuclei. In rats exposed to a 7 day chronic variate stress paradigm, chronic stress enhanced baseline startle responding induced by handling and exposure to bright lights. Following chronic stress, quantitative transcript assessments of brain regions demonstrated dramatic increases in PACAP and PAC1 receptor, BDNF, and TrkB receptor mRNA expression selectively in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST). Related vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and VPAC receptor, and other stress peptide transcript levels were not altered compared to controls. Moreover, acute PACAP38 infusion into the dBNST resulted in a robust dose-dependent anxiogenic response on baseline startle responding that persisted for 7 days. PACAP/PAC1 receptor signaling has established trophic functions and its coordinate effects with chronic stress-induced dBNST BDNF and TrkB transcript expression may underlie the maladaptive BNST remodeling and plasticity associated with anxiety-like behavior. PMID:19181454

  9. Pharmacokinetic interaction profile of riociguat, a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Verena; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Weiss, Johanna

    2014-08-01

    Riociguat is a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator under development for pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. So far, the interaction potential of riociguat with other drugs is nearly unknown. Therefore, we assessed in vitro the potency of riociguat to inhibit important drug metabolising enzymes (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) and drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and 1B3). In addition we evaluated its substrate characteristics for P-gp, BCRP, and the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1). We also assessed riociguat's inducing properties on important drug metabolising enzymes and transporters and investigated its ability to activate the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR). Riociguat was identified as a weak to moderate inhibitor of P-gp (f2-value: 11.7 ± 4.8 μM), BCRP (IC50 = 46.2 ± 20.3 μM), OATP1B1 (IC50 = 34.1 ± 3.15 μM), OATP1B3 (IC50 = 50.3 ± 7.5 μM), CYP2D6 (IC50 = 12.4 ± 0.74 μM), and CYP2C19 (IC50 = 46.1 ± 7.14 μM). Furthermore, it induced mRNA expression of BCRP/ABCG2 (3-fold at 20 μM) and to a lesser extent of CYP3A4 (2.3-fold at 20 μM), UGT1A4, and ABCB11. The only weak inducing properties were confirmed by weak activation of PXR. Considering its systemic concentrations its interaction potential as a perpetrator drug seems to be low. In contrast, our data suggest that riociguat is a P-gp substrate and might therefore act as a victim drug when co-administered with strong P-gp inductors or inhibitors. PMID:24657506

  10. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase by sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin and nitric oxide in various tissue preparations and comparison to the effects of sodium azide and hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, S; Arnold, W; Mittal, C; Murad, F

    1977-02-01

    Sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, sodium azide and hydroxylamine increased guanylate cyclase activity in particulate and/or soluble preparations from various tissues. While sodium nitroprusside increased guanylate cyclase activity in most of the preparations examined, the effects of sodium azide, hydroxylamine and nitroglycerin were tissue specific. Nitroglycerin and hydroxylamine were also less potent. Neither the protein activator factor nor catalase which is required for sodium azide effects altered the stimulatory effect of sodium nitroprusside. In the presence of sodium azide, sodium nitroprusside or hydroxylamine, magnesium ion was as effective as manganese ion as a sole cation cofactor for guanylate cyclase. With soluble guanylate cyclase from rat liver and bovine tracheal smooth muscle the concentrations of sodium nitroprusside that gave half-maximal stimulation with Mn2+ were 0.1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Effective concentrations were slightly less with Mg2+ as a sole cation cofactor. The ability of these agents to increase cyclic GMP levels in intact tissues is probably due to their effects on guanylate cyclase activity. While the precise mechanism of guanylate cyclase activation by these agents is not known, activation may be due to the formation of nitric oxide or another reactive material since nitric oxide also increased guanylate cyclase activity. PMID:14978

  11. Muscarinic cholinergic ligand binding to intact mouse pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20/D16-16) coupling with two biochemical effectors: adenylate cyclase and phosphatidylinositol turnover.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, K; Vickroy, T W; Watson, M; Roeske, W R; Reisine, T D; Smith, T L; Yamamura, H I

    1986-03-01

    (-)-[3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors on intact mouse pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20/D16-16) was characterized in an attempt to correlate radioligand binding properties with receptor-coupled biochemical responses. Performing rinse time studies for 2 hr produced a remarkably improved ratio of specific/total (+)-[3H]QNB binding (85%). Kinetic experiments yielded association (k+1) and dissociation (k-1) rate constants of 2.2 X 10(8) M-1 min-1 and 6.8 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively. Receptor occupancy curves demonstrated a uniform population of specific, saturable (-)-[3H]QNB binding sites with a Hill coefficient equal to 1.0 and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) equal to 34 pM under our conditions. Stereoselectivity was observed with the enantiomers (dexetimide and levetimide) of benzetimide (a factor of 4300). Concentrations of carbachol that produced a half-maximal inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and a concentration of carbachol for producing half-maximal stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover in the intact cells were 0.45 and 170 microM, respectively. Schild analysis revealed that pirenzepine, a nonclassical muscarinic antagonist, had a 40-fold greater affinity for reversing carbachol-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover (inhibition constant or Ki = 7 nM), compared to its antagonism of the carbachol-mediated inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP formation (Ki = 280 nM). Interestingly, pirenzepine inhibited (-)-[3H]QNB binding with a Ki value of 72 nM. In contrast, atropine was nearly equipotent (Ki = 0.3-0.5 nM) in binding studies and in both effector systems. PMID:3005550

  12. Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase: promising functional insights from rare coding atherosclerosis-related GUCY1A3 variants.

    PubMed

    Wobst, Jana; von Ameln, Simon; Wolf, Bernhard; Wierer, Michael; Dang, Tan An; Sager, Hendrik B; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Friebe, Andreas; Braun, Siegmund L; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kessler, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) are emerging therapeutic agents in cardiovascular diseases. Genetic alterations of the GUCY1A3 gene, which encodes the α1 subunit of the sGC, are associated with coronary artery disease. Studies investigating sGC stimulators in subjects with CAD and carrying risk-related variants in sGC are, however, lacking. Here, we functionally investigate the impact of coding GUCY1A3 variants on sGC activity and the therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in vitro. In addition to a known loss-of-function variant, eight coding variants in GUCY1A3 were cloned and expressed in HEK 293 cells. Protein levels and dimerization capability with the β1 subunit were analysed by immunoblotting and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. All α1 variants found in MI patients dimerized with the β1 subunit. Protein levels were reduced by 72 % in one variant (p < 0.01). Enzymatic activity was analysed using cGMP radioimmunoassay after stimulation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Five variants displayed decreased cGMP production upon NO stimulation (p < 0.001). The addition of the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP formation in all of these variants (p < 0.01). Except for the variant leading to decreased protein level, cGMP amounts reached the wildtype NO-induced level after addition of BAY 41-2272. In conclusion, rare coding variants in GUCY1A3 lead to reduced cGMP formation which can be rescued by a sGC stimulator in vitro. These results might therefore represent the starting point for discovery of novel treatment strategies for patients at risk with coding GUCY1A3 variants. PMID:27342234

  13. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulation Prevents Fibrotic Tissue Remodeling and Improves Survival in Salt-Sensitive Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geschka, Sandra; Kretschmer, Axel; Sharkovska, Yuliya; Evgenov, Oleg V.; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hucke, Andreas; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background A direct pharmacological stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an emerging therapeutic approach to the management of various cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction. Novel sGC stimulators, including riociguat (BAY 63-2521), have a dual mode of action: They sensitize sGC to endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) and also directly stimulate sGC independently of NO. Little is known about their effects on tissue remodeling and degeneration and survival in experimental malignant hypertension. Methods and Results Mortality, hemodynamics and biomarkers of tissue remodeling and degeneration were assessed in Dahl salt-sensitive rats maintained on a high salt diet and treated with riociguat (3 or 10 mg/kg/d) for 14 weeks. Riociguat markedly attenuated systemic hypertension, improved systolic heart function and increased survival from 33% to 85%. Histological examination of the heart and kidneys revealed that riociguat significantly ameliorated fibrotic tissue remodeling and degeneration. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of the pro-fibrotic biomarkers osteopontin (OPN), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the myocardium and the renal cortex was attenuated by riociguat. In addition, riociguat reduced plasma and urinary levels of OPN, TIMP-1, and PAI-1. Conclusions Stimulation of sGC by riociguat markedly improves survival and attenuates systemic hypertension and systolic dysfunction, as well as fibrotic tissue remodeling in the myocardium and the renal cortex in a rodent model of pressure and volume overload. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in diseases associated with impaired cardiovascular and renal functions. PMID:21789188

  14. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Costell, Melissa H; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J; Morgan, Lisa A; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R; Ballard, Victoria L T; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M; Jolivette, Larry J; Willette, Robert N; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Behm, David J

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5-10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  15. Comparison of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators and Activators in Models of Cardiovascular Disease Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Costell, Melissa H.; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E.; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R.; Ballard, Victoria L. T.; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W.; Lepore, John J.; Jucker, Beat M.; Jolivette, Larry J.; Willette, Robert N.; Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Behm, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5–10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  16. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase in relation to dopamine-induced long-term enhancement (LTE) of muscarinic depolarization in the rabbit superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Mochida, S; Kobayashi, H; Libet, B

    1987-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) induction of the long-term enhancement (LTE) of the slow muscarinic depolarizing response to methacholine (MCh), equivalent to the slow EPSP (S-EPSP), was previously found to be mimicked by exogenous cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the rabbit superior cervical ganglion (SCG). DA-induced LTE of the S-EPSP was shown to be depressed by some DA antagonists. We now show that DA (15 microM), its analog, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (ADTN), and a D2 receptor antagonist, metoclopramide, each can induce both LTE of MCh depolarization and an increase in ganglionic cAMP. Conversely, antagonists of DA-induced LTE also depress DA-induced rises in cAMP; these antagonists include haloperidol (1 microM), both (+) and (-) enantiomers of butaclamol (0.7-7 microM), flupenthixol (1 microM), and (+)-R-8-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-o l (SCH-23390) (7 microM). The selective D2 antagonists sulpiride (10 microM) and domperidone (10 microM) affect neither DA action. Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists (alpha-methyl-norepinephrine and clonidine) produce no LTE; alpha-antagonist dihydroergotamine (35 microM) does not affect either DA action, although it can completely block the hyperpolarizing response to DA or other catecholamines. Beta-antagonist propranolol (5 microM) partially depresses DA-induced rises in cAMP but has no effect on the DA-induced LTE. (Butaclamol and propranolol in combination can completely block the cAMP rise induced by DA.) Beta-agonist isoproterenol can induce appreciable LTE of MCh depolarization, but this LTE is not depressed by propranolol (10 microM). Isoproterenol can elicit a substantial rise in cAMP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Vasorelaxant effect of isoliquiritigenin, a novel soluble guanylate cyclase activator, in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S M; Kuo, S C

    1995-01-01

    1. The vasorelaxant activity of isoliquiritigenin, isolated from Dalbergia odorifera T, was investigated in the phenylephrine-precontracted rat aorta by measuring tension, guanylate and adenylate cyclase activities, guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. 2. Isoliquiritigenin concentration-dependently relaxed rat aorta contracted with phenylephrine, KCl, U-46619, endothelin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, with EC50s of 7.4 +/- 1.6, 10.5 +/- 2.3, 14.3 +/- 3.3, 11.8 +/- 2.0 and 13.6 +/- 3.7 microM, respectively. 3. Isoliquiritigenin caused endothelium-independent relaxation of phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings. Neither NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (an inhibitor of the L-arginine-NO pathway) nor oxyhaemoglobin (which binds NO) modified the relaxant effect of isoliquiritigenin. The relaxant action of isoliquiritigenin also persisted in intact aorta in the presence of indomethacin or glibenclamide. However, methylene blue, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, abolished relaxation induced by isoliquiritigenin. 4. Incubation of rat aorta with isoliquiritigenin not only increased aortic cyclic GMP content but also caused small increases in aortic cyclic AMP content, and greatly potentiated the increases in cyclic AMP observed in the presence of forskolin. The maximum increase in cyclic GMP by isoliquiritigenin was reached earlier than the increase in cyclic AMP. This result suggests that the increases in cyclic GMP caused by isoliquiritigenin might stimulate the accumulation of cyclic AMP. 5. Concentration-dependent increases in soluble guanylate cyclase activity were observed in isoliquiritigenin (1-100 microM)- or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells, while adenylate cyclase activity was unchanged in isoliquiritigenin (100 microM)-treated cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599926

  18. Stimulation of T-cells with OKT3 antibodies increases forskolin binding and cyclic AMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvanta, A; Gerwins, P; Jondal, M; Fredholm, B B

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that elevation of cAMP by adenosine receptor stimulation may be potentiated by stimulation of the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex on human T-cells with the monoclonal antibody OKT3, and that this is mimicked by activation of protein kinase C [Kvanta, A. et al. (1989) Naunyn-Schmeideberg's Arch. Pharmac. 340, 715-717]. In this study the diterpene forskolin, which binds to and activates the adenylate cyclase, has been used to examine further how the CD3 complex may influence the adenylate cyclase pathway. Stimulation with OKT3 alone was found to cause a small dose-dependent increase in basal cAMP accumulation. When combining OKT3 with a concentration of forskolin (10 microM), which by itself had little effect on the cyclase activity, the cAMP accumulation was markedly potentiated. This potentiation was paralleled by an increase in [3H]forskolin binding to saponine permeabilized Jurkat cells from 24 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells. The OKT3 effect on cAMP was blocked by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA or intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA and also by W-7, an inhibitor of calmodulin, but was unaffected by H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C. Even though OKT3 caused an increase in inositolphosphate turnover, and activated protein kinase C, neither phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PDBu) nor the Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 could mimic the OKT3 effect, whereas a combination of PDBu and A23187 at high concentrations could potentiate forskolin stimulated cyclase activity. Together, these results indicated that stimulation of the CD3 complex could influence the adenylate cyclase by two different mechanisms, one involving activation of protein kinase C and another which does not. PMID:2177619

  19. Agonist-induced desensitization of dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity is temporally and biochemically separated from D1 receptor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, G Y; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J; Bouvier, M; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor was investigated by using c-myc epitope-tagged D1 receptors expressed in Sf9 (fall armyworm ovary) cells. Treatment of D1 receptors with 10 microM dopamine for 15 min led to a loss of the dopamine-detected high-affinity state of the receptor accompanying a 40% reduction in the ability of the receptor to mediate maximal dopamine stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. After 60 min of agonist exposure, 45 min after the occurrence of desensitization, 28% of the cell surface receptors were internalized into an intracellular light vesicular membrane fraction as determined by radioligand binding and supported by photoaffinity labeling, immunocytochemical staining, and immunoblot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with concanavalin A or sucrose completely blocked agonist-induced D1 receptor internalization without preventing agonist-induced desensitization, indicating a biochemical separation of these processes. Collectively, these findings indicate that the desensitization of D1 receptor-coupled adenylyl cyclase activity and D1 receptor internalization are temporarily and biochemically distinct mechanisms regulating D1 receptor function following agonist activation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479745

  20. Pharmacological stimulation of type 5 adenylyl cyclase stabilizes heart rate under both microgravity and hypergravity induced by parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunzhe; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Jiao, Qibin; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Jin, Meihua; Cai, Wenqian; Jin, Hui-Ling; Fujita, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Suita, Kenji; Kurotani, Reiko; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5) functions in autonomic regulation in the heart. Based on that work, we hypothesized that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity could regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate under micro- and hypergravity. To test this hypothesis, we selected the approach of activating AC5 activity in mice with a selective AC5 activator (NKH477) or inhibitor (vidarabine) and examining heart rate variability during parabolic flight. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals, a marker of total autonomic variability, was significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the vidarabine group, while there were no significant changes in the NKH477 group, suggesting that autonomic regulation was unstable in the vidarabine group. The ratio of low frequency and high frequency (HF) in heart rate variability analysis, a marker of sympathetic activity, became significantly decreased under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group, while there was no such decrease in the vidarabine group. Normalized HF, a marker of parasympathetic activity, became significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group. In contrast, there was no such increase in the vidarabine group. This study is the first to indicate that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity under micro- and hypergravity could be useful to regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate.

  1. Role of cAMP- and IKK-2-Dependent Signaling Pathways in Functional Stimulation of Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells with Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Zyuz'kov, G N; Zhdanov, V V; Udut, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Chaikovskii, A V; Simanina, E V; Polyakova, T Yu; Minakova, M Yu; Udut, V V; Tolstikova, T G; Shul'ts, E E; Stavrova, L A; Burmina, Ya V; Suslov, N I; Dygai, A M

    2015-09-01

    The role of cAMP- and IKK-2-dependent pathways in stimulation of the growth capacity of mesenchymal progenitor cells with alkaloid songorine was studied in vitro. Inhibitors of adenylate cyclase and IKK-2 were shown to abolish the increase in proliferative activity of progenitor cells. Moreover, blockade of the inhibitory kinase complex was accompanied by a decrease in the intensity of progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:26472093

  2. Inhibitory role of monovalent ions on rat brain cortex adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ivana; Mitrovic, Marina; Zelen, Ivanka; Zaric, Milan; Kastratovic, Tatjana; Stanojevic, Marijana; Nenadovic, Milutin; Stojanovic, Tomislav

    2013-10-01

    Adenylyl cyclases, comprise of a large family of enzymes that catalyze synthesis of the cyclic AMP from ATP. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of monovalent ions on both basal, stimulated adenylate cyclase EC 4.6.1.1 (AC) activity and C unit of AC and on GTPase active G-protein in the synaptic membranes of rat brain cortex. The effect of ion concentration from 30 to 200 mM (1 mM MgCl2) showed dose-dependent and significant inhibition of the basal AC activity, stimulated and unstimulated C unit activity. Stimulation of AC with 5 μM GTPγS in the presence of 50-200 mM of tested salts showed inhibitory effect on the AC activity. From our results it could be postulated that the investigated monovalent ions exert inhibitory effect on the AC complex activity by affecting the intermolecular interaction of the activated α subunit of G/F protein and the C unit of AC complex an inhibitory influence of tested monovalent ions on these molecular interaction.

  3. Adenylate-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Stefan; Naismith, James H

    2009-12-01

    Thioesters, amides, and esters are common chemical building blocks in a wide array of natural products. The formation of these bonds can be catalyzed in a variety of ways. For chemists, the use of an activating group is a common strategy and adenylate enzymes are exemplars of this approach. Adenylating enzymes activate the otherwise unreactive carboxylic acid by transforming the normal hydroxyl leaving group into adenosine monophosphate. Recently there have been a number of studies of such enzymes and in this review we suggest a new classification scheme. The review highlights the diversity in enzyme fold, active site architecture, and metal coordination that has evolved to catalyze this particular reaction. PMID:19836944

  4. 7-Nitroindazole and methylene blue, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase, block MK-801-elicited behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, S I; Rosse, R B; Paul, S M; Tomasino, V; Koetzner, L; Morn, C B; Mastropaolo, J

    1996-07-01

    We examined the abilities of 7-nitroindazole and methylene blue, inhibitors of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity respectively, to attenuate explosive episodic jumping behavior(s) ("popping") elicited by MK-801 in mice. MK-801, like phencyclidine (PCP), is a high-affinity, noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor. We have postulated that MK-801-elicited popping behavior in mice represents an animal model of schizophrenia, because popping behavior is markedly inhibited/antagonized by both typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the present study, popping behavior induced by MK-801 was measured using an automated detection system that quantifies vertical displacements on the testing platform. 7-Nitroindazole (100 mg/kg) and methylene blue (32 and 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the number and force of MK-801-elicited popping behavior. Mouse rotorod performance did not differ between animals receiving 7-nitroindazole, methylene blue, or their respective vehicles, suggesting that attenuation of MK-801-elicited popping behavior was not due to either sedation or ataxia caused by 7-nitroindazole or methylene blue. Our findings suggest that nitric oxide may, in part, mediate behaviors induced by NMDA receptor antagonists, like MK-801, and that inhibitors of NOS may have antipsychotic actions.

  5. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen. PMID:22752677

  6. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen.

  7. Beneficial effect of the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 on impaired penile erection in db/db-/- type II diabetic and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Kenia Pedrosa; Teixeira, Cleber E; Priviero, Fernanda B M; Toque, Haroldo A; Webb, R Clinton

    2015-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and obesity are major risk factors for erectile dysfunction (ED). In diabetes, increased oxidative stress leads to decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and diabetic patients appear to be less responsive to conventional therapy with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. We investigated whether the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 (5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl]pyrimidin-4ylamine) is effective in improving impaired corpus cavernosum (CC) relaxation in obese DM2 mice by reducing oxidative stress. Adult db/db(-/-) mice or their lean db(/+) littermates were used to assess vascular function, cGMP levels, antioxidant status, NADPH oxidase expression, and superoxide formation in the absence or presence of BAY 41-2272. Results showed that BAY 41-2272 (10(-8) to 10(-5) M) potently relaxed CC from db(/+) or db/db(-/-) mice in a similar manner. BAY 41-2272 significantly enhanced both endothelium-dependent and nitrergic relaxation induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS), and improved the impaired relaxation to acetylcholine and EFS in the diabetic animals in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-8) to 10(-7) M). BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP levels and potentiated relaxation responses to exogenous NO in CC. Total antioxidant status was reduced in plasma and urine whereas expression of vascular NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91phox, p22phox, and p47phox) was increased in the CC of db/db(-/-) mice, suggesting a state of oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by BAY 41-2272 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that BAY 41-2272 improves CC relaxation in db/db(-/-) mice by increasing cGMP and augmenting antioxidant status, making this drug is a potential novel candidate to treat ED.

  8. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory. PMID:27695398

  9. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  10. Crystal Structures of the Catalytic Domain of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Allerston, Charles K.; von Delft, Frank; Gileadi, Opher

    2013-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) catalyses the synthesis of cyclic GMP in response to nitric oxide. The enzyme is a heterodimer of homologous α and β subunits, each of which is composed of multiple domains. We present here crystal structures of a heterodimer of the catalytic domains of the α and β subunits, as well as an inactive homodimer of β subunits. This first structure of a metazoan, heteromeric cyclase provides several observations. First, the structures resemble known structures of adenylate cyclases and other guanylate cyclases in overall fold and in the arrangement of conserved active-site residues, which are contributed by both subunits at the interface. Second, the subunit interaction surface is promiscuous, allowing both homodimeric and heteromeric association; the preference of the full-length enzyme for heterodimer formation must derive from the combined contribution of other interaction interfaces. Third, the heterodimeric structure is in an inactive conformation, but can be superposed onto an active conformation of adenylate cyclase by a structural transition involving a 26° rigid-body rotation of the α subunit. In the modelled active conformation, most active site residues in the subunit interface are precisely aligned with those of adenylate cyclase. Finally, the modelled active conformation also reveals a cavity related to the active site by pseudo-symmetry. The pseudosymmetric site lacks key active site residues, but may bind allosteric regulators in a manner analogous to the binding of forskolin to adenylate cyclase. This indicates the possibility of developing a new class of small-molecule modulators of guanylate cyclase activity targeting the catalytic domain. PMID:23505436

  11. Assessment of the effects of hepatic impairment and smoking on the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat (BAY 63-2521)

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Corina; Unger, Sigrun; Schmidt, Anja; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator developed for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, is metabolized in part by the liver. Expression of one of the metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, is induced by aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke. Two nonrandomized, nonblinded studies were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of riociguat in individuals with mild (Child-Pugh A) or moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment associated with liver cirrhosis compared with that in age-, weight-, and sex-matched healthy controls: study 1 included smokers and nonsmokers, and study 2 included nonsmokers only. Data from these studies were integrated for analysis. All participants (N = 64) received a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 mg. Riociguat exposure was significantly higher in individuals with Child-Pugh B hepatic impairment than in healthy controls (ratio: 153% [90% confidence interval: 103%–228%]) but was similar in those with Child-Pugh A hepatic impairment and controls. The half-life of the riociguat metabolite M1 was prolonged in patients with Child-Pugh B or A hepatic impairment compared with that in controls by approximately 43% and 24%, respectively. Impaired hepatic function was associated with higher riociguat exposure in nonsmokers compared with the population of smokers and nonsmokers combined. Riociguat’s safety profile was similar in individuals with impaired or normal liver function. In conclusion, moderate hepatic impairment was associated with increased riociguat exposure compared with that in controls, probably as a result of reduced clearance of the metabolite M1. This suggests that dose titration of riociguat should be administered with particular care in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. PMID:27162628

  12. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  13. Identification of an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor for treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Kim, Susan S; Chen, Tao; Koga, Kohei; Descalzi, Giannina; Gong, Bo; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Zhang, Xuehan; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

    2011-01-12

    Neuropathic pain, often caused by nerve injury, is commonly observed among patients with different diseases. Because its basic mechanisms are poorly understood, effective medications are limited. Previous investigations of basic pain mechanisms and drug discovery efforts have focused mainly on early sensory neurons such as dorsal root ganglion and spinal dorsal horn neurons, and few synaptic-level studies or new drugs are designed to target the injury-related cortical plasticity that accompanies neuropathic pain. Our previous work has demonstrated that calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) is critical for nerve injury-induced synaptic changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Through rational drug design and chemical screening, we have identified a lead candidate AC1 inhibitor, NB001, which is relatively selective for AC1 over other adenylate cyclase isoforms. Using a variety of behavioral tests and toxicity studies, we have found that NB001, when administered intraperitoneally or orally, has an analgesic effect in animal models of neuropathic pain, without any apparent side effects. Our study thus shows that AC1 could be a productive therapeutic target for neuropathic pain and describes a new agent for the possible treatment of neuropathic pain.

