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Sample records for adenylate kinase isoform

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi nuclear adenylate kinase isoform.

    PubMed

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3' UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes.

  2. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Adenylate Kinase Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A.; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3′ UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes. PMID:23409202

  3. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  4. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  5. Coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase activity in ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos-Karoly, Andrea; Vogel, Ramona; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane proteins, catalyse the translocation of substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. Here we demonstrate by nucleotide turnover and binding studies based on 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy that the ABC exporter and lipid A flippase MsbA can couple ATP hydrolysis to an adenylate kinase activity, where ADP is converted into AMP and ATP. Single-point mutations reveal that both ATPase and adenylate kinase mechanisms are associated with the same conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding domain. Based on these results, we propose a model for the coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase mechanism, involving the canonical and an additional nucleotide-binding site. We extend these findings to other prokaryotic ABC exporters, namely LmrA and TmrAB, suggesting that the coupled activities are a general feature of ABC exporters. PMID:28004795

  6. Multiforms of mammalian adenylate kinase and its monoclonal antibody against AK1.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Y; Takenaka, H; Sumida, M; Oka, K; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1990-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the intracellular distribution of the multiforms of the adenylate kinase (AK) isoenzymes in mammalian tissues, to shed some light on their physiological roles, especially in energy metabolism. The adenylate kinase zymograms obtained from isoelectric focusing yielded two typical isoform patterns: (1) with a pI greater than or equal to 9 and 8.6, specific for bovine skeletal muscle, heart, aorta and brain, and (2) with a pI = 7.9 and 7.1, specific for liver and kidney. Pattern (1) was attributed to the cytosolic isoenzyme (AK1) as demonstrated by immunostaining with anti-AK1. Pattern (2) was attributed to the mitochondrial isoenzyme (AK2). These results were largely confirmed by chromatofocusing experiments. The AK1 isoenzyme was partially purified from the cytosol fraction of bovine aortic smooth muscle and had an apparent Mr of 23.5 kilodaltons. Its kinetic features are discussed from a comparative standpoint. Finally, the human serum AK1 isoform was also detected by Western blotting with a monoclonal antibody directed against crystalline porcine muscle AK1. These results are to form the basis of further studies on the 'aberrant' adenylate kinase isoenzyme from the serum of Duchenne muscular dystrophics.

  7. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  8. An aberrant adenylate kinase isoenzyme from the serum of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Okuda, H; Oka, K; Watanabe, T; Ueda, K; Nojima, M; Kuby, S A; Manship, M; Tyler, F H; Ziter, F A

    1981-08-13

    The sera from patients with human Duchenne (X-linked) progressive muscular dystrophy contain elevated adenylate kinase (ATP: AMP phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.4.3) activities, in addition to their characteristically high creatine kinase (ATP; creatine N-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.3.2) activities. By agarose gel electrophoresis of human Duchenne dystrophic serum, the presence of an apparently normal human serum adenylate kinase together with a variant species of adenylate kinase was detected. The latter enzyme species appeared, in its mobility, to be similar to that of the normal human liver-type adenylate kinase. The presence of this aberrant liver-type adenylate kinase could also be demonstrated by characteristic (for the liver type) inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di-(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate. On the other hand, by inhibition titrations with an anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase, hemolysates from the erythrocytes of several Duchenne and Becker's dystrophics were found to contain approx. 96% muscle-type adenylate kinase and their serum approx. 97% muscle-type adenylate kinase. These same patients contained approx. 89% M-M type creatine kinase in their serum (by inhibition against anti-human muscle-type creatine kinase) indicative of the presence also of M-B plus B-B type active isoenzymes. All of these data can best be explained by the presence of a variant or mutant adenylate kinase isoenzyme in the dystrophic serum. This isoenzyme appears to resemble the liver type in its inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate, and in its heat stability (compare also the agarose gel electrophoresis pattern); but structurally, it is a muscle type, or derived from a muscle type, as shown immunologically by inhibition reactions with anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase. Whether this is a fetal-type isoenzyme of adenylate kinase will require further

  9. Adenylate kinase 1 knockout mice have normal thiamine triphosphate levels.

    PubMed

    Makarchikov, Alexander F; Wins, Pierre; Janssen, Edwin; Wieringa, Bé; Grisar, Thierry; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2002-10-21

    Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found at low concentrations in most animal tissues and it may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of proteins, suggesting a potential role in cell signaling. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the enzymatic synthesis of ThTP. A thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) kinase (ThDP+ATP if ThTP+ADP) has been purified from brewer's yeast and shown to exist in rat liver. However, other data suggest that, at least in skeletal muscle, adenylate kinase 1 (AK1) is responsible for ThTP synthesis. In this study, we show that AK1 knockout mice have normal ThTP levels in skeletal muscle, heart, brain, liver and kidney, demonstrating that AK1 is not responsible for ThTP synthesis in those tissues. We predict that the high ThTP content of particular tissues like the Electrophorus electricus electric organ, or pig and chicken skeletal muscle is more tightly correlated with high ThDP kinase activity or low soluble ThTPase activity than with non-stringent substrate specificity and high activity of adenylate kinase.

  10. Conformational transitions of Adenylate Kinase: switching by cracking

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Miyashita, Osamu; Levy, Yaakov; Onuchic, José N.

    2007-01-01

    Conformational heterogeneity in proteins is known to often be the key to their function. We present a coarse grained model to explore the interplay between protein structure, folding and function which is applicable to allosteric or non-allosteric proteins. We employ the model to study the detailed mechanism of the reversible conformational transition of Adenylate Kinase (AKE) between the open to the closed conformation, a reaction that is crucial to the protein’s catalytic function. We directly observe high strain energy which appears to be correlated with localized unfolding during the functional transition. This work also demonstrates that competing native interactions from the open and closed form can account for the large conformational transitions in AKE. We further characterize the conformational transitions with a new measure ΦFunc, and demonstrate that local unfolding may be due, in part, to competing intra-protein interactions. PMID:17217965

  11. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  12. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  13. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  14. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  15. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  16. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  17. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase [Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., & Mildvan, A. S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr3+AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T1 method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high anti-glycosyl torsional angle (chi = 110 +/- 10 degrees), a 3'-endo,2'-exo ribose pucker (delta = 105 +/- 10 degrees), and gauche-trans orientations about the C4'-C5' bond (gamma = 180 +/- 10 degrees) and the C5'-O5' bond (beta = 170 +/- 20 degrees). The distance from Cr3+ to the phosphorus of AMP is 5.9 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of approximately 3 A, which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near (less than or equal to 4 A from) Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine [Kuby, S. A., Palmieri, R. H., Frischat, A., Fischer, A. H., Wu, L. H., Maland, L., & Manship, M. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2393-2399], and chicken adenylate kinase [Kishi, F., Maruyama, M., Tanizawa, Y

  18. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  19. Structural Basis of Protein Kinase C Isoform Function

    PubMed Central

    STEINBERG, SUSAN F.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms comprise a family of lipid-activated enzymes that have been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions. PKCs are modular enzymes comprised of a regulatory domain (that contains the membrane-targeting motifs that respond to lipid cofactors, and in the case of some PKCs calcium) and a relatively conserved catalytic domain that binds ATP and substrates. These enzymes are coexpressed and respond to similar stimulatory agonists in many cell types. However, there is growing evidence that individual PKC isoforms subserve unique (and in some cases opposing) functions in cells, at least in part as a result of isoform-specific subcellular compartmentalization patterns, protein-protein interactions, and posttranslational modifications that influence catalytic function. This review focuses on the structural basis for differences in lipid cofactor responsiveness for individual PKC isoforms, the regulatory phosphorylations that control the normal maturation, activation, signaling function, and downregulation of these enzymes, and the intra-/intermolecular interactions that control PKC isoform activation and subcellular targeting in cells. A detailed understanding of the unique molecular features that underlie isoform-specific posttranslational modification patterns, protein-protein interactions, and subcellular targeting (i.e., that impart functional specificity) should provide the basis for the design of novel PKC isoform-specific activator or inhibitor compounds that can achieve therapeutically useful changes in PKC signaling in cells. PMID:18923184

  20. Role of protein kinase C on the acute desensitization of renal cortical adenylate cyclase to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, E; López, C; Díaz, K; Pernalete, N; López, M; Starosta, R

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of adenylate cyclase desensitization to parathyroid hormone are still unclear. Current evidence suggest that the signal generated after PTH binding to receptors results in activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase C with subsequent activation of protein kinase C. Recent studies have suggested a role of protein kinase C on the regulation of the PTH-dependent receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cultured cells. Therefore, the present studies were conducted to examine the role of protein kinase C on the desensitization of canine renal cortical adenylate cyclase after an acute exposure in vivo to PTH. A group of normal dogs were treated with a single intravenous injection of 1 microgram/k of syn bPTH (1-34) or Nle bPTH (3-34). Ten minutes later, animals were subjected to bilateral nephrectomy and the kidney cortex processed for preparations of basolateral membranes for determinations of adenylate cyclase activity, as well as membrane and cytosolic fractions for analysis of protein kinase C activity. Animals not treated with PTH were used as controls. PTH administration in vivo resulted in a 46.9 +/- 9.3% decrease in maximal adenylate cyclase activity in vitro in response to syn bPTH (1-34) (P < 0.001). Likewise, PTH binding as measured with 125I-Nle8,18,Tyr34-bPTH (1-34)NH2 showed a 40 +/- 3% decrease. This alterations were associated with a marked translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane. Thus, protein kinase C activity in membrane fractions increased from 160.6 +/- 44.8 pmol Pi/min in controls to 500.4 +/- 123 in PTH treated dogs (P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Opening mechanism of adenylate kinase can vary according to selected molecular dynamics force field.

    PubMed

    Unan, Hulya; Yildirim, Ahmet; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2015-07-01

    Adenylate kinase is a widely used test case for many conformational transition studies. It performs a large conformational transition between closed and open conformations while performing its catalytic function. To understand conformational transition mechanism and impact of force field choice on E. Coli adenylate kinase, we performed all-atom explicit solvent classical molecular dynamics simulations starting from the closed conformation with four commonly used force fields, namely, Amber99, Charmm27, Gromos53a6, Opls-aa. We carried out 40 simulations, each one 200 ns. We analyzed completely 12 of them that show full conformational transition from the closed state to the open one. Our study shows that different force fields can have a bias toward different transition pathways. Transition time scales, frequency of conformational transitions, order of domain motions and free energy landscapes of each force field may also vary. In general, Amber99 and Charmm27 behave similarly while Gromos53a6 results have a resemblance to the Opls-aa force field results.

  2. Study into the kinetic properties and surface attachment of a thermostable adenylate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, H.J.; Sutton, J.M.; Jenkins, A.T.A.

    2015-01-01

    A thermostable adenylate kinase (tAK) has been used as model protein contaminant on surfaces, so used because residual protein after high temperature wash steps can be detected at extremely low concentrations. This gives the potential for accurate, quantitative measurement of the effectiveness of different wash processes in removing protein contamination. Current methods utilise non-covalent (physisorbtion) of tAK to surfaces, but this can be relatively easily removed. In this study, the covalent binding of tAK to surfaces was studied to provide an alternative model for surface contamination. Kinetic analysis showed that the efficiency of the enzyme expressed as the catalytic rate over the Michaelis constant (kcat/KM) increased from 8.45±3.04 mM−1 s−1 in solution to 32.23±3.20 or 24.46±4.41 mM−1 s−1 when the enzyme was immobilised onto polypropylene or plasma activated polypropylene respectively. Maleic anhydride plasma activated polypropylene showed potential to provide a more robust challenge for washing processes as it retained significantly higher amounts of tAK enzyme than polypropylene in simple washing experiments. Inhibition of the coupled enzyme (luciferase/luciferin) system used for the detection of adenylate kinase activity, was observed for a secondary product of the reaction. This needs to be taken into consideration when using the assay to estimate cleaning efficacy. PMID:26339684

  3. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Richards, David H.; Mitch, William A.; Wilson, Corey J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections, and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary-structure, protein hydrodynamics and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance. Namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  4. Opening mechanism of adenylate kinase can vary according to selected molecular dynamics force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unan, Hulya; Yildirim, Ahmet; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2015-07-01

    Adenylate kinase is a widely used test case for many conformational transition studies. It performs a large conformational transition between closed and open conformations while performing its catalytic function. To understand conformational transition mechanism and impact of force field choice on E. Coli adenylate kinase, we performed all-atom explicit solvent classical molecular dynamics simulations starting from the closed conformation with four commonly used force fields, namely, Amber99, Charmm27, Gromos53a6, Opls-aa. We carried out 40 simulations, each one 200 ns. We analyzed completely 12 of them that show full conformational transition from the closed state to the open one. Our study shows that different force fields can have a bias toward different transition pathways. Transition time scales, frequency of conformational transitions, order of domain motions and free energy landscapes of each force field may also vary. In general, Amber99 and Charmm27 behave similarly while Gromos53a6 results have a resemblance to the Opls-aa force field results.

  5. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Richards, David H; Mitch, William A; Wilson, Corey J

    2015-10-16

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study, we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary structure, protein hydrodynamics, and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance, namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites.

  6. Use of adenylate kinase as a solubility tag for high level expression of T4 DNA ligase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Huang, Anliang; Luo, Dan; Liu, Haipeng; Han, Huzi; Xu, Yang; Liang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of T4 DNA ligase in 1960s was pivotal in the spread of molecular biotechnology. The enzyme has become ubiquitous for recombinant DNA routinely practiced in biomedical research around the globe. Great efforts have been made to express and purify T4 DNA ligase to meet the world demand, yet over-expression of soluble T4 DNA ligase in E. coli has been difficult. Here we explore the use of adenylate kinase to enhance T4 DNA ligase expression and its downstream purification. E.coli adenylate kinase, which can be expressed in active form at high level, was fused to the N-terminus of T4 DNA ligase. The resulting His-tagged AK-T4 DNA ligase fusion protein was greatly over-expressed in E. coli, and readily purified to near homogeneity via two purification steps consisting of Blue Sepharose and Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified AK-T4 DNA ligase not only is fully active for DNA ligation, but also can use ADP in addition to ATP as energy source since adenylate kinase converts ADP to ATP and AMP. Thus adenylate kinase may be used as a solubility tag to facilitate recombinant protein expression as well as their downstream purification.

  7. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  8. Synthetic genes for human muscle-type adenylate kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tanaka, T; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gene coding for the human muscle-type cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1) was chemically synthesized and directly expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of trp promoter. The DNA duplex of 596 bp was designed and constructed from 40 oligonucleotide fragments of typically 30 nucleotides in length. Twelve unique restriction sites were fairly evenly spaced in the synthetic gene to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis at any part of this recombinant protein. The genes for mutant hAK1 (Tyr 95----Phe 95, Y95F hAK1; Arg 97----Ala 97, R97A hAK1) were constructed by cassette mutagenesis and utilized restriction sites incorporated in the hAK1 gene. The recombinant hAK1 was purified to homogeneity by a two-step chromatographic procedure with a good yield, and showed the same adenylate kinase activity as that of authentic hAK1. Preliminary kinetic studies show that the enzymatic activity (Vmax app,cor/Et) of Y95F hAK1 was slightly greater than that of recombinant hAK1, whereas R97A hAK1 still possessed approximately 4% of recombinant hAK1 activity. These results suggest that the Arg-97 residue is important but not essential for catalytic activity, and that Tyr-95 can be replaced by phenylalanine without substantial effects on the enzymatic activity. Moreover, preliminary estimates of the apparent kinetic parameters suggest that these residues are not required for MgATP binding, and therefore they do not appear to be part of the MgATP binding site.

  9. Minimum free energy path of ligand-induced transition in adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Terada, Tohru; Furuta, Tadaomi; Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale conformational changes in proteins involve barrier-crossing transitions on the complex free energy surfaces of high-dimensional space. Such rare events cannot be efficiently captured by conventional molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that, by combining the on-the-fly string method and the multi-state Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method, the free energy profile of a conformational transition pathway in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase can be characterized in a high-dimensional space. The minimum free energy paths of the conformational transitions in adenylate kinase were explored by the on-the-fly string method in 20-dimensional space spanned by the 20 largest-amplitude principal modes, and the free energy and various kinds of average physical quantities along the pathways were successfully evaluated by the MBAR method. The influence of ligand binding on the pathways was characterized in terms of rigid-body motions of the lid-shaped ATP-binding domain (LID) and the AMP-binding (AMPbd) domains. It was found that the LID domain was able to partially close without the ligand, while the closure of the AMPbd domain required the ligand binding. The transition state ensemble of the ligand bound form was identified as those structures characterized by highly specific binding of the ligand to the AMPbd domain, and was validated by unrestrained MD simulations. It was also found that complete closure of the LID domain required the dehydration of solvents around the P-loop. These findings suggest that the interplay of the two different types of domain motion is an essential feature in the conformational transition of the enzyme.

  10. New crystal structures of adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 in two conformations.

    PubMed

    Thach, Trung Thanh; Lee, Sangho

    2014-11-01

    Adenylate kinases (AdKs; EC 2.7.3.4) play a critical role in intercellular homeostasis by the interconversion of ATP and AMP to two ADP molecules. Crystal structures of adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 (SpAdK) have recently been determined using ligand-free and inhibitor-bound crystals belonging to space groups P21 and P1, respectively. Here, new crystal structures of SpAdK in ligand-free and inhibitor-bound states determined at 1.96 and 1.65 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. The new ligand-free crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=73.5, b=54.3, c=62.7 Å, β=118.8°. The new ligand-free structure revealed an open conformation that differed from the previously determined conformation, with an r.m.s.d on Cα atoms of 1.4 Å. The new crystal of the complex with the two-substrate-mimicking inhibitor P1,P5-bis(adenosine-5'-)pentaphosphate (Ap5A) belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a=53.9, b=62.3, c=63.0 Å, α=101.9, β=112.6, γ=89.9°. Despite belonging to the same space group as the previously reported crystal, the new Ap5A-bound crystal contains four molecules in the asymmetric unit, compared with two in the previous crystal, and shows slightly different lattice contacts. These results demonstrate that SpAdK can crystallize promiscuously in different forms and that the open structure is flexible in conformation.

  11. Regulation of NADPH Oxidase 5 by Protein Kinase C Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Yanfang; Haigh, Steven; Johnson, John; Lucas, Rudolf; Stepp, David W.; Fulton, David J. R.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5) is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular complications of diabetes

  12. Acyclic phosphonate nucleotides and human adenylate kinases: impact of a borano group on alpha-P position.

    PubMed

    Topalis, D; Alvarez, K; Barral, K; Munier-Lehmann, H; Schneider, B; Véron, M; Guerreiro, C; Mulard, L; El-Amri, C; Canard, B; Deville-Bonne, D

    2008-04-01

    Adenylate kinases are involved in the activation of antiviral drugs such as the acyclic phosphonates analogs PMEA and (R)PMPA. We examine the in vitro phosphorylation of PMEA and PMPA bearing a borano- or a H- group on the phosphorus atom. The alpha-borano or alpha-H on PMEA and PMPA were detrimental to the activity of recombinant human AMP kinases 1 and 2. Docking PMEA to the active site of AMP kinase 1 indicated that the borano group may prevent two conserved critical Arg interactions with the alpha-phosphate, resulting in substrate bad positioning.

  13. Isoform-dependent interaction of BRDG1 with Tec kinase.

    PubMed

    Yokohari, K; Yamashita, Y; Okada, S; Ohya, K; Oda, S; Hatano, M; Mano, H; Hirasawa, H; Tokuhisa, T

    2001-11-30

    Tec is the prototype of an emerging family of protein-tyrosine kinases. Tec and Btk, another member of this family, together participate in the development of B-cell immune system. We previously identified one of the downstream messengers for human Tec kinase, BRDG1. BRDG1 is associated with Tec and becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in B-cells by the engagement of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). Here we show that overexpression of BRDG1 strongly augments BCR-mediated activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) but not that of c-Jun and the promoters of c-MYC and BCL-xL genes. Furthermore, we isolated the murine orthologue of BRDG1. Three isoforms of BRDG1 are generated by alternative splicing of the message. Two of them have a deletion of 33 amino acids in a Pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of BRDG1. Both the tyrosine-phosphorylation and CREB-activating ability of BRDG1 were isoform-dependent, suggesting a role of the PH domain of BRDG1. These data have identified a novel regulatory mechanism of CREB family of transcriptional factors.

  14. Metabolomic analysis of human oral cancer cells with adenylate kinase 2 or phosphorylate glycerol kinase 1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Cui, Li; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Siliangyu; Messadi, Diana; Yan, Xinmin; Hu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with XCMS for a quantitative metabolomic analysis of UM1 and UM2 oral cancer cells after knockdown of metabolic enzyme adenylate kinase 2 (AK2) or phosphorylate glycerol kinase 1 (PGK1). UM1 and UM2 cells were initially transfected with AK2 siRNA, PGK1 siRNA or scrambled control siRNA, and then analyzed with LC-MS for metabolic profiles. XCMS analysis of the untargeted metabolomics data revealed a total of 3200-4700 metabolite features from the transfected UM1 or UM2 cancer cells and 369-585 significantly changed metabolites due to AK2 or PGK1 suppression. In addition, cluster analysis showed that a common group of metabolites were altered by AK2 knockdown or by PGK1 knockdown between the UM1 and UM2 cells. However, the set of significantly changed metabolites due to AK2 knockdown was found to be distinct from those significantly changed by PGK1 knockdown. Our study has demonstrated that LC-MS with XCMS is an efficient tool for metabolomic analysis of oral cancer cells, and knockdown of different genes results in distinct changes in metabolic phenotypes in oral cancer cells. PMID:28243334

  15. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  16. The energy profiles of atomic conformational transition intermediates of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaping; Yang, Lei; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L

    2009-11-15

    The elastic network interpolation (ENI) (Kim et al., Biophys J 2002;83:1620-1630) is a computationally efficient and physically realistic method to generate conformational transition intermediates between two forms of a given protein. However it can be asked whether these calculated conformations provide good representatives for these intermediates. In this study, we use ENI to generate conformational transition intermediates between the open form and the closed form of adenylate kinase (AK). Based on C(alpha)-only intermediates, we construct atomic intermediates by grafting all the atoms of known AK structures onto the C(alpha) atoms and then perform CHARMM energy minimization to remove steric conflicts and optimize these intermediate structures. We compare the energy profiles for all intermediates from both the CHARMM force-field and from knowledge-based energy functions. We find that the CHARMM energies can successfully capture the two energy minima representing the open AK and closed AK forms, while the energies computed from the knowledge-based energy functions can detect the local energy minimum representing the closed AK form and show some general features of the transition pathway with a somewhat similar energy profile as the CHARMM energies. The combinatorial extension structural alignment (Shindyalov et al., 1998;11:739-747) and the k-means clustering algorithm are then used to show that known PDB structures closely resemble computed intermediates along the transition pathway.

  17. Metabolic compensation for profound erythrocyte adenylate kinase deficiency. A hereditary enzyme defect without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E; Carson, D; Dannawi, H; Forman, L; Kuhl, W; West, C; Westwood, B

    1983-01-01

    A child with hemolytic anemia was found to have severe erythrocyte adenylate kinase (AK) deficiency, but an equally enzyme-deficient sibling had no evidence of hemolysis. No residual enzyme activity was found in erythrocytes by spectrophotometric methods that could easily have detected 0.1% of normal activity. However, concentrated hemolysates were shown to have the capacity to generate small amounts of ATP and AMP from ADP after prolonged incubation. Hemolysates could also catalyze the transfer of labeled gamma-phosphate from ATP to ADP. Intact erythrocytes were able to transfer phosphate from the gamma-position of ATP to the beta-position, albeit at a rate substantially slower than normal. They could also incorporate 14C-labeled adenine into ADP and ATP. Thus, a small amount of residual AK-like activity representing about 1/2,000 of the activity normally present could be documented in the deficient erythrocytes. The residual activity was not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, which completely abolishes the activity of the normal AK1 isozyme of erythrocytes. The minute amount of residual activity in erythrocytes could represent a small amount of the AK2 isozyme, which has not been thought to be present in erythrocytes, or the activity of erythrocyte guanylate kinase with AMP substituting as substrate for GMP. Peripheral blood leukocytes, cultured skin fibroblasts, and transformed lymphoblasts from the deficient subject manifested about 17, 24, and 74%, respectively, of the activity of the concurrent controls. This residual activity is consistent with the existence of genetically independent AK isozyme, AK2, which is known to exist in these tissues. The cause of hemolysis in the proband was not identified. Possibilities include an unrelated enzyme deficiency or other erythrocyte enzyme defect and intraction of another unidentified defect with AK deficiency. PMID:6308059

  18. Adenylate cyclase, cyclic AMP and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 in airway smooth muscle: modulation by protein kinase C and growth serum.