  14. Adenylyl cyclase activation underlies intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation, cyclic AMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation evoked by beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, P A; Li, Y

    1995-09-18

    We have previously shown that stimulation of cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes with the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO) results in transport of cAMP from astrocytes followed by extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine [Rosenberg et al. J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 2953-2965]. In this study we found that the endogenous catecholamines epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE), but not dopamine, serotonin, or histamine, all at 10 microM, significantly stimulated intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation in cortical cultures. Detailed dose-response experiments were performed for NE and EPI, as well as ISO. For each catecholamine, the potencies in evoking intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation were similar. These data provide additional evidence that a single common mechanism, namely beta-adrenergic mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase, underlies intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation. It appears that regulation of extracellular adenosine levels via cAMP transport and extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine may be a final common pathway of neuromodulation in cerebral cortex for catecholamines, and, indeed, any substance whose receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

  15. Serum-stimulated cyclic-AMP production in S49 lymphoma cells grown in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Darfler, F J; Mullen, M D; Insel, P A

    1984-03-23

    Growth of S49 lymphoma cells with horse serum leads to an increase in cellular cAMP phosphodiesterase activity and a resultant loss of hormone- and cholera-toxin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. We now show that the serum requires protein synthesis to produce these effects. Further, we show that acute addition of serum to wild-type S49 cells, grown in serum-free medium, rapidly (under 2 min) and transiently (under 30 min) stimulates cellular cAMP, 10-fold over basal levels. This 'acute' effect of serum was not observed in UNC S49 cells, suggesting that a functional Ns, the guanine nucleotide regulatory component that mediates stimulation of adenylate cyclase, is required for the serum-mediated stimulation of cellular cAMP. Serum added acutely to wild-type S49 cells also augmented cAMP accumulation in response to isoproterenol and forskolin. The half-maximally effective concentrations of horse serum that acutely stimulated or more slowly decreased the cAMP accumulation were approx. 0.2% and 2.0%, respectively. Preliminary attempts to characterize further the serum factor indicate that it has a high (250 000-300 000) molecular weight and is insensitive to boiling; chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B yields a 100-fold purification. Thus, the serum contains one or more components that activate adenylate cyclase, increase cellular cAMP levels and ultimately induce cAMP phosphodiesterase in S49 lymphoma cells. PMID:6322858

  16. PACAP suppresses dry eye signs by stimulating tear secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nakamachi, Tomoya; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Seki, Tamotsu; Yofu, Sachiko; Kagami, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Shintani, Norihito; Baba, Akemichi; Mark, Laszlo; Lanekoff, Ingela; Kiss, Peter; Farkas, Jozsef; Reglodi, Dora; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is caused by a reduction in the volume or quality of tears. Here, we show that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-null mice develop dry eye-like symptoms such as corneal keratinization and tear reduction. PACAP immunoreactivity is co-localized with a neuronal marker, and PACAP receptor (PAC1-R) immunoreactivity is observed in mouse infraorbital lacrimal gland acinar cells. PACAP eye drops stimulate tear secretion and increase cAMP and phosphorylated (p)-protein kinase A levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands that could be inhibited by pre-treatment with a PAC1-R antagonist or an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Moreover, these eye drops suppress corneal keratinization in PACAP-null mice. PACAP eye drops increase aquaporin 5 (AQP5) levels in the membrane and pAQP5 levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands. AQP5 siRNA treatment of the infraorbital lacrimal gland attenuates PACAP-induced tear secretion. Based on these results, PACAP might be clinically useful to treat dry eye disorder. PMID:27345595

  17. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  18. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  19. Decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in potato tubers results in an enhanced rate of respiration and a stimulation of starch synthesis that is attributable to post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Sandra N; Tiessen, Axel; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides are of general importance for many aspects of cell function, but their role in the regulation of biosynthetic processes is still unclear. It was previously reported that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase, catalysing the interconversion of ATP and AMP to ADP, leads to increased adenylate pools and starch content in transgenic potato tubers. However, the underlying mechanisms were not elucidated. Here, it is shown that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in growing tubers leads to increased rates of respiratory oxygen consumption and increased carbon fluxes into starch. Increased rates of starch synthesis were accompanied by post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), catalysing the key regulatory step of starch synthesis in the plastid, while there were no substantial changes in metabolic intermediates or sugar levels. A similar increase in post-translational redox-activation of AGPase was found after supplying adenine to wild-type potato tuber discs to increase adenine nucleotide levels. Results provide first evidence for a link between redox-activation of AGPase and adenine nucleotide levels in plants.

  20. Curcumin inhibits ACTH- and angiotensin II-stimulated cortisol secretion and Ca(v)3.2 current.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Judith A; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J

    2009-08-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone and angiotensin II stimulate cortisol secretion from bovine adrenal zona fasciculata cells by the activation of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C-coupled receptors. Curcumin (1- 20 muM), a compound found in the spice turmeric, inhibited cortisol secretion stimulated by ACTH, AngII, and 8CPT-cAMP. Curcumin also suppressed ACTH-stimulated increases in mRNAs coding for steroid acute regulatory protein and CYP11a1 steroid hydroxylase. In whole cell patch clamp recordings from AZF cells, curcumin at slightly higher concentrations also inhibited Ca(v)3.2 current. These results identify curcumin as an effective inhibitor of ACTH- and AngII-stimulated cortisol secretion. The inhibition of Ca(v)3.2 current by curcumin may contribute to its suppression of secretion.

  1. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Meili, Dimirela; Salathe, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) was recently identified as a widely expressed intracellular source of cAMP in mammalian cells. sAC is evolutionary, structurally, and biochemically distinct from the G-protein-responsive transmembranous adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). The structure of the catalytic unit of sAC is similar to tmAC, but sAC does not contain transmembranous domains, allowing localizations independent of the membranous compartment. sAC activity is stimulated by HCO3-, Ca2+ and is sensitive to physiologically relevant ATP fluctuations. sAC functions as a physiological sensor for carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, and therefore indirectly for pH. Here we review the physiological role of sAC in different human tissues with a major focus on the lung. PMID:25064591

  2. Activation of the pacidamycin PacL adenylation domain by MbtH-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Heemstra, John R; Walsh, Christopher T; Imker, Heidi J

    2010-11-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines are major avenues for the biosynthesis of a vast array of peptidyl natural products. Several hundred bacterial NRPS gene clusters contain a small (∼70-residue) protein belonging to the MbtH family for which no function has been defined. Here we show that two strictly conserved Trp residues in MbtH-like proteins contribute to stimulation of amino acid adenylation in some NRPS modules. We also demonstrate that adenylation can be stimulated not only by cognate MbtH-like proteins but also by homologues from disparate natural product pathways.

  3. Activation of the Pacidamycin PacL Adenylation Domain by MbtH-Like Proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Heemstra, John R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Imker, Heidi J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines are major avenues for the biosynthesis of a vast array of peptidyl natural products. Several hundred bacterial NRPS gene clusters contain a small (~70 residue) protein belonging to the MbtH family for which no function has been defined. Here we show that two strictly conserved Trp residues in MbtH-like proteins contribute to stimulation of amino acid adenylation in some NRPS modules. We also demonstrate that adenylation can be stimulated not only by cognate MbtH-like proteins but also by homologues from disparate natural product pathways. PMID:20964365

  4. Uridylation and adenylation of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Song, JianBo; Song, Jun; Mo, BeiXin; Chen, XueMei

    2016-01-01

    The posttranscriptional addition of nontemplated nucleotides to the 3′ ends of RNA molecules can have a significant impact on their stability and biological function. It has been recently discovered that nontemplated addition of uridine or adenosine to the 3′ ends of RNAs occurs in different organisms ranging from algae to humans, and on different kinds of RNAs, such as histone mRNAs, mRNA fragments, U6 snRNA, mature small RNAs and their precursors etc. These modifications may lead to different outcomes, such as increasing RNA decay, promoting or inhibiting RNA processing, or changing RNA activity. Growing pieces of evidence have revealed that such modifications can be RNA sequence-specific and subjected to temporal or spatial regulation in development. RNA tailing and its outcomes have been associated with human diseases such as cancer. Here, we review recent developments in RNA uridylation and adenylation and discuss the future prospects in this research area. PMID:26563174

  5. Uridylation and adenylation of RNAs.

    PubMed

    Song, JianBo; Song, Jun; Mo, BeiXin; Chen, XueMei

    2015-11-01

    The posttranscriptional addition of nontemplated nucleotides to the 3' ends of RNA molecules can have a significant impact on their stability and biological function. It has been recently discovered that nontemplated addition of uridine or adenosine to the 3' ends of RNAs occurs in different organisms ranging from algae to humans, and on different kinds of RNAs, such as histone mRNAs, mRNA fragments, U6 snRNA, mature small RNAs and their precursors etc. These modifications may lead to different outcomes, such as increasing RNA decay, promoting or inhibiting RNA processing, or changing RNA activity. Growing pieces of evidence have revealed that such modifications can be RNA sequence-specific and subjected to temporal or spatial regulation in development. RNA tailing and its outcomes have been associated with human diseases such as cancer. Here, we review recent developments in RNA uridylation and adenylation and discuss the future prospects in this research area. PMID:26563174

  6. Inhibition by forskolin of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6 muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klip, A; Ramlal, T; Douen, A G; Bilan, P J; Skorecki, K L

    1988-01-01

    The cardioactive diterpene forskolin is a known activator of adenylate cyclase, but recently a specific interaction of this compound with the glucose transporter has been identified that results in the inhibition of glucose transport in several human and rat cell types. We have compared the sensitivity of basal and insulin-stimulated hexose transport to inhibition by forskolin in skeletal muscle cells of the L6 line. Forskolin completely inhibited both basal and insulin-stimulated hexose transport when present during the transport assay. The inhibition of basal transport was completely reversible upon removal of the diterpene. In contrast, insulin-stimulated hexose transport did not recover, and basal transport levels were attained instead. This effect of inhibiting (or reversing) the insulin-stimulated fraction of transport is a novel effect of the diterpene. Forskolin treatment also inhibited the stimulated fraction of transport when the stimulus was by 4 beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, reversing back to basal levels. Half-maximal inhibition of the above-basal insulin-stimulated transport was achieved with 35-50 microM-forskolin, and maximal inhibition with 100 microM. Forskolin did not inhibit 125I-insulin binding under conditions where it caused significant inhibition of insulin-stimulated hexose transport. Forskolin significantly elevated the cyclic AMP levels in the cells; however its inhibitory effect on the above basal, insulin-stimulated fraction of hexose transport was not mediated by cyclic AMP since: (i) 8-bromo cyclic AMP and cholera toxin did not mimic this effect of the diterpene, (ii) significant decreases in cyclic AMP levels caused by 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine in the presence of forskolin did not prevent inhibition of insulin-stimulated hexose transport, (iii) isobutylmethylxanthine did not potentiate forskolin effects on glucose transport but did potentiate the elevation in cyclic AMP, and (iv) 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate

  7. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Shiva; Lietzau, Grazyna; Lundberg, Mathias; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia. PMID:27305000

  8. A neomutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in a severe neonatal hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Polak, M; Couet, J; Leger, J; Czernichow, P; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1996-06-01

    Until recently, neonatal hyperthyroidism has been considered to be related to the transplacental passage of thyroid-stimulating Ig present in the serum of the mother. We report here the case of a newborn who presented with severe hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter, and important ocular signs (eyelid retraction and possibly proptosis). However, the absence of thyroid pathology in the parents and the lack of antithyroid antibodies in the mother and in the patient led us to suspect a nonimmune aetiology. Direct genomic sequencing of the last exon of the TSH receptor in the patient revealed a T-->C transversion yielding to a Met453-->Thr heterozygous substitution in the second transmembrane domain of the receptor. The mutation was absent in both parents. Eukaryotic expression analysis in COS-7 cells yielded a mutated receptor that produced constitutive activation of adenylate cyclase without enhancement of phospholipase C activity. PMID:8964822

  9. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  10. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  11. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  12. Neuroendocrine regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Okada, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Vaudry, Hubert; Kikuyama, Sakae

    2009-04-01

    The hypothalamic peptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which have been postulated as acting as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone in amphibians, were tested for their activity by employing a recently developed radioimmunoassay for bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) TSH. CRF markedly stimulated the release of TSH from both adult and larval bullfrog pituitary cells. Both TRH and GnRH moderately stimulated the release of TSH from adult pituitary cells but not from larval ones. The release of TSH was also enhanced by bullfrog hypothalamic extracts. The hypothalamic extract-evoked release of TSH was markedly reduced by a CRF receptor antagonist, suggesting that CRF and/or CRF-related peptides are the main TSH-releasing factors occurring in the bullfrog hypothalamus. Experiments using CRF receptor agonists and antagonists revealed that CRF acts through the type 2 receptor. With regard to other hypothalamic substances that influence the release of TSH, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide were found to be potent stimulators and somatostatin an inhibitor of TSH release. Thus, it becomes clear that the main regulatory peptides controlling TSH secretion in amphibians are different from those in mammals. Triiodothyronine did not affect the basal release of TSH from the pituitary of either larval or adult bullfrogs but suppressed the CRF-induced release of TSH, suggesting that negative feedback by thyroid hormone is functioning both in larvae and adults.

  13. Gustatory Habituation in "Drosophila" Relies on "Rutabaga" (Adenylate Cyclase)-Dependent Plasticity of GABAergic Inhibitory Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paranjpe, Pushkar; Rodrigues, Veronica; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani

    2012-01-01

    In some situations, animals seem to ignore stimuli which in other contexts elicit a robust response. This attenuation in behavior, which enables animals to ignore a familiar, unreinforced stimulus, is called habituation. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, it is generally poorly understood in terms of the underlying neural circuitry. Hungry…

  14. Loss of Adenylate Cyclase Tonxin among closely related B. bronchiseptica strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a multi-host, gram-negative respiratory pathogen that causes everything from asymptomatic infection to fatal pneumonia. We have identified a strain of B. bronchiseptica, 253, that is inefficient at persisting in the lower respiratory tract of mice compared to the typica...

  15. Comparative theoretical study of the binding of luciferyl-adenylate and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Vieira, João; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of a study employing a computational approach to study the binding of (D/L)-luciferyl-adenlyates and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase. A semi-empirical/molecular mechanics methodology was used to study the interaction between these ligands and active site molecules. All adenylates are complexed with the enzyme, mostly due to electrostatic interactions with cationic residues. Dehydroluciferyl-adenylate is expected to be a competitive inhibitor of luciferyl-adenylate, as their binding mechanism and affinity to luciferase are very similar. Both luciferyl-adenylates adopt the L-orientation in the active site of luciferase.

  16. Adiponectin stimulates proliferation and cytokine secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ogunwobi, Olorunseun Olatunji; Beales, Ian L P

    2006-05-15

    Adiponectin is a recently described mediator secreted by adipose tissue. Here we report the growth promoting and pro-inflammatory actions of adiponectin on colonic epithelial cancer cells. Full-length and globular adiponectin produced an identical stimulation of HT-29 cell growth that was blocked by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A and partially inhibited by a pan-specific protein kinase C inhibitor, but was unaffected by specific inhibition of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin but not full-length adiponectin significantly increased the secretion and mRNA levels of IL-8, GM-CSF and MCP-1. Globular adiponectin doubled IL-1beta-stimulated IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion. Adiponectin-stimulated cytokine secretion was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of NF-kappaB, ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin increased phosphorylation of both ERK and p38 MAP kinase and increased the nuclear translocation of active NF-kappaB. Adiponectin has pro-proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions on colonic epithelial cells; these appear to be differentially activated by the adiponectin isoforms. Adiponectin may have a role in the regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal function, inflammation and colon carcinogenesis.

  17. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors underlies microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity following stimulation with chromogranin A, a peptide up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D L; Diemel, L T; Cuzner, M L; Pocock, J M

    2002-09-01

    Regulation of microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity is critical for neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report that microglia possess functional group II metabotropic glutamate receptors, expressing mRNA and receptor protein for mGlu2 and mGlu3, negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. Two different agonists of these receptors were able to induce a neurotoxic microglial phenotype which was attenuated by a specific antagonist. Chromogranin A, a secretory peptide expressed in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease, activates microglia to a reactive neurotoxic phenotype. Chromogranin A-induced microglial activation and subsequent neurotoxicity may also involve an underlying stimulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors since their inhibition reduced chromogranin A-induced microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity. These results show that selective inhibition of microglial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors has a positive impact on neuronal survival, and may prove a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12358765

  18. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  19. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin. PMID:22642150

  20. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  1. The vasorelaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid involves stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA pathway: Evidences by pharmacological and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luciano A A; Alencar Filho, Edilson B; Coelho, Maisa C; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-10-01

    The relaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid (LBD) was investigated on isolated aortic rings and compared with forskolin (FSK), a standard and potent activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with relaxing effect. The presence of potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide (ATP-blocker), apamin (SKCa-blocker), charybdotoxin (BKCa-blocker) did not significantly affect either the LBD or FSK concentration-response curves. However, in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (KV-blocker), the relaxant effect for both diterpenes was significantly attenuated, with reduction of its relative potencies. Moreover, the relaxation induced by 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, was also significantly attenuated in the same conditions, i.e., in the presence of 4-aminopyridine. The presence of aminophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, caused a significant increasing in the potency for both LBD and FSK. On the other hand, the presence of Rp-cAMPS, a selective PKA-inhibitor, significantly attenuated the relaxant effect of LBD. In this work, in the same experimental conditions, both labdane-type diterpenes presented remarkably similar results; FSK, however, presented a higher potency (100-fold) than LBD. Thus, the hypothesis that LBD could be a novel AC-activator emerged. To assess that hypothesis, computational molecular docking studies were performed. Crystallographic structure of adenylyl cyclase/forskolin complex (1AB8) was obtained from RSCB Protein Data Bank and used to compare the modes of interaction of the native ligand and LBD. The computational data shows many similarities between LBD and FSK concerning the interaction with the regulatory site of AC. Taken together, the results presented here pointed to LBD as a novel AC-activator. PMID:26144373

  2. [Reactivity of the adenylyl cyclase system in rat tissues to biogenic amines and peptide hormones under starvation condition].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2007-04-01

    Under starvation condition, sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to regulatory action of biogenic amines and peptide hormones in rat tissues are changed. In the myocardium and skeletal muscles, after 2 and 4 days of starvation, the regulatory effects of isoproterenol and relaxin acting via G,-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity and the G-protein GTP-binding are significantly increased compared with control. At the same time, regulatory effects ofsomatostatin which are realized via Gi-proteins, on adenylyl cyclase system in the myocardium are decreased. Under prolonged starvation consisting of two consecutive 4-days periods, the effects of hormones acting via Gs-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity in muscle tissues are decreased to control value levels. The effects of hormones acting via Gi-proteins are largely reduced. In the brain, intensification of adenylyl cyclase stimulating hormonal effects was late and only observed after a 4-day starvation. Unlike muscle tissues, the increase of adenylyl cyclase stimulating effects in the brain is preserved after two-period starvation. The weakening of adenylyl cyclase inhibiting hormonal signals both in the brain and muscles is observed after a 2-day starvation and then the weakening is intensified. Possible role of glucose level and basal adenylyl cyclase activity in determination of the sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to hormones under study is discussed. It is suggested that one of the key causes of physiological changes in animal organism under starvation involves alteration of hormonal signalling systems sensitivity, in particular that of the adenylyl cyclase system, to hormone regulatory action.

  3. Crystal structure of the Alpha subunit PAS domain from soluble guanylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Rahul; Weichsel, Andrzej; Montfort, William R

    2013-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein of ∼150 kDa and the primary nitric oxide receptor. Binding of NO stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and providing attractive opportunities for drug discovery. How sGC is stimulated and where candidate drugs bind remains unknown. The α and β sGC chains are each composed of Heme-Nitric Oxide Oxygen (H-NOX), Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS), coiled-coil and cyclase domains. Here, we present the crystal structure of the α1 PAS domain to 1.8 Å resolution. The structure reveals the binding surfaces of importance to heterodimer function, particularly with respect to regulating NO binding to heme in the β1 H-NOX domain. It also reveals a small internal cavity that may serve to bind ligands or participate in signal transduction. PMID:23934793

  4. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Haslam, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with (/sup 3/H)adenine and (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A/sub 2/ formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC/sub 8/) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP observed with PGE/sub 1/ and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 ..mu..M PMA) and 42% (100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 ..mu..M) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1..mu..M PMA and 100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC/sub 8/ on the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMp formation by PGE/sub 1/ and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in /sup 32/P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE/sub 1/ is present.

  5. Ontogeny of regulatory mechanisms for beta-adrenoceptor control of rat cardiac adenylyl cyclase: targeting of G-proteins and the cyclase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Zeiders, J L; Seidler, F J; Slotkin, T A

    1997-02-01

    Fetal and neonatal tissues are resistant to catecholamine-induced desensitization of essential physiological responses. We examined the mechanisms underlying the ontogeny of desensitization in neonatal rat heart for the beta-adrenergic receptor/adenylyl cyclase signaling cascade. Animals of different ages received isoproterenol daily or 4 days and cardiac membrane preparations were evaluated on the 5th day (6, 15, 25 days old and adults). Measurements were made of basal activity, activity stimulated by two agonists (isoproterenol or glucagon) that operate at different receptors but that share Gs as the transduction intermediate, or by forskolin-Mn' to assess total catalytic capacity of the cyclase subunit; we also assessed inhibition of activity by carbachol which acts via muscarinic cholinergic receptors and G. Adult rats exhibited robust desensitization of the adenylyl cyclase response but the effect was heterologous in that equivalent loss of activity was seen for basal, isoproterenol- and glucagon-stimulated activity forskolin-Mn(2+)-stimulated activity was also decreased. Two factors contributed to desensitization; generalized reduction in membrane protein concentrations caused by cell enlargement (reduced surface-to-volume ratio), and specific interference with the G-protein component that couples receptors to the cyclase. Thus, after adjustment for changes in membrane protein, the desensitization of the forskolin-Mn2, response was no longer evident, but the effects on the other measures were still present. In addition, isoproterenol treatment produced crosstalk with the carbachol/Gi signaling pathway, with significant reductions in the ability of carbachol to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. Heterologous desensitization by isoproterenol was also present in 15 and 25 day old rats, but involved only selective components of the effects seen in adults. At 25 days, uncoupling of signals operating through Gs and Gi was obtained without a reduction in forskolin

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin Y Is a Promiscuous Cyclase That Increases Endothelial Tau Phosphorylation and Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Pastukh, Viktoriya; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Exotoxin Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in ∼ 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY causes inter-endothelial gaps and vascular leak, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Using both a bacteria-delivered and a codon-optimized conditionally expressed ExoY, we report that this toxin is a dual soluble adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase that results in intracellular cAMP and cGMP accumulation. The enzymatic activity of ExoY caused phosphorylation of endothelial Tau serine 214, accumulation of insoluble Tau, inter-endothelial cell gap formation, and increased macromolecular permeability. To discern whether the cAMP or cGMP signal was responsible for Tau phosphorylation and barrier disruption, pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were engineered for the conditional expression of either wild-type guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP, or a mutated guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cAMP. Sodium nitroprusside stimulation of the cGMP-generating cyclase resulted in transient Tau serine 214 phosphorylation and gap formation, whereas stimulation of the cAMP-generating cyclase induced a robust increase in Tau serine 214 phosphorylation, gap formation, and macromolecular permeability. These results indicate that the cAMP signal is the dominant stimulus for Tau phosphorylation. Hence, ExoY is a promiscuous cyclase and edema factor that uses cAMP and, to some extent, cGMP to induce the hyperphosphorylation and insolubility of endothelial Tau. Because hyperphosphorylated and insoluble Tau are hallmarks in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease, acute Pseudomonas infections cause a pathophysiological sequela in endothelium previously recognized only in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22637478

  7. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Hypoxic Effect of Nitroimidazole Embedded Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Kwon, Soonjo

    2016-05-01

    Adenylate cyclase is a key intracellular enzyme involved in energy imbalance leading to tumor hypoxia and cytotoxicity. In this study, adenylate cyclase activities in isolated hepatocytes and Kupffer cells were compared in the presence of several metabolic stimulators. In cultured hepatocyte cells, adenylate cyclase was stimulated by guanylyl imidotriphosphate (GITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), progesterone and nitroimidazole embedded nanoparticle (NNP) effectors, while prostaglandin E2 and F2α were used as effectors in cultured Kupffer cells. The results showed that NNPs decreased adenylate cyclase specific activity in a dose-dependent manner after preincubation of hepatocytes with NNPs. The NNPs stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in hepatocytes were evaluated based on measurement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The stimulatory effects of NNPs on adenylate cyclase were independent of the presence of GTP and may have been due to a direct effect on the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase. In addition, basal cAMP generation in hepatocyte cells was efficiently suppressed by the NNPs. In conclusion, NNPs exerted direct effects on the catalytic subunit of the adenylate cyclase system, and adenylate cyclase was hormone sensitive in liver cells. PMID:27483789

  8. Nucleotidyl Cyclase Activity of Particulate Guanylyl Cyclase A: Comparison with Particulate Guanylyl Cyclases E and F, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Bacterial Adenylyl Cyclases Cyaa and Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Kerstin Y.; Spangler, Corinna M.; Burhenne, Heike; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs) regulate many physiological processes by catalyzing the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. The GC family consists of seven particulate GCs (pGCs) and a nitric oxide-activated soluble GC (sGC). Rat sGC α1β1 possesses much broader substrate specificity than previously assumed. Moreover, the exotoxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor (EF) from Bacillus anthracis possess nucleotidyl cyclase (NC) activity. pGC-A is a natriuretic peptide-activated homodimer with two catalytic sites that act cooperatively. Here, we studied the NC activity of rat pGC-A in membranes of stably transfected HEK293 cells using a highly sensitive and specific HPLC-MS/MS technique. GTP and ITP were effective, and ATP and XTP were only poor, pGC-A substrates. In contrast to sGC, pGC-A did not use CTP and UTP as substrates. pGC-E and pGC-F expressed in bovine rod outer segment membranes used only GTP as substrate. In intact HEK293 cells, pGC-A generated only cGMP. In contrast to pGCs, EF and CyaA showed very broad substrate-specificity. In conclusion, NCs exhibit different substrate-specificities, arguing against substrate-leakiness of enzymes and pointing to distinct physiological functions of cyclic purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:23922959

  9. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field. PMID:27030537

  10. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  11. Structural Studies of Archaealthermophilic Adenylate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Konisky, J.