    PubMed Central

    Moughal, N; Stevens, P A; Kong, D; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1995-01-01

    Bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulate adenylate cyclase activity in serum-depleted cultured airway smooth muscle via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. The probable target is the type II adenylate cyclase, which can integrate coincident signals from both PKC and Gs. Therefore, activation of Gs (by cholera-toxin pre-treatment) amplified the bradykinin-stimulated cyclic AMP signal and concurrently attenuated the partial activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2) by bradykinin. We have previously demonstrated that, in order to induce full activation of ERK-2 with bradykinin, it is necessary to obliterate PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP formation. We concluded that the cyclic AMP signal limits the magnitude of ERK-2 activation [Pyne, Moughal, Stevens, Tolan and Pyne (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 611-616]. The present study indicates that the bradykinin-stimulated ERK-2 pathway is entirely cyclic AMP-sensitive, and suggests that coincident signal detection by adenylate cyclase may be an important physiological route for the modulation of early mitogenic signalling. Furthermore, the direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity enables bradykinin to induce DNA synthesis, indicating that the PKC-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase limits entry of cells into the cell cycle. These studies suggest that the mitogenicity of an agonist may be governed, in part, by its ability to stimulate an inhibitory cyclic AMP signal pathway in the cell. The activation of adenylate cyclase by PKC appears to be downstream of phospholipase D. However, in cells that were maintained in growth serum (i.e. were not growth-arrested), bradykinin was unable to elicit a PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP response. The lesion in the signal-response coupling was not at the level of either the receptor or phospholipase D, which remain functionally operative and suggests modification occurs at either PKC or adenylate cyclase itself. These studies are discussed with

  19. Modulation of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium tunes adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ådén, Jörgen; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-10-10

    Structural plasticity is often required for distinct microscopic steps during enzymatic reaction cycles. Adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli (AK(eco)) populates two major conformations in solution; the open (inactive) and closed (active) state, and the overall turnover rate is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the active conformation. Therefore, structural plasticity is intimately coupled to enzymatic turnover in AK(eco). Here, we probe the open to closed conformational equilibrium in the absence of bound substrate with NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational equilibrium in absence of substrate and, in turn, the turnover number can be modulated with mutational- and osmolyte-driven perturbations. Removal of one hydrogen bond between the ATP and AMP binding subdomains results in a population shift toward the open conformation and a resulting increase of k(cat). Addition of the osmolyte TMAO to AK(eco) results in population shift toward the closed conformation and a significant reduction of k(cat). The Michaelis constants (K(M)) scale with the change in k(cat), which follows from the influence of the population of the closed conformation for substrate binding affinity. Hence, k(cat) and K(M) are mutually dependent, and in the case of AK(eco), any perturbation that modulates k(cat) is mirrored with a proportional response in K(M). Thus, our results demonstrate that the equilibrium constant of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium directly affects enzymatic catalysis. From an evolutionary perspective, our findings suggest that, for AK(eco), there exists ample flexibility to obtain a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) that commensurate with the exerted cellular selective pressure.

  20. Zipping and Unzipping of Adenylate Kinase: Atomistic Insights into the Ensemble of Open ↔ Closed Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Beckstein, Oliver; Denning, Elizabeth J.; Perilla, Juan R.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AdK), a phosphotransferase enzyme, plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. It undergoes a large conformational change between an open and a closed state, even in the absence of substrate. We investigate the apo-AdK transition at the atomic level both with free energy calculations and our new dynamic importance sampling (DIMS) molecular dynamics (MD) method. DIMS is shown to sample biologically relevant conformations as verified by comparing an ensemble of hundreds of DIMS transitions to AdK crystal structure intermediates. The simulations reveal in atomic detail how hinge regions partially and intermittently unfold during the transition. Conserved salt bridges are seen to have important structural and dynamic roles; in particular four ionic bonds are identified that open in a sequential, zipper-like fashion and thus dominate the free energy landscape of the transition. Transitions between the closed and open conformations only have to overcome moderate free energy barriers. Unexpectedly, the closed and open state encompass broad free energy basins that contain conformations differing in domain hinge motions by up to 40°. The significance of these extended states is discussed in relation to recent experimental FRET measurements. Taken together, these results demonstrate how a small number of cooperative key interactions can shape the overall dynamics of an enzyme and suggest an “all-or-nothing” mechanism for the opening and closing of AdK. Our efficient DIMS-MD computer simulation approach can provide a detailed picture of a functionally important macromolecular transition and thus help to interpret and suggest experiments to probe the conformational landscape of dynamic proteins such as AdK. PMID:19751742

  1. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  2. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  3. Identification of valine/leucine/isoleucine and threonine/alanine/glycine proton-spin systems of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase by selective deuteration and selective protonation.

    PubMed Central

    Bock-Möbius, I; Brune, M; Wittinghofer, A; Zimmermann, H; Leberman, R; Dauvergne, M T; Zimmermann, S; Brandmeier, B; Rösch, P

    1991-01-01

    Adenylate kinase from two types of Escherichia coli strains, a wild-type and a leucine-auxotrophic strain, was purified. On the one hand, growing the leucine-auxotrophic bacteria on a medium containing deuterated leucine yielded E. coli adenylate kinase with all leucine residues deuterated. On the other hand, by growing the wild-type bacteria on deuterated medium with phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine present as protonated specimens, 80% randomly deuterated enzyme with protonated phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine residues could be prepared. Use of these proteins enabled identification of the spin systems of these amino acid residues in the n.m.r. spectra of the protein. PMID:1991031

  4. Unravelling the different functions of protein kinase C isoforms in platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Poole, Alastair W

    2011-06-23

    Platelets tightly regulate haemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in most platelet responses implicated in thrombus formation. Recent pharmacological and mouse gene knockout approaches show that the conventional PKC isoforms and the novel PKC isoforms contribute in distinct ways to these platelet responses. We hypothesize that, in platelets and other cells, the characteristic functions of PKC isoforms are established through unique activation mechanisms and unique interacting protein partners, which result in isoform-specific patterns of substrate phosphorylation. For identifying the substrate proteins in a living cell, new methodology is available and discussed.

  5. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  6. AMP promotes oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in heart mitochondria through the adenylate kinase reaction: an NMR spectroscopy and polarography study.

    PubMed

    Doliba, Nicolai M; Babsky, Andriy M; Doliba, Nataliya M; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Osbakken, Mary D

    2015-03-01

    Adenylate kinase plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis by catalysing the interconversion of adenine nucleotides. The goal of present study was to evaluate the contribution of the adenylate kinase reaction to oxidative ATP synthesis by direct measurements of ATP using (31) P NMR spectroscopy. Results show that AMP can stimulate ATP synthesis in the presence or absence of ADP. In particular, addition of 1 mM AMP to the 0.6 mM ADP superfusion system of isolated superfused mitochondria (contained and maintained in agarose beads) led to a 25% increase in ATP synthesis as measured by the increase in βATP signal. More importantly, we show that AMP can support ATP synthesis in the absence of ADP, demonstrated as follows. Superfusion of mitochondria without ADP led to the disappearance of ATP γ, α and β signals and the increase of Pi . Addition of AMP to the medium restored the production of ATP, as demonstrated by the reappearance of γ, α and β ATP signals, in conjunction with a decrease in Pi , which is being used for ATP synthesis. Polarographic studies showed Mg(2+) dependence of this process, confirming the specificity of the adenylate kinase reaction. Furthermore, data obtained from this study demonstrate, for the first time, that different aspects of the adenylate kinase reaction can be evaluated with (31) P NMR spectroscopy. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESEARCH PARAGRAPH: The data generated in the present study indicate that (31) P NMR spectroscopy can effectively be used to study the adenylate kinase reaction under a variety of conditions. This is important because understanding of adenylate kinase function and/or malfunction is essential to understanding its role in health and disease. The data obtained with (31) P NMR were confirmed by polarographic studies, which further strengthens the robustness of the NMR findings. In summary, (31) P NMR spectroscopy provides a sensitive tool to study adenylate kinase activity in different physiological and

  7. Structural characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei adenylate kinase (Adk): Profound asymmetry in the crystal structure of the ‘open’ state

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    In all organisms adenylate kinases (Adks) play a vital role in cellular energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. Due to differences in catalytic properties between the Adks found in prokaryotes and in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes, there is interest in targeting this enzyme for new drugs therapies against infectious bacterial agents. Here we report the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure for the 220-residue Adk from Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpAdk), the etiological agent responsible for the infectious disease meliodosis. The general structure of apo BpAdk is similar to other Adk structures, composed of a CORE subdomain with peripheral ATP-binding (ATPbd) and LID subdomains. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit have significantly different conformations, with a backbone RMSD of 1.46 Å. These two BpAdk conformations may represent ‘open’ Adk sub-states along the preferential pathway to the ‘closed’ substrate-bound state. PMID:20331978

  8. Structural characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei adenylate kinase (Adk): Profound asymmetry in the crystal structure of the 'open' state

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, G.W.; Robinson, H.; Abendroth, J.; Staker, B. L.; Myler, P. J.

    2010-04-16

    In all organisms adenylate kinases (Adks) play a vital role in cellular energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. Due to differences in catalytic properties between the Adks found in prokaryotes and in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes, there is interest in targeting this enzyme for new drug therapies against infectious bacterial agents. Here we report the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure for the 220-residue Adk from Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpAdk), the etiological agent responsible for the infectious disease melioidosis. The general structure of apo BpAdk is similar to other Adk structures, composed of a CORE subdomain with peripheral ATP-binding (ATP{sub bd}) and LID subdomains. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit have significantly different conformations, with a backbone RMSD of 1.46 {angstrom}. These two BpAdk conformations may represent 'open' Adk sub-states along the preferential pathway to the 'closed' substrate-bound state.

  9. Understanding thermal adaptation of enzymes through the multistate rational design and stability prediction of 100 adenylate kinases.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Inampudi, Krishna Kishore; Bean, Doyle P; Wilson, Corey J

    2014-02-04

    Careful balance between structural stability and flexibility is a hallmark of enzymatic function, and temperature can affect both properties. Canonical (fixed-backbone) enzyme design strategies currently do not consider the role of these properties. Herein, we describe the rational design of 100 temperature-adapted adenylate kinase enzymes using a multistate design strategy that incorporates the impact of conformational changes to backbone structure and stability, in addition to experimental analysis of thermostability and function. Comparison of the experimental temperature of maximum activity to the melting temperature across all 100 variants reveals a strong correlation between these two parameters. In turn, experimental stability data were used to produce accurate predictions of thermostability, providing the requisite complement for de novo temperature-adapted enzyme design. In principle, this level of design-based analysis can be applied to any protein, paving the way toward identifying and understanding the hallmarks of the thermodynamic and structural limits of function.

  10. Detection of somatic coliphages through a bioluminescence assay measuring phage mediated release of adenylate kinase and adenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Luna, Carolina; Costán-Longares, Ana; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Joan

    2009-10-01

    The feasibility of detecting somatic coliphages by phage infection of Escherichia coli WG5 and measurement of phage propagation by the lysis mediated release of the bacterial host adenylate kinase (AK) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) detected by a bioluminescent signal was evaluated. After 2h of incubation, all cultures infected with reference bacteriophage phiX174 showed a significant increase in the bioluminescent signal, even with number of phages as low as less of 10 plaque forming units (PFU). Naturally occurring somatic coliphages ensured a significant bioluminescent signal after 3h of infection when >10 PFU were inoculated. These results indicate that an easy and reliable method to detect low numbers of coliphages in less than 3h is feasible.

  11. Roles of Protein Kinase A and Adenylate Cyclase in Light-Modulated Cellulase Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, André; Tisch, Doris; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway represents a central signaling cascade with crucial functions in all organisms. Previous studies of Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) suggested a function of cAMP signaling in regulation of cellulase gene expression. We were therefore interested in how the crucial components of this pathway, adenylate cyclase (ACY1) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), would affect cellulase gene expression. We found that both ACY1 and PKA catalytic subunit 1 (PKAC1) are involved in regulation of vegetative growth but are not essential for sexual development. Interestingly, our results showed considerably increased transcript abundance of cellulase genes in darkness compared to light (light responsiveness) upon growth on lactose. This effect is strongly enhanced in mutant strains lacking PKAC1 or ACY1. Comparison to the wild type showed that ACY1 has a consistently positive effect on cellulase gene expression in light and darkness, while PKAC1 influences transcript levels of cellulase genes positively in light but negatively in darkness. A function of PKAC1 in light-modulated cellulase gene regulation is also reflected by altered complex formation within the cel6a/cbh2 promoter in light and darkness and in the absence of pkac1. Analysis of transcript levels of cellulase regulator genes indicates that the regulatory output of the cAMP pathway may be established via adjustment of XYR1 abundance. Consequently, both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A are involved in light-modulated cellulase gene expression in T. reesei and have a dampening effect on the light responsiveness of this process. PMID:22286997

  12. Neuronal and intestinal protein kinase d isoforms mediate Na+ (salt taste)-induced learning.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ya; Ren, Min; Feng, Hui; Chen, Lu; Altun, Zeynep F; Rubin, Charles S

    2009-08-11

    Ubiquitously expressed protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are poised to disseminate signals carried by diacylglycerol (DAG). However, the in vivo regulation and functions of PKDs are poorly understood. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, dkf-2, encodes not just DKF-2A, but also a second previously unknown isoform, DKF-2B. Whereas DKF-2A is present mainly in intestine, we show that DKF-2B is found in neurons. Characterization of dkf-2 null mutants and transgenic animals expressing DKF-2B, DKF-2A, or both isoforms revealed that PKDs couple DAG signals to regulation of sodium ion (Na+)-induced learning. EGL-8 (a phospholipase Cbeta4 homolog) and TPA-1 (a protein kinase Cdelta homolog) are upstream regulators of DKF-2 isoforms in vivo. Thus, pathways containing EGL-8-TPA-1-DKF-2 enable learning and behavioral plasticity by receiving, transmitting, and cooperatively integrating environmental signals targeted to both neurons and intestine.

  13. Relationship between bacterial virulence and nucleotide metabolism: a mutation in the adenylate kinase gene renders Yersinia pestis avirulent.

    PubMed Central

    Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Ionescu, Mihaela; Chrisova, Petya; Foulon, Jeannine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bârzu, Octavian

    2003-01-01

    Nucleoside monophosphate kinases (NMPKs) are essential catalysts for bacterial growth and multiplication. These enzymes display high primary sequence identities among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, belongs to this family. However, it was previously shown that its thymidylate kinase (TMPKyp) exhibits biochemical properties significantly different from those of its Escherichia coli counterpart [Chenal-Francisque, Tourneux, Carniel, Christova, Li de la Sierra, Barzu and Gilles (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 265, 112-119]. In this work, the adenylate kinase (AK) of Y. pestis (AKyp) was characterized. As with TMPKyp, AKyp displayed a lower thermodynamic stability than other studied AKs. Two mutations in AK (Ser129Phe and Pro87Ser), previously shown to induce a thermosensitive growth defect in E. coli, were introduced into AKyp. The recombinant variants had a lower stability than wild-type AKyp and a higher susceptibility to proteolytic digestion. When the Pro87Ser substitution was introduced into the chromosomal adk gene of Y. pestis, growth of the mutant strain was altered at the non-permissive temperature of 37 degree C. In virulence testings, less than 50 colony forming units (CFU) of wild-type Y. pestis killed 100% of the mice upon subcutaneous infection, whereas bacterial loads as high as 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of the adk mutant were unable to kill any animals. PMID:12879903

  14. Evidence for multiple protein kinase C isoforms in the leukocytes of a marine teleost, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Mericko, P A; Burnett, K G

    1998-05-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of isozymes mediates a diverse range of cellular functions, including activation of vertebrate lymphocytes through membrane-bound antigen receptors. The complex role of PKC in mammalian cells may be orchestrated in part by the presence of multiple isoforms, each of which displays a distinctive tissue distribution, substrate specificity and pattern of regulation. In the present study, PKC isoforms were identified in peripheral blood leukocytes of the marine teleost fish Sciaenops ocellatus by immunoprecipitation and Western blot using antibodies to mammalian isoforms. Functional activity was monitored by evaluating translocation of the teleost isoforms from membrane to cytosol in response to phorbol ester treatment. Teleost conventional isoforms PKC alpha and PKC beta (82 kDa) completely translocated out of the cytosol in response to phorbol ester. Phorbol ester did not induce translocation of teleost atypical isoform PKC zeta (67 kDa), as has been shown for its mammalian homologue. Although their identity as distinct isoforms is less clear, proposed teleost novel PKC delta (84, 86 kDa) and PKC eta (83, 85 kDa) also translocated out of the cytosol. The presence of multiple isoforms representing each of the three major classes of PKC in red drum leukocytes implies that the complexity of signal transduction pathways in vertebrates is highly conserved.

  15. Interferon-. alpha. selectively activates the. beta. isoform of protein kinase C through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, L.M.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Strulovici, B. )

    1990-09-01

    The early events that occur after interferon binds to discrete cell surface receptors remain largely unknown. Human leukocyte interferon (interferon-{alpha}) rapidly increases the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate to intact HeLa cells a measure of protein kinase C activation, and induces the selective translocation of the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of HeLa cells. The subcellular distribution of the {alpha} and {epsilon} isoforms is unaffected by interferon-{alpha} treatment. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters mimics the inhibitory action of interferon-{alpha} on HeLa cell proliferation and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the induction of antiviral activity by interferon-{alpha} in HeLa cells. Increased phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and phosphorylcholine production is accompanied by diacylglycerol production in response to interferon. However, inositol phospholipid turnover and free intracellular calcium concentration are unaffected. These results suggest that the transient increase in diacylglycerol, resulting from phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, may selectively activate the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C. Moreover, the activation of protein kinase C is a necessary element in interferon action on cells.

  16. A minor conformation of a lanthanide tag on adenylate kinase characterized by paramagnetic relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Liu, Wei-Min; Agafonov, Roman V; Otten, Renee; Phung, Lien A; Schilder, Jesika T; Kern, Dorothee; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2015-02-01

    NMR relaxation dispersion techniques provide a powerful method to study protein dynamics by characterizing lowly populated conformations that are in dynamic exchange with the major state. Paramagnetic NMR is a versatile tool for investigating the structures and dynamics of proteins. These two techniques were combined here to measure accurate and precise pseudocontact shifts of a lowly populated conformation. This method delivers valuable long-range structural restraints for higher energy conformations of macromolecules in solution. Another advantage of combining pseudocontact shifts with relaxation dispersion is the increase in the amplitude of dispersion profiles. Lowly populated states are often involved in functional processes, such as enzyme catalysis, signaling, and protein/protein interactions. The presented results also unveil a critical problem with the lanthanide tag used to generate paramagnetic relaxation dispersion effects in proteins, namely that the motions of the tag can interfere severely with the observation of protein dynamics. The two-point attached CLaNP-5 lanthanide tag was linked to adenylate kinase. From the paramagnetic relaxation dispersion only motion of the tag is observed. The data can be described accurately by a two-state model in which the protein-attached tag undergoes a 23° tilting motion on a timescale of milliseconds. The work demonstrates the large potential of paramagnetic relaxation dispersion and the challenge to improve current tags to minimize relaxation dispersion from tag movements.

  17. Secretion of adenylate kinase 1 is required for extracellular ATP synthesis in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Bong-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Bong; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (exATP) has been known to be a critical ligand regulating skeletal muscle differentiation and contractibility. ExATP synthesis was greatly increased with the high level of adenylate kinase 1 (AK1) and ATP synthase β during C2C12 myogenesis. The exATP synthesis was abolished by the knock-down of AK1 but not by that of ATP synthase β in C2C12 myotubes, suggesting that AK1 is required for exATP synthesis in myotubes. However, membrane-bound AK1β was not involved in exATP synthesis because its expression level was decreased during myogenesis in spite of its localization in the lipid rafts that contain various kinds of receptors and mediate cell signal transduction, cell migration, and differentiation. Interestingly, cytoplasmic AK1 was secreted from C2C12 myotubes but not from C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together all these data, we can conclude that AK1 secretion is required for the exATP generation in myotubes. PMID:18446060

  18. Molecular cloning, subcellular localization and characterization of two adenylate kinases from cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. KU50.

    PubMed

    Boonrueng, Channarong; Tangpranomkorn, Surachat; Yazhisai, Uthaman; Sirikantaramas, Supaart

    2016-10-01

    Adenylate kinase (ADK) is a phosphotransferase that plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. Many isozymes located in different subcellular compartments have been reported. In this study, we focus on the characterization of cassava (Manihot esculenta) ADKs. We found 15 ADKs that are publicly available in the African cassava genome database. We cloned two ADKs, namely MeADK1 and MeADK2, which are phylogenetically grouped together with the plastidial ADK in potato. Both MeADK1 and MeADK2 showed 66% identity in the amino acid sequences with plastidial ADK in potato. However, we demonstrated that they are localized to mitochondria using GFP fusions of MeADK1 and MeADK2. The Escherichia coli-produced recombinant MeADK1 and MeADK2 preferred forward reactions that produce ATP. They exhibited similar specific activities. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MeADK1 and MeADK2 in 2-month-old leaves have similar expression patterns under a diurnal light-dark cycle. However, MeADK2 transcripts were expressed at much higher levels than MeADK1 in 5-month-old leaves and roots. Thus, we conclude that MeADK2 might play a vital role in energy homeostasis in cassava mitochondria.

  19. Conformational heterogeneity within the LID domain mediates substrate binding to Escherichia coli adenylate kinase: function follows fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Travis P; Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exist as dynamic ensembles of molecules, implying that protein amino acid sequences evolved to code for both the ground state structure as well as the entire energy landscape of excited states. Accumulating theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that enzymes use such conformational fluctuations to facilitate allosteric processes important for substrate binding and possibly catalysis. This phenomenon can be clearly demonstrated in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase, where experimentally observed local unfolding of the LID subdomain, as opposed to a more commonly postulated rigid-body opening motion, is related to substrate binding. Because "entropy promoting" glycine mutations designed to increase specifically the local unfolding of the LID domain also affect substrate binding, changes in the excited energy landscape effectively tune the function of this enzyme without changing the ground state structure or the catalytic site. Thus, additional thermodynamic information, above and beyond the single folded structure of an enzyme-substrate complex, is likely required for a full and quantitative understanding of how enzymes work.

  20. Tyrosine phosphorylation on spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is differentially regulated in human and murine platelets by protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Dangelmaier, Carol; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Borgognone, Alessandra; Tsygankov, Alexander Y; McKenzie, Steven E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-10-04

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms differentially regulate platelet functional responses downstream of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) signaling, but the role of PKCs regulating upstream effectors such as Syk is not known. We investigated the role of PKC on Syk tyrosine phosphorylation using the pan-PKC inhibitor GF109203X (GFX). GPVI-mediated phosphorylation on Syk Tyr-323, Tyr-352, and Tyr-525/526 was rapidly dephosphorylated, but GFX treatment inhibited this dephosphorylation on Tyr-525/526 in human platelets but not in wild type murine platelets. GFX treatment did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on FcRγ chain or Src family kinases. Phosphorylation of Lat Tyr-191 and PLCγ2 Tyr-759 was also increased upon treatment with GFX. We evaluated whether secreted ADP is required for such dephosphorylation. Exogenous addition of ADP to GFX-treated platelets did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on Syk. FcγRIIA- or CLEC-2-mediated Syk tyrosine phosphorylation was also potentiated with GFX in human platelets. Because potentiation of Syk phosphorylation is not observed in murine platelets, PKC-deficient mice cannot be used to identify the PKC isoform regulating Syk phosphorylation. We therefore used selective inhibitors of PKC isoforms. Only PKCβ inhibition resulted in Syk hyperphosphorylation similar to that in platelets treated with GFX. This result indicates that PKCβ is the isoform responsible for Syk negative regulation in human platelets. In conclusion, we have elucidated a novel pathway of Syk regulation by PKCβ in human platelets.

  1. A New Type of Metal-Binding Site in Cobalt- And Zinc-Containing Adenylate Kinases Isolated From Sulfate-Reducers D. Gigas And D. Desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, O.Y.; Bursakov, S.A.; Rocco, G.Di; Trincao, J.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Calvete, J.J.; Brondino, C.; Pereira, A.S.; Lampreia, J.; Tavares, P.; Moura, J.J.G.; Moura, I.

    2009-05-18

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterized in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the 'LID' domain. The sequence {sup 129}Cys-X{sub 5}-His-X{sub 15}-Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  2. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility.

  3. Biochemical properties of human pantothenate kinase 2 isoforms and mutations linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2006-01-06

    The PANK2 gene encodes the human pantothenate kinase 2 protein isoforms, and PANK2 mutations are linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Two PanK2 protein forms are proteolytically processed to form a mitochondrially localized, mature PanK2. Another isoform arose from a proposed initiation at a leucine codon and was not processed further. The fifth isoform was postulated to arise from an alternative splicing event and was found to encode an inactive protein. Fourteen mutant PanK2 proteins with single amino acid substitutions, associated with either early or late onset disease, were evaluated for activity. The PanK2(G521R), the most frequent mutation in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, was devoid of activity and did not fold properly. However, nine of the mutant proteins associated with disease possessed catalytic activities that were indistinguishable from wild type, including the frequently encountered PanK2(T528M) missense mutation. PanK2 was extremely sensitive to feedback inhibition by CoA thioesters (IC50 values between 250 and 500 nM), and the regulation of the active PanK2 mutants was comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Coexpression of the PanK2(G521R) and wild-type PanK2 did not interfere with wild-type enzyme activity, arguing against a dominant negative effect of the PanK2(G521R) mutation in heterozygous patients. These data described the unique biochemical features of the PanK2 isoforms and suggested that catalytic defects may not be the sole cause for the neurodegenerative phenotype.

  4. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  5. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  6. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  7. Adenylate Charge Regulates Sensor Kinase CheS3 To Control Cyst Formation in Rhodospirillum centenum

    PubMed Central

    He, Kuang; Dragnea, Vladimira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodospirillum centenum forms metabolically dormant cysts under unfavorable growth conditions such as desiccation or nutrient starvation. The development of cysts is tightly regulated and involves a cyst-repressing chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathway called the Che3 signaling cascade. The Che3 cascade is comprised of a methyl chemoreceptor (MCP3), receptor-methylating/demethylating proteins CheB3 and CheR3, two CheW3 linker proteins, a CheA3-CheY hybrid histidine kinase, and a single-domain response regulator, CheY3. In addition to Che-like components, the Che3 cascade also contains a second hybrid histidine kinase, CheS3. Recent biochemical and genetic studies show that CheA3 does not serve as a phosphor donor for CheY3; instead, CheA3 inhibits a CheS3→CheY3 two-component system by phosphorylating an inhibitory receiver domain of CheS3. In this study, we show that in addition to phosphorylation by CheA3, the phosphorylation state of CheS3 is also regulated by the cellular energy level as quantified by the molar ratio of ATP/(ATP + ADP). A 35% decrease in cellular energy is shown to occur in vivo upon a nutrient downshift that gives rise to cyst formation. When this energy decline is replicated in vitro, the phosphorylation level of CheS3 is reduced by ~75%. Finally, we also show that ADP-mediated reduction of CheS3 phosphorylation is a consequence of ADP enhancing autodephosphorylation of CheS3. PMID:25944862

  8. hCINAP is an atypical mammalian nuclear adenylate kinase with an ATPase motif: Structural and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Drakou, Christina E.; Malekkou, Anna; Hayes, Joseph M.; Lederer, Carsten W.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Lamond, Angus I.; Santama, Niovi; Zographos, Spyros E.

    2013-01-01

    Human coilin interacting nuclear ATPase protein (hCINAP) directly interacts with coilin, a marker protein of Cajal Bodies (CBs), nuclear organelles involved in the maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins UsnRNPs and snoRNPs. hCINAP has previously been designated as an adenylate kinase (AK6), but is very atypical as it exhibits unusually broad substrate specificity, structural features characteristic of ATPase/GTPase proteins (Walker motifs A and B) and also intrinsic ATPase activity. Despite its intriguing structure, unique properties and cellular localization, the enzymatic mechanism and biological function of hCINAP have remained poorly characterized. Here, we offer the first high-resolution structure of hCINAP in complex with the substrate ADP (and dADP), the structure of hCINAP with a sulfate ion bound at the AMP binding site, and the structure of the ternary complex hCINAP-Mg2+ADP-Pi. Induced fit docking calculations are used to predict the structure of the hCINAP-Mg2+ATP-AMP ternary complex. Structural analysis suggested a functional role for His79 in the Walker B motif. Kinetic analysis of mutant hCINAP-H79G indicates that His79 affects both AK and ATPase catalytic efficiency and induces homodimer formation. Finally, we show that in vivo expression of hCINAP-H79G in human cells is toxic and drastically deregulates the number and appearance of CBs in the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that hCINAP may not simply regulate nucleotide homeostasis, but may have broader functionality, including control of CB assembly and disassembly in the nucleus of human cells. PMID:22038794

  9. Event detection and sub-state discovery from biomolecular simulations using higher-order statistics: application to enzyme adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J; Agarwal, Pratul K; Chennubhotla, Chakra S

    2012-11-01

    Biomolecular simulations at millisecond and longer time-scales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Because post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory datasets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA) (Ramanathan et al., PLoS One 2011;6:e15827), for partitioning the conformational landscape into a hierarchy of functionally relevant sub-states. The unique capabilities of QAA are enabled by exploiting anharmonicity in the form of fourth-order statistics for characterizing atomic fluctuations. In this article, we extend QAA for analyzing long time-scale simulations online. In particular, we present HOST4MD--a higher-order statistical toolbox for molecular dynamics simulations, which (1) identifies key dynamical events as simulations are in progress, (2) explores potential sub-states, and (3) identifies conformational transitions that enable the protein to access those sub-states. We demonstrate HOST4MD on microsecond timescale simulations of the enzyme adenylate kinase in its apo state. HOST4MD identifies several conformational events in these simulations, revealing how the intrinsic coupling between the three subdomains (LID, CORE, and NMP) changes during the simulations. Further, it also identifies an inherent asymmetry in the opening/closing of the two binding sites. We anticipate that HOST4MD will provide a powerful and extensible framework for detecting biophysically relevant conformational coordinates from long time-scale simulations.

  10. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  11. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-01-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme. Images PMID:2869483

  12. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  13. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness.

  14. New isozyme systems for maize (Zea mays L.): aconitate hydratase, adenylate kinase, NADH dehydrogenase, and shikimate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wendel, J F; Goodman, M M; Stuber, C W; Beckett, J B

    1988-06-01

    Electrophoretic variation and inheritance of four novel enzyme systems were studied in maize (Zea mays L.). A minimum of 10 genetic loci collectively encodes isozymes of aconitate hydratase (ACO; EC 4.2.1.3.), adenylate kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.4.3), NADH dehydrogenase (DIA; EC 1.6.99.-), and shikimate dehydrogenase (SAD; EC 1.1.1.25). At least four loci are responsible for the genetic control of ACO. Genetic data for two of the encoding loci, Aco1 and Aco4, demonstrated that at least two maize ACOs are active as monomers. Analysis of organellar preparations suggests that ACO1 and ACO4 are localized in the cytosolic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions, respectively. Maize ADK is encoded by a single nuclear locus, Adk1, governing monomeric enzymes that are located in the chloroplasts. Two cytosolic and two mitochondrial forms of DIA were electrophoretically resolved. Segregation analyses demonstrated that the two cytosolic isozymes are controlled by separate loci, Dia1 and Dia2, coding for products that are functional as monomers (DIA1) and dimers (DIA2). The major isozyme of SAD is apparently cytosolic, although an additional faintly staining plastid form may be present. Alleles at Sad1 are each associated with two bands that cosegregate in controlled crosses. Linkage analyses and crosses with B-A translocation stocks were effective in determining the map locations of six loci, including the previously described but unmapped locus Acp4. Several of these loci were localized to sparsely mapped regions of the genome. Dia2 and Acp4 were placed on the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 1, 12.6 map units apart. Dia1 was localized to chromosome 2, 22.2 centimorgans (cM) from B1. Aco1 was mapped to chromosome 4, 6.2 cM from su1. Adk1 was placed on the poorly marked short arm of chromosome 6, 8.1 map units from rgd1. Less than 1% recombination was observed between Glu1 (on chromosome 10) and Sad1. In contrast to many other maize isozyme systems, there was little

  15. Crystal structure of a trimeric archaeal adenylate kinase from the mesophile Methanococcus maripaludis with an unusually broad functional range and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Davlieva, Milya; Shamoo, Yousif

    2010-02-01

    The structure of the trimeric adenylate kinase from the Archaebacteria Methanococcus mariplaludis (AK(MAR)) has been solved to 2.5-A resolution and the temperature dependent stability and kinetics of the enzyme measured. The K(M) and V(max) of AK(MAR) exhibit only modest temperature dependence from 30 degrees -60 degrees C. Although M. mariplaludis is a mesophile with a maximum growth temperature of 43 degrees C, AK(MAR) has a very broad functional range and stability (T(m) = 74.0 degrees C) that are more consistent with a thermophilic enzyme with high thermostability and exceptional activity over a wide range of temperatures, suggesting that this microbe may have only recently invaded a mesophilic niche and has yet to fully adapt. A comparison of the Local Structural Entropy (LSE) for AK(MAR) to the related adenylate kinases from the mesophile Methanococcus voltae and thermophile Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus show that changes in LSE are able to fully account for the intermediate stability of AK(MAR) and highlights a general mechanism for protein adaptation in this class of enzymes.

  16. Structural basis for isoform selectivity in a class of benzothiazole inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ.

    PubMed

    Collier, Philip N; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Cornebise, Mark; Cottrell, Kevin M; Doran, John D; Griffith, James P; Mahajan, Sudipta; Maltais, François; Moody, Cameron S; Huck, Emilie Porter; Wang, Tiansheng; Aronov, Alex M

    2015-01-08

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) is an attractive target to potentially treat a range of disease states. Herein, we describe the evolution of a reported phenylthiazole pan-PI3K inhibitor into a family of potent and selective benzothiazole inhibitors. Using X-ray crystallography, we discovered that compound 22 occupies a previously unreported hydrophobic binding cleft adjacent to the ATP binding site of PI3Kγ, and achieves its selectivity by exploiting natural sequence differences among PI3K isoforms in this region.

  17. Activation of Protein Kinase C Isoforms & Its Impact on Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Geraldes, Pedro; King, George L

    2010-01-01

    Both cardio- and microvascular complications adversely affect the life quality of patients with diabetes and have been the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in this population. Cardiovascular pathologies of diabetes have an effect on microvenules, arteries, and myocardium. It is believed that hyperglycemia is one of the most important metabolic factors in the development of both micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Several prominent hypotheses exist to explain the adverse effect of hyperglycemia. One of them is the chronic activation by hyperglycemia of protein kinase C (PKC), a family of enzymes that are involved in controlling the function of other proteins. PKC has been associated with vascular alterations such as increases in permeability, contractility, extracellular matrix synthesis, cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, and cytokine activation and inhibition. These perturbations in vascular cell homeostasis caused by different PKC isoforms (PKC-α, -β1/2, and PKC-δ) are linked to the development of pathologies affecting large vessel (atherosclerosis, cardiomyopathy) and small vessel (retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) complications. Clinical trials using a PKC-β isoform inhibitor have been conducted, with some positive results for diabetic nonproliferative retinopathy, nephropathy and endothelial dysfunction. This paper reviews current understanding of how PKC isoforms cause vascular dysfunctions and pathologies in diabetes. PMID:20431074

  18. Dictyostelium discoideum has a single diacylglycerol kinase gene with similarity to mammalian theta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    De La Roche, Marc A; Smith, Janet L; Rico, Maribel; Carrasco, Silvia; Merida, Isabel; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the neutral lipid diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). In mammalian systems DGKs are a complex family of at least nine isoforms that are thought to participate in down-regulation of DG-based signalling pathways and perhaps activation of PA-stimulated signalling events. We report here that the simple protozoan amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum appears to contain a single gene encoding a DGK enzyme. This gene, dgkA, encodes a deduced protein that contains three C1-type cysteine-rich repeats, a DGK catalytic domain most closely related to the theta subtype of mammalian DGKs and a C-terminal segment containing a proline/glutamine-rich region and a large aspargine-repeat region. This gene corresponds to a previously reported myosin II heavy chain kinase designated myosin heavy chain-protein kinase C (MHC-PKC), but our analysis clearly demonstrates that this protein does not, as suggested by earlier data, contain a protein kinase catalytic domain. A FLAG-tagged version of DgkA expressed in Dictyostelium displayed robust DGK activity. Earlier studies indicating that disruption of this locus alters myosin II assembly levels in Dictyostelium raise the intriguing possibility that DG and/or PA metabolism may play a role in controlling myosin II assembly in this system. PMID:12296770

  19. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  20. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  1. Positioning atypical protein kinase C isoforms in the UV-induced apoptotic signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Berra, E; Municio, M M; Sanz, L; Frutos, S; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have documented the involvement of the atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and survival. Exposure of cells to a genotoxic stimulus that induces apoptosis, such as UV irradiation, leads to a profound inhibition of the atypical PKC activity in vivo. In this study, we addressed the relationship between this phenomenon and different proteins involved in the apoptotic response. We show that (i) the inhibition of the aPKC activity precedes UV-induced apoptosis; (ii) UV-induced aPKC inhibition and apoptosis are independent of p53; (iii) Bcl-2 proteins are potent modulators of aPKC activity; and (iv) the aPKCs are located upstream of the interleukin-converting enzyme-like protease system, which is required for the induction of apoptosis by both Par-4 (a selective aPKC inhibitor) and UV irradiation. We also demonstrate here that inhibition of aPKC activity leads to a decrease in mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity and simultaneously an increase in p38 activity. Both effects are critical for the induction of apoptosis in response to Par-4 expression and UV irradiation. Collectively, these results clarify the position of the aPKCs in the UV-induced apoptotic pathway and strongly suggest that MAP kinases play a role in this signaling cascade. PMID:9234692

  2. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylate kinase in complex with two molecules of ADP and Mg2+ supports an associative mechanism for phosphoryl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bellinzoni, Marco; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Shepard, William; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylate kinase (MtAK) in complex with two ADP molecules and Mg2+ has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison with the solution structure of the enzyme, obtained in the absence of substrates, shows significant conformational changes of the LID and NMP-binding domains upon substrate binding. The ternary complex represents the state of the enzyme at the start of the backward reaction (ATP synthesis). The structure is consistent with a direct nucleophilic attack of a terminal oxygen from the acceptor ADP molecule on the β-phosphate from the donor substrate, and both the geometry and the distribution of positive charge in the active site support the hypothesis of an associative mechanism for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:16672241

  3. Catalytic roles of lysines (K9, K27, K31) in the N-terminal domain in human adenylate kinase by random site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ayabe, T; Park, S K; Takenaka, H; Sumida, M; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, O; Hamada, M

    1996-11-01

    To elucidate lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of human cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1, EC 2.7.4.3), random site-directed mutagenesis of K9, K27, and K31 residues was performed, and six mutants were analyzed by steady-state kinetics. K9 residue may play an important role in catalysis by interacting with AMP2-. K27 and K31 residues appear to play a functional role in catalysis by interacting with MgATP2-. In human AK, the epsilon-amino group in the side chain of these lysine residues would be essential for phosphoryl transfer between MgATP2- and AMP2- during transition state.

  4. Large-scale motions in the adenylate kinase solution ensemble: Coarse-grained simulations and comparison with solution X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael D.; Makowski, Lee; Phillips, George N.; Cui, Qiang

    2012-03-01

    While coarse-grained (CG) simulations provide an efficient approach to identify small- and large-scale motions important to protein conformational transitions, coupling with appropriate experimental validation is essential. Here, by comparing small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) predictions from CG simulation ensembles of adenylate kinase (AK) with a range of energetic parameters, we demonstrate that AK is flexible in solution in the absence of ligand and that a small population of the closed form exists without ligand. In addition, by analyzing variation of scattering patterns within CG simulation ensembles, we reveal that rigid-body motion of the LID domain corresponds to a dominant scattering feature. Thus, we have developed a novel approach for three-dimensional structural interpretation of SAXS data. Finally, we demonstrate that the agreement between predicted and experimental SAXS can be improved by increasing the simulation temperature or by computationally mutating selected residues to glycine, both of which perturb LID rigid-body flexibility.

  5. In vitro mutagenesis studies at the arginine residues of adenylate kinase. A revised binding site for AMP in the X-ray-deduced model.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tokutomi, Y; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A; Uesugi, S

    1990-02-06

    Although X-ray crystallographic and NMR studies have been made on the adenylate kinases, the substrate-binding sites are not unequivocally established. In an attempt to shed light on the binding sites for MgATP2- and for AMP2- in human cytosolic adenylate kinase (EC 2.7.4.3, hAK1), we have investigated the enzymic effects of replacement of the arginine residues (R44, R132, R138, and R149), which had been assumed by Pai et al. [Pai, E. F., Sachsenheimer, W., Schirmer, R. H., & Schulz, G. E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 37-45] to interact with the phosphoryl groups of AMP2- and MgATP2-. With use of the site-directed mutagenesis method, point mutations were made in the artificial gene for hAK1 [Kim, H. J., Nishikawa, S., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Takenaka, H., Hamada, M., & Kuby, S. A. (1989) Protein Eng. 2, 379-386] to replace these arginine residues with alanyl residues and yield the mutants R44A hAK1, R132A hAK1, R138A hAK1, and R149A hAK1. The resulting large increases in the Km,app values for AMP2- of the mutant enzymes, the relatively small increases in the Km,app values for MgATP2-, and the fact that the R132A, R138A, and R149A mutant enzymes proved to be very poor catalysts are consistent with the idea that the assigned substrate binding sites of Pai et al. (1977) have been reversed and that their ATP-binding site may be assigned as the AMP site.

  6. Structural and biochemical investigation of two Arabidopsis shikimate kinases: The heat-inducible isoform is thermostable

    SciTech Connect

    Fucile, Geoffrey; Garcia, Christel; Carlsson, Jonas; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Christendat, Dinesh

    2011-10-27

    The expression of plant shikimate kinase (SK; EC 2.7.1.71), an intermediate step in the shikimate pathway to aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, is induced under specific conditions of environmental stress and developmental requirements in an isoform-specific manner. Despite their important physiological role, experimental structures of plant SKs have not been determined and the biochemical nature of plant SK regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two SKs, AtSK1 and AtSK2. We demonstrate that AtSK2 is highly unstable and becomes inactivated at 37 C whereas the heat-induced isoform, AtSK1, is thermostable and fully active under identical conditions at this temperature. We determined the crystal structure of AtSK2, the first SK structure from the plant kingdom, and conducted biophysical characterizations of both AtSK1 and AtSK2 towards understanding this mechanism of thermal regulation. The crystal structure of AtSK2 is generally conserved with bacterial SKs with the addition of a putative regulatory phosphorylation motif forming part of the adenosine triphosphate binding site. The heat-induced isoform, AtSK1, forms a homodimer in solution, the formation of which facilitates its relative thermostability compared to AtSK2. In silico analyses identified AtSK1 site variants that may contribute to AtSK1 stability. Our findings suggest that AtSK1 performs a unique function under heat stress conditions where AtSK2 could become inactivated. We discuss these findings in the context of regulating metabolic flux to competing downstream pathways through SK-mediated control of steady state concentrations of shikimate.

  7. Multiple isoforms of Arabidopsis casein kinase I combine conserved catalytic domains with variable carboxyl-terminal extensions.

    PubMed Central

    Klimczak, L J; Farini, D; Lin, C; Ponti, D; Cashmore, A R; Giuliano, G

    1995-01-01

    Three cDNA clones encoding isoforms of casein kinase I (CKI) were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. One full-length clone, designated CKI1, contained an open reading frame of 1371 bp encoding a protein of 51,949 D with an isoelectric point of 9.7. In addition to the highly conserved catalytic domain (of about 300 amino acids), the Arabidopsis CKI isoforms contain 150 to 180 amino acid carboxyl-terminal extensions, which show among themselves a lower level of sequence conservation. These extensions do not show any sequence similarity to nonplant CKI isoforms, such as rat testis CKI delta, which is their closest isolated homolog, or to yeast CKI isoforms. Three additional isoforms of Arabidopsis CKI were found in the data bases of expressed sequence tags and/or were isolated serendipitously in nonspecific screening procedures by others. One of them also shows a carboxyl-terminal extension, but of only 80 amino acids. Casein kinase activity was detected in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli strains expressing the CKI1 protein. This activity showed the crucial properties of CKI, including the ability to phosphorylate the D4 peptide, a specific substrate of CKI, and inhibition by N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific CKI inhibitor. Like several recombinant CKI isoforms from yeast, CKI1 was able to phosphorylate tyrosine-containing acidic polymers. PMID:7480353

  8. Loss of glycogen synthase kinase 3 isoforms during murine oocyte growth induces offspring cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Monteiro da Rocha, André; Ding, Jun; Slawny, Nicole; Wolf, Amber M; Smith, Gary D

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active serine threonine kinase with 1) two isoforms (GSK3A and GSK3B) that have unique and overlapping functions, 2) multiple molecular intracellular mechanisms that involve phosphorylation of diverse substrates, and 3) implications in pathogenesis of many diseases. Insulin causes phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3 and mammalian oocytes have a functional insulin-signaling pathway whereby prolonged elevated insulin during follicle/oocyte development causes GSK3 hyperphosphorylation, reduced GSK3 activity, and altered oocyte chromatin remodeling. Periconceptional diabetes and chronic hyperinsulinemia are associated with congenital malformations and onset of adult diseases of cardiovascular origin. Objectives were to produce transgenic mice with individual or concomitant loss of GSK3A and/or GSK3B and investigate the in vivo role of oocyte GSK3 on fertility, fetal development, and offspring health. Wild-type males bred to females with individual or concomitant loss of oocyte GSK3 isoforms did not have reduced fertility. However, concomitant loss of GSK3A and GSK3B in the oocyte significantly increased neonatal death rate due to congestive heart failure secondary to ventricular hyperplasia. Individual loss of oocyte GSK3A or GSK3B did not induce this lethal phenotype. In conclusion, absence of oocyte GSK3 in the periconceptional period does not alter fertility yet causes offspring cardiac hyperplasia, cardiovascular defects, and significant neonatal death. These results support a developmental mechanism by which periconceptional hyperinsulinemia associated with maternal metabolic syndrome, obesity, and/or diabetes can act on the oocyte and affect offspring cardiovascular development, function, and congenital heart malformation.