    2002-07-10

    Through this DOE-sponsored program Konisky has studied the evolution and molecular biology of microbes that live in extreme environments. The emphasis of this work has been the determination of the structural features of thermophilic enzymes that allow them to function optimally at near 100 C. The laboratory has focused on a comparative study of adenylate kinase (ADK), an enzyme that functions to interconvert adenine nucleotides. Because of the close phylogenetic relatedness of members of the Methanococci, differences in the structure of their ADKs will be dominated by structural features that reflect contributions to their optimal temperature for activity, rather than differences due to phylogenetic divergence. We have cloned, sequenced and modeled the secondary structure for several methanococcal ADKs. Using molecular modeling threading approaches that are based on the solved structure for the porcine ADK, we have also proposed a general low resolution three dimensional structure for each of the methanococcal enzymes. These analyses have allowed us to propose structural features that confer hyperthermoactivity to those enzymes functioning in the hyperthermophilic members of the Methanococci. Using protein engineering methodologies, we have tested our hypotheses by examining the effects of selective structural changes on thermoactivity. Despite possessing between 68-81% sequence identity, the methanococcal AKs had significantly different stability against thermal denaturation, with melting points ranging from 69-103 C. The construction of several chimerical AKs by linking regions of the MVO and MJA AKs demonstrated the importance of cooperative interactions between amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions in influencing thermostability. Addition of MJA terminal fragments to the MVO AK increased thermal stability approximately 20 C while maintaining 88% of the mesophilic sequence. Further analysis using structural models suggested that hydrophobic interactions are

  12. Inhibition of hormone-stimulated lipolysis by clofibrate. A possible mechanism for its hypolipidemic action.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, M A; Angel, A

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the antilipolytic action of clofibrate (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate). Clofibrate, in the dose range of 10-80 mg/199 ml, inhibited the initial rate of norepinephrine-stimulated lipolysis 17-44 percent in isolated rat fat cells. At a dose corresponding to therapeutic levels in vivo (10 mg/100 ml) clofibrate also inhibited hormone-stimulated lipolysis by 20-30 percent in fragments of human subcutaneous fat. Inhibition of lipolysis by clofibrate occurred at all concentrations of norepinephrine and ACTH (0.02-0.1 mug/ml) but did not occur with equilipolytic concentrations of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, suggesting a proximal site of action on the lipolytic sequence. Clofibrate reduced by 60 percent (315plus or minus40 vs. 120plus or minus25 pmol/g lipid; meanplus or minusSEM) the norepinephrine-stimulated initial rise in cyclic AMP, measured 10 min after addition of hormone. Because the antilipolytic effect occurred in the presence of glucose and without altering cellular ATP levels, the reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels could not be attributed to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism or to secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the presence of procaine-HC1, which blocks hormone-stimulated lipolysis without inhibiting cyclic AMP accumulation, addition of clofibrate prevented the hormone-stimulated rise in cyclic AMP. Clofibrate did not affect the activity of the low-Km 3',5'-cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in norepinephrine-stimulated adipocytes. These data suggest that the antilipolytic effect of clofibrate is due to its suppression of cyclic AMP production by inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The drug's hypolipidemic action may in part be explained by its antilipolytic effect, which deprives the liver of free fatty acid substrate for lipoprotein synthesis. Images PMID:162783

  13. Bifunctional Homodimeric Triokinase/FMN Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4′-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr112 (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His221 (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp401 and Asp403 (metal coordination to L), and Asp556 (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His221 point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity. PMID:24569995

  14. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Fewer, David P; Rouhiainen, Leo; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Laakso, Kati; Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2007-01-01

    Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1) and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains. PMID:17908306

  15. Mutations That Affect Transcription and Cyclic Amp-Crp Regulation of the Adenylate Cyclase Gene (Cya) of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Fandl, J. P.; Thorner, L. K.; Artz, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the expression of the cya promoter(s) in cya-lac fusion strains of Salmonella typhimurium and demonstrated cAMP receptor protein (CRP)-dependent repression by cAMP. Expression of cya was reduced about fourfold in cultures grown in acetate minimal medium as compared to cultures grown in glucose-6-phosphate minimal medium. Expression of cya was also reduced about fourfold by addition of 5 mM cAMP to cultures grown in glucose minimal medium. We constructed in vitro deletion and insertion mutations altering a major cya promoter (P2) and a putative CRP binding site overlapping P2. These mutations were recombined into the chromosome by allele replacement with M13mp::cya recombinant phages and the regulation of the mutant promoters was analyzed. A 4-bp deletion of the CRP binding site and a 4-bp insertion in this site nearly eliminated repression by cAMP. A mutant with the P2 promoter and the CRP binding site both deleted exhibited an 80% reduction in cya expression; the 20% residual expression was insensitive to cAMP repression. This mutant retained a Cya(+) phenotype. Taken together, the results establish that the cya gene is transcribed from multiple promoters one of which, P2, is negatively regulated by the cAMP-CRP complex. Correction for the contribution to transcription by the cAMP-CRP nonregulated cya promoters indicates that the P2 promoter is repressed at least eightfold by cAMP-CRP. PMID:2168849

  16. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  17. Parathyroid hormone stimulates juxtaglomerular cell cAMP accumulation without stimulating renin release

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, Douglas K.; Harding, Pamela; Cecilia Ortiz-Capisano, M.; Peterson, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is positively coupled to the generation of cAMP via its actions on the PTH1R and PTH2R receptors. Renin secretion from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is stimulated by elevated intracellular cAMP, and every stimulus that increases renin secretion is thought to do so via increasing cAMP. Thus we hypothesized that PTH increases renin release from primary cultures of mouse JG cells by elevating intracellular cAMP via the PTH1R receptor. We found PTH1R, but not PTH2R, mRNA expressed in JG cells. While PTH increased JG cell cAMP content from (log10 means ± SE) 3.27 ± 0.06 to 3.92 ± 0.12 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001), it did not affect renin release. The PTH1R-specific agonist, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), also increased JG cell cAMP from 3.13 ± 0.09 to 3.93 ± 0.09 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001), again without effect on renin release. PTH2R receptor agonists had no effect on cAMP or renin release. PTHrP increased cAMP in the presence of both low and high extracellular calcium from 3.31 ± 0.17 to 3.83 ± 0.20 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.01) and from 3.29 ± 0.18 to 3.63 ± 0.22 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.05), respectively, with no effect on renin release. PTHrP increased JG cell cAMP in the presence of adenylyl cyclase-V inhibition from 2.85 ± 0.17 to 3.44 ± 0.14 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001) without affecting renin release. As a positive control, forskolin increased JG cell cAMP from 3.39 ± 0.13 to 4.48 ± 0.07 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.01) and renin release from 2.96 ± 0.10 to 3.29 ± 0.08 ng ANG I·mg prot−1·h−1 (P < 0.01). Thus PTH increases JG cell cAMP via non-calcium-sensitive adenylate cyclases without affecting renin release. These data suggest compartmentalization of cAMP signaling in JG cells. PMID:22896038

  18. Parathyroid hormone stimulates juxtaglomerular cell cAMP accumulation without stimulating renin release.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Douglas K; Harding, Pamela; Cecilia Ortiz-Capisano, M; Peterson, Edward L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2012-10-15

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is positively coupled to the generation of cAMP via its actions on the PTH1R and PTH2R receptors. Renin secretion from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is stimulated by elevated intracellular cAMP, and every stimulus that increases renin secretion is thought to do so via increasing cAMP. Thus we hypothesized that PTH increases renin release from primary cultures of mouse JG cells by elevating intracellular cAMP via the PTH1R receptor. We found PTH1R, but not PTH2R, mRNA expressed in JG cells. While PTH increased JG cell cAMP content from (log(10) means ± SE) 3.27 ± 0.06 to 3.92 ± 0.12 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001), it did not affect renin release. The PTH1R-specific agonist, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), also increased JG cell cAMP from 3.13 ± 0.09 to 3.93 ± 0.09 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001), again without effect on renin release. PTH2R receptor agonists had no effect on cAMP or renin release. PTHrP increased cAMP in the presence of both low and high extracellular calcium from 3.31 ± 0.17 to 3.83 ± 0.20 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.01) and from 3.29 ± 0.18 to 3.63 ± 0.22 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.05), respectively, with no effect on renin release. PTHrP increased JG cell cAMP in the presence of adenylyl cyclase-V inhibition from 2.85 ± 0.17 to 3.44 ± 0.14 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.001) without affecting renin release. As a positive control, forskolin increased JG cell cAMP from 3.39 ± 0.13 to 4.48 ± 0.07 fmol/mg protein (P < 0.01) and renin release from 2.96 ± 0.10 to 3.29 ± 0.08 ng ANG I·mg prot(-1)·h(-1) (P < 0.01). Thus PTH increases JG cell cAMP via non-calcium-sensitive adenylate cyclases without affecting renin release. These data suggest compartmentalization of cAMP signaling in JG cells.

  19. The crystal structure of human adenylate kinase 6: An adenylate kinase localized to the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Wang, Liya; Bennett, Matthew; Liang, Yuhe; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lu, Fei; Li, Lanfen; Nan, Jie; Luo, Ming; Eriksson, Staffan; Zhang, Chuanmao; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2005-01-11

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) play important roles in nucleotide metabolism in all organisms and in cellular energetics by means of phosphotransfer networks in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of a human AK named AK6 was determined by in-house sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing methods and refined to 2.0-A resolution with a free R factor of 21.8%. Sequence analyses revealed that human AK6 belongs to a distinct subfamily of AKs present in all eukaryotic organisms sequenced so far. Enzymatic assays show that human AK6 has properties similar with other AKs, particularly with AK5. Fluorescence microscopy showed that human AK6 is localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells. The identification of a nuclear-localized AK sheds light on nucleotide metabolism in the nucleus and the energetic communication between mitochondria and nucleus by means of phosphotransfer networks.

  20. Soluble guanylate cyclase as a novel treatment target for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Joshua, Jisha; Schwaerzer, Gerburg K; Kalyanaraman, Hema; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L; Li, Mofei; Vaida, Florin; Boss, Gerry R; Pilz, Renate B

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem leading to fractures that cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Current osteoporosis therapies have significant drawbacks, creating a need for novel bone-anabolic agents. We previously showed that the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway mediates some of the anabolic effects of estrogens and mechanical stimulation in osteoblasts and osteocytes, leading us to hypothesize that cGMP-elevating agents may have bone-protective effects. We tested cinaciguat, a prototype of a novel class of soluble guanylate cyclase activators, in a mouse model of estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis. Compared with sham-operated mice, ovariectomized mice had lower serum cGMP concentrations, which were largely restored to normal by treatment with cinaciguat or low-dose 17β-estradiol. Microcomputed tomography of tibiae showed that cinaciguat significantly improved trabecular bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized animals, with effect sizes similar to those obtained with estrogen replacement therapy. Cinaciguat reversed ovariectomy-induced osteocyte apoptosis as efficiently as estradiol and enhanced bone formation parameters in vivo, consistent with in vitro effects on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Compared with 17β-estradiol, which completely reversed the ovariectomy-induced increase in osteoclast number, cinaciguat had little effect on osteoclasts. Direct guanylate cyclase stimulators have been extremely well tolerated in clinical trials of cardiovascular diseases, and our findings provide proof-of-concept for this new class of drugs as a novel, anabolic treatment strategy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, confirming an important role of nitric oxide/cGMP/protein kinase G signaling in bone. PMID:25188528

  1. Stimulation by parathyroid hormone of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ uptake in osteoblast-like cells: Possible involvement of alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, S.; Tashjian, A.H. Jr. )

    1990-04-01

    We have investigated the actions of human PTH (hPTH-(1-34)) on the association of 45Ca2+ with two human (SaOS-2 and MG-63) and two rat (ROS 17/2.8 and UMR-106) osteoblast-like cell types. In SaOS-2 cells, hPTH-(1-34) binds to specific membrane receptors to activate adenylate cyclase. Treatment of SaOS-2 cells with hPTH-(1-34) resulted in an increase in 45Ca2+ uptake, in a dose-dependent fashion, up to 2- to 4-fold above control values. The increase was first evident at 10 min and persisted for at least 30 min. Treatment with nimodipine, a calcium channel antagonist, was without effect on the stimulatory action of PTH. A similar enhancement of cell-associated 45Ca2+ was observed when the cells were incubated with vasoactive intestinal peptide, which acts via different receptors to activate adenylate cyclase in SaOS-2 cells. Treatment with (Bu)2cAMP also induced an increase in cell-associated 45Ca2+. Pretreatment of SaOS-2 cells with hPTH-(1-34) for 4 h, which induced homologous desensitization to a second challenge with the same peptide for stimulation of cAMP production, did not attenuate the further enhancement of cell-associated 45Ca2+ by a second treatment with hPTH-(1-34). We then examined a possible relationship between alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) and 45Ca2+ uptake. SaOS-2 cells contained high levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and continuously released the enzyme into the medium. Release was enhanced by treatment with hPTH-(1-34) for 10 min. Incubation of cells with levamisole (an inhibitor of the liver/bone/kidney type of ALPase) resulted in a rapid decrease in basal and PTH-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake, while treatment with L-Phe-Gly-Gly was without effect. Treatment of the cells with ALPase (bovine kidney) enhanced 45Ca2+ uptake. In MG-63 cells, a stimulatory effect of hPTH-(1-34) on cell-associated 45Ca2+ was also observed; however, hPTH-(1-34) did not stimulate cAMP production in MG-63 cells.

  2. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  3. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress.

    PubMed

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-07-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  4. Human dendritic cell maturation and cytokine secretion upon stimulation with Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Violette; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Willery, Eve; Alonso, Sylvie; Versheure, Virginie; Mascart, Françoise; Locht, Camille

    2014-07-01

    In addition to antibodies, Th1-type T cell responses are also important for long-lasting protection against pertussis. However, upon immunization with the current acellular vaccines, many children fail to induce Th1-type responses, potentially due to immunomodulatory effects of some vaccine antigens, such as filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). We therefore analysed the ability of FHA to modulate immune functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). FHA was purified from pertussis toxin (PTX)-deficient or from PTX- and adenylate cyclase-deficient Bordetella pertussis strains, and residual endotoxin was neutralized with polymyxin B. FHA from both strains induced phenotypic maturation of human MDDC and cytokine secretion (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6). To identify the FHA domains responsible for MDDC immunomodulation, MDDC were stimulated with FHA containing a Gly→Ala substitution at its RGD site (FHA-RAD) or with an 80-kDa N-terminal moiety of FHA (Fha44), containing its heparin-binding site. Whereas FHA-RAD induced maturation and cytokine production comparable to those of FHA, Fha44 did not induce IL-10 production, but maturated MDDC at least partially. Nevertheless, Fha44 induced the secretion of IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6 by MDDC, albeit at lower levels than FHA. Thus, FHA can modulate MDDC responses in multiple ways, and IL-10 induction can be dissociated from the induction of other cytokines.

  5. Vasopressin stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in LLC-PK sub 1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, L.C.; Kapturczak, E.; Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-10-01

    LLC-PK{sub 1} cells have been shown to possess vasopressin (VP) receptors (V{sub 2} type) that are coupled to adenyl cyclase to generate adenosine 3,5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). To determine whether VP also stimulates phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis to generate inositol phosphate (IP) and diacylglycerol (DAG) messenger system in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells, the authors measured the release of IP in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells in the absence and presence of various concentrations of VP. In addition, the authors also determined the effect of an increase in osmolality of the incubation medium on VP-stimulated PI hydrolysis in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. The methods involved the incubation of LLC-PK{sub 1} cells with ({sup 3}H)inositol for its incorporation into membrane PI and the measurement of the release of ({sup 3}H)IP in the presence of LiCl which prevents dephosphorylation. The osmolality of the incubation media was increased from 300 to 600, 900, and 1,200 mosmol/kgH{sub 2}O by the addition of NaCl and urea. In an isosmotic incubation medium, VP (10{sup {minus}8} M) produced a 100% increase in PI hydrolysis in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. The effect was much greater at higher concentrations of the hormone. The results suggest that in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells, VP stimulates PI hydrolysis probably through VP receptors that are coupled to phospholipase C. Furthermore, VP-stimulated PI messenger system in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells is influenced by osmolality of the extracellular fluid.

  6. Diterpene Cyclases and the Nature of the Isoprene Fold

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rong; Zhang, Yonghui; Mann, Francis M.; Huang, Cancan; Mukkamala, Dushyant; Hudock, Michael P.; Mead, Matthew; Prisic, Sladjana; Wang, Ke; Lin, Fu-Yang; Chang, Ting-Kai; Peters, Reuben; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The structures and mechanism of action of many terpene cyclases are known, but there are no structures of diterpene cyclases. Here, we propose structural models based on bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, domain swapping, enzyme inhibition and spectroscopy that help explain the nature of diterpene cyclase structure, function, and evolution. Bacterial diterpene cyclases contain ∼20 α-helices and the same conserved “QW” and DxDD motifs as in triterpene cyclases, indicating the presence of a βγ barrel structure. Plant diterpene cyclases have a similar catalytic motif and βγ-domain structure together with a third, α-domain, forming an αβγ structure, and in H+-initiated cyclases, there is an EDxxD-like Mg2+/diphosphate binding motif located in the γ-domain. The results support a new view of terpene cyclase structure and function and suggest evolution from ancient (βγ) bacterial triterpene cyclases to (βγ) bacterial and thence to (αβγ) plant diterpene cyclases. PMID:20602361

  7. Regional distribution of somatostatin receptor binding and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L; Garlind, A; Nilsson, L; Alafuzoff, I; Fowler, C J; Winblad, B; Cowburn, R F

    1991-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the superior temporal cortex of a group of Alzheimer's disease cases, compared to a group of matched controls. In the present study, the levels of high affinity 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding, its modulation by guanine nucleotides and the effects of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity have been measured in preparations of frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and cerebellum from the same patient and control groups. A significant reduction in 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding was observed in the frontal cortex, but not other regions, of the Alzheimer's disease group, compared with control values. The profiles of inhibition of specific 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding by Gpp(NH)p were similar in all regions in both groups. No significant differences in basal, forskolin-stimulated, or somatostatin and neuropeptide Y inhibitions of adenylyl cyclase activity were found between the two groups. The pattern of change of somatostatin binding in the Alzheimer's disease cases observed in the present study differs from the reported pattern of loss of somatostatin neurons and may be secondary to the degeneration of somatostatin receptor-bearing cholinergic afferents arising from the nucleus basalis. The results of this study indicate that impaired somatostatin modulation of adenylyl cyclase is not a global phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease brain and also that there are no major disruptions of somatostatin receptor-G-protein coupling or of adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity in this disorder. PMID:1684616

  8. Adenylating Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylation or adenylate-forming enzymes (AEs) are widely found in nature and are responsible for the activation of carboxylic acids to intermediate acyladenylates, which are mixed anhydrides of AMP. In a second reaction, AEs catalyze the transfer of the acyl group of the acyladenylate onto a nucleophilic amino, alcohol, or thiol group of an acceptor molecule leading to amide, ester, and thioester products, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes for more than 60 adenylating enzymes, many of which represent potential drug targets due to their confirmed essentiality or requirement for virulence. Several strategies have been used to develop potent and selective AE inhibitors including high-throughput screening, fragment-based screening, and the rationale design of bisubstrate inhibitors that mimic the acyladenylate. In this review, a comprehensive analysis of the mycobacterial adenylating enzymes will be presented with a focus on the identification of small molecule inhibitors. Specifically, this review will cover the aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (aaRSs), MenE required for menaquinone synthesis, the FadD family of enzymes including the fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAAL) and the fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs) involved in lipid metabolism, and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation enzyme MbtA that is necessary for mycobactin synthesis. Additionally, the enzymes NadE, GuaA, PanC, and MshC involved in the respective synthesis of NAD, guanine, pantothenate, and mycothiol will be discussed as well as BirA that is responsible for biotinylation of the acyl CoA-carboxylases. PMID:22283817

  9. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  10. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  11. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca(2+) and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed.

  12. Overexpression of the Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase in the Forebrain Leads to Deficits of Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition. PMID:25568126

  13. Overexpression of the type 1 adenylyl cyclase in the forebrain leads to deficits of behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanmao; Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition.

  14. The essential role of peripheral respiratory chemoreceptor inputs in maintaining breathing revealed when CO2 stimulation of central chemoreceptors is diminished.

    PubMed

    Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; O'Connor, Edward T; Roy, Arijit; Zuna, Ines; Wilson, Richard J A

    2013-03-15

    Central sleep apnoea is a condition characterized by oscillations between apnoea and hyperpnoea during sleep. Studies in sleeping dogs suggest that withdrawal of peripheral chemoreceptor (carotid body) activation following transient ventilatory overshoots plays an essential role in causing apnoea, raising the possibility that sustaining carotid body activity during ventilatory overshoots may prevent apnoea. To test whether sustained peripheral chemoreceptor activation is sufficient to drive breathing, even in the absence of central chemoreceptor stimulation and vagal feedback, we used a vagotomized, decerebrate dual-perfused in situ rat preparation in which the central and peripheral chemoreceptors are independently and artificially perfused with gas-equilibrated medium. At varying levels of carotid body stimulation (CB PO2/PCO2: 40/60, 100/40, 200/15, 500/15 Torr), we decreased the brainstem perfusate PCO2 in 5 Torr steps while recording phrenic nerve activity to determine the central apnoeic thresholds. The central apnoeic thresholds decreased with increased carotid body stimulation. When the carotid bodies were strongly stimulated (CB 40/60), the apnoeic threshold was 3.6 ± 1.4 Torr PCO2 (mean ± SEM, n = 7). Stimulating carotid body afferent activity with either hypercapnia (60 Torr PCO2) or the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide restored phrenic activity during central apnoea. We conclude that peripheral stimulation shifts the central apnoeic threshold to very hypocapnic levels that would likely increase the CO2 reserve and have a protective effect on breathing. These data demonstrate that peripheral respiratory chemoreceptors are sufficient to stave off central apnoeas when the brainstem is perfused with low to no CO2.

  15. Rho signaling in Entamoeba histolytica modulates actomyosin-dependent activities stimulated during invasive behavior.

    PubMed

    Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Zamudio-Meza, Horacio; Franco, Elizabeth; del Carmen Domínguez-Robles, M; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Meza, Isaura

    2006-03-01

    Interaction of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites with target cells and substrates activates signaling pathways in the parasite. Phosphorylation cascades triggered by phospho-inositide and adenyl-cyclase-dependent pathways modulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton to form structures that facilitate adhesion. In contrast, little is known about participation of Rho proteins and Rho signaling in actin rearrangements. We report here the in vivo expression of at least one Rho protein in trophozoites, whose activation induced actin reorganization and actin-myosin interaction. Antibodies to EhRhoA1 recombinant protein mainly localized Rho in the cytosol of nonactivated amoebae, but it was translocated to vesicular membranes and to some extent to the plasma membrane after treatment with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a specific agonist of Rho activation. Activated Rho was identified in LPA-treated trophozoites. LPA induced striking polymerization of actin into distinct dynamic structures. Disorganization of these structures by inhibition of Rho effector, Rho-kinase (ROCK), and by ML-7, an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase dependent phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggested that the actin structures also contained myosin. LPA stimulated concanavalin-A-mediated formation of caps, chemotaxis, invasion of extracellular matrix substrates, and erythrophagocytosis, but not binding to fibronectin. ROCK inhibition impaired LPA-stimulated functions and to some extent adhesion to fibronectin. Similar results were obtained with ML-7. These data suggest the presence and operation of Rho-signaling pathways in E. histolytica, that together with other, already described, signaling routes modulate actomyosin-dependent motile processes, particularly stimulated during invasive behavior.

  16. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is not required for axon guidance to netrin-1.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon W; Lai Wing Sun, Karen; Xie, Fang; Barker, Philip A; Conti, Marco; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2008-04-01

    During development, axons are directed to their targets by extracellular guidance cues. The axonal response to the guidance cue netrin-1 is profoundly influenced by the concentration of cAMP within the growth cone. In some cases, cAMP affects the sensitivity of the growth cone to netrin-1, whereas in others it changes the response to netrin-1 from attraction to repulsion. The effects of cAMP on netrin-1 action are well accepted, but the critical issue of whether cAMP production is activated by a netrin-1 induced signaling cascade remains uncertain. A previous report has suggested that axon guidance in response to netrin-1 requires cAMP production mediated by soluble adenyl cyclase (sAC). We have used genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies to assess this issue. Surprisingly, we found only extremely weak expression of sAC in embryonic neurons and determined that, under conditions where netrin-1 directs axonal pathfinding, exposure to netrin-1 does not alter cAMP levels. Furthermore, although netrin-1-deficient mice exhibit major axon guidance defects, we show that pathfinding is normal in sAC-null mice. Therefore, although cAMP can alter the response of axons to netrin-1, we conclude that netrin-1 does not alter cAMP levels in axons attracted by this cue, and that sAC is not required for axon attraction to netrin-1. PMID:18400890

  17. Aminoacyl transfer from an adenylate anhydride to polyribonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Imidazole catalysis of phenylalanyl transfer from phenylalanine adenylate to hydroxyl groups of homopolyribonucleotides is studied as a possible chemical model of biochemical aminoacylation of transfer RNA (tRNA). The effect of pH on imidazole-catalyzed transfer of phenylalanyl residues to poly(U) and poly(A) double helix strands, the number of peptide linkages and their lability to base and neutral hydroxylamine, and the nature of adenylate condensation products are investigated. The chemical model entertained exhibits a constraint by not acylating the hydroxyl groups of polyribonucleotides in a double helix. The constraint is consistent with selective biochemical aminoacylation at the tRNA terminus. Interest in imidazole as a model of histidine residue in protoenzymes participating in prebiotic aminoacyl transfer to polyribonucleotides, and in rendering the tRNA a more efficient adaptor, is indicated.

  18. Thyroid-stimulating hormone rapidly stimulates inositol polyphosphate formation in FRTL-5 thyrocytes without activating phosphoinositidase C.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, J; Hunt, P; Eggo, M C; Sheppard, M C; Kirk, C J; Michell, R H

    1996-01-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor is widely regarded as one of a limited number of G-protein-coupled receptors that activate both adenylate cyclase and phosphoinositidase C (PIC) via G-proteins, but the existing experimental evidence for TSH-stimulated PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis remains inconclusive. We have compared the effects of TSH and of ATP (acting via P2-purinergic receptors) on the inositol lipids and polyphosphates of [2-3H]inositol-labelled FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells. ATP initiated a rapid decrease in 3H-labelled PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2, whereas TSH did not. Stimulation with ATP and, less consistently, with noradrenaline (acting via alpha-adrenergic receptors) provoked rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4)P3 and Ins(1,4)P2, confirming activation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis. No concentration of TSH provoked detectable accumulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 or Ins(1,4)P2 during the first few minutes of stimulation. However, an InsP3 [with the chromatographic properties of Ins(1,3,4)P3] and two InsP4 isomers [neither of which was Ins(1,3,4,5)P4] accumulated quickly in TSH-stimulated cells. ATP immediately provoked a large increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in Indo 1-AM-loaded cells. TSH provoked a small and delayed [Ca2+]i elevation in only some experiments. We therefore confirm that activation of P2-purinergic receptors and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors provokes PIC activation, an accumulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and its metabolites and rapid [Ca2+]i mobilization in FRTL-5 cells. By contrast, TSH provokes no rapid PIC-catalysed PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis or immediate [Ca2+]i mobilization. These results fail to support the widespread view that the TSH receptor of FRTL-5 cells signals, in part, through PIC activation. Our results suggest that TSH activates another, still undefined, mechanism that causes accumulation of an InsP3 and two isomers of InsP4. PMID:8645202

  19. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  20. Bradykinin and vasopressin stimulate Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-Cl/sup -/ cotransport in cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Brugnara, C.; Canessa, M.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have characterized a Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-Cl/sup -/ cotransporter in vascular endothelial cells (EC) cultured from different blood vessels and species that is inhibited by the diuretics furosemide and bumentanide. Inward /sup 86/Rb influx transported by the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump in cultured EC from bovine and pig aorta, bovine vena cava, and baboon cephalic vein but not in human umbilical or saphenous vein EC. External Na/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/-stimulated, ouabain-insensitive /sup 86/Rb influx is equal to furosemide or bumetanide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx. Ouabain-insensitive /sup 22/Na influx is also partially inhibited by these drugs and stimulated by increasing external K/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/. Net Na/sup +/ extrusion occurs via the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-Cl/sup -/ cotransporter in the absence of external K/sup +/, whereas net Na/sup +/ influx occurs at higher external K/sup +/. Maximal concentrations (100 nM) of bradykinin and vasopressin increase the initial rate of bumetanide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx by approx.60 and 70%. Addition of either ethyleneglycol-bis(..beta..-aminotethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid or LaCl/sub 3/ (to block calcium influx) prevents bradykinin-stimulated /sup 86/Rb influx. When intracellular calcium is elevated using ionomycin (100 nM), a Ca/sup 2 +/ionophore, bumetanide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx increases approx.twofold. In contrast, isoproterenol (100 ..mu..M) and forskolin (50 /sup +/M), adenylate cyclase stimulators, decrease furosemide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx. Thus in certain types of cultured EC, a Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-Cl/sup -/ cotransporter mediates a fraction of K/sup +/ influx quantitatively as important as the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump (ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx) and appears to be modulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and cyclic nucleotides.

  1. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  2. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  3. The triterpene cyclase protein family: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Racolta, Silvia; Juhl, P Benjamin; Sirim, Demet; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Triterpene cyclases catalyze a broad range of cyclization reactions to form polycyclic triterpenes. Triterpene cyclases that convert squalene to hopene are named squalene-hopene cyclases (SHC) and triterpene cyclases that convert oxidosqualene are named oxidosqualene cyclases (OSC). Many sequences have been published, but there is only one structure available for each of SHCs and OSCs. Although they catalyze a similar reaction, the sequence similarity between SHCs and OSCs is low. A family classification based on phylogenetic analysis revealed 20 homologous families which are grouped into two superfamilies, SHCs and OSCs. Based on this family assignment, the Triterpene Cyclase Engineering Database (TTCED) was established. It integrates available information on sequence and structure of 639 triterpene cyclases as well as on structurally and functionally relevant amino acids. Family specific multiple sequence alignments were generated to identify the functionally relevant residues. Based on sequence alignments, conserved residues in SHCs and OSCs were analyzed and compared to experimentally confirmed mutational data. Functional schematic models of the central cavities of OSCs and SHCs were derived from structure comparison and sequence conservation analysis. These models demonstrate the high similarity of the substrate binding cavity of SHCs and OSCs and the equivalences of the respective residues. The TTCED is a novel source for comprehensive information on the triterpene cyclase family, including a compilation of previously described mutational data. The schematic models present the conservation analysis in a readily available fashion and facilitate the correlation of residues to a specific function or substrate interaction.

  4. Polymorphism in purified guanylate cyclase from vertebrate rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, F; Yamazaki, A

    1991-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase from rod photoreceptors of amphibian (toad, Bufo marinus, and frog, Rana catesbeiana) and bovine retinas was solubilized and purified by a single chromatography step on a GTP-agarose column. Silver staining of purified amphibian enzymes in SDS/polyacrylamide gels disclosed a doublet band (110 and 115 kDa), while the bovine enzyme appeared as a singlet band (110 kDa). The identification of these guanylate cyclases was confirmed using three chromatography systems with the purified enzymes. Specific binding to Con A-Sepharose suggested that rod guanylate cyclase is a glycoprotein. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of purified toad, frog, and bovine enzymes resolved two, three, and five variants, respectively, that differed in isoelectric point. Two variants of toad guanylate cyclase showed differences in various characterizations. These data suggest multiple mechanisms for regulation of guanylate cyclase activity in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Images PMID:1675787

  5. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  6. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  7. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction. PMID:27601272

  8. Interaction of GCAP1 with retinal guanylyl cyclase and calcium: sensitivity to fatty acylation

    PubMed Central

    Peshenko, Igor V.; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Dizhoor, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) are calcium/magnesium binding proteins within neuronal calcium sensor proteins group (NCS) of the EF-hand proteins superfamily. GCAPs activate retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) in vertebrate photoreceptors in response to light-dependent fall of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. GCAPs consist of four EF-hand domains and contain N-terminal fatty acylated glycine, which in GCAP1 is required for the normal activation of RetGC. We analyzed the effects of a substitution prohibiting N-myristoylation (Gly2 → Ala) on the ability of the recombinant GCAP1 to co-localize with its target enzyme when heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. We also compared Ca2+ binding and RetGC-activating properties of the purified non-acylated G2A mutant and C14:0 acylated GCAP1 in vitro. The G2A GCAP1 expressed with a C-terminal GFP tag was able to co-localize with the cyclase, albeit less efficiently than the wild type, but much less effectively stimulated cyclase activity in vitro. Ca2+ binding isotherm of the G2A GCAP1 was slightly shifted toward higher free Ca2+ concentrations and so was Ca2+ sensitivity of RetGC reconstituted with the G2A mutant. At the same time, myristoylation had little effect on the high-affinity Ca2+-binding in the EF-hand proximal to the myristoyl residue in three-dimensional GCAP1 structure. These data indicate that the N-terminal fatty acyl group may alter the activity of EF-hands in the distal portion of the GCAP1 molecule via presently unknown intramolecular mechanism. PMID:22371697

  9. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  10. Murine Guanylate Cyclase C Regulates Colonic Injury and Inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Harmel-Laws, Eleana; Garin-Laflam, Monica P.; Mann, Elizabeth A.; Bezerra, Lucas D.; Hogan, Simon P.; Cohen, Mitchell B.

    2011-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C or GC-C) and its ligands, guanylin (GUCA2A or Gn) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B or Ugn), are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and regulate ion secretion, intestinal barrier function, and epithelial monolayer homeostasis via cGMP-dependent signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to determine if GC-C and its ligands direct the course of intestinal inflammation. Here, we show that DSS-induced clinical disease and histological damage to the colonic mucosa were significantly less severe in GC-C−/− mice and moderately reduced in Gn−/− animals. Relative to wildtype controls, GC-C−/− and Gn−/− mice had reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation of IECs during DSS colitis. Basal and DSS-induced production of resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) was substantially diminished in GC-C−/− mice. RELMβ is thought to stimulate cytokine production in macrophages in this disease model and, consistent with this, TNFα and IFNγ production was minimal in GC-C−/− animals. RELMβ and cytokine levels were similar to wildtype in Gn−/− mice, however. Colonic instillation of recombinant RELMβ by enema into GC-C−/− mice restores sensitivity to DSS-mediated mucosal injury. These findings demonstrate a novel role for GC-C signaling in facilitating mucosal wounding and inflammation and further suggest that this may be mediated, in part, through control of RELMβ production. PMID:21555532

  11. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  12. An aberrant adenylate kinase isoenzyme from the serum of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Okuda, H; Oka, K; Watanabe, T; Ueda, K; Nojima, M; Kuby, S A; Manship, M; Tyler, F H; Ziter, F A

    1981-08-13

    The sera from patients with human Duchenne (X-linked) progressive muscular dystrophy contain elevated adenylate kinase (ATP: AMP phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.4.3) activities, in addition to their characteristically high creatine kinase (ATP; creatine N-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.3.2) activities. By agarose gel electrophoresis of human Duchenne dystrophic serum, the presence of an apparently normal human serum adenylate kinase together with a variant species of adenylate kinase was detected. The latter enzyme species appeared, in its mobility, to be similar to that of the normal human liver-type adenylate kinase. The presence of this aberrant liver-type adenylate kinase could also be demonstrated by characteristic (for the liver type) inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di-(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate. On the other hand, by inhibition titrations with an anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase, hemolysates from the erythrocytes of several Duchenne and Becker's dystrophics were found to contain approx. 96% muscle-type adenylate kinase and their serum approx. 97% muscle-type adenylate kinase. These same patients contained approx. 89% M-M type creatine kinase in their serum (by inhibition against anti-human muscle-type creatine kinase) indicative of the presence also of M-B plus B-B type active isoenzymes. All of these data can best be explained by the presence of a variant or mutant adenylate kinase isoenzyme in the dystrophic serum. This isoenzyme appears to resemble the liver type in its inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate, and in its heat stability (compare also the agarose gel electrophoresis pattern); but structurally, it is a muscle type, or derived from a muscle type, as shown immunologically by inhibition reactions with anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase. Whether this is a fetal-type isoenzyme of adenylate kinase will require further

  13. CO2/HCO3(-)- and calcium-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase as a physiological ATP sensor.

    PubMed

    Zippin, Jonathan H; Chen, Yanqiu; Straub, Susanne G; Hess, Kenneth C; Diaz, Ana; Lee, Dana; Tso, Patrick; Holz, George G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. In mammalian cells, cAMP can be generated from hormone- and G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases or via the widely expressed and structurally and biochemically distinct enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). sAC activity is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate ions, and in cells, sAC functions as a physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensor. sAC activity is also stimulated by calcium, and its affinity for its substrate ATP suggests that it may be sensitive to physiologically relevant fluctuations in intracellular ATP. We demonstrate here that sAC can function as a cellular ATP sensor. In cells, sAC-generated cAMP reflects alterations in intracellular ATP that do not affect transmembrane AC-generated cAMP. In β cells of the pancreas, glucose metabolism generates ATP, which corresponds to an increase in cAMP, and we show here that sAC is responsible for an ATP-dependent cAMP increase. Glucose metabolism also elicits insulin secretion, and we further show that sAC is necessary for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Mice Overexpressing Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase Show Enhanced Spatial Memory Flexibility in the Absence of Intact Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in understanding the contribution of intracellular signaling and synaptic substrates to memory flexibility, which involves new learning and suppression of obsolete memory. Here, we report that enhancement of Ca[superscript 2+]-stimulated cAMP signaling by overexpressing type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) facilitated…

  15. Purification, characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease from bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, A J; Shoshani, I; Minuth, M; Awad, J A; Elce, J S; Johnson, R A

    1995-03-01

    We previously reported the extraction of a factor from bovine sperm that activated adenylyl cyclases of rat brain and human platelets, and identified it as a trypsin-like protease that was referred to as "ninhibin." This proteolytic activity was purified to near homogeneity from an alkaline extract of washed sperm particles by sequential chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine agarose and CM-Sephadex. Purification was greater than 100-fold with nearly 30% recovery of protease activity exhibiting a major band of approximately 40 kDa. An approximately 45-kDa form of the protease was also evident in crude extracts and was preferentially isolated when the enzyme was prepared in the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors. The larger form of the protease was substantially less effective in stimulating adenylyl cyclase than was the smaller form; it is likely to be a zymogen form from which the smaller, more active form is derived. Purified forms of acrosin and ninhibin exhibited similar mobilities on PAGE, similar capacities for activating adenylyl cyclase, similar patterns of proteolytic fragmentation, and similar immunoblot patterns obtained with an antibody against purified bovine acrosin. More importantly, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine ninhibin was found to be identical with that of bovine acrosin and caprine acrosin and more than 75% identical with porcine acrosin. The data support the conclusion that the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease previously referred to as ninhibin is, in fact, acrosin. PMID:7756444

  16. The DUSP26 phosphatase activator adenylate kinase 2 regulates FADD phosphorylation and cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Lee, Ho-June; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Song-Yi; Choi, Ji-Woo; Su Hwang, Deog; Kim, Key-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Zhang, Jianke; Youn, Hyun-Jo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-02-01

    Adenylate kinase 2 (AK2), which balances adenine nucleotide pool, is a multi-functional protein. Here we show that AK2 negatively regulates tumour cell growth. AK2 forms a complex with dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) phosphatase and stimulates DUSP26 activity independently of its AK activity. AK2/DUSP26 phosphatase protein complex dephosphorylates fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and regulates cell growth. AK2 deficiency enhances cell proliferation and induces tumour formation in a xenograft assay. This anti-growth function of AK2 is associated with its DUSP26-stimulating activity. Downregulation of AK2 is frequently found in tumour cells and human cancer tissues showing high levels of phospho-FADDSer194. Moreover, reconstitution of AK2 in AK2-deficient tumour cells retards both cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. Consistent with this, AK2+/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit enhanced cell proliferation with a significant alteration in phospho-FADDSer191. These results suggest that AK2 is an associated activator of DUSP26 and suppresses cell proliferation by FADD dephosphorylation, postulating AK2 as a negative regulator of tumour growth.

  17. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23977104

  18. Soluble Variants of Human Recombinant Glutaminyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of 1H-15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23977104

  19. Structural and functional investigation of the intermolecular interaction between NRPS adenylation and carrier protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Sundlov, Jesse A.; Shi, Ce; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are modular proteins that produce peptide antibiotics and siderophores. These enzymes act as catalytic assembly lines where substrates, covalently bound to integrated carrier domains, are delivered to adjacent catalytic domains. The carrier domains are initially loaded by adenylation domains, which use two distinct conformations to catalyze sequentially the adenylation of the substrate and the thioesterification of the pantetheine cofactor. We have used a mechanism-based inhibitor to determine the crystal structure of an engineered adenylation-carrier domain protein illustrating the intermolecular interaction between the adenylation and carrier domains. This structure enabled directed mutations to improve the interaction between non-native partner proteins. Comparison with prior NRPS adenylation domain structures provides insights into the assembly line dynamics of these modular enzymes. PMID:22365602

  20. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  1. Adenylate Energy Charge in Escherichia coli During Growth and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Astrid G.; Fall, Lana; Atkinson, Daniel E.

    1971-01-01

    The value of the adenylate energy charge, [(adenosine triphosphate) + ½ (adenosine diphosphate)]/[(adenosine triphosphate) + (adenosine diphosphate) + (adenosine monophosphate)], in Escherichia coli cells during growth is about 0.8. During the stationary phase after cessation of growth, or during starvation in carbon-limited cultures, the energy charge declines slowly to a value of about 0.5, and then falls more rapidly. During the slow decline in energy charge, all the cells are capable of forming colonies, but a rapid fall in viability coincides with the steep drop in energy charge. These results suggest that growth can occur only at energy charge values above about 0.8, that viability is maintained at values between 0.8 and 0.5, and that cells die at values below 0.5. Tabulation of adenylate concentrations previously reported for various organisms and tissues supports the prediction, based on enzyme kinetic observations in vitro, that the energy charge is stabilized near 0.85 in intact metabolizing cells of a wide variety of types. PMID:4333317

  2. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of action of relaxin on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system using synthetic peptides derived from the LGR7 relaxin receptor.

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Gur'yanov, I A; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Shpakova, E A; Vlasov, G P; Pertseva, M N

    2007-09-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin produces dose-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in rat tissues (striatum, cardiac and skeletal muscle) and the muscle tissues of invertebrates, i.e., the bivalve mollusk Anodonta cygnea and the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, adenylyl cyclase stimulation being more marked in the rat striatum and cardiac muscle. Our studies of the type of relaxin receptor involved in mediating these actions of relaxin involved the first synthesis of peptides 619-629, 619-629-Lys(Palm), and 615-629, which are derivatives of the primary structure of the C-terminal part of the third cytoplasmic loop of the type 1 relaxin receptor (LGR7). Peptides 619-629-Lys(Palm) and 615-629 showed competitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase stimulation by relaxin in rat striatum and cardiac muscle but had no effect on the action of relaxin in rat skeletal muscle or invertebrate muscle, which is evidence for the tissue and species specificity of their actions. On the one hand, this indicates involvement of the LGR7 receptor in mediating the adenylyl cyclase-stimulating action of relaxin in rat striatum and cardiac muscle and, on the other, demonstrates the existence of other adenylyl cyclase signal mechanisms for the actions of relaxin in rat skeletal muscle and invertebrate muscle, not involving LGR7 receptors. The adenylyl cyclase-stimulating effect of relaxin in the striatum and cardiac muscles was found to be decreased in the presence of C-terminal peptide 385-394 of the alpha(s) subunit of the mammalian G protein and to be blocked by treatment of membranes with cholera toxin. These data provide evidence that in the striatum and cardiac muscle, relaxin stimulates adenylyl cyclase via the LGR7 receptor, this being functionally linked with G(s) protein. It is also demonstrated that linkage of relaxin-activated LGR7 receptor with the G(s) protein is mediated by interaction of the C-terminal half of the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor with the C

  3. Estradiol-17beta-BSA stimulates Ca(2+) uptake through nongenomic pathways in primary rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells: involvement of cAMP and PKC.

    PubMed

    Han, H J; Lee, Y H; Park, S H

    2000-04-01

    The effect of estradiol-17beta-BSA (E(2)-BSA) on Ca(2+) uptake and its related signal pathways were examined in the primary cultured rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells. E(2)-BSA (10(-9) M) significantly stimulated Ca(2+) uptake from 2 h by 13% and at 8 h by 35% as compared to control, respectively. This stimulatory effect of E(2)-BSA was not inhibited by tamoxifen (10(-8) M, an intracellular estrogen receptor antagonist), actinomycin D (10(-7) M, a transcription inhibitor), and cycloheximide (4 x 10(-5) M, a protein synthesis inhibitor). However, E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was blocked by methoxyverapamil (10(-6) M, an L-type calcium channel blocker) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (10(-5) M, a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter blocker). These results suggest that E(2)-BSA stimulates Ca(2+) uptake through nongenomic pathways. Thus, we investigated which signal pathways were related to E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake. 8-Br-cAMP (10(-6) M) alone increased Ca(2+) uptake by 22% compared to control. When E(2)-BSA combined with 8-Br-cAMP, Ca(2+) uptake was not significantly stimulated compared to E(2)-BSA. SQ 22536 (10(-6) M, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and myristoylated protein kinase A inhibitor amide 14-22 (10(-6) M, a protein kinase A inhibitor) blocked E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake and E(2)-BSA also increased cAMP generation by 26% of that of control. In addition, TPA (0.02 ng/ml, an artificial PKC promoter) stimulated the Ca(2+) uptake by 14%, and the cotreatment of TPA and E(2)-BSA did not significantly stimulate Ca(2+) uptake compared to E(2)-BSA. E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was blocked by U 73122 (10(-6) M, a phospholipase C inhibitor) or bisindolylmaleimide I (10(-6) M, a protein kinase C inhibitor). Indeed, E(2)-BSA stimulated PKC activity by 26%. In conclusion, E(2)-BSA (10(-9) M) stimulated Ca(2+) uptake by nongenomic action, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC pathways.

  4. Farnesyloxycoumarins, a new class of squalene-hopene cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Balliano, Gianni; Robaldo, Bruna; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Chimichi, Stefano; Boccalini, Marco

    2004-04-19

    A few naturally occurring prenyl- and prenyloxycoumarins and several new related synthetic derivatives were evaluated as inhibitors of squalene-hopene cyclase (SHC), a useful model enzyme, to predict their interactions with oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC). Umbelliprenin-10',11'-monoepoxide (IC(50) 2.5 microM) and the corresponding 6',7'-10',11' diepoxide (IC(50) 1.5 microM) were the most active enzyme inhibitors.

  5. The Src kinase Yes is activated in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters, but not pancreatic growth factors, which stimulate its association with numerous other signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Veronica; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Jensen, R T

    2012-08-01

    For growth factors, cytokines, G-protein-coupled receptors and numerous other stimuli, the Src Family of kinases (SFK) play a central signaling role. SFKs also play an important role in pancreatic acinar cell function including metabolism, secretion, endocytosis, growth and cytoskeletal integrity, although the specific SFKs involved are not fully known. In the present study we used specific antibodies for the SFK, Yes, to determine its presence, activation by pancreatic secretagogues or growth factors, and interaction with cellular signaling cascades mediated by CCK in which Yes participates in to cause acinar cell responses. Yes was identified in acini and secretagogues known to activate phospholipase C (PLC) [CCK, carbachol, bombesin] as well as post-receptor stimulants activating PKC [TPA] or mobilizing cellular calcium [thapsigargin/calcium ionophore (A23187)] each activated Yes. Secretin, which activates adenylate cyclase did not stimulate Yes, nor did pancreatic growth factors. CCK activation of Yes required both high- and low-affinity CCK(1)-receptor states. TPA-/CCK-stimulated Yes activation was completely inhibited by thapsigargin and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. CCK/TPA stimulated the association of Yes with focal adhesion kinases (Pyk2, FAK) and its autophosphorylated forms (pY397FAK, pY402Pyk2). Moreover, CCK/TPA stimulated Yes interacted with a number of other signaling proteins, including Shc, PKD, p130(Cas), PI3K and PTEN. This study demonstrates that in rat pancreatic acini, the SFK member Yes is expressed and activated by CCK and other gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters. Because its activation results in the direct activation of many cellular signaling cascades that have been shown to mediate CCK's effect in acinar cell function our results suggest that it is one of the important pancreatic SFKs mediating these effects.

  6. E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylyl cyclase C: new functions and unsuspected actions.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, Ralph A.; Mann, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    Some E. coli cause diarrhea by elaborating heat-labile and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins which stimulate intestinal secretion. E. coli ST's are small peptides which bind to intestinal luminal epithelial cell receptors. The ST receptor, one of a family of receptor-cyclases called guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), is a membrane spanning protein containing an extracellular binding domain and intracellular protein kinase and catalytic domains. The intestine synthesizes and secretes homologous peptides, guanylin and uroguanylin. The kidney also synthesizes uroguanylin. ST, guanylin or uroguanylin binding to GC-C results in increased cGMP, phosphorylation of the CFTR Cl- channel and secretion. Proguanylin and prouroguanylin circulate in blood and bind to receptors in intestine, kidney, liver, brain etc. In the kidney, they stimulate the excretion of Na+ and K+. Study of GC-C "knock-out" mice reveal that GC-C is important to intestinal salt and water secretion, duodenal bicarbonate secretion, recovery from CCl4-induced liver injury, and to intestinal polyp formation in Min mice lacking GC-C. PMID:12813912

  7. Regulation of cGMP levels by guanylate cyclase in truncated frog rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP is the second messenger in phototransduction and regulates the photoreceptor current. In the present work, we tried to understand the regulation mechanism of cytoplasmic cGMP levels in frog photoreceptors by measuring the photoreceptor current using a truncated rod outer segment (tROS) preparation. Since exogenously applied substance diffuses into tROS from the truncated end, we could examine the biochemical reactions relating to the cGMP metabolism by manipulating the cytoplasmic chemical condition. In tROS, exogenously applied GTP produced a dark current whose amplitude was half-maximal at approximately 0.4 mM GTP. The conductance for this current was suppressed by light in a fashion similar to when it is activated by cGMP. In addition, no current was produced in the absence of Mg2+, which is known to be necessary for the guanylate cyclase activity. These results indicate that guanylate cyclase was present in tROS and synthesized cGMP from exogenously applied GTP. The enzyme activity was distributed throughout the rod outer segment. The amount of synthesized cGMP increased as the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of tROS decreased, which indicated the activation of guanylate cyclase at low Ca2+ concentrations. Half-maximal effect of Ca2+ was observed at approximately 100 nM. tROS contained the proteins involved in the phototransduction mechanism and therefore, we could examine the regulation of the light response waveform by Ca2+. At low Ca2+ concentrations, the time course of the light response was speeded up probably because cGMP recovery was facilitated by activation of the cyclase. Then, if the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of a photoreceptor decreases during light stimulation, the Ca2+ decrease may explain the acceleration of the light response during light adaptation. In tROS, however, we did observe an acceleration during repetitive light flashes when the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration increased during the stimulation. This result suggests the

  8. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record.