  9. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  10. Genomic tagging reveals a random association of endogenous PtdIns5P 4-kinases IIα and IIβ and a partial nuclear localization of the IIα isoform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minchuan; Bond, Nicholas J.; Letcher, Andrew J.; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Irvine, Robin F.; Clarke, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    PtdIns5P 4-kinases IIα and IIβ are cytosolic and nuclear respectively when transfected into cells, including DT40 cells [Richardson, Wang, Clarke, Patel and Irvine (2007) Cell. Signalling 19, 1309–1314]. In the present study we have genomically tagged both type II PtdIns5P 4-kinase isoforms in DT40 cells. Immunoprecipitation of either isoform from tagged cells, followed by MS, revealed that they are associated directly with each other, probably by heterodimerization. We quantified the cellular levels of the type II PtdIns5P 4-kinase mRNAs by real-time quantitative PCR and the absolute amount of each isoform in immunoprecipitates by MS using selective reaction monitoring with 14N,13C-labelled internal standard peptides. The results suggest that the dimerization is complete and random, governed solely by the relative concentrations of the two isoforms. Whereas PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIβ is >95% nuclear, as expected, the distribution of PtdIns4P 4-kinase IIα is 60% cytoplasmic (all bound to membranes) and 40% nuclear. In vitro, PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIα was 2000-fold more active as a PtdIns5P 4-kinase than the IIβ isoform. Overall the results suggest a function of PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIβ may be to target the more active IIα isoform into the nucleus. PMID:20569199

  11. Effects of insulin on the translocation of protein kinase C-theta and other protein kinase C isoforms in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, K; Avignon, A; Standaert, M L; Cooper, D R; Spencer, B; Farese, R V

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-theta is a newly recognized major PKC isoform in skeletal muscle. In this study we found that insulin provoked rapid biphasic increases in membrane-associated immunoreactive PKC-theta, as well as PKC-alpha, PKC-beta and PKC-epsilon, in rat soleus muscles incubated in vitro. Effects of insulin on PKC isoforms in the soleus were comparable in magnitude with those of phorbol esters. Increases in membrane-associated PKC-theta, PKC-alpha, PKC-beta and PKC-epsilon were also observed in rat gastrocnemius muscles after insulin treatment in vivo. Our findings suggest that PKC-theta, like other diacylglycerol-sensitive PKC isoforms (alpha, beta and epsilon), may play a role in insulin action in skeletal muscles. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7755563

  12. Oleanolic acid suppresses aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells by switching pyruvate kinase type M isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wu, Ning; Ma, Leina; Liu, Ming; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Yuyan; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Warburg effect, one of the hallmarks for cancer cells, is characterized by metabolic switch from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. In recent years, increased expression level of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been found to be the culprit of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells. However, there is no agent inhibiting aerobic glycolysis by targeting PKM2. In this study, we found that Oleanolic acid (OA) induced a switch from PKM2 to PKM1, and consistently, abrogated Warburg effect in cancer cells. Suppression of aerobic glycolysis by OA is mediated by PKM2/PKM1 switch. Furthermore, mTOR signaling was found to be inactivated in OA-treated cancer cells, and mTOR inhibition is required for the effect of OA on PKM2/PKM1 switch. Decreased expression of c-Myc-dependent hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA1 was responsible for OA-induced switch between PKM isoforms. Collectively, we identified that OA is an antitumor compound that suppresses aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells and there is potential that PKM2 may be developed as an important target in aerobic glycolysis pathway for developing novel anticancer agents.

  13. Isoform-specific regulation of adipocyte differentiation by Akt/protein kinase B{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Tucker, David F.; Kim, Chi Dae; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Bae, Sun Sik

    2008-06-20

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway tightly regulates adipose cell differentiation. Here we show that loss of Akt1/PKB{alpha} in primary mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells results in a defect of adipocyte differentiation. Adipocyte differentiation in vitro and ex vivo was restored in cells lacking both Akt1/PKB{alpha} and Akt2/PKB{beta} by ectopic expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha} but not Akt2/PKB{beta}. Akt1/PKB{alpha} was found to be the major regulator of phosphorylation and nuclear export of FoxO1, whose presence in the nucleus strongly attenuates adipocyte differentiation. Differentiation-induced cell division was significantly abrogated in Akt1/PKB{alpha}-deficient cells, but was restored after forced expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha}. Moreover, expression of p27{sup Kip1}, an inhibitor of the cell cycle, was down regulated in an Akt1/PKB{alpha}-specific manner during adipocyte differentiation. Based on these data, we suggest that the Akt1/PKB{alpha} isoform plays a major role in adipocyte differentiation by regulating FoxO1 and p27{sup Kip1}.

  14. Pyruvate kinase isoform expression alters nucleotide synthesis to impact cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, Sophia Y.; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Hosios, Aaron M.; Israelsen, William J.; Gui, Dan Y.; Newhouse, Lauren; Ogrodzinski, Martin; Hecht, Vivian; Xu, Kali; Acevedo, Paula N. Marín; Hollern, Daniel P.; Bellinger, Gary; Dayton, Talya L.; Christen, Stefan; Elia, Ilaria; Dinh, Anh T.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Manalis, Scott R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Andrechek, Eran R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic regulation influences cell proliferation. The influence of pyruvate kinase isoforms on tumor cells has been extensively studied, but whether PKM2 is required for normal cell proliferation is unknown. We examine how PKM2-deletion affects proliferation and metabolism in non-transformed, non-immortalized PKM2-expressing primary cells. We find that deletion of PKM2 in primary cells results in PKM1 expression and proliferation arrest. PKM1 expression, rather than PKM2 loss, is responsible for this effect, and proliferation arrest cannot be explained by cell differentiation, senescence, death, changes in gene expression, or prevention of cell growth. Instead, PKM1 expression impairs nucleotide production and the ability to synthesize DNA and progress through the cell cycle. Nucleotide biosynthesis is limiting, as proliferation arrest is characterized by severe thymidine depletion, and supplying exogenous thymine rescues both nucleotide levels and cell proliferation. Thus, PKM1 expression promotes a metabolic state that is unable to support DNA synthesis. PMID:25482511

  15. Oleanolic Acid Suppresses Aerobic Glycolysis in Cancer Cells by Switching Pyruvate Kinase Type M Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Leina; Liu, Ming; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Yuyan; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Warburg effect, one of the hallmarks for cancer cells, is characterized by metabolic switch from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. In recent years, increased expression level of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been found to be the culprit of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells. However, there is no agent inhibiting aerobic glycolysis by targeting PKM2. In this study, we found that Oleanolic acid (OA) induced a switch from PKM2 to PKM1, and consistently, abrogated Warburg effect in cancer cells. Suppression of aerobic glycolysis by OA is mediated by PKM2/PKM1 switch. Furthermore, mTOR signaling was found to be inactivated in OA-treated cancer cells, and mTOR inhibition is required for the effect of OA on PKM2/PKM1 switch. Decreased expression of c-Myc-dependent hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA1 was responsible for OA-induced switch between PKM isoforms. Collectively, we identified that OA is an antitumor compound that suppresses aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells and there is potential that PKM2 may be developed as an important target in aerobic glycolysis pathway for developing novel anticancer agents. PMID:24626155

  16. Subcellular localization of adenosine kinase in mammalian cells: The long isoform of AdK is localized in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xianying Amy; Singh, Bhag; Park, Jae; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2009-10-09

    Two isoforms of adenosine kinase (AdK) have been identified in mammalian organisms with the long isoform (AdK-long) containing extra 20-21 amino acids at the N-terminus (NTS). The subcellular localizations of these isoforms are not known and they contain no identifiable targeting sequence. Immunofluorescence labeling of mammalian cells expressing either only AdK-long or both isoforms with AdK-specific antibody showed only nuclear labeling or both nucleus and cytoplasmic labeling, respectively. The AdK-long and -short isoforms fused at the C-terminus with c-myc epitope also localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. Fusion of the AdK-long NTS to green fluorescent protein also resulted in its nuclear localization. AdK-long NTS contains a cluster of conserved amino acids (PKPKKLKVE). Replacement of KK in this sequence with either AA or AD abolished its nuclear localization capability, indicating that this cluster likely serves as a nuclear localization signal. AdK in nucleus is likely required for sustaining methylation reactions.

  17. Two p90 ribosomal S6 kinase isoforms are involved in the regulation of mitotic and meiotic arrest in Artemia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ru-Bing; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dian-Fu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2014-06-06

    There are multiple isoforms of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), which regulate diverse cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, maturation, and motility. However, the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms remains undetermined. Artemia is a useful model in which to study cell cycle arrest because these animals undergo prolonged diapauses, a state of obligate dormancy. A novel RSK isoform was identified in Artemia, which was termed Ar-Rsk2. This isoform was compared with an RSK isoform that we previously identified in Artemia, termed Ar-Rsk1. Ar-Rsk2 has an ERK-docking motif, whereas Ar-Rsk1 does not. Western blot analysis revealed that Ar-Rsk1 was activated by phosphorylation, which blocked meiosis in oocytes. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk1 reduced the level of phosphorylated cdc2 and thereby suppressed cytostatic factor activity. This indicates that Ar-Rsk1 regulates the cytostatic factor in meiosis. Expression of Ar-Rsk2 was down-regulated in Artemia cysts in which mitosis was arrested. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk2 resulted in decreased levels of cyclin D3 and phosphorylated histone H3, and the production of pseudo-diapause cysts. This indicates that Ar-Rsk2 regulates mitotic arrest. PLK and ERK RNAi showed that Ar-Rsk2, but not Ar-Rsk1, could be activated by PLK-ERK in Artemia. This is the first study to report that RSK isoforms with and without an ERK-docking motif regulate mitosis and meiosis, respectively. This study provides insight into the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms.

  18. Transcription initiation in vivo without classical transactivators: DNA kinks flanking the core promoter of the housekeeping yeast adenylate kinase gene, AKY2, position nucleosomes and constitutively activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Oechsner, Ulrich; Gregor, Kerstin; Schroth, Gary P; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2002-10-01

    The housekeeping gene of the major adenylate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AKY2, ADK1) is constitutively transcribed at a moderate level. The promoter has been dissected in order to define elements that effect constitutive transcription. Initiation of mRNA synthesis at the AKY2 promoter is shown to be mediated by a non-canonic core promoter, (TA)(6). Nucleotide sequences 5' of this element only marginally affect transcription suggesting that promoter activation can dispense with transactivators and essentially involves basal transcription. We show that the core promoter of AKY2 is constitutively kept free of nucleosomes. Analyses of permutated AKY2 promoter DNA revealed the presence of bent DNA. DNA structure analysis by computer and by mutation identified two kinks flanking an interstitial stretch of 65 bp of moderately bent core promoter DNA. Kinked DNA is likely incompatible with packaging into nucleosomes and responsible for positioning nucleosomes at the flanks allowing unimpeded access of the basal transcription machinery to the core promoter. The data show that in yeast, constitutive gene expression can dispense with classical transcriptional activator proteins, if two prerequisites are met: (i) the core promoter is kept free of nucleosomes; this can be due to structural properties of the DNA as an alternative to chromatin remodeling factors; and (ii) the core promoter is pre-bent to allow a high rate of basal transcription initiation.

  19. Realtime (31)P NMR Investigation on the Catalytic Behavior of the Enzyme Adenylate kinase in the Matrix of a Switchable Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Rogne, Per; Sparrman, Tobias; Anugwom, Ikenna; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2015-11-01

    The integration of highly efficient enzymatic catalysis with the solvation properties of ionic liquids for an environmentally friendly and efficient use of raw materials such as wood requires fundamental knowledge about the influence of relevant ionic liquids on enzymes. Switchable ionic liquids (SIL) are promising candidates for implementation of enzymatic treatments of raw materials. One industrially interesting SIL is constituted by monoethanol amine (MEA) and 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) formed with sulfur dioxide (SO2) as the coupling media (DBU-SO2-MEASIL). It has the ability to solubilize the matrix of lignocellulosic biomass while leaving the cellulose backbone intact. Using a novel (31)P NMR-based real-time assay we show that this SIL is compatible with enzymatic catalysis because a model enzyme, adenylate kinase, retains its activity in up to at least 25 wt % of DBU-SO2-MEASIL. Thus this SIL appears suitable for, for example, enzymatic degradation of hemicellulose.

  20. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  1. Genetical control and linkage relationships of isozyme markers in sugar beet (B. vulgaris L.) : 1. Isocitrate dehydrogenase, adenylate kinase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose phosphate isomerase and cathodal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Smed, E; Van Geyt, J P; Oleo, M

    1989-07-01

    Five isozyme systems were genetically investigated. The different separation techniques, the developmental expression and the use as marker system in sugar beet genetics and breeding is discussed. Isocitrate dehydrogenase was controlled by two genes. The gene products form inter- as well as intralocus dimers, even with the gene products of the Icd gene in B. procumbens and B. patellaris. Adenylate kinase was controlled by one gene. Three different allelic forms were detected, which were active as monomeric proteins. Glucose phosphate isomerase showed two zones of activity. One zone was polymorphic. Three allelic variants, active as dimers, were found. Phosphoglucomutase also showed two major zones of activity. One zone was polymorphic and coded for monomeric enzymes. Two allelic forms were found in the accessions studied. The cathodal peroxidase system was controlled by two independent genes, of which only one was polymorphic. The gene products are active as monomers. Linkage was found between red hypocotyl color (R) and Icd 2. Pgm 1, Gpi 2, Ak 1 and the Icd 2-R linkage group segregated independently.

  2. Couplings between hierarchical conformational dynamics from multi-time correlation functions and two-dimensional lifetime spectra: Application to adenylate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Junichi; Takada, Shoji; Saito, Shinji

    2015-06-07

    An analytical method based on a three-time correlation function and the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) lifetime spectrum is developed to elucidate the time-dependent couplings between the multi-timescale (i.e., hierarchical) conformational dynamics in heterogeneous systems such as proteins. In analogy with 2D NMR, IR, electronic, and fluorescence spectroscopies, the waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra can provide a quantitative description of the dynamical correlations between the conformational motions with different lifetimes. The present method is applied to intrinsic conformational changes of substrate-free adenylate kinase (AKE) using long-time coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the hierarchical conformational dynamics arise from the intra-domain structural transitions among conformational substates of AKE by analyzing the one-time correlation functions and one-dimensional lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances corresponding to single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments with the use of the principal component analysis. In addition, the complicated waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances is attributed to the fact that the time evolution of the couplings between the conformational dynamics depends upon both the spatial and temporal characters of the system. The present method is expected to shed light on the biological relationship among the structure, dynamics, and function.

  3. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-21

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  4. Strategies for the thermodynamic characterization of linked binding/local folding reactions within the native state application to the LID domain of adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Travis P; Elam, W Austin; Li, Jing; Hilser, Vincent J

    2011-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations in proteins have emerged as an important aspect of biological function, having been linked to processes ranging from molecular recognition and catalysis to allostery and signal transduction. In spite of the realization of their importance, however, the connections between fluctuations and function have largely been empirical, even when they have been quantitative. Part of the problem in understanding the role of fluctuations in function is the fact that the mere existence of fluctuations complicates the interpretation of classic mutagenesis approaches. Namely, mutagenesis, which is typically targeted to an internal position (to elicit an effect), will change the fluctuations as well as the structure of the native state. Decoupling these effects is essential to an unambiguous understanding of the role of fluctuations in function. Here, we use a mutation strategy that targets surface-exposed sites in flexible parts of the molecule for mutation to glycine. Such mutations leave the ground-state structure unaffected. As a result, we can assess the nature of the fluctuations, develop a quantitative model relating fluctuations to function (in this case, molecular recognition), and unambiguously resolve the probabilities of the fluctuating states. We show that when this approach is applied to Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK), unique thermodynamic and structural insights are obtained, even when classic mutagenesis approaches targeted to the same region yield ambiguous results.

  5. Cooperation and Competition between Adenylate Kinase, Nucleoside Diphosphokinase, Electron Transport, and ATP Synthase in Plant Mitochondria Studied by 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, JKM.; Aubert, S.; Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Douce, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria was studied using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the O2 electrode. Immediately following the addition of ADP, ATP synthesis exceeded the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, fueled by succinate oxidation, due to mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK) activity two to four times the maximum activity of ATP synthase. Only when the AK reaction approached equilibrium was oxidative phosphorylation the primary mechanism for net ATP synthesis. A pool of sequestered ATP in mitochondria enabled AK and ATP synthase to convert AMP to ATP in the presence of exogenous inorganic phosphate. During this conversion, AK activity can indirectly influence rates of oxidation of both succinate and NADH via changes in mitochondrial ATP. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphokinase, in cooperation with ATP synthase, was found to facilitate phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates other than ADP at rates similar to the maximum rate of oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that plant mitochondria contain all of the machinery necessary to rapidly regenerate nucleoside triphosphates from AMP and nucleoside diphosphates made during cellular biosynthesis and that AK activity can affect both the amount of ADP available to ATP synthase and the level of ATP regulating electron transport. PMID:12223600

  6. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Tsz Yan; Wang, C.C.; Leung, Lai K.

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase. - Highlights: • The pollutant bisphenol A differentially activated PKC isoforms in the placenta. • CRE-binding activity in the nuclear protein of placenta was increased. • Bisphenol A induces CRH mRNA expression in mice.

  7. Purification and characterization of an isoform of protein kinase C from bovine neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dianoux, A.C.; Stasia, M.J.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1989-01-24

    Protein kinase C (PKC) from bovine neutrophils was purified 1,420-fold. Subcellular fractionation analysis of bovine neutrophil homogenate in the presence of EGTA indicated that more than 95% of the PKC activity was present in the soluble fraction. Whereas bovine brain PKC could be resolved into four isoenzymatic forms by chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column, bovine neutrophil PKC was eluted in a single peak, suggesting that it corresponded to a single isoform. The apparent molecular weight of bovine neutrophil PKC was 82,000, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Bovine neutrophil PKC was autophosphorylated in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, provided that the medium was supplemented with Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol; phorbol myristate acetate could substitute for diacylglycerol. Autophosphorylated PKC could be cleaved by trypsin to generate two radiolabeled peptides of M{sub r} 48,000 and 39,000. The labeled amino acids were serine and threonine. During the course of the purification procedure of bovine neutrophil PKC, a protein of M{sub r} 23,000 was found to exhibit a strong propensity to PKC-dependent phosphorylation in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol. This protein was recovered together with PKC in one of the two active peaks eluted from the Mono Q column at the second step of PKC purification. It is suggested that the M{sub r} 23,000 protein might be a natural substrate for bovine neutrophil PKC.

  8. Mechanism of inhibition of protein kinase C by 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3 isoforms do not have phospholipase A2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K; Jones, D; Patel, Y; Martin, H; Madrazo, J; Martin, S; Howell, S; Elmore, M; Finnen, M J; Aitken, A

    1994-01-01

    The ability of individual members of the 14-3-3 protein family to inhibit protein kinase C (PKC) has been studied by using a synthetic peptide based on the specific 80 kDa substrate for PKC (MARCKS protein) in two different assay systems. Recombinant 14-3-3 and isoforms renatured by a novel method after separation by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. were studied. The detailed effects of diacylglycerol and the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on the inhibition were also investigated. This suggests that one of the sites of interaction of 14-3-3 may be the cysteine-rich (C1) domain in PKC. Since a region in secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2) shares similarity with this domain, the ability of 14-3-3 to interact with mammalian PLA2 was studied. Cytosolic PLA2 has some similarity to the C2 region of PKC, and the effect of 14-3-3 on this class of PLA2 was also analysed. In contrast with a previous report, no PLA2 activity was found in brain 14-3-3, nor in any of the recombinant proteins tested. These include zeta 14-3-3 isoform, on which the original observation was made. Images Figure 2 PMID:8192676

  9. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of three phosphoglycerate kinase isoforms from developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Troncoso-Ponce, M A; Rivoal, J; Venegas-Calerón, M; Dorion, S; Sánchez, R; Cejudo, F J; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2012-07-01

    Three cDNAs encoding different phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK, EC 2.7.2.3) isoforms, two cytosolic (HacPGK1 and HacPGK2) and one plastidic (HapPGK), were cloned and characterized from developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds. The expression profiles of these genes showed differences in heterotrophic tissues, such as developing seeds and roots, where HacPGK1 was predominant, while HapPGK was highly expressed in photosynthetic tissues. The cDNAs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding proteins purified to electrophoretic homogeneity, using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and biochemically characterized. Despite the high level of identity between sequences, the HacPGK1 isoform showed strong differences in terms of specific activity, temperature stability and pH sensitivity in comparison to HacPGK2 and HapPGK. A polyclonal immune serum was raised against the purified HacPGK1 isoform, which showed cross-immunoreactivity with the other PGK isoforms. This serum allowed the localization of high expression levels of PGK isozymes in embryo tissues.

  10. Isoform-specific subcellular localization and function of protein kinase A identified by mosaic imaging of mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ilouz, Ronit; Lev-Ram, Varda; Bushong, Eric A; Stiles, Travis L; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Douglas, Christopher; Goldberg, Geoffrey; Ellisman, Mark H; Taylor, Susan S

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in neuronal function that are mediated by different regulatory (R) subunits. Deficiency in either the RIβ or the RIIβ subunit results in distinct neuronal phenotypes. Although RIβ contributes to synaptic plasticity, it is the least studied isoform. Using isoform-specific antibodies, we generated high-resolution large-scale immunohistochemical mosaic images of mouse brain that provided global views of several brain regions, including the hippocampus and cerebellum. The isoforms concentrate in discrete brain regions, and we were able to zoom-in to show distinct patterns of subcellular localization. RIβ is enriched in dendrites and co-localizes with MAP2, whereas RIIβ is concentrated in axons. Using correlated light and electron microscopy, we confirmed the mitochondrial and nuclear localization of RIβ in cultured neurons. To show the functional significance of nuclear localization, we demonstrated that downregulation of RIβ, but not of RIIβ, decreased CREB phosphorylation. Our study reveals how PKA isoform specificity is defined by precise localization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17681.001 PMID:28079521

  11. NMR studies of the MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase and of a 45-residue peptide fragment of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1985-08-13

    Proton NMR was used to study the interaction of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP and MgATP with rabbit muscle adenylate kinase, which has 194 amino acids, and with a synthetic peptide consisting of residues 1-45 of the enzyme, which has previously been shown to bind MgepsilonATP [Hamada, M., Palmieri, R. H., Russell, G. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1979) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 195, 155-177]. The peptide is globular and binds Cr3+ATP competitively with MgATP with a dissociation constant, KD(Cr3+ATP) = 35 microM, comparable to that of the complete enzyme [KI(Cr3+ATP) = 12 microM]. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE's) were used to measure interproton distances on enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP. The correlation time was measured directly for peptide-bound MgATP by studying the frequency dependence of the NOE's at 250 and 500 MHz. The H2' to H1' distance so obtained (3.07 A) was within the range established by X-ray and model-building studies of nucleotides (2.9 +/- 0.2 A). Interproton distances yielded conformations of enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP with indistinguishable anti-glycosyl torsional angles (chi = 63 +/- 12 degrees) and 3'-endo/O1'-endo ribose puckers (sigma = 96 +/- 12 degrees). Enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP molecules exhibited different C4'-C5' torsional angles (gamma) of 170 degrees and 50 degrees, respectively. Ten intermolecular NOE's from protons of the enzyme and four such NOE's from protons of the peptide to protons of bound MgATP were detected, which indicated proximity of the adenine ribose moiety to the same residues on both the enzyme and the peptide. Paramagnetic effects of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP on the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons of the peptide provided a set of distances to the side chains of five residues, which allowed the location of the bound Cr3+ atom to be uniquely defined. Distances from enzyme-bound Cr3+ATP to the side chains of three residues of the protein agreed with those measured for the peptide. The mutual

  12. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-04

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC.