  9. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record. PMID:17686016

  10. Renal Phosphate Wasting in the Absence of Adenylyl Cyclase 6

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Robert A.; Murray, Fiona; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Tang, Tong; Levi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) enhance phosphate excretion by the proximal tubule of the kidney by retrieval of the sodium-dependent phosphate transporters (Npt2a and Npt2c) from the apical plasma membrane. PTH activates adenylyl cyclase (AC) through PTH 1 receptors and stimulates the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. However, the precise role and isoform(s) of AC in phosphate homeostasis are not known. We report here that mice lacking AC6 (AC6−/−) have increased plasma PTH and FGF-23 levels compared with wild-type (WT) mice but comparable plasma phosphate concentrations. Acute activation of the calcium-sensing receptor or feeding a zero phosphate diet almost completely suppressed plasma PTH levels in both AC6−/− and WT mice, indicating a secondary cause for hyperparathyroidism. Pharmacologic blockade of FGF receptors resulted in a comparable increase in plasma phosphate between genotypes, whereas urinary phosphate remained significantly higher in AC6−/− mice. Compared with WT mice, AC6−/− mice had reduced renal Npt2a and Npt2c protein abundance, with approximately 80% of Npt2a residing in lysosomes. WT mice responded to exogenous PTH with redistribution of Npt2a from proximal tubule microvilli to intracellular compartments and lysosomes alongside a PTH-induced dose–response relationship for fractional phosphate excretion and urinary cAMP excretion. These responses were absent in AC6−/− mice. In conclusion, AC6 in the proximal tubule modulates cAMP formation, Npt2a trafficking, and urinary phosphate excretion, which are highlighted by renal phosphate wasting in AC6−/− mice. PMID:24854272

  11. Rat muscle 5'-adenylic acid aminohydrolase. Role of K+ and adenylate energy charge in expression of kinetic and regulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Coffee, C J; Solano, C

    1977-03-10

    The kinetic and regulatory properties of homogeneous AMP deaminase from rat skeletal muscle have ben examined with particular emphasis on (a) the role of potassium ions in the expression of these properties and (b) the role of the adenylate energy charge in the regulation of AMP deaminase activity. Although the enzyme has an absolute requirement for K+, the concentration required for maximum activation is dependent on the concentration of substrate. At saturating levels of AMP (greater than or equal 2.0 mM) maximum activation is observed with 25 mM KCl, whereas at lower substrate concentrations (0.2 mM) approximately 50 mM KCl is needed for maximum activation. Conversely, the response of enzyme activity ot increasing levels of substrate is dependent on the level of potassium ions. At substrating concentrations of K+, the saturation curve for AMP is highly sigmoidal (nh=3.2) whereas at higher KCl concentrations, the apparent cooperativity between AMP sites is almost completely abolished (nh=1.5). The inhibition by a number of phosphorylated metabolites, including ATP, GTP, creatine-P, and P1, is likewise sensitive to the concentration of K+. These results suggest that a significant amount of interaction between K+ sites and both substrate and effector sites is required for the expression of the catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme. The specific effects of ATP, creatine-P, and P1 on the parameters of Km and Vmax indicate that each of these profile of AMP deaminase activity generated in response to variations in the adenylate energy charge shows that within the physiological range of energy charge (0.75 to 0.95), the activity increases linearly with decreasesing energy charge and is insensitive to both the total adenylate pool size and the presence of P1 and creatine-P. These data suggest that the most important factor in the regulation of AMP deaminase activity is the state of the energy charge rather than the absolute concentrations of the individual

  12. Electrical stimulation and testosterone differentially enhance expression of regeneration-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nijee; Marzo, Sam J; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M

    2010-05-01

    As functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury is dependent upon successful repair and regeneration, treatments that enhance different regenerative events may be advantageous. Using a rat facial nerve crush axotomy model, our lab has previously investigated the effects of a combinatorial treatment strategy, consisting of electrical stimulation (ES) of the proximal nerve stump and testosterone propionate (TP) administration. Results indicated that the two treatments differentially enhance facial nerve regenerative properties, whereby ES reduced the delay before sprout formation, TP accelerated the overall regeneration rate, and the combinatorial treatment had additive effects. To delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying such treatments, the present study investigated the effects of ES and TP on expression of specific regeneration-associated genes. Following a right facial nerve crush at the stylomastoid foramen, gonadectomized adult male rats were administered only ES, only TP, a combination of both, or left untreated. Real time RT-PCR analysis was used to assess fold changes in mRNA levels in the facial motor nucleus at 0 h, 6 h, 1 d, 2 d, 7 d, and 21 d post-axotomy. The candidate genes analyzed included two tubulin isoforms (alpha(1)-tubulin and beta(II)-tubulin), 43-kiloDalton growth-associated protein (GAP-43), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), and neuritin (candidate plasticity-related gene 15). The two treatments have differential effects on gene expression, with ES leading to early but transient upregulation and TP producing late but steady increases in mRNA levels. In comparison to individual treatments, the combinatorial treatment strategy has the most enhanced effects on the transcriptional program activated following injury. PMID:19427307

  13. Effects of electromagnetic field stimulation on cellular signal transduction mechanisms: Analyses of the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields on calcium spiking in ROS 17/2.8 cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sisken, B.F.; Sisken, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    The general goals of this work were to determine whether resting levels of cellular second messengers, especially calcium, are affected by low-level electromagnetic fields and the mechanisms that could lead to such changes. The work performed was directed at (1) verifying the report of McLeod et al (1990) that low frequency sinusoidal EMF can alter basal calcium fluctuations in cultured ROS 17/2.8 osteoblast-like cells and (2) reproducing the findings of Luben et al (1982) that pulsed electromagnetic fields can affect PTH-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in osteoblasts. Initially a system was constructed so that cells could be exposed to sinusoidal electric fields using platinum electrodes. In this system, the electrodes were separated from the cells and culture medium by agar barriers. A series of experiments indicated that this system was subject to a significant, though little-known artifact in which a not well understood interaction between the electrodes and sodium ions in the medium or in plain salt solutions led to frequency and amplitude dependent emission of photons that are recorded by the detection system. They therefore designed and constructed an air gap reactor system that utilizes a ferromagnetic core to direct the magnetic flux generated by a sinusoidal coil. Studies on the effects of a 15 Hz pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on cyclic AMP metabolism were performed on ROS 17/2.8 and MC3T3 cells.

  14. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Pankey, Edward A; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the principal mediator of penile erection, and PDE-5 inhibitors are the first-line agents used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). When NO formation or bioavailability is decreased by oxidative stress and PDE-5 inhibitors are no longer effective, a new class of agents called soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators like BAY 41-8543 will induce erection. sGC stimulators bind to the normally reduced, NO-sensitive form of sGC to increase cGMP formation and promote erection. The sGC stimulators produce normal erectile responses when NO formation is inhibited and the nerves innervating the corpora cavernosa are damaged. However, with severe oxidative stress, the heme iron on sGC can be oxidized, rendering the enzyme unresponsive to NO or sGC stimulators. In this pathophysiological situation, another newly developed class of agents called sGC activators can increase the catalytic activity of the oxidized enzyme, increase cGMP formation, and promote erection. The use of newer agents that stimulate or activate sGC to promote erection and treat ED is discussed in this brief review article. PMID:23817801

  15. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Pankey, Edward A; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the principal mediator of penile erection, and PDE-5 inhibitors are the first-line agents used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). When NO formation or bioavailability is decreased by oxidative stress and PDE-5 inhibitors are no longer effective, a new class of agents called soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators like BAY 41-8543 will induce erection. sGC stimulators bind to the normally reduced, NO-sensitive form of sGC to increase cGMP formation and promote erection. The sGC stimulators produce normal erectile responses when NO formation is inhibited and the nerves innervating the corpora cavernosa are damaged. However, with severe oxidative stress, the heme iron on sGC can be oxidized, rendering the enzyme unresponsive to NO or sGC stimulators. In this pathophysiological situation, another newly developed class of agents called sGC activators can increase the catalytic activity of the oxidized enzyme, increase cGMP formation, and promote erection. The use of newer agents that stimulate or activate sGC to promote erection and treat ED is discussed in this brief review article.

  16. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  17. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana R; Holmes, Andrew P S; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J; Monteiro, Emília C; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3(-) and/or H(+) mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3(-)-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3(-) in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis.

  18. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of a 24-kDa Ca(2+)-binding protein activating photoreceptor guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Dizhoor, A M; Olshevskaya, E V; Henzel, W J; Wong, S C; Stults, J T; Ankoudinova, I; Hurley, J B

    1995-10-20

    Two vertebrate photoreceptor-specific membrane guanylyl cyclases, RetGC-1 and RetGC-2, are activated by a soluble 24-kDa retinal protein, p24, in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner (Dizhoor, A.M., Lowe, D.G., Olshevskaya, E.V., Laura, R.P., and Hurley, J.B. (1994) Neuron 12, 1345-1352; Lowe, D.G., Dizhoor, A.M., Liu, K., Gu, O., Laura, R., Lu, L., and Hurley, J.B. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92, 5535-5539). The primary structure of bovine p24 has been derived from peptide sequencing and from its cDNA. p24 is a new EF-hand-type Ca(2+)-binding protein, related but not identical to another guanylyl cyclase-activating protein, GCAP (Palczewski, K., Subbaraya, I., Gorczyca, W.A., Helekar, B.S., Ruiz, C.C., Ohguro, H. Huang, J., Zhao, X., Crabb, J.W., Johnson, R.S., Walsh, K.A., Gray-Keller, M.P., Detwiler, P.B., and Baehr, W. (1994) Neuron 13, 395-404) and other members of the recovering family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. Antibodies against a truncated fusion protein and against a p24-specific synthetic peptide specifically recognize retinal p24 on immunoblot. Both antibodies inhibit activation of photoreceptor membrane guanylyl cyclase by purified p24. p24 is found only in retina, and it copurifies with outer segment membranes. Immunocytochemical analysis shows that it is present in rod photoreceptor cells. An immobilized antibody column was used to purify p24 from a heat-treated retinal extract. Purified p24 appears on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a homogeneous protein not contaminated with GCAP, and it activates photoreceptor guanylyl cyclase in vitro at submicromolar concentrations. Ca2+ inhibits this activation with an EC50 near 200 nM and a Hill coefficient of 1.7. Recombinant p24 expressed in 293 cells effectively stimulates photoreceptor guanylyl cyclase. These findings demonstrate that p24, like GCAP, imparts Ca2+ sensitivity to photoreceptor membrane guanylyl cyclase. We propose that p24 be referred to as GCAP-2 and that GCAP be referred to as

  19. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst. PMID:22526778

  20. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst.

  1. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  2. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  3. Type VI adenylyl cyclase negatively regulates GluN2B-mediated LTD and spatial reversal learning

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Pang; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Hou, Wen-Hsien; Lin, Meng-Syuan; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chien, Chen-Li; Chang, Chen; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Chern, Yijuang

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensitive type VI adenylyl cyclase (AC6) is a membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase (AC) that converts ATP to cAMP under stimulation. It is a calcium-inhibited AC and integrates negative inputs from Ca2+ and multiple other signals to regulate the intracellular cAMP level. In the present study, we demonstrate that AC6 functions upstream of CREB and negatively controls neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus. Genetic removal of AC6 leads to cyclase-independent and N-terminus of AC6 (AC6N)-dependent elevation of CREB expression, and enhances the expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons. Consequently, GluN2B-dependent calcium signaling and excitatory postsynaptic current, long-term depression, and spatial reversal learning are enhanced in the hippocampus of AC6−/− mice without altering the gross anatomy of the brain. Together, our results suggest that AC6 negatively regulates neuronal plasticity by modulating the levels of CREB and GluN2B in the hippocampus. PMID:26932446

  4. Intramolecular signaling in tandem-GAF domains from PDE5 and PDE10 studied with a cyanobacterial adenylyl cyclase reporter.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Ana; Zimmermann, Markus O; Boeckler, Frank M; Kurz, Ursula; Schultz, Anita; Schultz, Joachim E

    2012-03-01

    The dimeric mammalian phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are regulated by N-terminal domains. In PDE5, the GAF-A subdomain of a GAF-tandem (GAF-A and -B) binds the activator cGMP and in PDE10 GAF-B binds cAMP. GAF-tandem chimeras of PDE5 and 10 in which the 36 aa linker helix between GAF-A and -B was swapped lost allosteric regulation of a reporter adenylyl cyclase. In 16 consecutive constructs we substituted the PDE10 linker with that from PDE5. An initial stretch of 10 amino acids coded for isoform specificity. A C240Y substitution uncoupled cyclase activity from regulation, whereas C240F, L or G did not. The C240Y substitution increased basal activity to stimulated levels. Notably, over the next 12 substitutions basal cyclase activity decreased linearly. Further targeted substitutions were based on homology modeling using the PDE2 structure. No combination of substitutions within the initial 10 linker residues caused loss of regulation. The full 10 aa stretch was required. Modeling indicated a potential interaction of the linker with a loop from GAF-A. To interrupt H-bonding a glycine substitution of the loop segment was generated. Despite reduction of basal activity, loss of regulation was maintained. Possibly, the orientation of the linker helix is determined by formation of the dimer at the initial linker segment. Downstream deflections of the linker helix may have caused loss of regulation.

  5. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  6. Chirally selective, intramolecular interaction observed in an aminoacyl adenylate anhydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between amino acids and nucleotide bases is studied. The proton NMR spectrum of N-acetylphenylalanyl-AMP-anhydride is analyzed H8 and H2 signals, two upfield signals of equal size, and five phenylalanine ring proton signals are observed in the spectrum; the upfield movement of the proton and the racemization of the N-acetyl L-phenylalanine material are examined. The differences in the position of the signals due to the diastereoisomers are investigated. The separation of the D and L amino acyl adenylates using HPLC is described. H-1 NMR spectra of the isomers are examined in order to determine which isomer displays the strongest interaction between the phenyl ring and the adenine ring. The spectra reveal that the L isomer shows the highest upfield change of both H8 and H2 signals. It is noted that the phenyl ring lies over C2 of the adenine ring with the phenyl meta and para protons extended past the adenine ring and the phenyl ortho protons.

  7. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  8. Analysis of the Linker Region Joining the Adenylation and Carrier Protein Domains of the Modular Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Drake, Eric J.; Makin, Thomas A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) are multi-modular proteins capable of producing important peptide natural products. Using an assembly-line process the amino acid substrate and peptide intermediates are passed between the active sites of different catalytic domains of the NRPS while bound covalently to a peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain. Examination of the linker sequences that join the NRPS adenylation and PCP domains identified several conserved proline residues that are not found in standalone adenylation domains. We examined the roles of these proline residues and neighboring conserved sequences through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the adenylation domain and the fully reconstituted NRPS pathway. In particular, we identified a conserved LPxP motif at the start of the adenylation-PCP linker. The LPxP motif interacts with a region on the adenylation domain to stabilize a critical catalytic lysine residue belonging to the A10 motif that immediately precedes the linker. Further, this interaction with the C-terminal sub-domain of the adenylation domain may coordinate movement of the PCP with the conformational change of the adenylation domain. Through this work, we extend the conserved A10 motif of the adenylation domain and identify residues that enable proper adenylation domain function. PMID:24975514

  9. Tocopherol Cyclases-Substrate Specificity and Phylogenetic Relations.

    PubMed

    Dłużewska, Jolanta; Szymańska, Renata; Gabruk, Michal; Kós, Peter B; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    In the present studies, we focused on substrate specificity of tocopherol cyclase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the tocopherols and plastochromanol-8, the main plant lipid antioxidants, with special emphasis on the preference for tocopherols and plastochromanol-8 precursors, taking advantage of the recombinant enzyme originating from Arabidopsis thaliana and isolated plastoglobules, thylakoids and various model systems like micelles and thylakoids. Plastoglobules and triacylglycerol micelles were the most efficient reaction environment for the cyclase. In various investigated systems, synthesis of γ-tocopherol proceeded considerably faster than that of plastochromanol-8, probably mainly due to different localization of the corresponding substrates in the analyzed lipid structures. Moreover, our study was complemented by bioinformatics analysis of the phylogenetic relations of the cyclases and sequence motifs, crucial for the enzyme activity, were proposed. The analysis revealed also a group of tocopherol cyclase-like proteins in a number of heterotrophic bacterial species, with a conserved region common with photosynthetic organisms, that might be engaged in the catalytic activity of both groups of organisms. PMID:27462710

  10. General base-general acid catalysis by terpenoid cyclases.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Travis A; Christianson, David W

    2016-07-01

    Terpenoid cyclases catalyze the most complex reactions in biology, in that more than half of the substrate carbon atoms often undergo changes in bonding during the course of a multistep cyclization cascade that proceeds through multiple carbocation intermediates. Many cyclization mechanisms require stereospecific deprotonation and reprotonation steps, and most cyclization cascades are terminated by deprotonation to yield an olefin product. The first bacterial terpenoid cyclase to yield a crystal structure was pentalenene synthase from Streptomyces exfoliatus UC5319. This cyclase generates the hydrocarbon precursor of the pentalenolactone family of antibiotics. The structures of pentalenene synthase and other terpenoid cyclases reveal predominantly nonpolar active sites typically lacking amino acid side chains capable of serving general base-general acid functions. What chemical species, then, enables the Brønsted acid-base chemistry required in the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes? The most likely candidate for such general base-general acid chemistry is the co-product inorganic pyrophosphate. Here, we briefly review biological and nonbiological systems in which phosphate and its derivatives serve general base and general acid functions in catalysis. These examples highlight the fact that the Brønsted acid-base activities of phosphate derivatives are comparable to the Brønsted acid-base activities of amino acid side chains.

  11. Regulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by matricellular thrombospondins: implications for blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Seeger, Franziska; Garcin, Elsa D; Roberts, David D; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) maintains cardiovascular health by activating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) to increase cellular cGMP levels. Cardiovascular disease is characterized by decreased NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. Pharmacological activators and stimulators of sGC are being actively pursued as therapies for acute heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Here we review molecular mechanisms that modulate sGC activity while emphasizing a novel biochemical pathway in which binding of the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) to the cell surface receptor CD47 causes inhibition of sGC. We discuss the therapeutic implications of this pathway for blood flow, tissue perfusion, and cell survival under physiologic and disease conditions.

  12. Effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers KCN and CO on ultraviolet light-induced activation of crude soluble guanylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.O.; Axelsson, K.L.; Andersson, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The crude soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) from bovine mesenteric artery was stimulated by ultraviolet (UV) light (366 nm). Addition of free radical scavengers, dimethylsulfoxide or superoxide dismutase and/or catalase to the GC assay did not abolish the stimulatory effect of UV light. On the contrary, the UV light-induced activation was enhanced in the presence of these scavengers. KCN (1 mM) did not affect the UV light-induced activation, while 0.1 mM of CO potentiated the activation. These results may indicate that UV light is operating through a direct interaction with the ferrous form of the GC-heme.

  13. Differential regulation of right and left ventricular beta-adrenergic receptors in newborn lambs with experimental cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, D; Voss, E; Huang, S; Doshi, R; Crane, C

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether chronic hypoxemia secondary to an intracardiac right-to-left shunt alters regulation of the myocardial beta-adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase system, we produced chronic hypoxemia in nine newborn lambs by creating right ventricular outflow obstruction and an atrial septal defect. Oxygen saturation was reduced to 65-74% for 2 wk. Eight lambs served as normoxemic controls. beta-receptor density (Bmax) and ligand affinity (KD) were determined with the radio-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol and adenylate cyclase activity determined during stimulation with isoproterenol, sodium fluoride (NaF), and forskolin. During chronic hypoxemia, Bmax decreased 45% (hypoxemic, 180.6 +/- 31.5 vs. control, 330.5 +/- 60.1 fmol/mg) in the left ventricle (exposed to hypoxemia alone) but was unchanged in the right ventricle (exposed to hypoxemia and pressure overload). KD was not different from control in either ventricle. Left ventricular isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was decreased by 39% (30.0 +/- 4.3% increase vs. 44.1 +/- 9.5% increase) whereas right ventricular adenylate cyclase activity was unchanged. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase with NaF or forskolin was not different from control in either ventricle. Circulating epinephrine was increased fourfold whereas circulating and myocardial norepinephrine were unchanged. These data demonstrate a down-regulation of the left ventricular beta-adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase system during chronic hypoxemia secondary to an intracardiac right-to-left shunt. PMID:2153153

  14. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and PAC1 receptor in the testis of cartilaginous fish Torpedo marmorata: A molecular and phylogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Agnese, Marisa; Valiante, Salvatore; Rosati, Luigi; Andreuccetti, Piero; Prisco, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The role of PACAP in spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis has been largely investigated in last years in mammals; conversely, a few studies have been performed in non mammalian vertebrates. In this paper we investigated the sequence, expression and localization of PACAP and its PAC1 receptor in the testis of the benthic elasmobranch Torpedo marmorata, the marbled electric ray. Cloning a partial PACAP cDNA, we demonstrated for the first time in elasmobranches that PACAP shows a highly conserved sequence, compared with the PACAP of other chordates (tunicates and vertebrates). Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP has been well preserved during evolution and that a negative selection acts on PACAP sequence, leading to the conservation of the coding sites. The phylogenetic consensus tree showed also that Torpedo PACAP is more related with the amphibian PACAP than with the teleost one. Finally, we demonstrated that in T. marmorata PACAP and its PAC1 receptor are synthesized directly in the testis, where they show a wider localization than mammals, suggesting that this neuropeptide is involved in the control of Torpedo spermatogenesis. PMID:26393433

  16. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Are the essential lysines essential?

    PubMed

    Tian, G C; Yan, H G; Jiang, R T; Kishi, F; Nakazawa, A; Tsai, M D

    1990-05-01

    Using site-specific mutagenesis, we have probed the structural and functional roles of lysine-21 and lysine-27 of adenylate kinase (AK) from chicken muscle expressed in Escherichia coli. The two residues were chosen since according to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) model [Mildvan, A. S., & Fry, D. C. (1987) Adv. Enzymol. 58, 241-313], they are located near the alpha- and the gamma-phosphates, respectively, of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the AK-MgATP complex. In addition, a lysine residue (Lys-21 in the case of AK) along with a glycine-rich loop is considered "essential" in the catalysis of kinases and other nucleotide binding proteins. The Lys-27 to methionine (K27M) mutant showed only slight increases in kcat and Km, but a substantial increase (1.8 kcal/mol) in the free energy of unfolding, relative to the WT AK. For proper interpretation of the steady-state kinetic data, viscosity-dependent kinetics was used to show that the chemical step is partially rate-limiting in the catalysis of AK. Computer modeling suggested that the folded form of K27M could gain stability (relative to the wild type) via hydrophobic interactions of Met-27 with Val-179 and Phe-183 and/or formation of a charge-transfer complex between Met-27 and Phe-183. The latter was supported by an upfield shift of the methyl protons of Met-27 in 1H NMR. Other than this, the 1H NMR spectrum of K27M is very similar to that of WT, suggesting little perturbation in the global or even local conformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2161682

  17. Effects of abstinence and family history for alcoholism on platelet adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Menninger, J A; Barón, A E; Tabakoff, B

    1998-12-01

    Platelet adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was measured in 32 alcohol-dependent subjects and 27 control subjects who were categorized as either family history-positive (FHP) or family history-negative (FHN) for alcoholism. The interview and blood sample collections were performed shortly after cessation of heavy drinking in the alcoholic group, and repeat blood samples were obtained at the end of the first and second weeks of monitored abstinence. Control subjects received the same interview and provided blood samples at the time of the interview. When subjects were not segregated for FHP or FHN status, there were no statistically significant differences in basal, cesium fluoride (CsF)-, or forskolin-stimulated mean AC activities between the controls and the alcoholics, at study entry or with 1 or 2 weeks of abstinence. On the other hand, over the 2-week course of sobriety from heavy drinking, the CsF-stimulated AC activity of FHP alcohol-dependent subjects decreased significantly (p = 0.03). FHP alcohol-dependent subjects after 2 weeks of sobriety had significantly lower mean CsF-stimulated AC activity than FHN controls (p = 0.04), whereas the FHN alcoholic subjects' CsF-stimulated AC activity did not differ significantly from FHN controls at this point in time. When all subjects were pooled and then categorized as either FHP or FHN, there was a significant difference in mean CsF-stimulated AC activity (p = 0.02) between the FHP and FHN subject groups. Genetic factors and abstinence appear to have roles in determining low platelet AC activity in alcoholic and nonalcoholic subjects. CsF-stimulated platelet AC activity, in particular, appears to act as a trait marker for a genetic vulnerability to developing alcoholism, but recent heavy drinking in male alcoholics is a factor that can mask differences between FHP and FHN subjects.

  18. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  19. Synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using the tert-butoxycarbonyl protecting group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, D. W.; Seguin, R.; Saburi, M.; Fendler, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-protected amino acids is reported. Anhydrous solutions containing N-tert-butoxycarbonyl alanine, phenylalanine, and methionine were combined with the anhydrous mono (tri-n-octylammonium) salt of adenosine 5'-phosphate and the resultant amino acyl adenylates were characterized by means of elemental analysis, and infrared and proton NMR spectroscopy. Amino acyl adenylate yields of up to 60% were obtained with high purity at room temperatures. The reported synthesis is considered to represent a large improvement over previous methods due to the purity of the products, normal temperature requirements, and the stability of the starting compounds, which suggests its use in investigations of prebiotic oligo- and polypeptide synthesis.

  20. Clay catalyzed polymerization of amino acid adenylates and its relationship to biochemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and polymerization of alanine adenylate on montmorillonite at pH 7 when either its interspacial faces or its edger are blocked by an excess of histidine or sodium hexametaphosphate was investigated. Results indicate that alanine adenylate can be adsorbed any place on the interspacial spaces of the clay; however, adsorption of its phosphate part, which is limited to the edges of the clay, is necessary for polymerization to occur. As a result, polymerization takes place only at sites on the interspacial faces bordering the edges.

  1. Zinc, a structural component of adenylate kinases from gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, A M; Glaser, P; Perrier, V; Meier, A; Longin, R; Sebald, M; Maignan, L; Pistotnik, E; Bârzu, O

    1994-01-01

    The recent finding that Bacillus stearothermophilus adenylate kinase contains a zinc atom coordinated to four cysteines prompted us to investigate the metal-binding properties of the enzyme from various bacteria. We conclude that zinc was present only in adenylate kinase from gram-positive species and that this property is correlated with the presence of three or four Cys residues in the sequence Cys-X2-Cys-X16-Cys-X2-Cys/Asp, in which X stands for different amino acid residues. PMID:8288548

  2. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Holubova, Jana; Jelinek, Jiri; Tomala, Jakub; Masin, Jiri; Kosova, Martina; Stanek, Ondrej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michalek, Jaroslav; Kovar, Marek; Sebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA; also called ACT or AC-Hly) targets CD11b-expressing phagocytes and translocates into their cytosol an adenylyl cyclase (AC) that hijacks cellular signaling by conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP). Intriguingly, insertion of large passenger peptides removes the enzymatic activity but not the cell-invasive capacity of the AC domain. This has repeatedly been exploited for delivery of heterologous antigens into the cytosolic pathway of CD11b-expressing dendritic cells by CyaA/AC− toxoids, thus enabling their processing and presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs). We produced a set of toxoids with overlapping deletions within the first 371 residues of CyaA and showed that the structure of the AC enzyme does not contain any sequences indispensable for its translocation across target cell membrane. Moreover, replacement of the AC domain (residues 1 to 371) with heterologous polypeptides of 40, 146, or 203 residues yielded CyaAΔAC constructs that delivered passenger CTL epitopes into antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induced strong antigen-specific CD8+ CTL responses in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. This shows that the RTX (repeats in toxin) hemolysin moiety, consisting of residues 374 to 1706 of CyaA, harbors all structural information involved in translocation of the N-terminal AC domain across target cell membranes. These results decipher the extraordinary capacity of the AC domain of CyaA to transport large heterologous cargo polypeptides into the cytosol of CD11b+ target cells and pave the way for the construction of CyaAΔAC-based polyvalent immunotherapeutic T cell vaccines. PMID:22215742

  3. All five cloned human somatostatin receptors (hSSTR1-5) are functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M T; Warszynska, A; Panetta, R; Srikant, C B

    1994-01-28

    Recent reports have suggested that only some of the cloned somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are coupled to adenylyl cyclase. These studies have used both stable and transiently transfected cells or cells lacking appropriate Gi alpha and are controversial. To investigate SSTR signalling mechanisms, we have established stably transfected CHO-K1 cells expressing human genes for SSTR1-5. The effect of 0.1-100 nM SST-14 and SST-28 on forskolin (1 microM) stimulated cAMP accumulation was determined and compared to their receptor binding affinities. The 5 expressed hSSTRs bound SST-14 and SST-28 with high affinity (IC50 1.1-2.1 nM for SST-14; IC50 0.25-5.4 nM for SST-28). hSSTR1-4 bound SST-14 > SST-28 whereas hSSTR5 bound SST-28 > SST-14. Radioligand binding to hSSTR1-5 was significantly inhibited by GTP, GTP gamma S and pertussis toxin. Both SST-14 and SST-28 inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP stimulation with ED50 values which paralleled their binding affinities for the individual hSSTR subtypes. These results demonstrate that all 5 human SSTRs are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in CHO-K1 cells via pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins.

  4. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  5. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  6. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  7. Novel metabotropic glutamate receptor negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Toms, Nick J; Roberts, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Several excitatory amino acid ligands were found potently to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat cultured cerebellar astrocytes: L-cysteine sulfinic acid (L-CSA) = L-aspartate > L-glutamate >/= the glutamate uptake inhibitor, L-PDC. This property did not reflect activation of conventional glutamate receptors, since the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists NMDA, AMPA, and kainate, as well as several mGlu receptor agonists [(1S,3R)-ACPD, (S)-DHPG, DCG-IV, L-AP4, L-quisqualate, and L-CCG-I], were without activity. In addition, the mGlu receptor antagonists, L-AP3, (S)-4CPG, Eglu, LY341495, (RS)-CPPG, and (S)-MCPG failed to reverse 30 microM glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. L-PDC-mediated inhibition was abolished by the addition of the enzyme glutamate-pyruvate transaminase. This finding suggests that the effect of L-PDC is indirect and that it is mediated through endogenously released L-glutamate. Interestingly, L-glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses were resistant to pertussis toxin, suggesting that G(i)/G(o) type G proteins were not involved. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC, either via the selective PKC inhibitor GF109203X or chronic PMA treatment) augmented glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. Although mGlu3 receptors (which are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase) are expressed in astrocyte populations, in our study Western blot analysis indicated that this receptor type was not expressed in cerebellar astrocytes. We therefore suggest that cerebellar astrocytes express a novel mGlu receptor, which is negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and possesses an atypical pharmacological profile. PMID:14999808

  8. Adenylate kinases 1 and 2 are part of the accessory structures in the mouse sperm flagellum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenlei; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Gerton, George L; Moss, Stuart B

    2006-10-01

    Proper sperm function depends on adequate ATP levels. In the mammalian flagellum, ATP is generated in the midpiece by oxidative respiration and in the principal piece by glycolysis. In locations where ATP is rapidly utilized or produced, adenylate kinases (AKs) maintain a constant adenylate energy charge by interconverting stoichiometric amounts of ATP and AMP with two ADP molecules. We previously identified adenylate kinase 1 and 2 (AK1 and AK2) by mass spectrometry as part of a mouse SDS-insoluble flagellar preparation containing the accessory structures (fibrous sheath, outer dense fibers, and mitochondrial sheath). A germ cell-specific cDNA encoding AK1 was characterized and found to contain a truncated 3' UTR and a different 5' UTR compared to the somatic Ak1 mRNA; however, it encoded an identical protein. Ak1 mRNA was upregulated during late spermiogenesis, a time when the flagellum is being assembled. AK1 was first seen in condensing spermatids and was associated with the outer microtubular doublets and outer dense fibers of sperm. This localization would allow the interconversion of ATP and ADP between the fibrous sheath where ATP is produced by glycolysis and the axonemal dynein ATPases where ATP is consumed. Ak2 mRNA was expressed at relatively low levels throughout spermatogenesis, and the protein was localized to the mitochondrial sheath in the sperm midpiece. AK1 and AK2 in the flagellar accessory structures provide a mechanism to buffer the adenylate energy charge for sperm motility.

  9. Crystal structure of papaya glutaminyl cyclase, an archetype for plant and bacterial glutaminyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Wintjens, René; Belrhali, Hassan; Clantin, Bernard; Azarkan, Mohamed; Bompard, Coralie; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Looze, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent

    2006-03-24

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) (EC 2.3.2.5) catalyze the intramolecular cyclization of protein N-terminal glutamine residues into pyroglutamic acid with the concomitant liberation of ammonia. QCs may be classified in two groups containing, respectively, the mammalian enzymes, and the enzymes from plants, bacteria, and parasites. The crystal structure of the QC from the latex of Carica papaya (PQC) has been determined at 1.7A resolution. The structure was solved by the single wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur and zinc as anomalous scatterers. The enzyme folds into a five-bladed beta-propeller, with two additional alpha-helices and one beta hairpin. The propeller closure is achieved via an original molecular velcro, which links the last two blades into a large eight stranded beta-sheet. The zinc ion present in the PQC is bound via an octahedral coordination into an elongated cavity located along the pseudo 5-fold axis of the beta-propeller fold. This zinc ion presumably plays a structural role and may contribute to the exceptional stability of PQC, along with an extended hydrophobic packing, the absence of long loops, the three-joint molecular velcro and the overall folding itself. Multiple sequence alignments combined with structural analyses have allowed us to tentatively locate the active site, which is filled in the crystal structure either by a Tris molecule or an acetate ion. These analyses are further supported by the experimental evidence that Tris is a competitive inhibitor of PQC. The active site is located at the C-terminal entrance of the PQC central tunnel. W83, W110, W169, Q24, E69, N155, K225, F22 and F67 are highly conserved residues in the C-terminal entrance, and their putative role in catalysis is discussed. The PQC structure is representative of the plants, bacterial and parasite enzymes and contrasts with that of mammalian enzymes, that may possibly share a conserved scaffold of the bacterial aminopeptidase.

  10. Efficient synthesis of stably adenylated DNA and RNA adapters for microRNA capture using T4 RNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunke; Liu, Kelvin J; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA profiling methods have become increasingly important due to the rapid rise of microRNA in both basic and translational sciences. A critical step in many microRNA profiling assays is adapter ligation using pre-adenylated adapters. While pre-adenylated adapters can be chemically or enzymatically prepared, enzymatic adenylation is preferred due to its ease and high yield. However, previously reported enzymatic methods either require tedious purification steps or use thermostable ligases that can generate side products during the subsequent ligation step. We have developed a highly efficient, template- and purification-free, adapter adenylation method using T4 RNA ligase 1. This method is capable of adenylating large amounts of adapter at ~100% efficiency and can efficiently adenylate both DNA and RNA bases. We find that the adenylation reaction speed can differ between DNA and RNA and between terminal nucleotides, leading to bias if reactions are not allowed to run to completion. We further find that the addition of high PEG levels can effectively suppress these differences.

  11. Aging does not affect soluble guanylate cyclase redox state in mouse aortas.

    PubMed

    Shimosato, Takashi; Tawa, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hirotaka; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with endothelial dysfunction, defined as a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Although the redox state of the NO acceptor soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is another determinant factor for its bioavailability and is disturbed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) known to be increased with age, it is unclear whether aging actually has an impact on vascular sGC redox equilibrium. Therefore, this study investigated this issue using two different types of compounds, the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 and the sGC activator BAY 60-2770. Plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels were markedly higher in aged (19-20 months old) mice than in young (2-3 months old) mice, whereas superoxide levels in endothelium-denuded aortas were not different between the groups. The relaxant response of endothelium-denuded aortas to either BAY 41-2272 or BAY 60-2770 was identical in aged and young mice. In addition, the vascular cGMP production stimulated with BAY 41-2272 or BAY 60-2770 in aged mice was the same level as that in young mice. These findings suggest that aging accompanied by an increase in systemic oxidative stress does not affect vascular smooth muscle ROS generation and sGC redox equilibrium. Unless ROS are increased in vascular smooth muscle, the sGC redox equilibrium might remain unchanged.

  12. PKA-independent cAMP stimulation of white adipocyte exocytosis and adipokine secretion: modulations by Ca2+ and ATP.

    PubMed

    Komai, Ali M; Brännmark, Cecilia; Musovic, Saliha; Olofsson, Charlotta S

    2014-12-01

    We examined the effects of cAMP, Ca(2+) and ATP on exocytosis and adipokine release in white adipocytes by a combination of membrane capacitance patch-clamp recordings and biochemical measurements of adipokine secretion. 3T3-L1 adipocyte exocytosis proceeded even in the complete absence of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i; buffered with BAPTA) provided cAMP (0.1 mm) was included in the intracellular (pipette-filling) solution. Exocytosis typically plateaued within ∼10 min, probably signifying depletion of a releasable vesicle pool. Inclusion of 3 mm ATP in combination with elevation of [Ca(2+)]i to ≥700 nm augmented the rate of cAMP-evoked exocytosis ∼2-fold and exocytosis proceeded for longer periods (≥20 min) than with cAMP alone. Exocytosis was stimulated to a similar extent upon substitution of cAMP by the Epac (exchange proteins activated by cAMP) agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP (1 mm included in the pipette solution). Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by addition of Rp-cAMPS (0.5 mm) to the cAMP-containing pipette solution was without effect. A combination of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μm) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (200 μm; forsk-IBMX) augmented adiponectin secretion measured over 30 min 3-fold and 2-fold in 3T3-L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes, respectively. This effect was unaltered by pre-loading of cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and 2-fold amplified upon inclusion of the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 μm) in the extracellular solution. Adiponectin release was also stimulated by the membrane-permeable Epac agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM but unaffected by inclusion of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (200 μm). The adipokines leptin, resistin and apelin were present in low amounts in the incubation medium (1-6% of measured adiponectin). Adipsin was secreted in substantial quantities (50% of adiponectin concentration) but release of this adipokine was unaffected by forsk

  13. PKA-independent cAMP stimulation of white adipocyte exocytosis and adipokine secretion: modulations by Ca2+ and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Komai, Ali M; Brännmark, Cecilia; Musovic, Saliha; Olofsson, Charlotta S

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of cAMP, Ca2+ and ATP on exocytosis and adipokine release in white adipocytes by a combination of membrane capacitance patch-clamp recordings and biochemical measurements of adipokine secretion. 3T3-L1 adipocyte exocytosis proceeded even in the complete absence of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i; buffered with BAPTA) provided cAMP (0.1 mm) was included in the intracellular (pipette-filling) solution. Exocytosis typically plateaued within ∼10 min, probably signifying depletion of a releasable vesicle pool. Inclusion of 3 mm ATP in combination with elevation of [Ca2+]i to ≥700 nm augmented the rate of cAMP-evoked exocytosis ∼2-fold and exocytosis proceeded for longer periods (≥20 min) than with cAMP alone. Exocytosis was stimulated to a similar extent upon substitution of cAMP by the Epac (exchange proteins activated by cAMP) agonist 8-Br-2′-O-Me-cAMP (1 mm included in the pipette solution). Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by addition of Rp-cAMPS (0.5 mm) to the cAMP-containing pipette solution was without effect. A combination of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μm) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (200 μm; forsk–IBMX) augmented adiponectin secretion measured over 30 min 3-fold and 2-fold in 3T3-L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes, respectively. This effect was unaltered by pre-loading of cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM and 2-fold amplified upon inclusion of the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 μm) in the extracellular solution. Adiponectin release was also stimulated by the membrane-permeable Epac agonist 8-Br-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM but unaffected by inclusion of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (200 μm). The adipokines leptin, resistin and apelin were present in low amounts in the incubation medium (1–6% of measured adiponectin). Adipsin was secreted in substantial quantities (50% of adiponectin concentration) but release of this adipokine was unaffected by forsk–IBMX. We

  14. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  15. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  16. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L.; Barron, Megan E.; Roa, Jinae N.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3−, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3− sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3−-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H+ absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  17. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  18. A new small molecule inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Filipa; Gane, Paul; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Allerston, Charles K.; Garthwaite, John; Selwood, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a haem containing enzyme that regulates cardiovascular homeostasis and multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system. Commonly used inhibitors of sGC activity act through oxidation of the haem moiety, however they also bind haemoglobin and this limits their bioavailability for in vivo studies. We have discovered a new class of small molecule inhibitors of sGC and have characterised a compound designated D12 (compound 10) which binds to the catalytic domain of the enzyme with a KD of 11 μM in a SPR assay. PMID:26264842

  19. Expression of a fungal sesquiterpene cyclase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hohn, T M; Ohlrogge, J B

    1991-09-01

    The complete coding sequence for the trichodiene synthase gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the regulation of the cauliflower mosiac virus 35S promoter. Expression of trichodiene synthase was demonstrated in the leaves of transformed plants. Leaf homogenates incubated with [(3)H]farnesyl pyrophosphate produced trichodiene as a major product. Trichodiene was detected in the leaves of a transformed plant at a level of 5 to 10 nanograms per gram fresh weight. The introduction of a fungal sesquiterpene cyclase gene into tobacco has resulted in the expression of an active enzyme and the accumulation of low levels of its sesquiterpenoid product. PMID:16668409

  20. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  1. Cloning and expression of a second photoreceptor-specific membrane retina guanylyl cyclase (RetGC), RetGC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D G; Dizhoor, A M; Liu, K; Gu, Q; Spencer, M; Laura, R; Lu, L; Hurley, J B

    1995-01-01

    One of the membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), RetGC, is expressed predominantly in photoreceptors. No extracellular ligand has been described for RetGC, but it is sensitive to activation by a soluble 24-kDa protein (p24) and is inhibited by Ca2+. This enzyme is, therefore, thought to play a role in resynthesizing cGMP for photoreceptor recovery or adaptation. By screening a human retinal cDNA library at low stringency with the cytoplasmic domains from four cyclases, we cloned cDNAs encoding a membrane CG that is most closely related to RetGC. We have named this GC RetGC-2, and now term the initially described RetGC RetGC-1. By in situ hybridization, mRNA encoding RetGC-2 is found only in the outer nuclear layer and inner segments of photoreceptor cells. By using synthetic peptide antiserum specific for each RetGC subtype, RetGC-2 can be distinguished from RetGC-1 as a slightly smaller protein in immunoblots of bovine rod outer segments. Membrane GC activity of recombinant RetGC-2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells is stimulated by the activator p24 and is inhibited by Ca2+ with an EC50 value of 50-100 nM. Our data reveal a previously unappreciated diversity of photoreceptor GCs. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777544

  2. Origin of asymmetry in adenylyl cyclases: structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1900c.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Wetterer, Martina; Sprang, Stephen R; Schultz, Joachim E; Linder, Jürgen U

    2005-02-23

    Rv1900c, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylyl cyclase, is composed of an N-terminal alpha/beta-hydrolase domain and a C-terminal cyclase homology domain. It has an unusual 7% guanylyl cyclase side-activity. A canonical substrate-defining lysine and a catalytic asparagine indispensable for mammalian adenylyl cyclase activity correspond to N342 and H402 in Rv1900c. Mutagenic analysis indicates that these residues are dispensable for activity of Rv1900c. Structures of the cyclase homology domain, solved to 2.4 A both with and without an ATP analog, form isologous, but asymmetric homodimers. The noncanonical N342 and H402 do not interact with the substrate. Subunits of the unliganded open dimer move substantially upon binding substrate, forming a closed dimer similar to the mammalian cyclase heterodimers, in which one interfacial active site is occupied and the quasi-dyad-related active site is occluded. This asymmetry indicates that both active sites cannot simultaneously be catalytically active. Such a mechanism of half-of-sites-reactivity suggests that mammalian heterodimeric adenylyl cyclases may have evolved from gene duplication of a primitive prokaryote-type cyclase, followed by loss of function in one active site. PMID:15678099

  3. Key Role of the Adenylate Moiety and Integrity of the Adenylate-Binding Site for the NAD(+)/H Binding to Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Calogero, Alessandra Maria; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein with pro-life and pro-death activities, which plays critical roles in mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent apoptosis. Defects in AIF structure or expression can cause mitochondrial abnormalities leading to mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration. The mechanism of AIF-induced apoptosis was extensively investigated, whereas the mitochondrial function of AIF is poorly understood. A unique feature of AIF is the ability to form a tight, air-stable charge-transfer (CT) complex upon reaction with NADH and to undergo a conformational switch leading to dimerization, proposed to be important for its vital and lethal functions. Although some aspects of interaction of AIF with NAD(+)/H have been analyzed, its precise mechanism is not fully understood. We investigated how the oxidized and photoreduced wild-type and G307A and -E variants of murine AIF associate with NAD(+)/H and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN(+)/H) to determine the role of the adenylate moiety in the binding process. Our results indicate that (i) the adenylate moiety of NAD(+)/H is crucial for the association with AIF and for the subsequent structural reorganization of the complex, but not for protein dimerization, (ii) FAD reduction rather than binding of NAD(+)/H to AIF initiates conformational rearrangement, and (iii) alteration of the adenylate-binding site by the G307E (equivalent to a pathological G308E mutation in human AIF) or G307A replacements decrease the affinity and association rate of NAD(+)/H, which, in turn, perturbs CT complex formation and protein dimerization but has no influence on the conformational switch in the regulatory peptide.

  4. Inhibition of vaccinia mRNA methylation by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, O.K.; Goswami, B.B.

    1981-04-01

    Extracts of interferon-treated cells synthesize unique 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-phosphates in the presence of ATP and double-stranded RNA. 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-triphosphate inhibits protein synthesis at nanomolar concentrations by activating RNase. We have observed that oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-monophosphate and 5'-triphosphate are potent inhibitors of vaccinia mRNA methylation in vitro. Both the methylation of the 5'-terminal guanine at the 7 position and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of the penultimate nucleoside are inhibited. Such inhibition of mRNA methylation is not due to degradation of the mRNA. Inhibition of the requisite modification of the 5' terminus of mRNA by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acids) may be a mechanism of interferon action against both DNA and RNA viruses in which mRNAs derived from them are capped.

  5. Block by gabapentin of the facilitation of glutamate release from rat trigeminal nucleus following activation of protein kinase C or adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Maneuf, Yannick P; McKnight, Alexander T

    2001-01-01

    The effect of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) or adenylyl cyclase on release of glutamate has been investigated in a perfused slice preparation from the rat caudal trigeminal nucleus. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) produced a concentration-dependent increase in K+-evoked release of [2H]-glutamate (maximum increase 45%, EC50 11.8 nM), but in the presence of gabapentin (30 μM) the facilitation of release was blocked. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin (FSK) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate (maximum increase 36%, EC50 2.4 μM), and again this facilitatory effect was blocked by gabapentin (30 μM). We suggest that these results may be of relevance to the antihyperalgesic properties of gabapentin, in conditions where concomitant release of substance P and CGRP produces activation of PKC and adenylyl cyclase respectively. PMID:11564640

  6. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  7. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  8. Crystallization of the class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Natasha; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Prasad T.; Gallagher, D. Travis

    2006-03-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Y. pestis has been crystallized in an orthorhombic form suitable for structure determination. The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been cloned and crystallized in both a triclinic and an orthorhombic form. An amino-terminal His-tagged construct, from which the tag was removed by thrombin, crystallized in a triclinic form diffracting to 1.9 Å, with one dimer per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 33.5, b = 35.5, c = 71.8 Å, α = 88.7, β = 82.5, γ = 65.5°. Several mutants of this construct crystallized but diffracted poorly. A non-His-tagged native construct (179 amino acids, MW = 20.5 kDa) was purified by conventional chromatography and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 118.6, c = 144.5 Å, diffract to 3 Å and probably have two dimers per asymmetric unit and V{sub M} = 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Both crystal forms appear to require pH below 5, complicating attempts to incorporate nucleotide ligands into the structure. The native construct has been produced as a selenomethionine derivative and crystallized for phasing and structure determination.

  9. Structural analysis of an oxygen-regulated diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger that is involved in switching between motile and sessile lifestyles. Given the medical importance of biofilm formation, there has been increasing interest in understanding the synthesis and degradation of cyclic di-GMPs and their regulation in various bacterial pathogens. Environmental cues are detected by sensing domains coupled to GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains that have diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively, producing and degrading cyclic di-GMP. The Escherichia coli protein DosC (also known as YddV) consists of an oxygen-sensing domain belonging to the class of globin sensors that is coupled to a C-terminal GGDEF domain via a previously uncharacterized middle domain. DosC is one of the most strongly expressed GGDEF proteins in E. coli, but to date structural information on this and related proteins is scarce. Here, the high-resolution structural characterization of the oxygen-sensing globin domain, the middle domain and the catalytic GGDEF domain in apo and substrate-bound forms is described. The structural changes between the iron(III) and iron(II) forms of the sensor globin domain suggest a mechanism for oxygen-dependent regulation. The structural information on the individual domains is combined into a model of the dimeric DosC holoprotein. These findings have direct implications for the oxygen-dependent regulation of the activity of the cyclase domain.

  10. Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-C gene leads to a paradoxical phenotype of viable but heat-stable enterotoxin-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S; Lopez, M J; Kuhn, M; Garbers, D L

    1997-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STa), which cause an acute secretory diarrhea, have been suggested to mediate their actions through the guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C) receptor. The GC-C gene was disrupted by insertion of neo into exon 1 and subsequent homologous recombination. GC-C null mice contained no detectable GC-C protein. Intestine mucosal guanylyl cyclase activity was approximately 16-fold higher in wild-type mice than in the GC-C null mice, and STa-stimulable guanylyl cyclase activity was absent in the null animals. Thus, GC-C is the major cyclase activity present in the intestine, and also completely accounts for the STa-induced elevations of cGMP. Gavage with STa resulted in marked fluid accumulation within the intestine of wild-type and heterozygous suckling mice, but GC-C null animals were resistant. In addition, infection with enterotoxigenic bacteria that produce STa led to diarrhea and death in wild-type and heterozygous mice, while the null mice were protected. Cholera toxin, in contrast, continued to cause diarrhea in GC-C null mice, demonstrating that the cAMP signaling pathway remained intact. Markedly different diets (high carbohydrate, fat, or protein) or the inclusion of high salt (K+, Na+) in the drinking water or diet also did not severely affect the null animals. Given that GC-C is a major intestinal receptor in all mammals, the pressure to retain a functional GC-C in the face of diarrhea-inflicted mortality remains unexplained. Therefore, GC-C likely provides a protective effect against stressors not yet tested, possibly pathogens other than noninvasive enterotoxigenic bacteria. PMID:9294128

  11. Multiforms of mammalian adenylate kinase and its monoclonal antibody against AK1.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Y; Takenaka, H; Sumida, M; Oka, K; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1990-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the intracellular distribution of the multiforms of the adenylate kinase (AK) isoenzymes in mammalian tissues, to shed some light on their physiological roles, especially in energy metabolism. The adenylate kinase zymograms obtained from isoelectric focusing yielded two typical isoform patterns: (1) with a pI greater than or equal to 9 and 8.6, specific for bovine skeletal muscle, heart, aorta and brain, and (2) with a pI = 7.9 and 7.1, specific for liver and kidney. Pattern (1) was attributed to the cytosolic isoenzyme (AK1) as demonstrated by immunostaining with anti-AK1. Pattern (2) was attributed to the mitochondrial isoenzyme (AK2). These results were largely confirmed by chromatofocusing experiments. The AK1 isoenzyme was partially purified from the cytosol fraction of bovine aortic smooth muscle and had an apparent Mr of 23.5 kilodaltons. Its kinetic features are discussed from a comparative standpoint. Finally, the human serum AK1 isoform was also detected by Western blotting with a monoclonal antibody directed against crystalline porcine muscle AK1. These results are to form the basis of further studies on the 'aberrant' adenylate kinase isoenzyme from the serum of Duchenne muscular dystrophics.