  14. Thermostable adenylate kinase technology: a new process indicator and its use as a validation tool for the reprocessing of surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Hesp, J R; Poolman, T M; Budge, C; Batten, L; Alexander, F; McLuckie, G; O'Brien, S; Wells, P; Raven, N D H; Sutton, J M

    2010-02-01

    Adenylate kinase (tAK), a thermostable enzyme, was assessed as a possible means of providing a quantitative measure of cleaning efficacy suitable for validating the performance of an automated washer disinfector (AWD) during routine use. Two indicator formulations were developed using either a commercially available washer disinfector soil or a protein-based soil. Each indicator consisted of 100 microg (in test soil) of tAK dried on to a steel or plastic surface. These indicators were placed in each basket of a washer disinfector and processed alongside soiled surgical instruments during a standard day's operation. After processing, remaining tAK activity was detected using a rapid enzyme assay (2 min detection time) in a handheld hygiene monitor. The amount of tAK remaining on each indictor after a full AWD cycle was found to range from 0.1 to 0.4 ng, which represented a mean log(10) removal of 5.8+/-0.3. There was no statistical difference in the residual tAK activity between individual runs or the position of the indicator in the machine. The tAK indicator was also used to analyse the protein removal within each component of the wash cycle. These results demonstrated that all phases of the wash process contributed to the removal of the protein load, with the main wash alone being responsible for 3.6-4.0 log(10) reductions in protein activity. We propose that a quantitative cleaning index using such rapid readout indicator devices would provide a valuable addition to the methodologies for validating cleaning processes.

  15. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  16. Dephosphorylation of human cyclin-dependent kinases by protein phosphatase type 2C alpha and beta 2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kaldis, P; Solomon, M J

    2000-11-03

    We previously reported that the activating phosphorylation on cyclin-dependent kinases in yeast (Cdc28p) and in humans (Cdk2) is removed by type 2C protein phosphatases. In this study, we characterize this PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract and determine that it is due to PP2C beta 2, a novel PP2C beta isoform, and to PP2C alpha. PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 co-purified with Mg(2+)-dependent Cdk2/Cdk6 phosphatase activity in DEAE-Sepharose, Superdex-200, and Mono Q chromatographies. Moreover, purified recombinant PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 proteins efficiently dephosphorylated monomeric Cdk2/Cdk6 in vitro. The dephosphorylation of Cdk2 and Cdk6 by PP2C isoforms was inhibited by the binding of cyclins. We found that the PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract, partially purified HeLa PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 isoforms, and the recombinant PP2Cs exhibited a comparable substrate preference for a phosphothreonine containing substrate, consistent with the conservation of threonine residues at the site of activating phosphorylation in CDKs.

  17. Protein Kinase C isoform epsilon (ε) negatively regulates ADP-induced calcium mobilization and thromboxane generation in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bynagari-Settipalli, Yamini S; Lakhani, Parth; Jin, Jianguo; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Rico, Mario C.; Kim, Soochong; Woulfe, Donna; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2012-01-01

    Objective Members of Protein Kinase C (PKC) family are shown to positively and negatively regulate platelet activation. Although positive regulatory roles are extensively studied, negative regulatory roles of PKCs are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the mechanism and specific isoforms involved in PKC-mediated negative regulation of ADP-induced functional responses. Methods and Results A pan-PKC inhibitor GF109203X potentiated ADP-induced cPLA2 phosphorylation and thromboxane generation, as well as ERK activation and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) mobilization, two signaling molecules, upstream of cPLA2 activation. Thus, PKCs inhibit cPLA2 activation by inhibiting ERK and Ca2+i mobilization. Since, the inhibitor of Classical PKC isoforms, GO-6976 did not affect ADP-mediated thromboxane generation, we investigated the role of novel class of PKC isoforms. ADP- induced thromboxane generation, calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation were potentiated in PKCε null murine platelets compared to platelets from wild type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, when thromboxane release is blocked, ADP-induced aggregation in PKCε KO and WT was similar, suggesting that PKCε does not affect ADP-induced aggregation directly. PKCε knockout mice exhibited shorter times to occlusion in FeCl3-induced arterial injury model and shorter bleeding times in tail bleeding experiments. Conclusion We conclude that PKCε negatively regulates ADP-induced thromboxane generation in platelets and offers protection against thrombosis. PMID:22362759

  18. Both synchronous and asynchronous muscle isoforms of projectin (the Drosophila bent locus product) contain functional kinase domains

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In Drosophila, the large muscle protein, projectin, has very different localizations in synchronous and asynchronous muscles, suggesting that projectin has different functions in different muscle types. The multiple projectin isoforms are encoded by a single gene; however they differ significantly in size (as detected by gel mobility) and show differences in some peptide fragments, presumably indicating alternative splicing or termination. We now report additional sequence of the projectin gene, showing a kinase domain and flanking regions highly similar to equivalent regions of twitchin, including a possible autoinhibitory region. In spite of apparent differences in function, all isoforms of projectin have the kinase domain and all are capable of autophosphorylation in vitro. The projectin gene is in polytene region 102C/D where the bentD phenotype maps. The recessive lethality of bentD is associated with a breakpoint that removes sequence of the projectin kinase domain. We find that different alleles of the highly mutable recessive lethal complementation group, l(4)2, also have defects in different parts of the projectin sequence, both NH2-terminal and COOH- terminal to the bentD breakpoint. These alleles are therefore renamed as alleles of the bent locus. Adults heterozygous for projectin mutations show little, if any, effect of one defective gene copy, but homozygosity for any of the defects is lethal. The times of death can vary with allele. Some alleles kill the embryos, others are larval lethal. These molecular studies begin to explain why genetic studies suggested that l(4)2 was a complex (or pseudoallelic) locus. PMID:7844153

  19. Targeting Human Central Nervous System Protein Kinases: An Isoform Selective p38αMAPK Inhibitor That Attenuates Disease Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first kinase inhibitor drug approval in 2001 initiated a remarkable decade of tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs for oncology indications, but a void exists for serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor drugs and central nervous system indications. Stress kinases are of special interest in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders due to their involvement in synaptic dysfunction and complex disease susceptibility. Clinical and preclinical evidence implicates the stress related kinase p38αMAPK as a potential neurotherapeutic target, but isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor candidates are lacking and the mixed kinase inhibitor drugs that are promising in peripheral tissue disease indications have limitations for neurologic indications. Therefore, pursuit of the neurotherapeutic hypothesis requires kinase isoform selective inhibitors with appropriate neuropharmacology features. Synaptic dysfunction disorders offer a potential for enhanced pharmacological efficacy due to stress-induced activation of p38αMAPK in both neurons and glia, the interacting cellular components of the synaptic pathophysiological axis, to be modulated. We report a novel isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor, MW01-18-150SRM (=MW150), that is efficacious in suppression of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory deficits in two distinct synaptic dysfunction mouse models. A synthetic scheme for biocompatible product and positive outcomes from pharmacological screens are presented. The high-resolution crystallographic structure of the p38αMAPK/MW150 complex documents active site binding, reveals a potential low energy conformation of the bound inhibitor, and suggests a structural explanation for MW150’s exquisite target selectivity. As far as we are aware, MW150 is without precedent as an isoform selective p38MAPK inhibitor or as a kinase inhibitor capable of modulating in vivo stress related behavior. PMID:25676389

  20. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation.

  1. Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the cockroach Periplaneta americana: identification of five isoforms and their tissues distribution.

    PubMed

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Heuland, Emilie; Bourdin, Céline M; Griveau, Audrey; Quinchard, Sophie; Tricoire-Leignel, Helene; Legros, Christian; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-07-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key kinase that transduces Ca²⁺ signals into downstream effects acting on a range of cellular processes in nervous system and muscular tissues. In insects, different CaMKII isoforms have been reported in Drosophila melanogaster, Apis florae, Bombus terrestris, and Bombus impatiens but little is known on the organization and tissue-specific expression of these isoforms with the exception of Drosophila. The present study reports the cloning of five CaMKII splice variants issued from a single gene and their tissue-specific expression in the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Each CaMKII isoform shared 82-90% identity with Drosophila CaMKII isoforms and accordingly were named PaCaMKII-A, PaCaMKII-B,PaCaMKII-C,PaCaMKII-D, and PaCaMKII-E. PaCaMKII-A and PaCaMKII-D isoforms are ubiquitously expressed in all tissues, but some such as PaCaMKII-B andPaCaMKII-C are preferentially expressed in the nerve cord and muscle. In addition, using single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we found a tissue-specific expression of PaCaMKII-E in the dorsal unpaired median neurons. Alternative splicing of PaCaMKII transcripts is likely a common mechanism in insects to control the pattern of isoform expression in the different tissues.

  2. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B; Ahmed, Mohamed R; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  3. Distinct Cellular and Subcellular Distributions of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase and Arrestin Isoforms in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B.; Ahmed, Mohamed R.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling. PMID:23139825

  4. Studies on the adenylate kinase isozymes from the serum and erythrocyte of normal and Duchenne dystrophic patients. Isolation, physicochemical properties, and several comparisons with the Duchenne dystrophic aberrant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Sumida, M; Kurokawa, Y; Sunayashiki-Kusuzaki, K; Okuda, H; Watanabe, T; Kuby, S A

    1985-09-25

    Two species of adenylate kinase isozymes (ATP:AMP phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.4.3) from human Duchenne dystrophic serum were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity column chromatography. One of these species was the "aberrant" adenylate kinase isozyme, found specifically in the Duchenne type of this disease (Hamada, M., Okuda, H., Oka, K., Watanabe, T., Ueda, K., Nojima, M., Kuby, S.A., Manship, M., Tyler, F., and Ziter, F. (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 660, 227-237). The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular size of 98,000 (+/- 1,500), whereas the normal serum species of the enzyme was 87,000 (+/- 1,600) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, by gel filtration, and by sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficient of each species was found to be 5.8 S for the aberrant form and 5.6 S for the normal form, respectively. The subunit size (Mr = 24,700) of the aberrant enzyme in 8 M urea proved to be very similar to that of the normal human liver enzyme (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S.A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128), and the normal species subunit (Mr = 21,700) was found to be very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme (Kuby, S.A., Fleming, G., Frischat, A., Cress, M.C., and Hamada, M. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 1901-1907). Both species were tetrameric enzymes in the serum. The amino acid composition for the normal species was similar to that for the muscle-type enzyme, and that for the aberrant species was similar to the liver enzyme, but with some notable exceptions in both cases. Thus, the normal species had no tryptophan and two half-cystine residues/subunit; whereas, there was 1 tryptophan and 4 half-cystine residues/subunit of the aberrant molecule. The amino acid composition of both serum isozymes when compared to their respective muscle or liver-type enzyme differed mainly in the content of Glu, Asp, His, Leu, Ile, Gly. Kinetic properties of the two forms

  5. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy involves activation of p90 ribosomal s6 kinase.

    PubMed

    Jaballah, Maiy; Mohamed, Iman A; Alemrayat, Bayan; Al-Sulaiti, Fatima; Mlih, Mohamed; Mraiche, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Studies using pharmacological and genetic approaches have shown that increased activity/expression of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. Despite the importance of NHE1 in cardiac hypertrophy, severe cerebrovascular side effects were associated with the use of NHE1 inhibitors when administered to patients with myocardial infarctions. p90 ribosomal S6 Kinase (RSK), a downstream regulator of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has also been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. We hypothesized that RSK plays a role in the NHE1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophic response. Infection of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with the active form of the NHE1 adenovirus induced hypertrophy and was associated with an increase in the phosphorylation of RSK (P<0.05). Parameters of hypertrophy such as cell area, protein content and atrial natriuretic mRNA expression were significantly reduced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts infected with active NHE1 in the presence of dominant negative RSK (DN-RSK) (P<0.05). These results confirm that NHE1 lies upstream of RSK. Increased phosphorylation and activation of GATA4 at Ser261 was correlated with increased RSK phosphorylation. This increase was reversed upon inhibition of RSK or NHE1. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the NHE1 mediated hypertrophy is accounted for by increased activation and phosphorylation of RSK, which subsequently increased the phosphorylation of GATA4; eventually activating fetal gene transcriptional machinery.

  6. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A; Perreault, E; Turaga, R V N; Bohr, V A; Lebel, M

    2010-03-11

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1), a highly conserved anchoring protein involved in various biological processes, such as cell growth and proliferation. RACK1 binds strongly to the RQC domain of WRN and weakly to its acidic repeat region. Purified RACK1 has no impact on the helicase activity of WRN, but selectively inhibits WRN exonuclease activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCdelta and PKCbetaII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases.

  7. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A; Perreault, È; Turaga, RVN; Bohr, VA; Lebel, M

    2015-01-01

    Werner’s syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1), a highly conserved anchoring protein involved in various biological processes, such as cell growth and proliferation. RACK1 binds strongly to the RQC domain of WRN and weakly to its acidic repeat region. Purified RACK1 has no impact on the helicase activity of WRN, but selectively inhibits WRN exonuclease activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCδ and PKCβII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases. PMID:19966859

  8. Isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the bivalve mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis: activation by cyclic nucleotides and effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Bardales, José R; Díaz-Enrich, María J; Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, J Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Two different isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been partially purified from the posterior adductor muscle and the mantle tissue of the sea mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The holoenzymes contain as regulatory subunit (R) the previously identified isoforms Rmyt1 and Rmyt2, and were named PKAmyt1 and PKAmyt2, respectively. Both cAMP and cGMP can activate these PKA isoforms completely, although they exhibit a sensitivity approximately 100-fold higher for cAMP than for cGMP. When compared to PKAmyt2, the affinity of PKAmyt1 for cAMP and cGMP is 2- and 3.5-fold higher, respectively. The effect of temperature on the protein kinase activity of both PKA isoforms was examined. Temperature changes did not affect significantly the apparent activation constants (Ka) for cAMP. However, the protein kinase activity was clearly modified and a remarkable difference was observed between both PKA isoforms. PKAmyt1 showed a linear Arrhenius plot over the full range of temperature tested, with an activation energy of 15.3+/-1.5 kJ/mol. By contrast, PKAmyt2 showed a distinct break in the Arrhenius plot at 15 degrees C; the activation energy when temperature was above 15 degrees C was 7-fold higher than that of lower temperatures (70.9+/-8.1 kJ/mol vs 10.6+/-6.5 kJ/mol). These data indicate that, above 15 degrees C, PKAmyt2 activity is much more temperature-dependent than that of PKAmyt1. This different behavior would be related to the different role that these isoforms may play in the tissues where they are located.

  9. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  10. Expression and regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms in the developing rat heart and in adulthood: role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, M C; Langdown, M L; Harris, R A; Holness, M J

    2000-01-01

    Activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDHC) promotes glucose disposal, whereas inactivation conserves glucose. The PDH kinases (PDHKs) regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of PDHC. The adult rat heart contains three PDHK isoforms PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4. Using Western-blot analysis, with specific antibodies raised against individual recombinant PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4, the present study investigated PDHK isoform expression in the developing rat heart and adulthood. We identified clear differences in the patterns of protein expression of each of these PDHK isoforms during the first 3 weeks of post-natal development, with most marked up-regulation of isoforms PDHK1 and PDHK4. Distinctions between the three cardiac PDHK isoforms were also demonstrated with respect to post-neonatal maturational up-regulation; with greatest up-regulation of PDHK1 and least up-regulation of PDHK4 from the post-neonatal period until maturity. The study also examined the role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply on PDHK isoform expression. We observed marked selective increases in the amount of PDHK4 protein present relative to total cardiac protein in both hyperthyroidism and high-fat feeding. Overall, our data identify PDHK isoform PDHK1 as being of more potential regulatory importance for glucose oxidation in the adult compared with the neonatal heart, and cardiac PDHK4 as a PDHK isoform whose expression is specifically responsive to changes in lipid supply, suggesting that its up-regulation during early post-natal life may be the perinatal switch to use fatty acids as the energy source. We also identify regulation of pyruvate sensitivity of cardiac PDHK as a physiological variable, a change in which requires factors in addition to a change in lipid supply. PMID:11104680

  11. Analysis of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction with protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits: PKA isoform specificity in AKAP binding.

    PubMed

    Herberg, F W; Maleszka, A; Eide, T; Vossebein, L; Tasken, K

    2000-04-28

    Compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is in part mediated by specialized protein motifs in the dimerization domain of the regulatory (R)-subunits of PKA that participate in protein-protein interactions with an amphipathic helix region in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). In order to develop a molecular understanding of the subcellular distribution and specific functions of PKA isozymes mediated by association with AKAPs, it is of importance to determine the apparent binding constants of the R-subunit-AKAP interactions. Here, we present a novel approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to examine directly the association and dissociation of AKAPs with all four R-subunit isoforms immobilized on a modified cAMP surface with a high level of accuracy. We show that both AKAP79 and S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 bind RIIalpha very well (apparent K(D) values of 0.5 and 2 nM, respectively). Both proteins also bind RIIbeta quite well, but with three- to fourfold lower affinities than those observed versus RIIalpha. However, only S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 interacts with RIalpha at a nanomolar affinity (apparent K(D) of 185 nM). In comparison, AKAP95 binds RIIalpha (apparent K(D) of 5.9 nM) with a tenfold higher affinity than RIIbeta and has no detectable binding to RIalpha. Surface competition assays with increasing concentrations of a competitor peptide covering amino acid residues 493 to 515 of the thyroid anchoring protein Ht31, demonstrated that Ht31, but not a proline-substituted peptide, Ht31-P, competed binding of RIIalpha and RIIbeta to all the AKAPs examined (EC(50)-values from 6 to 360 nM). Furthermore, RIalpha interaction with S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 was competed (EC(50) 355 nM) with the same peptide. Here we report for the first time an approach to determine apparent rate- and equilibria binding constants for the interaction of all PKA isoforms with any AKAP as well as a novel approach for characterizing peptide competitors that disrupt PKA-AKAP anchoring.

  12. Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C isoforms in rat pituitary hyperplasia: effect of in vivo treatment with quinagolide.

    PubMed

    Lévy, L; Alvaro, V; Dubray, C; Joubert, D

    1994-08-16

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) activity, diacylglycerol levels and PKC alpha, beta I, beta II and gamma expression were analyzed in the pituitary of female rats treated with estradiol alone (2 months) or in combination with quinagolide in the second month. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed the presence of PKC alpha, beta I and beta II isoenzymes in the rat pituitary gland but not of PKC gamma isoenzymes. Increases in pituitary weight and plasma prolactin levels induced by estradiol were associated with an increase in diacylglycerol pituitary content (1.55 +/- 0.06 versus 1.12 +/- 0.17 nmol diacylglycerol/mg protein in controls, P < 0.01). Cotreatment with quinagolide reversed these effects. Changes in PKC activity were accompanied by parallel changes in PKC alpha and beta I expressions. Estradiol treatment increased the expression of these isoforms whereas cotreatment with quinagolide antagonized these effects. PKC beta II expression was not affected. In conclusion, Ca(2+)-dependent PKC activity and protein expression are increased in hyperplastic pituitary cells, suggesting the involvement of this class of PKCs in the rat pituitary cell proliferation and/or hormonal secretion. This is further assessed by the fact that the dopamine receptor agonist treatment decreases activity and expression of these PKCs in parallel with the decrease in hormonal secretion and cell proliferation.

  13. Protective role of intracellular zinc in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion is associated with preservation of protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Karagulova, Gulnura; Yue, Yuankun; Moreyra, Abel; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Korichneva, Irina

    2007-05-01

    The recent discovery of zinc signals and their essential role in the redox signaling network implies that zinc homeostasis and the function of zinc-containing proteins are probably altered as a result of oxidative stress, suggesting new targets for pharmacological intervention. We hypothesized that the level of intracellular labile zinc is changed in hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and investigated whether the maintenance of myocardial zinc status protected heart functions. Using fluorescent imaging, we demonstrated decreased levels of labile zinc in the I/R hearts. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known trigger of zinc release, liberated zinc ions in control hearts but failed to produce any increase in zinc levels in the I/R rat hearts. Adding the zinc ionophore pyrithione at reperfusion improved myocardial recovery up to 100% and reduced the incidence of arrhythmias more than 2-fold. This effect was dose-dependent, and high concentrations of zinc were toxic. Adding membrane-impermeable zinc chloride was ineffective. Hearts from rats receiving zinc pyrithione supplements in their diet fully recovered from I/R. The recovery was associated with the prevention of degradation of the two protein kinase C isoforms, delta and epsilon, during I/R. In conclusion, our results suggest a protective role of intracellular zinc in myocardial recovery from oxidative stress imposed by I/R. The data support the potential clinical use of zinc ionophores in the settings of acute redox stress in the heart.

  14. A dynamic mechanism for AKAP binding to RII isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kinderman, Francis S; Kim, Choel; von Daake, Sventja; Ma, Yuliang; Pham, Bao Q; Spraggon, Glen; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Jennings, Patricia A; Taylor, Susan S

    2006-11-03

    A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific microdomains by using an amphipathic helix that docks to N-terminal dimerization and docking (D/D) domains of PKA regulatory (R) subunits. To understand specificity, we solved the crystal structure of the helical motif from D-AKAP2, a dual-specific AKAP, bound to the RIIalpha D/D domain. The 1.6 Angstrom structure reveals how this dynamic, hydrophobic docking site is assembled. A stable, hydrophobic docking groove is formed by the helical interface of two RIIalpha protomers. The flexible N terminus of one protomer is then recruited to the site, anchored to the peptide through two essential isoleucines. The other N terminus is disordered. This asymmetry provides greater possibilities for AKAP docking. Although there is strong discrimination against RIalpha in the N terminus of the AKAP helix, the hydrophobic groove discriminates against RIIalpha. RIalpha, with a cavity in the groove, can accept a bulky tryptophan, whereas RIIalpha requires valine.

  15. Protein kinase C-δ isoform mediates lysosome labilization in DNA damage-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    PARENT, NICOLAS; SCHERER, MAX; LIEBISCH, GERHARD; SCHMITZ, GERD; BERTRAND, RICHARD

    2013-01-01

    A lysosomal pathway, characterized by the partial rupture or labilization of lysosomal membranes (LLM) and cathepsin release into the cytosol, is evoked during the early events of 20-S-camptothecin lactone (CPT)-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells, including human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells. These lysosomal events begin rapidly and simultaneously with mitochondrial permeabilization and caspase activation within 3 h after drug treatment. Recently, in a comparative proteomics analysis performed on highly-enriched lysosomal extracts, we identified proteins whose translocation to lysosomes correlated with LLM induction after CPT treatment, including protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ). In this study, we show that the PKC-δ translocation to lysosomes is required for LLM, as silencing its expression with RNA interference or suppressing its activity with the inhibitor, rottlerin, prevents CPT-induced LLM. PKC-δ translocation to lysosomes is associated with lysosomal acidic sphingomyelinase (ASM) phosphorylation and activation, which in turn leads to an increase in ceramide (CER) content in lysosomes. The accumulation of endogenous CER in lysosomes is a critical event for CPT-induced LLM as suppressing PKC-δ or ASM activity reduces both the CPT-mediated CER generation in lysosomes and CPT-induced LLM. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which PKC-δ mediates ASM phosphorylation/activation and CER accumulation in lysosomes in CPT-induced LLM, rapidly activating the lysosomal pathway of apoptosis after CPT treatment. PMID:21174057

  16. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Tsz Yan; Wang, C C; Leung, Lai K

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase.

  17. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  18. Use of serum creatine kinase MM isoforms for predicting the progression of left ventricular dilation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hina, K; Kusachi, S; Iwasaki, K; Takaishi, A; Yamamoto, K; Tominaga, Y; Kita, T; Tsuji, T

    1997-04-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) isoforms were examined to detect the progression of left ventricular (LV) enlargement with reduced motion, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Changes in LV indices were determined annually by echocardiography in 51 patients until serum measurements (first follow-up period, 6.5 +/- 2.2 years). Serum creatine isoforms (CKMM1, CKMM2 and CKMM3) were measured with high-voltage electrophoresis in 35 of these patients from 1991 to 1992, and the data for these latter patients are reported here. Serum total CK, CKMB, lactate dehydrogenase and its isoenzyme LDH1 were also measured. The changes in LV indices were further monitored until January, 1995 (second follow-up). During the 2 follow-up periods, the patients in the on-going group showed a reduction in the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) to < 55% with LV end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) < 55 mm, and those in the DCM-like group showed a reduction in LVEF to < 55% and an increase in LVDd to > 55 mm. During the first follow-up period, LVEF and LVDd remained at > or = 55% and < 55 mm, respectively, in 26 patients (nonprogressive-disease group), while 3 patients entered the on-going group and 6 entered the DCM-like group. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratios in the on-going and DCM-like groups were significantly higher than those in the control and nonprogressive-disease groups. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio was significantly correlated with the annual rate of change for the LV end-systolic dimension (LVDs), LVDd, and LVEF, with the closest correlation observed for the annual change in LVDs. Moreover, 5 patients in the nonprogressive-disease group with elevation of the CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio to > + 2SD above the mean for the controls had an elevated annual change in LVDs within +/- 1SD of the mean in the DCM-like group. These results indicate that the ratio of CKMM3 to CKMM1 can be used to predict the progression of LV enlargement in HCM.

  19. A Direct Interaction between Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Specific β-Tubulin Isoforms Regulates Tubulin Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Bernard M. H.; Spain, Victoria A.; Leinster, Veronica H. L.; Chia, Ruth; Beilina, Alexandra; Cho, Hyun J.; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Urban, Mary K.; Sancho, Rosa M.; Ramírez, Marian Blanca; Biskup, Saskia; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cai, Huaibin; Cookson, Mark R.; Berwick, Daniel C.; Harvey, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2, encoding the multifunctional protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), are a common cause of Parkinson disease. LRRK2 has been suggested to influence the cytoskeleton as LRRK2 mutants reduce neurite outgrowth and cause an accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau. This might cause alterations in the dynamic instability of microtubules suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Here, we describe a direct interaction between LRRK2 and β-tubulin. This interaction is conferred by the LRRK2 Roc domain and is disrupted by the familial R1441G mutation and artificial Roc domain mutations that mimic autophosphorylation. LRRK2 selectively interacts with three β-tubulin isoforms: TUBB, TUBB4, and TUBB6, one of which (TUBB4) is mutated in the movement disorder dystonia type 4 (DYT4). Binding specificity is determined by lysine 362 and alanine 364 of β-tubulin. Molecular modeling was used to map the interaction surface to the luminal face of microtubule protofibrils in close proximity to the lysine 40 acetylation site in α-tubulin. This location is predicted to be poorly accessible within mature stabilized microtubules, but exposed in dynamic microtubule populations. Consistent with this finding, endogenous LRRK2 displays a preferential localization to dynamic microtubules within growth cones, rather than adjacent axonal microtubule bundles. This interaction is functionally relevant to microtubule dynamics, as mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from LRRK2 knock-out mice display increased microtubule acetylation. Taken together, our data shed light on the nature of the LRRK2-tubulin interaction, and indicate that alterations in microtubule stability caused by changes in LRRK2 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:24275654

  20. Succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-Phosphate (SAICAR) Activates Pyruvate Kinase Isoform M2 (PKM2) in Its Dimeric Form.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Tokuda, Joshua M; Pollack, Lois; Bowman, Gregory D; Lee, Young-Sam

    2016-08-23

    Human pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolytic enzyme isoform implicated in cancer. Malignant cancer cells have higher levels of dimeric PKM2, which is regarded as an inactive form of tetrameric pyruvate kinase. This perceived inactivity has fueled controversy about how the dimeric form of pyruvate kinase might contribute to cancer. Here we investigate enzymatic properties of PKM2(G415R), a variant derived from a cancer patient, which we show by size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering to be a dimer that cannot form a tetramer in solution. Although PKM2(G415R) binds to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), unlike the wild type this PKM2 variant shows no activation by FBP. In contrast, PKM2(G415R) is activated by succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-phosphate (SAICAR), an endogenous metabolite that we previously showed correlates with an increased level of cell proliferation and promotes protein kinase activity of PKM2. Our results demonstrate an important and unexpected enzymatic activity of the PKM2 dimer that likely has a key role in cancer progression.

  1. Functional Isoforms of IκB Kinase α (IKKα) Lacking Leucine Zipper and Helix-Loop-Helix Domains Reveal that IKKα and IKKβ Have Different Activation Requirements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Fergus R.; Connelly, Margery A.; Balzarano, Darlene; Müller, Jurgen R.; Geleziunas, Romas; Marcu, Kenneth B.

    2000-01-01

    The activity of the NF-κB family of transcription factors is regulated principally by phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of their inhibitory IκB subunits. Site-specific serine phosphorylation of IκBs by two IκB kinases (IKKα [also known as CHUK] and IKKβ) targets them for proteolysis. IKKα and -β have a unique structure, with an amino-terminal serine-threonine kinase catalytic domain and carboxy-proximal helix-loop-helix (HLH) and leucine zipper-like (LZip) amphipathic α-helical domains. Here, we describe the properties of two novel cellular isoforms of IKKα: IKKα-ΔH and IKKα-ΔLH. IKKα-ΔH and IKKα-ΔLH are differentially spliced isoforms of the IKKα mRNA lacking its HLH domain and both its LZip and HLH domains, respectively. IKKα is the major RNA species in most murine cells and tissues, except for activated T lymphocytes and the brain, where the alternatively spliced isoforms predominate. Remarkably, IKKα-ΔH and IKKα-ΔLH, like IKKα, respond to tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation to potentiate NF-κB activation in HEK293 cells. A mutant, catalytically inactive form of IKKα blocked IKKα-, IKKα-ΔH-, and IKKα-ΔLH-mediated NF-κB activation. Akin to IKKα, its carboxy-terminally truncated isoforms associated with the upstream activator NIK (NF-κB-inducing kinase). In contrast to IKKα, IKKα-ΔLH failed to associate with either itself, IKKα, IKKβ, or NEMO-IKKγ-IKKAP1, while IKKα-ΔH complexed with IKKβ and IKKα but not with NEMO. Interestingly, each IKKα isoform rescued HEK293 cells from the inhibitory effects of a dominant-negative NEMO mutant, while IKKα could not. IKKα-ΔCm, a recombinant mutant of IKKα structurally akin to IKKα-ΔLH, was equally functional in these assays, but in sharp contrast, IKKβ-ΔCm, a structurally analogous mutant of IKKβ, was inactive. Our results demonstrate that the functional roles of seemingly analogous domains in IKKα and IKKβ need not be equivalent and can also exhibit

  2. Structural insights into FGFR kinase isoform selectivity: diverse binding modes of AZD4547 and ponatinib in complex with FGFR1 and FGFR4.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Julie A; Klein, Tobias; Breed, Jason; Breeze, Alexander L; Overman, Ross; Phillips, Chris; Norman, Richard A

    2014-12-02

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family of receptor tyrosine kinases has been implicated in a wide variety of cancers. Despite a high level of sequence homology in the ATP-binding site, the majority of reported inhibitors are selective for the FGFR1-3 isoforms and display much reduced potency toward FGFR4, an exception being the Bcr-Abl inhibitor ponatinib. Here we present the crystal structure of the FGFR4 kinase domain and show that both FGFR1 and FGFR4 kinase domains in complex with ponatinib adopt a DFG-out activation loop conformation. Comparison with the structure of FGFR1 in complex with the candidate drug AZD4547, combined with kinetic characterization of the binding of ponatinib and AZD4547 to FGFR1 and FGFR4, sheds light on the observed differences in selectivity profiles and provides a rationale for developing FGFR4-selective inhibitors.

  3. Urochordate ascidians possess a single isoform of Aurora kinase that localizes to the midbody via TPX2 in eggs and cleavage stage embryos.

    PubMed

    Hebras, Celine; McDougall, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Aurora kinases are key proteins found throughout the eukaryotes that control mitotic progression. Vertebrate Aurora-A and B kinases are thought to have evolved from a single Aurora-kinase isoform closest to that found in present day urochordates. In urochordate ascidians Aurora binds both TPX2 (a vertebrate AURKA partner) and INCENP (a vertebrate AURKB partner) and localizes to centrosomes and spindle microtubules as well as chromosomes and midbody during both meiosis and mitosis. Ascidian Aurora also displays this localization pattern during mitosis in echinoderms, strengthening the idea that non-vertebrate deuterostomes such as the urochordates and echinoderms possess a single form of Aurora kinase that has properties of vertebrate Aurora-kinase A and B. In the ascidian, TPX2 localizes to the centrosome and the spindle poles also as in vertebrates. However, we were surprised to find that TPX2 also localized strongly to the midbody in ascidian eggs and embryos. We thus examined more closely Aurora localization to the midbody by creating two separate point mutations of ascidian Aurora predicted to perturb binding to TPX2. Both forms of mutated Aurora behaved as predicted: neither localized to spindle poles where TPX2 is enriched. Interestingly, neither form of mutated Aurora localized to the midbody where TPX2 is also enriched, suggesting that ascidian Aurora midbody localization required TPX2 binding in ascidians. Functional analysis revealed that inhibition of Aurora kinase with a pharmacological inhibitor or with a dominant negative kinase dead form of Aurora caused cytokinesis failure and perturbed midbody formation during polar body extrusion. Our data support the view that vertebrate Aurora-A and B kinases evolved from a single non-vertebrate deuterostome ancestor. Moreover, since TPX2 localizes to the midbody in ascidian eggs and cleavage stage embryos it may be worthwhile re-assessing whether Aurora A kinase or TPX2 localize to the midbody in eggs and

  4. Distinct interaction modes of an AKAP bound to two regulatory subunit isoforms of protein kinase A revealed by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns-Hamuro, Lora L; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kim, Jack S; Sigala, Paul; Fayos, Rosa; Stranz, David D; Jennings, Patricia A; Taylor, Susan S; Woods, Virgil L

    2005-12-01

    The structure of an AKAP docked to the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of the type II (RIIalpha) isoform of protein kinase A (PKA) has been well characterized, but there currently is no detailed structural information of an AKAP docked to the type I (RIalpha) isoform. Dual-specific AKAP2 (D-AKAP2) binds in the nanomolar range to both isoforms and provided us with an opportunity to characterize the isoform-selective nature of AKAP binding using a common docked ligand. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange combined with mass spectrometry (DXMS) was used to probe backbone structural changes of an alpha-helical A-kinase binding (AKB) motif from D-AKAP2 docked to both RIalpha and RIIalpha D/D domains. The region of protection upon complex formation and the magnitude of protection from H/D exchange were determined for both interacting partners in each complex. The backbone of the AKB ligand was more protected when bound to RIalpha compared to RIIalpha, suggesting an increased helical stabilization of the docked AKB ligand. This combined with a broader region of backbone protection induced by the AKAP on the docking surface of RIalpha indicated that there were more binding constraints for the AKB ligand when bound to RIalpha. This was in contrast to RIIalpha, which has a preformed, localized binding surface. These distinct modes of AKAP binding may contribute to the more discriminating nature of the RIalpha AKAP-docking surface. DXMS provides valuable structural information for understanding binding specificity in the absence of a high-resolution structure, and can readily be applied to other protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions.

  5. Opposite effects of the p52shc/p46shc and p66shc splicing isoforms on the EGF receptor-MAP kinase-fos signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, E; Mele, S; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, G; Lai, K M; Superti-Furga, G; Pawson, T; Di Fiore, P P; Lanfrancone, L; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Shc proteins are targets of activated tyrosine kinases and are implicated in the transmission of activation signals to Ras. The p46shc and p52shc isoforms share a C-terminal SH2 domain, a proline- and glycine-rich region (collagen homologous region 1; CH1) and a N-terminal PTB domain. We have isolated cDNAs encoding for a third Shc isoform, p66shc. The predicted amino acid sequence of p66shc overlaps that of p52shc and contains a unique N-terminal region which is also rich in glycines and prolines (CH2). p52shc/p46shc is found in every cell type with invariant reciprocal relationship, whereas p66shc expression varies from cell type to cell type. p66shc differs from p52shc/p46shc in its inability to transform mouse fibroblasts in vitro. Like p52shc/p46shc, p66shc is tyrosine-phosphorylated upon epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, binds to activated EGF receptors (EGFRs) and forms stable complexes with Grb2. However, unlike p52shc/p46shc it does not increase EGF activation of MAP kinases, but inhibits fos promoter activation. The isolated CH2 domain retains the inhibitory effect of p66shc on the fos promoter. p52shc/p46shc and p66shc, therefore, appear to exert different effects on the EGFR-MAP kinase and other signalling pathways that control fos promoter activity. Regulation of p66shc expression might, therefore, influence the cellular response to growth factors. PMID:9049300

  6. Structure–Function Analysis of the Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase (nmMLCK) Isoform by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling: Influence of MYLK Variants

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kui; Ramirez, Benjamin; Mapes, Brandon; Shen, Grace R.; Gokhale, Vijay; Brown, Mary E.; Santarsiero, Bernard; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Dudek, Steven M.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    The MYLK gene encodes the multifunctional enzyme, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), involved in isoform-specific non-muscle and smooth muscle contraction and regulation of vascular permeability during inflammation. Three MYLK SNPs (P21H, S147P, V261A) alter the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the non-muscle isoform of MLCK (nmMLCK) and are highly associated with susceptibility to acute lung injury (ALI) and asthma, especially in individuals of African descent. To understand the functional effects of SNP associations, we examined the N-terminal segments of nmMLCK by 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy, a 2-D NMR technique, and by in silico molecular modeling. Both NMR analysis and molecular modeling indicated SNP localization to loops that connect the immunoglobulin-like domains of nmMLCK, consistent with minimal structural changes evoked by these SNPs. Molecular modeling analysis identified protein-protein interaction motifs adversely affected by these MYLK SNPs including binding by the scaffold protein 14-3-3, results confirmed by immunoprecipitation and western blot studies. These structure-function studies suggest novel mechanisms for nmMLCK regulation, which may confirm MYLK as a candidate gene in inflammatory lung disease and advance knowledge of the genetic underpinning of lung-related health disparities. PMID:26111161

  7. Pyruvate Kinase Isoform Switching and Hepatic Metabolic Reprogramming by the Environmental Contaminant 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Fader, Kelly A.; Kirby, Mathew P.; Ahmed, Shaimaa; Matthews, Jason; Jones, A. Daniel; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits dose-dependent hepatotoxicity that includes fat accumulation, inflammation, and fibrosis that may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. To further investigate these effects, RNA-Seq data were integrated with computationally identified putative dioxin response elements, and complementary targeted metabolomic and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ChIP-Seq data from female C57BL/6 mice gavaged with TCDD every 4 days for 28 days. Data integration using CytoKEGG with manual curation identified dose-dependent alterations in central carbon and amino acid metabolism. More specifically, TCDD increased pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) gene and protein expression. PKM2 has lower catalytic activity resulting in decreased glycolytic flux and the accumulation of upstream intermediates that were redirected to the pentose phosphate pathway and serine/folate biosynthesis, 2 important NADPH producing pathways stemming from glycolysis. In addition, the GAC:KGA glutaminase (GLS1) protein isoform ratio was increased, consistent with increases in glutaminolysis which serves an anaplerotic role for the TCA cycle and compensates for the reduced glycolytic flux. Collectively, gene expression, protein, and metabolite changes were indicative of increases in NADPH production in support of cytochrome P450 activity and ROS defenses. This AhR-mediated metabolic reprogramming is similar to the Warburg effect and represents a novel advantageous defense mechanism to increase anti-oxidant capacity in normal differentiated hepatocytes. PMID:26582802

  8. Isoform-selective phosphoinositide 3'-kinase inhibitors inhibit CXCR4 signaling and overcome stromal cell-mediated drug resistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a novel therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Niedermeier, Matthias; Hennessy, Bryan T; Knight, Zachary A; Henneberg, Marina; Hu, Jianhua; Kurtova, Antonina V; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Shokat, Kevan M; Burger, Jan A

    2009-05-28

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are among the most frequently activated signaling pathways in cancer. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), signals from the microenvironment are critical for expansion of the malignant B cells, and cause constitutive activation of PI3Ks. CXCR4 is a key receptor for CLL cell migration and adhesion to marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Because of the importance of CXCR4 and PI3Ks for CLL-microenvironment cross-talk, we investigated the activity of novel, isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors that target different isoforms of the p110-kDa subunit. Inhibition with p110alpha inhibitors (PIK-90 and PI-103) resulted in a significant reduction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization to CXCL12 and reduced migration beneath MSC (pseudoemperipolesis). Western blot and reverse phase protein array analyses consistently demonstrated that PIK-90 and PI-103 inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and S6, whereas p110delta or p110beta/p110delta inhibitors were less effective. In suspension and MSC cocultures, PI-103 and PIK-90 were potent inducers of CLL cell apoptosis. Moreover, these p110alpha inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of fludarabine and reversed the protective effect of MSC on fludarabine-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data demonstrate that p110alpha inhibitors antagonize stromal cell-derived migration, survival, and drug-resistance signals and therefore provide a rational to explore the therapeutic activity of these promising agents in CLL.

  9. Pyruvate Kinase Isoform Switching and Hepatic Metabolic Reprogramming by the Environmental Contaminant 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Fader, Kelly A; Kirby, Mathew P; Ahmed, Shaimaa; Matthews, Jason; Jones, A Daniel; Lunt, Sophia Y; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2016-02-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits dose-dependent hepatotoxicity that includes fat accumulation, inflammation, and fibrosis that may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. To further investigate these effects, RNA-Seq data were integrated with computationally identified putative dioxin response elements, and complementary targeted metabolomic and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ChIP-Seq data from female C57BL/6 mice gavaged with TCDD every 4 days for 28 days. Data integration using CytoKEGG with manual curation identified dose-dependent alterations in central carbon and amino acid metabolism. More specifically, TCDD increased pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) gene and protein expression. PKM2 has lower catalytic activity resulting in decreased glycolytic flux and the accumulation of upstream intermediates that were redirected to the pentose phosphate pathway and serine/folate biosynthesis, 2 important NADPH producing pathways stemming from glycolysis. In addition, the GAC:KGA glutaminase (GLS1) protein isoform ratio was increased, consistent with increases in glutaminolysis which serves an anaplerotic role for the TCA cycle and compensates for the reduced glycolytic flux. Collectively, gene expression, protein, and metabolite changes were indicative of increases in NADPH production in support of cytochrome P450 activity and ROS defenses. This AhR-mediated metabolic reprogramming is similar to the Warburg effect and represents a novel advantageous defense mechanism to increase anti-oxidant capacity in normal differentiated hepatocytes.

  10. Molecular characterisation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) catalytic subunit isoforms in the male tick, Amblyomma hebraeum.

    PubMed

    Tabish, Mohammad; Clegg, Roger A; Turner, Philip C; Jonczy, Jan; Rees, Huw H; Fisher, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, PK-A) plays a central role in the regulation of diverse aspects of cellular activity. Specifically, PK-A appears to play a key controlling role in the maturation of spermatids. Using a PCR-based approach, with degenerate primers from the highly conserved regions of the PK-A catalytic (C) subunit in combination with 5' and 3' RACE, we have cloned three cDNAs for the PK-A C-subunit of the male tick, Amblyomma hebraeum. The three cDNAs have open reading frames of 1059, 1275 and 1404bp which encode proteins of 40.6, 48.2 and 52.5kDa, respectively. These transcripts appear to arise from 5' alternative splicing of RNA derived from a single gene for the PK-A C-subunit. One isoform (AH-PK-A C1), in common with PK-A C-subunits from a range of species, contains a consensus sequence for N-myristoylation. RT-PCR and Western blot experiments suggest that the three splice variants are expressed ubiquitously; however, expression of the myristoylatable AH-PK-A C1 isoform is predominant in all investigated tissues (accessory gland, midgut, Malpighian tubules, salivary gland, testis and immature spermatids). There is no evidence for a sperm-specific PK-A C-subunit (Cs) in tick sperm; however, tyrosine protein phosphorylation, previously shown to be modulated by PK-A activity during mammalian sperm maturation, was observed in tick sperm.

  11. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca2+- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations (“spiking”) at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K+ depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca2+]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca2+]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  12. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  13. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-related Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 activation controls hexokinase II expression in benzo(a)pyrene-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huc, Laurence; Tekpli, Xavier; Holme, Jørn A; Rissel, Mary; Solhaug, Anita; Gardyn, Claire; Le Moigne, Gwénaelle; Gorria, Morgane; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2007-02-15

    Regulation of the balance between survival, proliferation, and apoptosis on carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure is still poorly understood and more particularly the role of physiologic variables, including intracellular pH (pH(i)). Although the involvement of the ubiquitous pH(i) regulator Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) in tumorigenesis is well documented, less is known about its role and regulation during apoptosis. Our previous works have shown the primordial role of NHE1 in carcinogenic PAH-induced apoptosis. This alkalinizing transporter was activated by an early CYP1-dependent H(2)O(2) production, subsequently promoting mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptosis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate how NHE1 was activated by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and what the downstream events were in the context of apoptosis. Our results indicate that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (MKK4/JNK) pathway was a link between BaP-induced H(2)O(2) production and NHE1 activation. This activation, in combination with BaP-induced phosphorylated p53, promoted mitochondrial superoxide anion production, supporting the existence of a common target for NHE1 and p53. Furthermore, we showed that the mitochondrial expression of glycolytic enzyme hexokinase II (HKII) was decreased following a combined action of NHE1 and p53 pathways, thereby enhancing the BaP-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that, on BaP exposure, MKK4/JNK targets NHE1 with consequences on HKII protein, which might thus be a key protein during carcinogenic PAH apoptosis.

  14. Glucocorticoid adrenal steroids and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase isoforms in the regulation of GluR6 expression

    PubMed Central

    Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Seebohm, Guiscard; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Mack, Andreas F; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Lampert, Angelika; Grahammer, Florian; Henke, Guido; Just, Lothar; Skutella, Thomas; Hollmann, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2005-01-01

    Generation of memory is enhanced during stress, an effect attributed to stimulation of neuronal learning by adrenal glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid-dependent genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1. SGK1 is activated through the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3-kinase) pathway by growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) or tumour growth factor β (TGF-β). Previously, a fourfold higher expression of SGK1 has been observed in fast-learning rats as compared with slow-learning rats. The mechanisms linking glucocorticoids or SGK1 with neuronal function have, however, remained elusive. We show here that treatment of mice with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (238 μg day−1 for 8–20 days) enhances hippocampal expression of GluR6. Immunohistochemistry reveals significantly enhanced GluR6 protein abundance at neurones but not at astrocytes in mice. Immunohistochemistry and patch clamp on hippocampal neurones in primary culture reveal upregulation of GluR6 protein abundance and kainate-induced currents following treatment with dexamethasone (1 μm) and TGF-β (1 μm). In Xenopus oocytes expressing rat GluR6, coexpression of SGK1 strongly increases glutamate-induced current at least partially by increasing the abundance of GluR6 protein in the plasma membrane. The related kinases SGK2 and SGK3 similarly stimulate GluR6, but are less effective than SGK1. The observations point to a novel mechanism regulating GluR6 which contributes to the regulation of neuronal function by glucocorticoids. PMID:15774535

  15. Differential regulation of insulin receptor substrates-1 and -2 (IRS-1 and IRS-2) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoforms in liver and muscle of the obese diabetic (ob/ob) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kerouz, N J; Hörsch, D; Pons, S; Kahn, C R

    1997-01-01

    Intracellular insulin signaling involves a series of alternative and complementary pathways created by the multiple substrates of the insulin receptor (IRS) and the various isoforms of SH2 domain signaling molecules that can interact with these substrates. In this study, we have evaluated the roles of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in signaling to the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase pathway in the ob/ob mouse, a model of the insulin resistance of obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We find that the levels of expression of both IRS-1 and IRS-2 are decreased approximately 50% in muscle, whereas in liver the decrease is significantly greater for IRS-2 (72%) than for IRS-1 (29%). This results in differential decreases in IRS-1 and IRS-2 phosphorylation, docking of the p85alpha regulatory subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activation of this enzyme in these two insulin target tissues. In ob/ob liver there is also a change in expression of the alternatively spliced isoforms of the regulatory subunits for PI 3-kinase that was detected at the protein and mRNA level. This resulted in a 45% decrease in the p85alpha form of PI 3-kinase, a ninefold increase in the AS53/p55alpha, and a twofold increase in p50alpha isoforms. Thus, there are multiple alterations in the early steps of insulin signaling in the ob/ob mouse, with differential regulation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, various PI 3-kinase regulatory isoforms, and a lack of compensation for the decrease in insulin signaling by any of the known alternative pathways at these levels. PMID:9399964

  16. Nuclear import of isoforms of the cytomegalovirus kinase pUL97 is mediated by differential activity of NLS1 and NLS2 both acting through classical importin-α binding.