  12. Adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for growth through its catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Thach, Trung Thanh; Luong, Truc Thanh; Lee, Sangho; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) infection causes more than 1.6 million deaths worldwide. Pneumococcal growth is a prerequisite for its virulence and requires an appropriate supply of cellular energy. Adenylate kinases constitute a major family of enzymes that regulate cellular ATP levels. Some bacterial adenylate kinases (AdKs) are known to be critical for growth, but the physiological effects of AdKs in pneumococci have been poorly understood at the molecular level. Here, by crystallographic and functional studies, we report that the catalytic activity of adenylate kinase from S.pneumoniae (SpAdK) serotype 2 D39 is essential for growth. We determined the crystal structure of SpAdK in two conformations: ligand-free open form and closed in complex with a two-substrate mimic inhibitor adenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A). Crystallographic analysis of SpAdK reveals Arg-89 as a key active site residue. We generated a conditional expression mutant of pneumococcus in which the expression of the adk gene is tightly regulated by fucose. The expression level of adk correlates with growth rate. Expression of the wild-type adk gene in fucose-inducible strains rescued a growth defect, but expression of the Arg-89 mutation did not. SpAdK increased total cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, lack of functional SpAdK caused a growth defect in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SpAdK is essential for pneumococcal growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25180151

  13. GMP reductase and genetic uncoupling of adenylate and guanylate metabolism in Leishmania donovani parasites.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-08-01

    Purine acquisition is an essential nutritional process for Leishmania. Although purine salvage into adenylate nucleotides has been investigated in detail, little attention has been focused on the guanylate branch of the purine pathway. To characterize guanylate nucleotide metabolism in Leishmania and create a cell culture model in which the pathways for adenylate and guanylate nucleotide synthesis can be genetically uncoupled for functional studies in intact cells, we created and characterized null mutants of L. donovani that were deficient in either GMP reductase alone (Δgmpr) or in both GMP reductase and its paralog IMP dehydrogenase (Δgmpr/Δimpdh). Whereas wild type parasites were capable of utilizing virtually any purine nucleobase/nucleoside, the Δgmpr and Δgmpr/Δimpdh null lines exhibited highly restricted growth phenotypes. The Δgmpr single mutant could not grow in xanthine, guanine, or their corresponding nucleosides, while no purine on its own could support the growth of Δgmpr/Δimpdh cells. Permissive growth conditions for the Δgmpr/Δimpdh necessitated both xanthine, guanine, or the corresponding nucleosides, and additionally, a second purine that could serve as a source for adenylate nucleotide synthesis. Interestingly, GMPR, like its paralog IMPDH, is compartmentalized to the leishmanial glycosome, a process mediated by its COOH-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. The restricted growth phenotypes displayed by the L. donovani Δgmpr and Δgmpr/Δimpdh null mutants confirms the importance of GMPR in the purine interconversion processes of this parasite.

  14. A Chemoattractant-mediated Gi-coupled Pathway Activates Adenylyl Cyclase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeo, Dana C.; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Smoot, Rory L.; Roselova, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophils and Dictyostelium use conserved signal transduction pathways to decipher chemoattractant gradients and migrate directionally. In both cell types, addition of chemoattractants stimulates the production of cAMP, which has been suggested to regulate chemotaxis. We set out to define the mechanism by which chemoattractants increase cAMP levels in human neutrophils. We show that chemoattractants elicit a rapid and transient activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). This activation is sensitive to pertussis toxin treatment but independent of phosphoinositide-3 kinase activity and an intact cytoskeleton. Remarkably, and in sharp contrast to Gαs-mediated activation, chemoattractant-induced AC activation is lost in cell lysates. Of the nine, differentially regulated transmembrane AC isoforms in the human genome, we find that isoforms III, IV, VII, and IX are expressed in human neutrophils. We conclude that the signal transduction cascade used by chemoattractants to activate AC is conserved in Dictyostelium and human neutrophils and is markedly different from the canonical Gαs-meditated pathway. PMID:17135293

  15. NO and CO Differentially Activate Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase via a Heme Pivot-bend Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,X.; Sayed, N.; Beuve, A.; van den Akker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Diatomic ligand discrimination by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is paramount to cardiovascular homeostasis and neuronal signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates sGC activity 200-fold compared with only four-fold by carbon monoxide (CO). The molecular details of ligand discrimination and differential response to NO and CO are not well understood. These ligands are sensed by the heme domain of sGC, which belongs to the heme nitric oxide oxygen (H-NOX) domain family, also evolutionarily conserved in prokaryotes. Here we report crystal structures of the free, NO-bound, and CO-bound H-NOX domains of a cyanobacterial homolog. These structures and complementary mutational analysis in sGC reveal a molecular ruler mechanism that allows sGC to favor NO over CO while excluding oxygen, concomitant to signaling that exploits differential heme pivoting and heme bending. The heme thereby serves as a flexing wedge, allowing the N-terminal subdomain of H-NOX to shift concurrent with the transition of the six- to five-coordinated NO-bound state upon sGC activation. This transition can be modulated by mutations at sGC residues 74 and 145 and corresponding residues in the cyanobacterial H-NOX homolog.

  16. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  17. Soluble guanylate cyclase as an alternative target for bronchodilator therapy in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Koziol-White, Cynthia J.; Asosingh, Kewal; Cheng, Georgina; Ruple, Lisa; Groneberg, Dieter; Friebe, Andreas; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Aronica, Mark A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is defined by airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, and contributes to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although bronchodilation is a cornerstone of treatment, current bronchodilators become ineffective with worsening asthma severity. We investigated an alternative pathway that involves activating the airway smooth muscle enzyme, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Activating sGC by its natural stimulant nitric oxide (NO), or by pharmacologic sGC agonists BAY 41–2272 and BAY 60–2770, triggered bronchodilation in normal human lung slices and in mouse airways. Both BAY 41–2272 and BAY 60–2770 reversed airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic asthma and restored normal lung function. The sGC from mouse asthmatic lungs displayed three hallmarks of oxidative damage that render it NO-insensitive, and identical changes to sGC occurred in human lung slices or in human airway smooth muscle cells when given chronic NO exposure to mimic the high NO in asthmatic lung. Our findings show how allergic inflammation in asthma may impede NO-based bronchodilation, and reveal that pharmacologic sGC agonists can achieve bronchodilation despite this loss. PMID:27071111

  18. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase: A new therapeutic target for pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, Asish; Bowman, Lindsay; D’Arsigny, Christine L.; Archer, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by binding its prosthetic heme group, thereby catalyzing cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis. cGMP causes vasodilation and may inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelet aggregation. The NO-sGC-cGMP pathway is disordered in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a syndrome in which pulmonary vascular obstruction, inflammation, thrombosis, and constriction ultimately lead to death from right heart failure. Expression of sGC is increased in PAH but its function is reduced by decreased NO bioavailability, sGC oxidation and the related loss of sGC’s heme group. Two classes of sGC modulators offer promise in PAH. sGC stimulators (e.g. riociguat) require heme-containing sGC to catalyze cGMP production, whereas sGC activators (e.g. cinaciguat) activate heme-free sGC. Riociguat is approved for PAH and yields functional and hemodynamic benefits similar to other therapies. Its main serious adverse effect is dose-dependent hypotension Riociguat is also approved for inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25670386

  19. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  20. DIFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED ADENYLYL CYCLASE ISOFORMS MEDIATE SECRETORY FUNCTIONS IN CHOLANGIOCYTE SUBPOPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, Mario; Fiorotto, Romina; Melero, Saida; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Spirlì, Carlo; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    cAMP is generated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) a group of enzymes with different tissue specificity and regulation. We hypothesized that AC isoforms are heterogeneously expressed along the biliary tree, are associated with specific secretory stimuli and are differentially modulated in cholestasis. Methods: Small (SDC) and large (LDC) cholangiocytes were isolated from controls and from lipopolysaccharide-treated (LPS) or α-naphthylisothiocyanate-treated (ANIT) rats. ACs isoforms expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Secretion and cAMP levels were measured in intrahepatic bile duct units after stimulation with secretin, forskolin, HCO3−/CO2, cholinergic and β-adrenergic agonists, with or without selected inhibitors or after silencing of AC8 or sAC with siRNA. Results: Gene expression of the Ca2+-insensitive isoforms (AC4, AC7) was higher in SDC, while that of the Ca2+-inhibitable (AC5, AC6, AC9), the Ca2+/calmodulin stimulated AC8, and the soluble sAC, was higher in LDC. Ca2+/calmodulin-inhibitors and AC8 gene silencing inhibited choleresis and cAMP production stimulated by secretin and acetylcholine, but not by forskolin. Secretion stimulated by isoproterenol and calcineurin-inibitors was cAMP-dependent and GABA-inhibitable, consistent with activation of AC9. Cholangiocyte secretion stimulated by isohydric changes in [HCO3−]i, was cAMP-dependent and inhibited by sAC-inhibitior and by sAC gene silencing. Treatment with LPS or ANIT increased expression of AC7 and sAC, while decreasing that of the others ACs. Conclusion: These studies demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of AC in biliary pathophysiology. In fact: 1) ACs isoforms are differentially expressed in cholangiocyte subpopulations, 2) AC8, AC9, and sAC mediate cholangiocyte secretion in response to secretin, β-adrenergic agonists, or changes in [HCO3−]i, respectively, 3) ACs gene expression is modulated in experimental cholestasis. PMID:19444869

  1. YC-1 binding to the β subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase overcomes allosteric inhibition by the α subunit.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rahul; Fritz, Bradley G; The, Juliana; Issaian, Aaron; Weichsel, Andrzej; David, Cynthia L; Campbell, Eric; Hausrath, Andrew C; Rassouli-Taylor, Leida; Garcin, Elsa D; Gage, Matthew J; Montfort, William R

    2014-01-14

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein and the primary nitric oxide receptor. NO binding stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and making sGC an attractive target for drug discovery. YC-1 and related compounds stimulate sGC both independently and synergistically with NO and CO binding; however, where the compounds bind and how they work remain unknown. Using linked equilibrium binding measurements, surface plasmon resonance, and domain truncations in Manduca sexta and bovine sGC, we demonstrate that YC-1 binds near or directly to the heme-containing domain of the β subunit. In the absence of CO, YC-1 binds with a Kd of 9-21 μM, depending on the construct. In the presence of CO, these values decrease to 0.6-1.1 μM. Pfizer compound 25 bound ∼10-fold weaker than YC-1 in the absence of CO, whereas compound BAY 41-2272 bound particularly tightly in the presence of CO (Kd = 30-90 nM). Additionally, we found that CO binds much more weakly to heterodimeric sGC proteins (Kd = 50-100 μM) than to the isolated heme domain (Kd = 0.2 μM for Manduca β H-NOX/PAS). YC-1 greatly enhanced binding of CO to heterodimeric sGC, as expected (Kd ∼ 1 μM). These data indicate the α subunit induces a heme pocket conformation with a lower affinity for CO and NO. YC-1 family compounds bind near the heme domain, overcoming the α subunit effect and inducing a heme pocket conformation with high affinity. We propose this high-affinity conformation is required for the full-length protein to achieve high catalytic activity.

  2. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors. PMID:11533056

  3. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors.

  4. Product identification and adenylyl cyclase activity in chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Witters, Erwin; Quanten, Lieve; Bloemen, Jo; Valcke, Roland; Van Onckelen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    In view of the ongoing debate on plant cyclic nucleotide metabolism, especially the functional presence of adenylyl cyclase, a novel detection method has been worked out to quantify the reaction product. Using uniformly labelled (15)N-ATP as a substrate for adenylyl cyclase, a qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed to measure de novo formed (15)N-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. Adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in chloroplasts obtained from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana and the kinetic parameters and influence of various metabolic effectors are discussed in their context.

  5. Isoglutaminyl cyclase contributes to CCL2-driven neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Waniek, Alexander; Meissner, Juliane; Morawski, Markus; Schilling, Stephan; Jäger, Carsten; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Cynis, Holger; Kehlen, Astrid; Arendt, Thomas; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Rossner, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are characterized by deposits of Abeta peptides and by accompanying chronic inflammation. Here, we provide evidence that the enzyme isoglutaminyl cyclase (isoQC) is a novel factor contributing to both aspects of AD pathology. Two putative substrates of isoQC, N-truncated Abeta peptides and the monocyte chemoattractant chemokine CCL2, undergo isoQC-catalyzed pyroglutamate (pGlu) modification. This triggers Abeta aggregation and facilitates the biological activity of CCL2, which collectively results in the formation of high molecular weight Abeta aggregates, glial cell activation, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. In mouse brain, we found isoQC to be neuron-specifically expressed in neocortical, hippocampal and subcortical structures, localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus as well as co-expressed with its substrate CCL2. In aged APP transgenic Tg2576 mice, both isoQC and CCL2 mRNA levels are up-regulated and isoQC and CCL2 proteins were found to be co-induced in Abeta plaque-associated reactive astrocytes. Also, in mouse primary astrocyte culture, a simultaneous up-regulation of isoQC and CCL2 expression was revealed upon Abeta and pGlu-Abeta stimulation. In brains of AD patients, the expression of isoQC and CCL2 mRNA and protein is up-regulated compared to controls and correlates with pGlu-Abeta load and with the decline in mini-mental state examination. Our observations provide evidence for a dual involvement of isoQC in AD pathogenesis by catalysis of pGlu-Abeta and pGlu-CCL2 formation which mutually stimulate inflammatory events and affect cognition. We conclude that isoQC inhibition may target both major pathological events in the development of AD. PMID:25666182

  6. Tetrahydrobiopterin protects soluble guanylate cyclase against oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kurt; Neubauer, Andrea; Kolesnik, Bernd; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Werner, Ernst R; Gorren, Antonius C F; Mayer, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a major endogenous vasoprotective agent that improves endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and scavenging of superoxide and peroxynitrite. Therefore, administration of BH4 is considered a promising therapy for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Here we report on a novel function of BH4 that might contribute to the beneficial vascular effects of the pteridine. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with nitroglycerin (GTN) or 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) resulted in heme oxidation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as evident from diminished NO-induced cGMP accumulation that was paralleled by increased cGMP response to a heme- and NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase [4-([(4-carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-([4'-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy)phenyl)ethyl]amino]methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770)]. Whereas scavenging of superoxide and/or peroxynitrite with superoxide dismutase, tiron, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin, and urate had no protective effects, supplementation of the cells with BH4, either by application of BH4 directly or of its precursors dihydrobiopterin or sepiapterin, completely prevented the inhibition of NO-induced cGMP accumulation by GTN and ODQ. Tetrahydroneopterin had the same effect, and virtually identical results were obtained with RFL-6 fibroblasts, suggesting that our observation reflects a general feature of tetrahydropteridines that is unrelated to NO synthase function and not limited to endothelial cells. Protection of sGC against oxidative inactivation may contribute to the known beneficial effects of BH4 in cardiovascular disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:22648973

  7. Effect of 3' terminal adenylic acid residue on the uridylation of human small RNAs in vitro and in frog oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Sinha, K; Perumal, K; Reddy, R

    2000-01-01

    It is known that several small RNAs including human and Xenopus signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 7SK RNAs are posttranscriptionally adenylated, whereas U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA are posttranscriptionally uridylated on their 3' ends. In this study, we provide evidence that a small fraction of U6 snRNA and 5S ribosomal RNA molecules from human as well as Xenopus oocytes contain a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends. These data show that U6 snRNA and 5S rRNAs are posttranscriptionally modified on their 3' ends by both uridylation and adenylation. Although the SRP RNA, 7SK RNA, 5S RNA, and U6 snRNA with the uridylic acid residue on their 3' ends were readily uridylated, all these RNAs with posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends were not uridylated in vitro, or when U6 snRNA with 3' A(OH) was injected into Xenopus oocytes. These results show that the presence of a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on the 3' end of SRP RNA, U6 snRNA, 5S rRNA, or 7SK RNA prevents 3' uridylation. These data also show that adenylation and uridylation are two competing processes that add nucleotides on the 3' end of some small RNAs and suggest that one of the functions of the 3' adenylation may be to negatively affect the 3' uridylation of small RNAs. PMID:10999605

  8. Structural Basis of the Interaction of MbtH-like Proteins, Putative Regulators of Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis, with Adenylating Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Dominik A.; Boll, Björn; Zocher, Georg; Stehle, Thilo; Heide, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of nonribosomally formed peptides (NRPs), which include important antibiotics such as vancomycin, requires the activation of amino acids through adenylate formation. The biosynthetic gene clusters of NRPs frequently contain genes for small, so-called MbtH-like proteins. Recently, it was discovered that these MbtH-like proteins are required for some of the adenylation reactions in NRP biosynthesis, but the mechanism of their interaction with the adenylating enzymes has remained unknown. In this study, we determined the structure of SlgN1, a 3-methylaspartate-adenylating enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the hybrid polyketide/NRP antibiotic streptolydigin. SlgN1 contains an MbtH-like domain at its N terminus, and our analysis defines the parameters required for an interaction between MbtH-like domains and an adenylating enzyme. Highly conserved tryptophan residues of the MbtH-like domain critically contribute to this interaction. Trp-25 and Trp-35 form a cleft on the surface of the MbtH-like domain, which accommodates the alanine side chain of Ala-433 of the adenylating domain. Mutation of Ala-433 to glutamate abolished the activity of SlgN1. Mutation of Ser-23 of the MbtH-like domain to tyrosine resulted in strongly reduced activity. However, the activity of this S23Y mutant could be completely restored by addition of the intact MbtH-like protein CloY from another organism. This suggests that the interface found in the structure of SlgN1 is the genuine interface between MbtH-like proteins and adenylating enzymes. PMID:23192349

  9. Structural basis of the interaction of MbtH-like proteins, putative regulators of nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis, with adenylating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Dominik A; Boll, Björn; Zocher, Georg; Stehle, Thilo; Heide, Lutz

    2013-01-18

    The biosynthesis of nonribosomally formed peptides (NRPs), which include important antibiotics such as vancomycin, requires the activation of amino acids through adenylate formation. The biosynthetic gene clusters of NRPs frequently contain genes for small, so-called MbtH-like proteins. Recently, it was discovered that these MbtH-like proteins are required for some of the adenylation reactions in NRP biosynthesis, but the mechanism of their interaction with the adenylating enzymes has remained unknown. In this study, we determined the structure of SlgN1, a 3-methylaspartate-adenylating enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the hybrid polyketide/NRP antibiotic streptolydigin. SlgN1 contains an MbtH-like domain at its N terminus, and our analysis defines the parameters required for an interaction between MbtH-like domains and an adenylating enzyme. Highly conserved tryptophan residues of the MbtH-like domain critically contribute to this interaction. Trp-25 and Trp-35 form a cleft on the surface of the MbtH-like domain, which accommodates the alanine side chain of Ala-433 of the adenylating domain. Mutation of Ala-433 to glutamate abolished the activity of SlgN1. Mutation of Ser-23 of the MbtH-like domain to tyrosine resulted in strongly reduced activity. However, the activity of this S23Y mutant could be completely restored by addition of the intact MbtH-like protein CloY from another organism. This suggests that the interface found in the structure of SlgN1 is the genuine interface between MbtH-like proteins and adenylating enzymes.

  10. Stimulation of Hippocampal Adenylyl Cyclase Activity Dissociates Memory Consolidation Processes for Response and Place Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Guillaume; Millard, Annabelle; Jaffard, Robert; Guillou, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Procedural and declarative memory systems are postulated to interact in either a synergistic or a competitive manner, and memory consolidation appears to be a highly critical stage for this process. However, the precise cellular mechanisms subserving these interactions remain unknown. To investigate this issue, 24-h retention performances were…

  11. Mechanism of MenE inhibition by acyl-adenylate analogues and discovery of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Matarlo, Joe S; Evans, Christopher E; Sharma, Indrajeet; Lavaud, Lubens J; Ngo, Stephen C; Shek, Roger; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; French, Jarrod B; Tan, Derek S; Tonge, Peter J

    2015-10-27

    MenE is an o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase in the bacterial menaquinone biosynthesis pathway and is a promising target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. The enzyme catalyzes CoA ligation via an acyl-adenylate intermediate, and we have previously reported tight-binding inhibitors of MenE based on stable acyl-sulfonyladenosine analogues of this intermediate, including OSB-AMS (1), which has an IC50 value of ≤25 nM for Escherichia coli MenE. Herein, we show that OSB-AMS reduces menaquinone levels in Staphylococcus aureus, consistent with its proposed mechanism of action, despite the observation that the antibacterial activity of OSB-AMS is ∼1000-fold lower than the IC50 for enzyme inhibition. To inform the synthesis of MenE inhibitors with improved antibacterial activity, we have undertaken a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study stimulated by the knowledge that OSB-AMS can adopt two isomeric forms in which the OSB side chain exists either as an open-chain keto acid or a cyclic lactol. These studies revealed that negatively charged analogues of the keto acid form bind, while neutral analogues do not, consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively charged keto acid form of OSB-AMS is the active isomer. X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis confirm the importance of a conserved arginine for binding the OSB carboxylate. Although most lactol isomers tested were inactive, a novel difluoroindanediol inhibitor (11) with improved antibacterial activity was discovered, providing a pathway toward the development of optimized MenE inhibitors in the future.

  12. Effects of 39 Compounds on Calmodulin-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclases AC1 and Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP into the second messenger cAMP. Membranous AC1 (AC1) is involved in processes of memory and learning and in muscle pain. The AC toxin edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is involved in the development of anthrax. Both ACs are stimulated by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM). The CaM-AC interaction could constitute a potential target to enhance or impair the AC activity of AC1 and EF to intervene in above (patho)physiological mechanisms. Thus, we analyzed the impact of 39 compounds including typical CaM-inhibitors, an anticonvulsant, an anticholinergic, antidepressants, antipsychotics and Ca2+-antagonists on CaM-stimulated catalytic activity of AC1 and EF. Compounds were tested at 10 μM, i.e., a concentration that can be reached therapeutically for certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Calmidazolium chloride decreased CaM-stimulated AC1 activity moderately by about 30%. In contrast, CaM-stimulated EF activity was abrogated by calmidazolium chloride and additionally decreased by chlorpromazine, felodipine, penfluridol and trifluoperazine by about 20–40%. The activity of both ACs was decreased by calmidazolium chloride in the presence and absence of CaM. Thus, CaM-stimulated AC1 activity is more insensitive to inhibition by small molecules than CaM-stimulated EF activity. Inhibition of AC1 and EF by calmidazolium chloride is largely mediated via a CaM-independent allosteric mechanism. PMID:25946093

  13. Purification and characterization of recombinant human soluble guanylate cyclase produced from baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Thomas L; Mathis, Karl J; Shuck, Mary E; Reitz, Beverly A; Curran, Daniel F; Walker, Mark C; Leone, Joseph W; Day, Jacqueline E; Bienkowski, Michael J; Fischer, H David; Tomasselli, Alfredo G

    2009-06-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) has been purified from 100 L cell culture infected by baculovirus using the newer and highly effective titerless infected-cells preservation and scale-up (TIPS) method. Successive passage of the enzyme through DEAE, Ni(2+)-NTA, and POROS Q columns obtained approximately 100mg of protein. The sGC obtained by this procedure was already about 90% pure and suitable for various studies which include high throughput screening (HTS) and hit follow-up. However, in order to obtain enzyme of greater homogeneity and purity for crystallographic and high precision spectroscopic and kinetic studies of sGC with select stimulators, the sGC solution after the POROS Q step was further purified by GTP-agarose affinity chromatography. This additional step led to the generation of 26 mg of enzyme that was about 99% pure. This highly pure and active enzyme exhibited a M(r)=144,933 by static light scattering supportive of a dimeric structure. It migrated as a two-band protein, each of equal intensity, on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the alpha (M(r) approximately 77,000) and beta (M(r) approximately 70,000) sGC subunits. It showed an A(430)/A(280)=1.01, indicating one heme per heterodimer, and a maximum of the Soret band at 430 nm indicative of a penta-coordinated ferrous heme with a histidine as the axial ligand. The Soret band shifted to 398 nm in the presence of an NO donor as expected for the formation of a penta-coordinated nitrosyl-heme complex. Non-stimulated sGC had k(cat)/K(m)=1.7 x 10(-3)s(-1)microM(-1) that increased to 5.8 x 10(-1)s(-1)microM(-1) upon stimulation with an NO donor which represents a 340-fold increase due to stimulation. The novel combination of using the TIPS method for co-expression of a heterodimeric heme-containing enzyme, along with the application of a reproducible ligand affinity purification method, has enabled us to obtain recombinant human sGC of both the quality and quantity needed to study structure-function relationships

  14. The Structure of PA1221, a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase containing Adenylation and Peptidyl Carrier Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Carter A.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Many bacteria use large modular enzymes for the synthesis of polyketide and peptide natural products. These multidomain enzymes contain integrated carrier domains that deliver bound substrates to multiple catalytic domains, requiring coordination of these chemical steps. Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) load amino acids onto carrier domains through the activity of an upstream adenylation domain. Our lab recently determined the structure of an engineered two-domain NRPS containing fused adenylation and carrier domains. This structure adopted a domain swapped dimer that illustrated the interface between these two domains. To continue our investigation, we now examine PA1221, a natural two-domain protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have determined the amino acid specificity of this new enzyme and used domain specific mutations to demonstrate that loading the downstream carrier domain within a single protein molecule occurs more quickly than loading of a non-fused carrier domain inter-molecularly. Finally, we have determined crystal structures of both the apo- and holo-PA1221 protein, the latter using a valine-adenosine vinylsulfonamide inhibitor that traps the adenylation-carrier domain interaction. The protein adopts a similar interface to that seen with the prior adenylation-carrier protein construct. A comparison of these structures with previous structures of multidomain NRPSs suggests that a large conformational change within the NRPS adenylation domains guides the carrier domain into the active site for thioester formation. PMID:22452656

  15. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of the Essential Diadenylate Cyclase CdaA from Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Dickmanns, Achim; Neumann, Piotr; Gunka, Katrin; Arens, Johannes; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified second messenger cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is involved in several important cellular processes, such as cell wall metabolism, maintenance of DNA integrity, ion transport, transcription regulation, and allosteric regulation of enzyme function. Interestingly, c-di-AMP is essential for growth of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Although the genome of B. subtilis encodes three c-di-AMP-producing diadenlyate cyclases that can functionally replace each other, the phylogenetically related human pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus possess only one enzyme, the diadenlyate cyclase CdaA. Because CdaA is also essential for growth of these bacteria, the enzyme is a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. Here we present the first crystal structure of the L. monocytogenes CdaA diadenylate cyclase domain that is conserved in many human pathogens. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the cyclase revealed an unusual metal cofactor requirement. PMID:25605729

  16. Increased Gsα within Blood Cell Membrane Lipid Microdomains in Some Depressive Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, John J.; Samson, Jacqueline A.; McHale, Nancy L.; Pappalarado, Kathleen M.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Schildkraut, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein Gs couples many cellular receptors to adenylate cyclase, and the Gsα subunit activates all 9 isoforms of the adenylate cyclase catalytic unit to produce the enzyme product cyclicAMP or cAMP. In prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of unipolar depressive suicides, Rasenick and colleagues have found increased concentrations of Gsα in membrane lipid microdomains (Donati et al, 2008), where the ensconced Gsα is less likely to activate adenylate cyclase by receptor and postreceptor pathways (Allen et al, 2005 & 2009). We report that a group of 7 depressed patients (DP-1) had (1) reduced activation of platelet receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase by both prostaglandins E2 and D2 compared to controls, and (2) reduced postreceptor stimulation of adenylate cyclase by aluminum fluoride ion in both platelets and mononuclear leukocytes when compared to both another group of depressed patients (DP-2, n=17) and to controls (n=21). Our observations in the blood cells of the group DP-1 support the findings of Donati et al (2008), and they reflect the importance of this interaction between the activated Gsα subunit and membrane lipid microdomains in the pathophysiology and treatment of some major depressive disorders. PMID:23490066

  17. Functional classification of cNMP-binding proteins and nucleotide cyclases with implications for novel regulatory pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    McCue, L A; McDonough, K A; Lawrence, C E

    2000-02-01

    We have analyzed the cyclic nucleotide (cNMP)-binding protein and nucleotide cyclase superfamilies using Bayesian computational methods of protein family identification and classification. In addition to the known cNMP-binding proteins (cNMP-dependent kinases, cNMP-gated channels, cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and bacterial cAMP-dependent transcription factors), new functional groups of cNMP-binding proteins were identified, including putative ABC-transporter subunits, translocases, and esterases. Classification of the nucleotide cyclases revealed subtle differences in sequence conservation of the active site that distinguish the five classes of cyclases: the multicellular eukaryotic adenylyl cyclases, the eukaryotic receptor-type guanylyl cyclases, the eukaryotic soluble guanylyl cyclases, the unicellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic adenylyl cyclases, and the putative prokaryotic guanylyl cyclases. Phylogenetic distribution of the cNMP-binding proteins and cyclases was analyzed, with particular attention to the 22 complete archaeal and eubacterial genome sequences. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Synechocystis PCC6803 were each found to encode several more putative cNMP-binding proteins than other prokaryotes; many of these proteins are of unknown function. M. tuberculosis also encodes several more putative nucleotide cyclases than other prokaryotic species. PMID:10673278

  18. Structure and Mechanism of the Diterpene Cyclase ent-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) reveals three α-helical domains (α, β, γ), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the βγ domains in CPS but exclusively in the α domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions. PMID:21602811

  19. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    PubMed

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823).