    PubMed

    Webel, Rike; Solbak, Sara M Ø; Held, Christian; Milbradt, Jens; Groß, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Wittenberg, Thomas; Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2012-08-01

    The multifunctional protein kinase pUL97 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strongly determines the efficiency of virus replication. Previously, the existence of two pUL97 isoforms that arise from alternative translational initiation and show a predominant nuclear localization was described. Two bipartite nuclear localization sequences, NLS1 and NLS2, were identified in the N terminus of the large isoform, whilst the small isoform exclusively contained NLS2. The current study found the following: (i) pUL97 nuclear localization in HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts showed accumulations in virus replication centres and other nuclear sections; (ii) in a quantitative evaluation system for NLS activity, the large isoform showed higher efficiency of nuclear translocation than the small isoform; (iii) NLS1 was mapped to aa 6-35 and NLS2 to aa 190-213; (iv) using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, the binding of both NLS1 and NLS2 to human importin-α was demonstrated, stressing the importance of individual arginine residues in the bipartite consensus motifs; (v) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of pUL97 peptides confirmed an earlier statement about the functional requirement of NLS1 embedding into an intact α-helical structure; and (vi) a bioinformatics investigation of the solvent-accessible surface suggested a high accessibility of NLS1 and an isoform-specific, variable accessibility of NLS2 for interaction with importin-α. Thus, the nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanism of the isoforms appeared to be differentially regulated, and this may have consequences for isoform-dependent functions of pUL97 during virus replication.

  17. DNA Unwinding Functions of Minute Virus of Mice NS1 Protein Are Modulated Specifically by the Lambda Isoform of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Dettwiler, Sabine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.

    1999-01-01

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice NS1 protein is a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of processes during virus propagation, ranging from viral DNA replication to promoter regulation and cytotoxic action to the host cell. Since NS1 becomes phosphorylated during infection, it was proposed that the different tasks of this protein might be regulated in a coordinated manner by phosphorylation. Indeed, comparing biochemical functions of native NS1 with its dephosphorylated counterpart showed that site-specific nicking of the origin and the helicase and ATPase activities are remarkably reduced upon NS1 dephosphorylation while site-specific affinity of the protein to the origin became enhanced. As a consequence, the dephosphorylated polypeptide is deficient for initiation of DNA replication. By adding fractionated cell extracts to a kinase-free in vitro replication system, the combination of two protein components containing members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family was found to rescue the replication activity of the dephosphorylated NS1 protein upon addition of PKC cofactors. One of these components, termed HA-1, also stimulated NS1 helicase function in response to acidic lipids but not phorbol esters, indicating the involvement of atypical PKC isoforms in the modulation of this NS1 function (J. P. F. Nüesch, S. Dettwiler, R. Corbau, and J. Rommelaere, J. Virol. 72:9966–9977, 1998). The present study led to the identification of atypical PKCλ/ι as the active component of HA-1 responsible for the regulation of NS1 DNA unwinding and replicative functions. Moreover, a target PKCλ phosphorylation site was localized at S473 of NS1. By site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this residue is essential for NS1 helicase activity but not promoter regulation, suggesting a possible modulation of NS1 functions by PKCλ phosphorylation at residue S473. PMID:10438831

  18. Activation of medullary dorsal horn γ isoform of protein kinase C interneurons is essential to the development of both static and dynamic facial mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Pham-Dang, Nathalie; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), which is concentrated in a specific class of interneurons within inner lamina II (IIi ) of the spinal dorsal horn and medullary dorsal horn (MDH), is known to be involved in the development of mechanical allodynia, a widespread and intractable symptom of inflammatory or neuropathic pain. However, although genetic and pharmacological impairment of PKCγ were shown to prevent mechanical allodynia in animal models of pain, after nerve injury or reduced inhibition, the functional consequences of PKCγ activation alone on mechanical sensitivity are still unknown. Using behavioural and anatomical approaches in the rat MDH, we tested whether PKCγ activation in naive animals is sufficient for the establishment of mechanical allodynia. Intracisternal injection of the phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate concomitantly induced static as well as dynamic facial mechanical allodynia. Monitoring neuronal activity within the MDH with phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 immunoreactivity revealed that activation of both lamina I-outer lamina II and IIi -outer lamina III neurons, including lamina IIi PKCγ-expressing interneurons, was associated with the manifestation of mechanical allodynia. Phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate-induced mechanical allodynia and associated neuronal activations were all prevented by inhibiting selectively segmental PKCγ with KIG31-1. Our findings suggest that PKCγ activation, without any other experimental manipulation, is sufficient for the development of static and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons have been shown to be directly activated by low-threshold mechanical inputs carried by myelinated afferents. Thus, the level of PKCγ activation within PKCγ interneurons might gate the transmission of innocuous mechanical inputs to lamina I, nociceptive output neurons, thus turning touch into pain.

  19. C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor α-related Protein Isoform 5 Is Increased in Mitochondrial DNA-depleted Myocytes and Activates AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Choi, Jung Hyun; Ryu, Hyun Su; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Wan

    2009-01-01

    Depletion of mtDNA in myocytes causes insulin resistance and alters nuclear gene expression that may be involved in rescuing processes against cellular stress. Here we show that the expression of C1q tumor necrosis factor α-related protein isoform 5 (C1QTNF5) is drastically increased following depletion of mtDNA in myocytes. C1QTNF5 is homologous to adiponectin in respect to domain structure, and its expression and secretion from myocytes correlated negatively with the cellular mtDNA content. Similar to adiponectin, C1QTNF5 induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased cell surface recruitment of GLUT4 and increased glucose uptake. Treatment of cells with purified recombinant C1QTNF5 increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and stimulated fatty acid oxidation. C1QTNF5-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK or acetyl-CoA carboxylase was unaffected by depletion of adiponectin receptors such as AdipoR1 or AdipoR2, which indicated that adiponectin receptors do not participate in C1QTNF5-induced activation of AMPK. Serum C1QTNF5 levels were significantly higher in obese/diabetic animals (OLETF rats, ob/ob mice, and db/db mice). These results highlight C1QTNF5 as a putative biomarker for mitochondrial dysfunction and a potent activator of AMPK. PMID:19651784

  20. C1q tumor necrosis factor alpha-related protein isoform 5 is increased in mitochondrial DNA-depleted myocytes and activates AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Choi, Jung Hyun; Ryu, Hyun Su; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Wan

    2009-10-09

    Depletion of mtDNA in myocytes causes insulin resistance and alters nuclear gene expression that may be involved in rescuing processes against cellular stress. Here we show that the expression of C1q tumor necrosis factor alpha-related protein isoform 5 (C1QTNF5) is drastically increased following depletion of mtDNA in myocytes. C1QTNF5 is homologous to adiponectin in respect to domain structure, and its expression and secretion from myocytes correlated negatively with the cellular mtDNA content. Similar to adiponectin, C1QTNF5 induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased cell surface recruitment of GLUT4 and increased glucose uptake. Treatment of cells with purified recombinant C1QTNF5 increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and stimulated fatty acid oxidation. C1QTNF5-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK or acetyl-CoA carboxylase was unaffected by depletion of adiponectin receptors such as AdipoR1 or AdipoR2, which indicated that adiponectin receptors do not participate in C1QTNF5-induced activation of AMPK. Serum C1QTNF5 levels were significantly higher in obese/diabetic animals (OLETF rats, ob/ob mice, and db/db mice). These results highlight C1QTNF5 as a putative biomarker for mitochondrial dysfunction and a potent activator of AMPK.

  1. Role of the alpha2-isoform of AMP-activated protein kinase in the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Carjaval, Karla; Beauloye, Christophe; Ginion, Audrey; Mateo, Philippe; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Horman, Sandrine; Vaulont, Sophie; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Bertrand, Luc

    2006-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major sensor and regulator of the energetic state of the cell. Little is known about the specific role of AMPKalpha(2), the major AMPK isoform in the heart, in response to global ischemia. We used AMPKalpha(2)-knockout (AMPKalpha(2)(-/-)) mice to evaluate the consequences of AMPKalpha(2) deletion during normoxia and ischemia, with glucose as the sole substrate. Hemodynamic measurements from echocardiography of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice during normoxia showed no significant modification compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, the response of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice to no-flow ischemia was characterized by a more rapid onset of ischemia-induced contracture. This ischemic contracture was associated with a decrease in ATP content, lactate production, glycogen content, and AMPKbeta(2) content. Hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice were also characterized by a decreased phosphorylation state of acetyl-CoA carboxylase during normoxia and ischemia. Despite an apparent worse metabolic adaptation during ischemia, the absence of AMPKalpha(2) does not exacerbate impairment of the recovery of postischemic contractile function. In conclusion, AMPKalpha(2) is required for the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia. The remaining AMPKalpha(1) cannot compensate for the absence of AMPKalpha(2).

  2. Regulation of the meiosis-inhibited protein kinase, a p38(MAPK) isoform, during meiosis and following fertilization of seastar oocytes.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D L; Yee, A; Paddon, H B; Vilimek, D; Aebersold, R; Pelech, S L

    2000-11-03

    A p38(MAPK) homolog Mipk (meiosis-inhibited protein kinase) was cloned from seastar oocytes. This 40-kDa protein shares approximately 65% amino acid identity with mammalian p38-alpha isoforms. Mipk was one of the major tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in immature oocytes arrested at the G(2)/M transition of meiosis I. The tyrosine phosphorylation of Mipk was increased in response to anisomycin, heat, and osmotic shock of oocytes. During 1-methyladenine-induced oocyte maturation, Mipk underwent tyrosine dephosphorylation and remained dephosphorylated in mature oocytes and during the early mitotic cell divisions until approximately 12 h after fertilization. At the time of differentiation and acquisition of G phases in the developing embryos, Mipk was rephosphorylated on tyrosine. In oocytes that were microinjected with Mipk antisense oligonucleotides and subsequently were allowed to mature and become fertilized, differentiation was blocked. Because MipK antisense oligonucleotides and a dominant-negative (K62R)Mipk when microinjected into immature oocytes failed to induce germinal vesicle breakdown, inhibition of Mipk function was not sufficient by itself to cause oocyte maturation. These findings point to a putative role for Mipk in cell cycle control as a G-phase-promoting factor.

  3. Evaluation of Substituted N,N′-Diarylsulfonamides as Activators of the Tumor Cell Specific M2 Isoform of Pyruvate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Matthew B.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Shen, Min; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Southall, Noel; Veith, Henrike; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.; Park, Hee Won; Inglese, James; Cantley, Lewis C.; Auld, Douglas S.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolism of cancer cells is altered to support rapid proliferation. Pharmacological activators of a tumor cell specific pyruvate kinase isozyme (PKM2) may be an approach for altering the classic Warburg effect characteristic of aberrant metabolism in cancer cells yielding a novel anti-proliferation strategy. In this manuscript we detail the discovery of a series of substituted N,N′-diarylsulfonamides as activators of PKM2. The synthesis of numerous analogues and the evaluation of structure activity relationships are presented as well as assessments of mechanism and selectivity. Several agents are found that have good potencies and appropriate solubility for use as chemical probes of PKM2 including 55 (AC50 = 43 nM, maximum response = 84%; solubility = 7.3 μg/mL), 56 (AC50 = 99 nM, maximum response = 84%; solubility = 5.7 μg/mL) and 58 (AC50 = 38 nM, maximum response = 82%; solubility = 51.2 μg/mL). The small molecules described here represent first-in-class activators of PKM2 PMID:20017496

  4. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM. PMID:26823761

  5. Knockdown of the M2 Isoform of Pyruvate Kinase (PKM2) with shRNA Enhances the Effect of Docetaxel in Human NSCLC Cell Lines In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sujuan; Zhuang, Xibing; Chen, Wei; Xing, Na; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study was to explore the relationships between the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and the sensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to docetaxel in vitro. Materials and Methods With the method of plasmid transfection, we silenced the expression of PKM2 successfully in A549 and H460 cells. Western blotting and real-time PCR were applied to detect PKM2 expression at protein and gene levels. Cell viability was examined by CCK8 assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. P21 and Bax were detected. Results Expression of PKM2 mRNA and protein were significantly decreased by shRNA targeting PKM2. Silencing of PKM2 increased docetaxel sensitivity of human NSCLC A549 and H460 cells in a collaborative manner, resulting in strong suppression of cell viability. The results of flow cytometric assays suggested that knockdown of PKM2 or docetaxel treatment, whether used singly or in combination, blocked the cells in the G2/M phase, which is in consistent with the effect of the two on the expression of p21. Cells with PKM2 silencing were more likely to be induced into apoptosis by docetaxel although knockdown of PKM2 alone can't induce apoptosis significantly, which is in consistent with the effect of the two on Bax expression. Conclusion The results suggest that PKM2 knockdown could serve as a chemosensitizer to docetaxel in non-small lung cancer cells through targeting PKM2, leading to inhibition of cell viability, increase of cell arrest of G2/M phase and apoptosis. PMID:27593857

  6. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM.

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  8. Akt isoforms in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease. PMID:25929188

  9. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  10. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  11. Role of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase isozymes in murine colonic glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Ronn S; Moss, Catherine E; Mace, Jessica; Parker, Helen E; Tolhurst, Gwen; Habib, Abdella M; Wachten, Sebastian; Cooper, Dermot M; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells after food intake. Increasing GLP-1 signalling either through inhibition of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV or injection of GLP-1-mimetics has recently been successfully introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Boosting secretion from the L-cell has so far not been exploited, due to our incomplete understanding of L-cell physiology. Elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to be a strong stimulus for GLP-1 secretion and here we investigate the activities of adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes likely to shape cAMP responses in L-cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of AC and PDE isoforms was quantified by RT-PCR. Single cell responses to stimulation or inhibition of AC and PDE isoforms were monitored with real-time cAMP probes. GLP-1 secretion was assessed by elisa. KEY RESULTS Quantitative PCR identified expression of protein kinase C- and Ca2+-activated ACs, corresponding with phorbolester and cytosolic Ca2+-stimulated cAMP elevation. Inhibition of PDE2, 3 and 4 were found to stimulate GLP-1 secretion from murine L-cells in primary culture. This corresponded with cAMP elevations monitored with a plasma membrane targeted cAMP probe. Inhibition of PDE3 but not PDE2 was further shown to prevent GLP-1 secretion in response to guanylin, a peptide secreted into the gut lumen, which had not previously been implicated in L-cell secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results reveal several mechanisms shaping cAMP responses in GLP-1 secreting cells, with some of the molecular components specifically expressed in L-cells when compared with their epithelial neighbours, thus opening new strategies for targeting these cells therapeutically. PMID:21054345

  12. Short-term Mg deficiency upregulates protein kinase C isoforms in cardiovascular tissues and cells; relation to NF-kB, cytokines, ceramide salvage sphingolipid pathway and PKC-zeta: hypothesis and review.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Zhang, Aimin; Li, Wenyan; Zheng, Tao; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2014-01-01

    Numerous recent,epidemiological studies reveal that Western populations are growing more and more deficient in daily Mg intake which have been linked to etiology of cardiovascular (CV) diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that a major missing link to this dilemma may reside within the sphingolipid-ceramide pathways. For the past 25 years , our labs have been focusing on these pathways in Mg-deficient mammals. The objective of this paper is two-fold: 1) to test various hypotheses and 2) to review the current status of the field and how protein kinase C isoforms may be pivotal to solving some of the CV attributes of Mg deficiency. Below, we test the hypotheses that: 1) short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (MgD) would result in the upregulation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in left ventricular (LV) and aortic smooth muscle (ASM) and serum; 2) MgD would result in a release of select cytokines and an upregulation of NF-kB in LV and ASM, and in primary cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (PCASMC); 3) MgD would result in an activation of the sphingolipid salvage pathway in LV and ASM, and in PCASMC; 4) MgD would result in a synthesis of sphingosine, but not sphinganine, in PCASMC which could be inhibited by fumonisin B1 (FB) an inhibitor of ceramide synthase (CS), but not scyphostatin an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase); 5) incubation of PCASMC (in low Mg(2+)) with the PKC-mimic PMA would result in release and synthesis of NF-kB, cytokines, and ceramide but not sphingosine. The new data indicate that short-term MgD (10% normal dietary intake) result in an upregulation of all three classes of PKC isoforms in LV, aortic muscle and in serum coupled to the upregulation of ceramide, NF-kB activation, and cytokines. High degrees of linear correlation were found to exist between upregulation of PKC isoforms, p65 and cytokine release, suggesting cross-talk between these molecules and molecular pathways. Our experiments with PCASMCs demonstrated

  13. The AP-3 Complex Required for Endosomal Synaptic Vesicle Biogenesis is Associated with a Casein Kinase Ια-Like Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor V.; Kelly, Regis B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of small vesicles is mediated by cytoplasmic coats the assembly of which is regulated by the activity of GTPases, kinases, and phosphatases. A heterotetrameric AP-3 adaptor complex has been implicated in the formation of synaptic vesicles from PC12 endosomes (Faundez et al., 1998). When the small GTPase ARF1 is prevented from hydrolyzing GTP, we can reconstitute AP-3 recruitment to synaptic vesicle membranes in an assembly reaction that requires temperatures above 15°C and the presence of ATP suggesting that an enzymatic step is involved in the coat assembly. We have now found an enzymatic reaction, the phosphorylation of the AP-3 adaptor complex, that is linked with synaptic vesicle coating. Phosphorylation occurs in the β3 subunit of the complex by a kinase similar to casein kinase 1α. The kinase copurifies with neuronal-specific AP-3. In vitro, purified casein kinase I selectively phosphorylates the β3A and β3B subunit at its hinge domain. Inhibiting the kinase hinders the recruitment of AP-3 to synaptic vesicles. The same inhibitors that prevent coat assembly in vitro also inhibit the formation of synaptic vesicles in PC12 cells. The data suggest, therefore, that the mechanism of AP-3-mediated vesiculation from neuroendocrine endosomes requires the phosphorylation of the adaptor complex at a step during or after AP-3 recruitment to membranes. PMID:10930456

  14. Isoform-selective phosphoinositide 3′-kinase inhibitors inhibit CXCR4 signaling and overcome stromal cell–mediated drug resistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a novel therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Niedermeier, Matthias; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Knight, Zachary A.; Henneberg, Marina; Hu, Jianhua; Kurtova, Antonina V.; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are among the most frequently activated signaling pathways in cancer. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), signals from the microenvironment are critical for expansion of the malignant B cells, and cause constitutive activation of PI3Ks. CXCR4 is a key receptor for CLL cell migration and adhesion to marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Because of the importance of CXCR4 and PI3Ks for CLL-microenvironment cross-talk, we investigated the activity of novel, isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors that target different isoforms of the p110-kDa subunit. Inhibition with p110α inhibitors (PIK-90 and PI-103) resulted in a significant reduction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization to CXCL12 and reduced migration beneath MSC (pseudoemperipolesis). Western blot and reverse phase protein array analyses consistently demonstrated that PIK-90 and PI-103 inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and S6, whereas p110δ or p110β/p110δ inhibitors were less effective. In suspension and MSC cocultures, PI-103 and PIK-90 were potent inducers of CLL cell apoptosis. Moreover, these p110α inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of fludarabine and reversed the protective effect of MSC on fludarabine-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data demonstrate that p110α inhibitors antagonize stromal cell-derived migration, survival, and drug-resistance signals and therefore provide a rational to explore the therapeutic activity of these promising agents in CLL. PMID:19318683

  15. Isolated regulatory domains of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha and Ibeta retain dimerization and native cGMP-binding properties and undergo isoform-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Richie-Jannetta, Robyn; Busch, Jennifer L; Higgins, Kristin A; Corbin, Jackie D; Francis, Sharron H

    2006-03-17

    Molecular mechanisms that provide for cGMP activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) are unknown. PKGs are dimeric; each monomer contains a regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) domain. In this study, isolated recombinant R domains of PKGIalpha-(Delta349-670) and PKGIbeta-(Delta364-685) containing the dimerization and autoinhibitory subdomains and two allosteric cGMP-binding sites were expressed in Sf9 cells. Both R domains were dimers with elongated conformations (Stokes radii of 44 and 51 A, respectively, and frictional coefficients of 1.6 and 1.8, respectively). Exchange dissociation kinetics and K(D) values for cGMP were similar for each holoenzyme and its isolated R domain, indicating that under these conditions the C domain does not appreciably alter cGMP-binding functions of the R domain. As determined by gel filtration chromatography, cGMP binding caused elongation of the PKGIalpha-isolated R domain and contraction of the PKGIbeta-isolated R domain. Cyclic GMP-bound forms of the isoforms have similar physical dimensions that may reflect a common conformation of active isoforms. Elongation of the PKGIbeta holoenzyme associated with cGMP binding and PKG activation cannot be explained solely by conformational change in its R domain, but elongation of the PKGIalpha R domain may partially account for the elongation of wild type PKGIalpha associated with cGMP binding. The cGMP-induced conformational changes in the respective R domains are likely to be critical for kinase activation.

  16. Crystal structures of apo and inhibitor-bound TGFβR2 kinase domain: insights into TGFβR isoform selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Tebben, Andrew J.; Ruzanov, Maxim; Gao, Mian; Xie, Dianlin; Kiefer, Susan E.; Yan, Chunhong; Newitt, John A.; Zhang, Liping; Kim, Kyoung; Lu, Hao; Kopcho, Lisa M.; Sheriff, Steven

    2016-04-26

    The cytokine TGF-β modulates a number of cellular activities and plays a critical role in development, hemostasis and physiology, as well as in diseases including cancer and fibrosis. TGF-β signals through two transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors: TGFβR1 and TGFβR2. Multiple structures of the TGFβR1 kinase domain are known, but the structure of TGFβR2 remains unreported. Wild-type TGFβR2 kinase domain was refractory to crystallization, leading to the design of two mutated constructs: firstly, a TGFβR1 chimeric protein with seven ATP-site residues mutated to their counterparts in TGFβR2, and secondly, a reduction of surface entropy through mutation of six charged residues on the surface of the TGFβR2 kinase domain to alanines. These yielded apo and inhibitor-bound crystals that diffracted to high resolution (<2 Å). Comparison of these structures with those of TGFβR1 reveal shared ligand contacts as well as differences in the ATP-binding sites, suggesting strategies for the design of pan and selective TGFβR inhibitors.

  17. The Phosphatase-Resistant Isoform of CaMKI, Ca²⁺/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Iδ (CaMKIδ), Remains in Its "Primed" Form without Ca²⁺ Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Senga, Yukako; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Shigeri, Yasushi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2015-06-16

    Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI) is known to play pivotal roles in Ca²⁺ signaling pathways. Four isoforms of CaMKI (α, β, γ, and δ) have been reported so far. CaMKI is activated through phosphorylation by the upstream kinase, CaMK kinase (CaMKK), and phosphorylates downstream targets. When CaMKI was transiently expressed in 293T cells, CaMKIα was not phosphorylated at all under low-Ca²⁺ conditions in the cells. In contrast, we found that CaMKIδ was significantly phosphorylated and activated to phosphorylate cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) under the same conditions. Herein, we report that the sustained activation of CaMKIδ is ascribed to its phosphatase resistance resulting from the structure of its N-terminal region. First, we examined whether CaMKIδ is more readily phosphorylated by CaMKK than CaMKIα, but no significant difference was observed. Next, to compare the phosphatase resistance between CaMKIα and CaMKIδ, we assessed the dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated CaMKIs by CaMK phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F). Surprisingly, CaMKIδ was hardly dephosphorylated by CaMKP, whereas CaMKIα was significantly dephosphorylated under the same conditions. To date, there have been no detailed reports concerning dephosphorylation of CaMKI. Through extensive analysis of CaMKP-catalyzed dephosphorylation of various chimeric and point mutants of CaMKIδ and CaMKIα, we identified the amino acid residues responsible for the phosphatase resistance of CaMKIδ (Pro-57, Lys-62, Ser-66, Ile-68, and Arg-76). These results also indicate that the phosphatase resistance of CaMKI is largely affected by only several amino acids in its N-terminal region. The phosphatase-resistant CaMKI isoform may play a physiological role under low-Ca²⁺ conditions in the cells.