  20. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  1. On the Dynamics of the Adenylate Energy System: Homeorhesis vs Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Valero, Edelmira; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim; Malaina, Iker; Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical energy is the fundamental element that maintains both the adequate turnover of the biomolecular structures and the functional metabolic viability of unicellular organisms. The levels of ATP, ADP and AMP reflect roughly the energetic status of the cell, and a precise ratio relating them was proposed by Atkinson as the adenylate energy charge (AEC). Under growth-phase conditions, cells maintain the AEC within narrow physiological values, despite extremely large fluctuations in the adenine nucleotides concentration. Intensive experimental studies have shown that these AEC values are preserved in a wide variety of organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Here, to understand some of the functional elements involved in the cellular energy status, we present a computational model conformed by some key essential parts of the adenylate energy system. Specifically, we have considered (I) the main synthesis process of ATP from ADP, (II) the main catalyzed phosphotransfer reaction for interconversion of ATP, ADP and AMP, (III) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP yielding ADP, and (IV) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP providing AMP. This leads to a dynamic metabolic model (with the form of a delayed differential system) in which the enzymatic rate equations and all the physiological kinetic parameters have been explicitly considered and experimentally tested in vitro. Our central hypothesis is that cells are characterized by changing energy dynamics (homeorhesis). The results show that the AEC presents stable transitions between steady states and periodic oscillations and, in agreement with experimental data these oscillations range within the narrow AEC window. Furthermore, the model shows sustained oscillations in the Gibbs free energy and in the total nucleotide pool. The present study provides a step forward towards the understanding of the fundamental principles and quantitative laws governing the adenylate energy system, which is a fundamental element for

  2. Adenylate Energy Pool and Energy Charge in Maturing Rape Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Te May; Crane, Jim M.; Stamp, David L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of energy state and chemical composition of pod walls and seeds of maturing rape (Brassica napus L.) was conducted on two varieties, Victor and Gorczanski. Total adenosine phosphates, ATP, and adenylate energy charge increased with increasing cell number and cellular synthesis during the early stages, remained high at maximum dry weight accumulation and maximum substrate influx time, and decreased with ripening. A temporal control of energy supply and ATP concentration is evident in developing tissues with determined functions; whereas the association of a high energy charge and active cellular biosynthesis occurs only in tissues with a stabilized cell number. PMID:16658964

  3. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase [Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., & Mildvan, A. S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr3+AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T1 method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high anti-glycosyl torsional angle (chi = 110 +/- 10 degrees), a 3'-endo,2'-exo ribose pucker (delta = 105 +/- 10 degrees), and gauche-trans orientations about the C4'-C5' bond (gamma = 180 +/- 10 degrees) and the C5'-O5' bond (beta = 170 +/- 20 degrees). The distance from Cr3+ to the phosphorus of AMP is 5.9 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of approximately 3 A, which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near (less than or equal to 4 A from) Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine [Kuby, S. A., Palmieri, R. H., Frischat, A., Fischer, A. H., Wu, L. H., Maland, L., & Manship, M. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2393-2399], and chicken adenylate kinase [Kishi, F., Maruyama, M., Tanizawa, Y

  4. A double origin electrophoretic method for the simultaneous separation of adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase, and carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Murch, R S; Gambel, A M; Kearney, J J

    1986-10-01

    A rapid, reliable method for the simultaneous separation of adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase, and carbonic anhydrase II by agarose gel electrophoresis is presented. This method uses a double origin sample application system. Unreduced sample extracts for adenylate kinase analysis are applied 13.0 cm from the anode. Reduced sample extracts for the remaining proteins of interest are applied 7.0 cm from the anode. The use of applicator foils and an increased voltage gradient result in superior resolution, linearity, and band sharpness of the allozyme patterns. Further, there is no masking of the adenylate kinase 2 band as a result of the use of a reducing agent, and carbonic anhydrase II is resolved without interference from hemoglobin as has been observed with other multisystem methods.

  5. Role of MbtH-like Proteins in the Adenylation of Tyrosine during Aminocoumarin and Vancomycin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Björn; Taubitz, Tatjana; Heide, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    MbtH-like proteins consist of ∼70 amino acids and are encoded in the biosynthetic gene clusters of non-ribosomally formed peptides and other secondary metabolites derived from amino acids. Recently, several MbtH-like proteins have been shown to be required for the adenylation of amino acid in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. We now investigated the role of MbtH-like proteins in the biosynthesis of the aminocoumarin antibiotics novobiocin, clorobiocin, and simocyclinone D8 and of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. The tyrosine-adenylating enzymes CloH, SimH, and Pcza361.18, involved in the biosynthesis of clorobiocin, simocyclinone D8, and vancomycin, respectively, required the presence of MbtH-like proteins in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming heterotetrameric complexes. In contrast, NovH, involved in novobiocin biosynthesis, showed activity in the absence of MbtH-like proteins. Comparison of the active centers of CloH and NovH showed only one amino acid to be different, i.e. Leu-383 versus Met-383. Mutation of this amino acid in CloH (L383M) indeed led to MbtH-independent adenylating activity. All investigated tyrosine-adenylating enzymes exhibited remarkable promiscuity for MbtH-like proteins from different pathways and organisms. YbdZ, the MbtH-like protein from the expression host Escherichia coli, was found to bind to adenylating enzymes during expression and to influence their biochemical properties markedly. Therefore, the use of ybdZ-deficient expression hosts is important in biochemical studies of adenylating enzymes. PMID:21890635

  6. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) increases corticosterone in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lezak, K. R.; Roelke, E.; Harris, O.; Choi, I.; Edwards, S.; Gick, N.; Cocchiaro, G.; Missig, G.; Roman, C. W.; Braas, K. M.; Toufexis, D.J.; May, V.; Hammack, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the genes for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the PAC1 receptor have been associated with several psychiatric disorders whose etiology has been associated with stressor exposure and/or dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In rats, exposure to repeated variate stress has been shown to increase PACAP and its cognate PAC1 receptor expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region implicated in anxiety and depression-related behaviors as well as the regulation of HPA axis activity. We have argued that changes in BNST PACAP signaling may mediate the changes in emotional behavior and dysregulation of the HPA axis associated with anxiety and mood disorders. The current set of studies was designed to determine whether BNST PACAP infusion leads to activation of the HPA axis as determined by increases in plasma corticosterone. We observed an increase in plasma corticosterone levels 30 minutes following BNST PACAP38 infusion in male and female rats, which was independent of estradiol (E2) treatment in females, and we found that plasma corticosterone levels were increased at both 30 minutes and 60 minutes, but returned to baseline levels 4 hours following the highest dose. PACAP38 infusion into the lateral ventricles immediately above the BNST did not alter plasma corticosterone level, and the increased plasma corticosterone following BNST PACAP was not blocked by BNST corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) receptor antagonism. These results support others suggesting that BNST PACAP plays a key role in regulating stress responses. PMID:24845172

  7. Control of outflow resistance by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Suk; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the United States affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure, even in patients with normal tension glaucoma. Typically, this is accomplished by reducing the rate of aqueous flow by limiting aqueous production or enhancing drainage using drugs and surgery. Whereas these strategies are effective in diminishing vision loss, some patients continue to lose vision and many discontinue use of their medications because of undesirable side effects. Drugs known to be effective in altering conventional outflow have for the most part been abandoned from modern clinical practice due to undesirable side effects. Identification of new drugs that could enhance conventional outflow, would offer additional options in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. To this end, our laboratory has recently uncovered a novel pathway for regulation of conventional outflow by the ciliary body. This pathway is dependent on soluble adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) in response to bicarbonate.

  8. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  9. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  10. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-09-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C's role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  11. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is essential for proper lysosomal acidification.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nawreen; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Milner, Teresa A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R

    2016-10-01

    Lysosomes, the degradative organelles of the endocytic and autophagic pathways, function at an acidic pH. Lysosomes are acidified by the proton-pumping vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), but the molecular processes that set the organelle's pH are not completely understood. In particular, pH-sensitive signaling enzymes that can regulate lysosomal acidification in steady-state physiological conditions have yet to be identified. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a widely expressed source of cAMP that serves as a physiological pH sensor in cells. For example, in proton-secreting epithelial cells, sAC is responsible for pH-dependent translocation of V-ATPase to the luminal surface. Here we show genetically and pharmacologically that sAC is also essential for lysosomal acidification. In the absence of sAC, V-ATPase does not properly localize to lysosomes, lysosomes fail to fully acidify, lysosomal degradative capacity is diminished, and autophagolysosomes accumulate. PMID:27670898

  12. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention.

  13. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  14. Persistent Electrical Activity in Primary Nociceptors after Spinal Cord Injury Is Maintained by Scaffolded Adenylyl Cyclase and Protein Kinase A and Is Associated with Altered Adenylyl Cyclase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Li, Yong; Wu, Zizhen; Yang, Qing; Herrera, Juan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intracellular signaling mechanisms that persistently excite neurons in pain pathways. Persistent spontaneous activity (SA) generated in the cell bodies of primary nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been found to make major contributions to chronic pain in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) (Bedi et al., 2010; Yang et al., 2014). The occurrence of SCI-induced SA in a large fraction of DRG neurons and the persistence of this SA long after dissociation of the neurons provide an opportunity to define intrinsic cell signaling mechanisms that chronically drive SA in pain pathways. The present study demonstrates that SCI-induced SA requires continuing activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), as well as a scaffolded complex containing AC5/6, A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), and PKA. SCI caused a small but significant increase in the expression of AKAP150 but not other AKAPs. DRG membranes isolated from SCI animals revealed a novel alteration in the regulation of AC. AC activity stimulated by Ca2+-calmodulin increased, while the inhibition of AC activity by Gαi showed an unexpected and dramatic decrease after SCI. Localized enhancement of the activity of AC within scaffolded complexes containing PKA is likely to contribute to chronic pathophysiological consequences of SCI, including pain, that are promoted by persistent hyperactivity in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic neuropathic pain is a major clinical problem with poorly understood mechanisms and inadequate treatments. Recent findings indicate that chronic pain in a rat SCI model depends upon hyperactivity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Although cAMP signaling is involved in many forms of neural plasticity, including hypersensitivity of nociceptors in the presence of inflammatory mediators, our finding that continuing cAMP-PKA signaling is required for persistent SA months after SCI and long after isolation of

  15. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  16. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  17. RNA mimicry by the fap7 adenylate kinase in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loc'h, Jérôme; Blaud, Magali; Réty, Stéphane; Lebaron, Simon; Deschamps, Patrick; Bareille, Joseph; Jombart, Julie; Robert-Paganin, Julien; Delbos, Lila; Chardon, Florian; Zhang, Elodie; Charenton, Clément; Tollervey, David; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    During biogenesis of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, the pre-40S particles are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA to mature 18S rRNA. Amongst the factors involved in this maturation step, Fap7 is unusual, as it both interacts with ribosomal protein Rps14 and harbors adenylate kinase activity, a function not usually associated with ribonucleoprotein assembly. Human hFap7 also regulates Cajal body assembly and cell cycle progression via the p53-MDM2 pathway. This work presents the functional and structural characterization of the Fap7-Rps14 complex. We report that Fap7 association blocks the RNA binding surface of Rps14 and, conversely, Rps14 binding inhibits adenylate kinase activity of Fap7. In addition, the affinity of Fap7 for Rps14 is higher with bound ADP, whereas ATP hydrolysis dissociates the complex. These results suggest that Fap7 chaperones Rps14 assembly into pre-40S particles via RNA mimicry in an ATP-dependent manner. Incorporation of Rps14 by Fap7 leads to a structural rearrangement of the platform domain necessary for the pre-rRNA to acquire a cleavage competent conformation.

  18. Inhibition by methioninyl adenylate of focus formation by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Robert-Gero, M; Lawrence, F; Vigier, P

    1975-12-01

    Methioninyl adenylate is a specific and potent inhibitor of the enzyme methionyl-tRNA synthetase and, consequently, of protein biosynthesis. In cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Rous sarcoma virus, incubation for a 2-day period with 1 to 3 mM concentrations of this inhibitor, as late as 4 days after infection, irreversibly prevented subsequent formation of foci of transformed cells. Later addition could also elicit the irreversible disappearance of already existing foci, by phenotypic reversion and/or cell killing. Virus production in transformed cells and replication in newly infected cells were also inhibited but to a lesser degree. Under the same conditions, the same concentrations of methioninyl adenylate caused only a reversible growth arrest of normal cells. The selective toxicity of the inhibitor for transformed cells is not due to a greater affinity for the target enzyme, but it may be due to the fact that inhibition of protein biosynthesis is only partially reversible in these cells, whereas it is fully reversible in normal cells.

  19. Effects of a novel guanylate cyclase inhibitor on nitric oxide-dependent inhibitory neurotransmission in canine proximal colon

    PubMed Central

    Franck, H; Sweeney, K M; Sanders, K M; Shuttleworth, C W R

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that nitric oxide (NO) may cause hyperpolarization and relaxation of canine colonic smooth muscle by both cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent mechanisms. This hypothesis was tested using 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), a novel inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. In the presence of histamine (30 μM), atropine and indomethacin (both at 1 μM), electrical field stimulation of intrinsic neurons (EFS; 5 Hz) produced inhibition of phasic contractile activity that is due to NO synthesis. ODQ caused a concentration-dependent block of this response (10 nM to 10 μM). Inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) due to NO synthesis were recorded from muscle cells located near the myenteric border of the circular muscle layer, using intracellular microelectrodes. IJPs were abolished by ODQ (1–10 μM). EFS (10–20 Hz) produced frequency-dependent inhibition of electrical slow waves recorded from cells located near the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer. This inhibition is due to NO synthesis, and it was abolished by ODQ (1–10 μM). Hyperpolarization and relaxation produced by an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, were abolished by ODQ pretreatment (1–10 μM). In contrast, inhibitory responses to 8-Br-cGMP (1 mM) were unaffected by ODQ. ODQ alone (1–10 μM) had no significant effect on spontaneous electrical or phasic contractile activity. In tissues pre-treated with L-NAME (300 μM), ODQ decreased the amplitude of spontaneous or histamine-stimulated phasic contractile activity. These results suggest that electrical and mechanical effects of endogenously released and exogenously applied NO in canine colon are largely due to cGMP synthesis by ODQ-sensitive soluble guanylate cyclase. No evidence to support a direct (cGMP-independent) mechanism of NO action was found. ODQ also appears to cause a non-specific inhibition of muscle contractile activity; however, this effect does not

  20. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  1. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  2. Role of soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological effects of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Severina, I S

    1998-07-01

    In this review the molecular mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. It has been shown that these effects are directly connected with the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and the accumulation of cyclic 3;,5;-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism of guanylate cyclase activation by NO is analyzed, especially the role and biological significance of the nitrosyl--heme complex formed as a result of interaction of guanylate cyclase heme with NO and the role of sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme in this process. Using new approaches for studying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide in combination with the newly obtained data on the regulatory role of guanylate cyclase in the platelet aggregation process, the most important results were obtained regarding the molecular bases providing for a directed search for and creation of new effective antihypertensive and antiaggregatory preparations. In studying the molecular mechanism for directed activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by new NO donors, a series of hitherto unknown enzyme activators generating NO and involved in the regulation of hemostasis and vascular tone were revealed. PMID:9721331

  3. Overexpression and characterization of lycopene cyclase (CrtY) from marine bacterium Paracoccus haeundaensis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Hyug; Ji, Keunho; Kim, Young Tae

    2013-02-01

    Lycopene cyclase converts lycopene to beta-carotene by catalyzing the formation of two beta-rings at each end of the linear carotene structure. This reaction takes place as a two-step reaction in which both sides of of the lycopene molecule are cyclized into beta-carotene rings via the monocyclic gamma-carotene as an intermediate. The crtY gene coding for lycopene cyclase from Paracoccus haeundaensis consists of 1,158 base pairs encoding 386 amino acids residues. An expression plasmid containing the crtY gene (pET44a-CrtY) was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli, and produced a recombinant protein of approximately 43 kDa, corresponding to the molecular mass of lycopene cyclase. The expressed protein was purified to homogeneity by His-tag affinity chromatography and showed enzymatic activity corresponding to lycopene cyclase. We also determined the lycopene substrate specificity and NADPH cofactor requirements of the purified protein. The Km values for lycopene and NADPH were 3.5 microM and 2 mM, respectively. The results obtained from this study will provide a wider base of knowledge on the enzyme characterization of lycopene cyclase at the molecular level.

  4. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  5. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  6. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  7. Biochemistry and physiology of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Johanne; Desjardins, Richard; Hum, David; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GC) exist as soluble and particulate, membrane-associated enzymes which catalyse the conversion of GTP to cGMP, an intracellular signalling molecule. Several membrane forms of the enzyme have been identified up to now. Some of them serve as receptors for the natriuretic peptides, a family of peptides which includes atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), three peptides known to play important roles in renal and cardiovascular physiology. These are transmembrane proteins composed of a single transmembrane domain, a variable extracellular natriuretic peptide-binding domain, and a more conserved intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) and catalytic domain. GC-A, the receptor for ANP and BNP, also named natriuretic peptide receptor-A or -1 (NPR-A or NPR- 1), has been studied widely. Its mode of activation by peptide ligands and mechanisms of regulation serve as prototypes for understanding the function of other particulate GC. Activation of this enzyme by its ligand is a complex process requiring oligomerization, ligand binding, KHD phosphorylation and ATP binding. Gene knockout and genetic segregation studies have provided strong evidence for the importance of GC-A in the regulation of blood pressure and heart and renal functions. GC-B is the main receptor for CNP, the latter having a more paracrine role at the vascular and venous levels. The structure and regulation of GC-B is similar to that of GC-A. This chapter reviews the structure and roles of GC-A and GC-B in blood pressure regulation and cardiac and renal pathophysiology. PMID:11952095

  8. Molecular characterization of tick salivary gland glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Chao, Chien-Chung; Bateman, Robert C; Ching, Wei-Mei; Karim, Shahid

    2013-09-01

    Glutaminyl cyclase (QC) catalyzes the cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues into pyroglutamate. This post-translational modification extends the half-life of peptides and, in some cases, is essential in binding to their cognate receptor. Due to its potential role in the post-translational modification of tick neuropeptides, we report the molecular, biochemical and physiological characterization of salivary gland QC during the prolonged blood feeding of the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the gulf-coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum). QC sequences from I. scapularis and A. maculatum showed a high degree of amino acid identity to each other and other arthropods and residues critical for zinc binding/catalysis (D159, E202, and H330) or intermediate stabilization (E201, W207, D248, D305, F325, and W329) are conserved. Analysis of QC transcriptional gene expression kinetics depicts an upregulation during the bloodmeal of adult female ticks prior to fast-feeding phases in both I. scapularis and A. maculatum suggesting a functional link with bloodmeal uptake. QC enzymatic activity was detected in saliva and extracts of tick salivary glands and midguts. Recombinant QC was shown to be catalytically active. Furthermore, knockdown of QC transcript by RNA interference resulted in lower enzymatic activity, and small, unviable egg masses in both studied tick species as well as lower engorged tick weights for I. scapularis. These results suggest that the post-translational modification of neurotransmitters and other bioactive peptides by QC is critical to oviposition and potentially other physiological processes. Moreover, these data suggest that tick-specific QC-modified neurotransmitters/hormones or other relevant parts of this system could potentially be used as novel physiological targets for tick control. PMID:23770496

  9. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha activates soluble guanylate cyclase in bovine glomerular mesangial cells via an L-arginine-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) causes vasodilatation by activating soluble guanylate cyclase, and glomerular mesangial cells respond to NO with elevations of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). We explored whether mesangial cells can be stimulated to produce NO and whether NO modulates mesangial cell function in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) raised mesangial cell cGMP levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (threshold dose 1 ng/ml, IC50 13.8 ng/ml, maximal response 100 ng/ml). TNF-alpha-induced increases in mesangial cGMP content were evident at 8 h and maximal at 18-24 h. The TNF-alpha-induced stimulation of mesangial cell cGMP production was abrogated by actinomycin D or cycloheximide suggesting dependence on new RNA or protein synthesis. Hemoglobin and methylene blue, both known to inhibit NO action, dramatically reduced TNF-alpha-induced mesangial cell cGMP production. Superoxide dismutase, known to potentiate NO action, augmented the TNF-alpha-induced effect. Ng-monomethyl-L- arginine (L-NMMA) decreased cGMP levels in TNF-alpha-treated, but not vehicle-treated mesangial cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 53 microM). L-arginine had no effect on cGMP levels in control or TNF-alpha-treated mesangial cells but reversed L-NMMA-induced inhibition. Interleukin 1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not interferon gamma, also increased mesangial cell cGMP content. Transforming growth factor beta 1 blunted the mesangial cell response to TNF-alpha. TNF-alpha-induced L-arginine-dependent increases in cGMP were also evident in bovine renal artery vascular smooth muscle cells, COS-1 cells, and 1502 human fibroblasts. These findings suggest that TNF-alpha induces expression in mesangial cell of an enzyme(s) involved in the formation of L-arginine-derived NO. Moreover, the data indicate that NO acts in an autocrine and paracrine fashion to activate mesangial cell soluble

  11. Deficits in behavioral sensitization and dopaminergic responses to methamphetamine in adenylyl cyclase 1/8-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Charlton, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Newman, Brooke; Eagle, Andrew L; Mathews, Tiffany A; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2015-12-01

    The cAMP/protein kinase A pathway regulates methamphetamine (METH)-induced neuroplasticity underlying behavioral sensitization. We hypothesize that adenylyl cyclases (AC) 1/8 mediate these neuroplastic events and associated striatal dopamine regulation. Locomotor responses to METH (1 and 5 mg/kg) and striatal dopamine function were evaluated in mice lacking AC 1/8 (DKO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Only 5 mg/kg METH induced an acute locomotor response in DKO mice, which was significantly attenuated versus WT controls. DKO mice showed a marked attenuation in the development and expression of METH-induced behavioral sensitization across doses relative to WT controls. While basal and acute METH (5 mg/kg)-evoked accumbal dialysate dopamine levels were similar between genotypes, saline-treated DKO mice showed elevated tissue content of dopamine and homovanillic acid in the dorsal striatum (DS), reflecting dysregulated dopamine homeostasis and/or metabolism. Significant reductions in DS dopamine levels were observed in METH-sensitized DKO mice compared to saline-treated controls, an effect not observed in WT mice. Notably, saline-treated DKO mice had significantly increased phosphorylated Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein levels, which were not further augmented following METH sensitization, as observed in WT mice. These data indicate that AC 1/8 are critical to mechanisms subserving drug-induced behavioral sensitization and mediate nigrostriatal pathway METH sensitivity. Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 and 8 were studied for their involvement in the adaptive neurobehavioral responses to methamphetamine. AC 1/8 double knockout (DKO) mice showed heightened basal locomotor activity and dorsal striatal dopamine responsivity. Conversely, methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity was attenuated in DKO mice, accompanied by reductions in dopamine and HVA content and impaired DARPP-32 activation. These findings indicate AC 1/8 signaling

  12. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B.; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we