  18. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  19. The three-dimensional structure of shikimate kinase.

    PubMed

    Krell, T; Coggins, J R; Lapthorn, A J

    1998-05-22

    The three-dimensional structure of shikimate kinase from Erwinia chrysanthemi has been determined by multiple isomorphous replacement. Two models are presented: a high resolution 1.9 A model and a 2.6 A model which contains bound Mg-ADP. The enzyme is an alpha/beta protein consisting of a central sheet of five parallel beta-strands flanked by alpha-helices with overall topology similar to adenylate kinase. Evidence is presented that shikimate kinase undergoes major conformational changes on ligand binding. It resembles adenylate kinase in having a P-loop containing core structure and two flexible domains which undergo induced fit movement on substrate binding. The binding of Mg2+ in the active site of shikimate kinase involves direct interaction with two protein side-chains which is different from the situation found in adenylate kinase. Shikimate kinase has a readily identifiable Walker A-motif and a recognisable but modified Walker B-motif. Comparison of shikimate kinase to adenylate kinase has led to the identification of an adenine-binding motif (I/VDAXQ/NXP). Difference Fourier calculations have revealed the shikimate binding site which corresponds to the location of the AMP-binding site in adenylate kinase. A model for shikimate-binding is presented.

  20. From Drug Screening to Target Deconvolution: a Target-Based Drug Discovery Pipeline Using Leishmania Casein Kinase 1 Isoform 2 To Identify Compounds with Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Durieu, Emilie; Prina, Eric; Leclercq, Olivier; Oumata, Nassima; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Aulner, Nathalie; Defontaine, Audrey; No, Joo Hwan; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Galons, Hervé; Späth, Gerald F.; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Existing therapies for leishmaniases present significant limitations, such as toxic side effects, and are rendered inefficient by parasite resistance. It is of utmost importance to develop novel drugs targeting Leishmania that take these two limitations into consideration. We thus chose a target-based approach using an exoprotein kinase, Leishmania casein kinase 1.2 (LmCK1.2) that was recently shown to be essential for intracellular parasite survival and infectivity. We developed a four-step pipeline to identify novel selective antileishmanial compounds. In step 1, we screened 5,018 compounds from kinase-biased libraries with Leishmania and mammalian CK1 in order to identify hit compounds and assess their specificity. For step 2, we selected 88 compounds among those with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration to test their biological activity on host-free parasites using a resazurin reduction assay and on intramacrophagic amastigotes using a high content phenotypic assay. Only 75 compounds showed antileishmanial activity and were retained for step 3 to evaluate their toxicity against mouse macrophages and human cell lines. The four compounds that displayed a selectivity index above 10 were then assessed for their affinity to LmCK1.2 using a target deconvolution strategy in step 4. Finally, we retained two compounds, PP2 and compound 42, for which LmCK1.2 seems to be the primary target. Using this four-step pipeline, we identify from several thousand molecules, two lead compounds with a selective antileishmanial activity. PMID:26902771

  1. DAF-16/FoxO Directly Regulates an Atypical AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Gamma Isoform to Mediate the Effects of Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling on Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tullet, Jennifer M. A.; Araiz, Caroline; Sanders, Matthew J.; Au, Catherine; Benedetto, Alexandre; Papatheodorou, Irene; Clark, Emily; Schmeisser, Kathrin; Jones, Daniel; Schuster, Eugene F.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gems, David

    2014-01-01

    The DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor controls growth, metabolism and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. The large number of genes that it regulates has been an obstacle to understanding its function. However, recent analysis of transcript and chromatin profiling implies that DAF-16 regulates relatively few genes directly, and that many of these encode other regulatory proteins. We have investigated the regulation by DAF-16 of genes encoding the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has α, β and γ subunits. C. elegans has 5 genes encoding putative AMP-binding regulatory γ subunits, aakg-1-5. aakg-4 and aakg-5 are closely related, atypical isoforms, with orthologs throughout the Chromadorea class of nematodes. We report that ∼75% of total γ subunit mRNA encodes these 2 divergent isoforms, which lack consensus AMP-binding residues, suggesting AMP-independent kinase activity. DAF-16 directly activates expression of aakg-4, reduction of which suppresses longevity in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. This implies that an increase in the activity of AMPK containing the AAKG-4 γ subunit caused by direct activation by DAF-16 slows aging in daf-2 mutants. Knock down of aakg-4 expression caused a transient decrease in activation of expression in multiple DAF-16 target genes. This, taken together with previous evidence that AMPK promotes DAF-16 activity, implies the action of these two metabolic regulators in a positive feedback loop that accelerates the induction of DAF-16 target gene expression. The AMPK β subunit, aakb-1, also proved to be up-regulated by DAF-16, but had no effect on lifespan. These findings reveal key features of the architecture of the gene-regulatory network centered on DAF-16, and raise the possibility that activation of AMP-independent AMPK in nutritionally replete daf-2 mutant adults slows aging in C. elegans. Evidence of activation of AMPK subunits in mammals suggests that such FoxO-AMPK interactions may be evolutionarily conserved

  2. Evaluation of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-d]pyridazinones as activators of the tumor cell specific M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Shen, Min; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P; Southall, Noel; Veith, Henrike; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P; Park, Hee Won; Inglese, James; Cantley, Lewis C; Auld, Douglas S; Thomas, Craig J

    2010-06-01

    Cancer cells have distinct metabolic needs that are different from normal cells and can be exploited for development of anti-cancer therapeutics. Activation of the tumor specific M2 form of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is a potential strategy for returning cancer cells to a metabolic state characteristic of normal cells. Here, we describe activators of PKM2 based upon a substituted thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-d]pyridazinone scaffold. The synthesis of these agents, structure-activity relationships, analysis of activity at related targets (PKM1, PKR and PKL) and examination of aqueous solubility are investigated. These agents represent the second reported chemotype for activation of PKM2.

  3. WR-2721 inhibits parathyroid adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.E.; Morrissey, J.; McConkey, C. Jr.; Goldfarb, S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Martin, K.J.

    1987-02-01

    WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) is a chemoprotective and radioprotective agent that has been shown to lower serum calcium in dogs and in humans. This is secondary both to impaired release of CaS from bone and diminished secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from parathyroid glands. Because cAMP plays a role in the regulation of PTH secretion and WR-2721 has been shown to lower cAMP levels in radiated mouse spleen, the authors investigated the effects of WR-2721 on cAMP production in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Additional, they studied the adenylate cyclase in plasma membranes from normal bovine parathyroid glands after exposure to WR-2721. With parathyroid cells incubated at 0.5 mM CaS , addition of Wr-2721 in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 2.0 mM resulted in a progressive decrease in intracellular cAMP measured by radioimmunoassay. In plasma membranes of bovine parathyroid cells a dose-dependent decrease in adenylate cyclase activity was noted. Inhibition of the cyclase was seen over a wide range of MgS concentrations. WR-2721 inhibited both basal and NaF, Gpp(NH)(, forskolin, and pertussin toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. These data suggest that WR-2721 inhibits the activity of parathyroid adenylate cyclase.

  4. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: entry of bacterial adenylate cyclase into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Confer, D L; Slungaard, A S; Graf, E; Panter, S S; Eaton, J W

    1984-01-01

    We have identified an adenylate cyclase toxin in urea extracts and culture supernatant fluids of Bordetella pertussis (2). The ability of this toxin and the lack of a strong correlation between its activity and adenylate cyclase activity found in urea extracts suggest that it is an oligomer of readily dissociable subunits. The mechanism by which Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin interacts with target cells is unknown, but polyvalent cations are necessary. Neutrophils exposed to the toxin acquire a 39,000 Mr protein that can also be photoaffinity labeled with 32P-ATP. We anticipate that this protein will prove to be a catalytic component of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin. Susceptible cells exposed to Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin are functionally aberrant. In phagocytes, decreased bactericidal capacity may be important in the pathogenesis of human whooping cough and other Bordetella infections occurring in domestic animals. The effects of the toxin on neoplastic cells may offer new insights into the factors controlling their growth and differentiation. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique bacterial product. Further purification and characterization of this toxin will add to our understanding of cell-protein interactions and pathogen-host relationships.

  5. Pfkfb (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase) isoforms display a tissue-specific and dynamic expression during Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Maczkowiak, Frederique; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2013-10-01

    Pfkfb (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase) enzymes are bi-functional enzymes encoded by four different genes (pfkfb1, pfkfb2, pfkfb3, pfkfb4) in vertebrates. They are involved in the regulation of glycolysis: they catalyze the synthesis and the degradation of F-2,6-BP (fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), the most potent allosteric activator of phosphofructokinase 1 (Pfk1), a key glycolytic enzyme. By producing F-2,6-BP, Pfkfb enzymes allow glycolysis to proceed, while by degrading F-2,6-BP they block glycolysis. As major regulators of glycolysis, Pfkfb enzymes are involved in cancer: tumor cells have a higher glycolytic rate compared to normal cells, even in the presence of adequate oxygen levels (Warburg effect) and several cancer cell lines express elevated levels of Pfkfb enzymes. Glycolysis is also important for energy and metabolite production in proliferating cells. In embryos, however, the role of glycolysis and the expression of glycolysis regulators remain to be explored. Here, we provide a phylogenetic analysis of Pfkfb enzymes in vertebrates, and we detail the expression pattern of pfk1, pfkfb1, pfkfb2, pfkfb3, and pfkfb4 genes in Xenopus laevis embryos. We show that pfkfb transcripts expression is overlapping at blastula and gastrula stages and that from neurulation to tadpole stages, they display tissue-specific, complementary and dynamic expression patterns.

  6. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  7. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta isoform is expressed in motor neurons during axon outgrowth and is part of slow axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2002-03-15

    Previously, we identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta (CaMKIIbeta) mRNA in spinal motor neurons with 372 bp inserted in what corresponds to the "association" domain of the protein. This was interesting because known additions and deletions to CaMKIIbeta mRNA are usually less than 100 bp in size and found in the "variable" region. Changes in the association domain of CaMKIIbeta could influence substrate specificity, activity or intracellular targeting. We show that three variations of this insert are found in CNS neurons or sciatic motor neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats. We used PCR and nucleic acid sequencing to identify inserts of 114, 243, or 372 bases. We also show that addition of the 372 bases is associated with outgrowth of the axon (the standard CaMKIIbeta downregulates when axon outgrowth occurs). Radiolabeling, immunoblots, and 2D PAGE identified this larger CaMKIIbeta as part of the group of soluble proteins moving at the slowest rate of axonal transport (SCa) in sciatic motor neurons (similar1 mm/day). This group is composed mainly of structural proteins (e.g., tubulin) used to assemble the cytoskeleton of regrowing axons.

  8. Differential distribution of phospholipase C beta isoforms and diaglycerol kinase beta in rodents cerebella corroborates the division of unipolar brush cells into two major subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masahiko; Martina, Marco; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Sublineage diversification of specific neural cell classes occurs in complex as well as simply organized regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems; the significance of the phenomenon, however, remains insufficiently understood. The unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are glutamatergic cerebellar interneurons that occur at high density in vestibulocerebellum. As they are classified into subsets that differ in chemical phenotypes, intrinsic properties, and lobular distribution, they represent a valuable neuronal model to study subclass diversification. In this study we show that cerebellar UBCs of adult rats and mice form two subclasses – type I and type II UBCs - defined by somatodendritic expression of calretinin (CR), mGluR1α, phospholipases PLCβ1 and PLCβ4, and diacylglycerol kinase-beta (DGKβ). We demonstrate that PLCβ1 is associated only with the CR+ type I UBCs while PLCβ4 and DGKβ are exclusively present in mGluR1α+ type II UBCs. Notably, all PLCβ4+ UBCs, representing about 2/3 of entire UBC population, also express mGluR1α. Furthermore, our data show that the sum of CR+ type I UBCs and mGluR1α+ type II UBCs accounts for the entire UBC class identified with Tbr2 immunolabeling. The two UBC subtypes also show a very different albeit somehow overlapping topographical distribution as illustrated by detailed cerebellar maps in this study. Our data not only complement and extend the previous knowledge on the diversity and subclass specificity of the chemical phenotypes within the UBC population but provide a new angle to the understanding of the signaling networks in type I and type II UBCs. PMID:23503970

  9. Differential distribution of phospholipase C beta isoforms and diaglycerol kinase-beta in rodents cerebella corroborates the division of unipolar brush cells into two major subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masahiko; Martina, Marco; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Sublineage diversification of specific neural cell classes occurs in complex as well as simply organized regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems; the significance of the phenomenon, however, remains insufficiently understood. The unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are glutamatergic cerebellar interneurons that occur at high density in vestibulocerebellum. As they are classified into subsets that differ in chemical phenotypes, intrinsic properties, and lobular distribution, they represent a valuable neuronal model to study subclass diversification. In this study, we show that cerebellar UBCs of adult rats and mice form two subclasses-type I and type II UBCs-defined by somatodendritic expression of calretinin (CR), mGluR1α, phospholipases PLCβ1 and PLCβ4, and diacylglycerol kinase-beta (DGKβ). We demonstrate that PLCβ1 is associated only with the CR(+) type I UBCs, while PLCβ4 and DGKβ are exclusively present in mGluR1α(+) type II UBCs. Notably, all PLCβ4(+) UBCs, representing about 2/3 of entire UBC population, also express mGluR1α. Furthermore, our data show that the sum of CR(+) type I UBCs and mGluR1α(+) type II UBCs accounts for the entire UBC class identified with Tbr2 immunolabeling. The two UBC subtypes also show a very different albeit somehow overlapping topographical distribution as illustrated by detailed cerebellar maps in this study. Our data not only complement and extend the previous knowledge on the diversity and subclass specificity of the chemical phenotypes within the UBC population, but also provide a new angle to the understanding of the signaling networks in type I and type II UBCs.

  10. M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is upregulated in Kazakh's ESCC and promotes proliferation and migration of ESCC cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liang, Meng; Liu, Tao; Vuitton, Lucine; Zheng, Shutao; Gao, Xiangpeng; Lu, Mang; Li, Xiuling; Sheyhidin, Ilyar; Lu, Xiaomei

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of the present study are to explore role of pyruvate kinase isoenzyme type M2 (PKM2) in progression of Kazakh's esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in Xinjiang, China, and to clarify mechanism of PKM2 in malignant phenotype. PKM2 expression was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 101 matched pairs of ESCC and normal adjacent tissues (NATs) and using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 35 serum samples of Kazakh's ESCC and 8 serum samples of healthy subjects. To investigate mechanism, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-PKM2 was transfected into ESCC cells. Cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and Transwell assays. Apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). PKM2 expression was significantly higher in ESCC tissues (77.2 %, 78/101) compared with matched NAT (P = 0.003) and also higher in serum samples of Kazakh's ESCC patients (78.84 ng/mL) compared with healthy subjects (13.55 ng/mL) (P = 0.001). Patients with overexpression of PKM2 had a poor prognosis (P = 0.032). After knockdown of PKM2, cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were significantly reduced (P = 0.001), apoptosis increased (P = 0.001), and cell cycle was arrested at G1 phase. PKM2 overexpression was significantly correlated with the worse outcome of Kazakh's ESCC. Furthermore, PKM2 was involved in progression of ESCC by promoting proliferation and suppressing apoptosis, accelerating invasion, and influencing cell cycle. PKM2 could be a potential biomarker for molecular classification of ESCC.

  11. Regulation of protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) signalling by the TPα and TPβ isoforms of the human thromboxane A2 receptor: Implications for thromboxane- and androgen- dependent neoplastic and epigenetic responses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Aine G; Mulvaney, Eamon P; Kinsella, B Therese

    2017-04-01

    The prostanoid thromboxane (TX) A2 and its T Prostanoid receptor (the TP) are increasingly implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). Mechanistically, we recently discovered that both TPα and TPβ form functional signalling complexes with members of the protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) family, AGC- kinases essential for the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription and promising therapeutic targets for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Critically, similar to androgens, activation of the PRKs through the TXA2/TP signalling axis induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr11 (H3Thr11), a marker of androgen-induced chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation, raising the possibility that TXA2-TP signalling can mimic and/or enhance AR-induced cellular changes even in the absence of circulating androgens such as in CRPC. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate whether TXA2/TP-induced PRK activation can mimic and/or enhance AR-mediated cellular responses in the model androgen-responsive prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cell line. We reveal that TXA2/TP signalling can act as a neoplastic- and epigenetic-regulator, promoting and enhancing both AR-associated chromatin remodelling (H3Thr11 phosphorylation, WDR5 recruitment and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16) and AR-mediated transcriptional activation (e.g of the KLK3/prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 genes) through mechanisms involving TPα/TPβ mediated-PRK1 and PRK2, but not PRK3, signalling complexes. Overall, these data demonstrate that TPα/TPβ can act as neoplastic and epigenetic regulators by mimicking and/or enhancing the actions of androgens within the prostate and provides further mechanistic insights into the role of the TXA2/TP signalling axis in PCa, including potentially in CRPC.

  12. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  13. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II α-Isoform PI3K-C2α Is Required for Transforming Growth Factor β-induced Smad Signaling in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Sho; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Okamoto, Yasuo; Takuwa, Noriko; Takuwa, Yoh

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the PI3K class II-α isoform (PI3K-C2α), which generates phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates, plays crucial roles in angiogenesis, by analyzing PI3K-C2α knock-out mice. The PI3K-C2α actions are mediated at least in part through its participation in the internalization of VEGF receptor-2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1P1 and thereby their signaling on endosomes. TGFβ, which is also an essential angiogenic factor, signals via the serine/threonine kinase receptor complex to induce phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 (Smad2/3). SARA (Smad anchor for receptor activation) protein, which is localized in early endosomes through its FYVE domain, is required for Smad2/3 signaling. In the present study, we showed that PI3K-C2α knockdown nearly completely abolished TGFβ1-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). PI3K-C2α was necessary for TGFβ-induced increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates in the plasma membrane and TGFβ receptor internalization into the SARA-containing early endosomes, but not for phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate enrichment or localization of SARA in the early endosomes. PI3K-C2α was also required for TGFβ receptor-mediated formation of SARA-Smad2/3 complex. Inhibition of dynamin, which is required for the clathrin-dependent receptor endocytosis, suppressed both TGFβ receptor internalization and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. TGFβ1 stimulated Smad-dependent VEGF-A expression, VEGF receptor-mediated EC migration, and capillary-like tube formation, which were all abolished by either PI3K-C2α knockdown or a dynamin inhibitor. Finally, TGFβ1-induced microvessel formation in Matrigel plugs was greatly attenuated in EC-specific PI3K-C2α-deleted mice. These observations indicate that PI3K-C2α plays the pivotal role in TGFβ receptor endocytosis and thereby Smad2/3 signaling, participating in angiogenic

  15. Antineoplastic effects of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Jacob, H S; Eaton, J W

    1983-01-01

    Urea extracts of B. pertussis, but not B. bronchiseptica, cause large and sustained intracellular cAMP elevation in several neoplastic cell lines. These cAMP elevations are associated with growth inhibition (HL-60, Friend erythroleukemia) and a phenotypic change/differentiation (HL-60, L1210). B. pertussis extract injections prolong survival of L1210 tumor-bearing mice. Pretreatment of L1210 cells with B. pertussis extract both delays mortality and induces growth of solid tumors instead of ascites in subsequently inoculated mice. We conclude that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase is capable of invading a variety of neoplastic cells to catalyze the intracellular formation of large amounts of cAMP. These cAMP elevations are durable and promote growth arrest, differentiation, or phenotypic alterations reflected in altered biologic behavior. B. pertussis adenylate cyclase should prove to be a useful tool for manipulating cAMP levels in neoplastic cells to elucidate the role of cAMP in malignant transformation.

  16. GSK3β Mediates Renal Response to Vasopressin by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Hao, ChuanMing; Woodgett, James; Harris, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a key target of drug discovery in several diseases, including diabetes and Alzheimer disease. Because lithium, a potent inhibitor of GSK3β, causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, GSK3β may play a crucial role in regulating water homeostasis. We developed renal collecting duct-specific GSK3β knockout mice to determine whether deletion of GSK3β affects arginine vasopressin-dependent renal water reabsorption. Although only mildly polyuric under normal conditions, knockout mice exhibited an impaired urinary concentrating ability in response to water deprivation or treatment with a vasopressin analogue. The knockout mice had reduced levels of mRNA, protein, and membrane localization of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 compared with wild-type mice. The knockout mice also expressed lower levels of pS256-AQP2, a phosphorylated form crucial for membrane trafficking. Levels of cAMP, a major regulator of aquaporin 2 expression and trafficking, were also lower in the knockout mice. Both GSK3β gene deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3β reduced adenylate cyclase activity. In summary, GSK3β inactivation or deletion reduces aquaporin 2 expression by modulating adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP generation, thereby impairing responses to vasopressin in the renal collecting duct. PMID:20056751

  17. Ethrel (Ethylene Releaser)-Induced Increases in the Adenylate Pool and Transtonoplast ΔpH within Hevea Latex Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amalou, Zakia; Bangratz, Jacques; Chrestin, Hervé

    1992-01-01

    The treatment of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) bark with chloro-2-ethyl phosphonic acid (ethrel), an ethylene-releasing chemical, induced, after a lag period of 13 to 21 hours, a marked increase in the total adenine nucleotides (essentially ATP and ADP) of latex cells. This rise in the latex adenylate pool was concomitant with a marked decrease in the [ATP]/[ADP] ratio without significant changes in the adenylate energy charge. The apparent equilibrium constant for the adenylate kinase, which appeared to behave as a key enzyme in maintaining the adenylate energy charge in the latex, was considerably reduced, probably as a consequence of the alkalinization of the latex cytosol induced by the treatment with ethrel. To reduce the “sink effect” and activation of the metabolism induced in Hevea bark by regular tapping, the latex was collected by micropuncture (few drops) at increasing distance (5-50 centimeters) above and below an ethrel-treated area on the virgin bark of resting trees. The effect of ethrel was shown to spread progressively along the trunk. The increase in the adenylate pool (essentially ATP) was detectable as early as 24 hours after the bark treatment and was maximum after 6 or 8 days, 5 centimeters as well as 50 centimeters above and below the stimulated bark ring. The correlative vacuolar acidification and cytosolic alkalinization, i.e. the increase in the transtonoplast ΔpH, induced in the latex cells by ethrel were shown to be concomitant with the rise in ATP content of the latex. This suggests that the tonoplast H+-pumping ATPase, which catalyzes vacuolar acidification in the latex, is directly and essentially under the control of the availability of its substrate (i.e. ATP) in the latex. The results are discussed in relation to energy-dependent activation of metabolism, and increased rubber production, as induced by the stimulation of rubber trees with ethrel. PMID:16668787

  18. Cellular interactions uncouple beta-adrenergic receptors from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; de Vellis, J

    1978-11-17

    C6 glioma cells and B104 neuroblastoma cells both possess adenylate cyclase activity, but only C6 cells have beta-adrenergic receptors. However, when cocultured with B104 cells, C6 cells show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate upon stimulation with beta receptor agonists. Since both beta receptors and cholera toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities are present in C6/B104 cocultures, we conclude that the beta receptor/adenylate cyclase transduction mechanism in cocultured C6 cells is uncoupled.

  19. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  20. Ultraviolet radiation augments epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, H.; Kajita, S.; Ohkawara, A.

    1985-05-01

    Pig skin was irradiated in vivo with fluorescent sunlamp tubes (peak emission at 305 nm). A significant increase in epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was observed as early as 12 h following 1-2 minimum erythema doses (MEDs) UVB exposure, which lasted at least 48 h. The augmentation of adenylate cyclase response was relatively specific to the beta-adrenergic system and there was no significant difference in either adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response of epidermis. The increased beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was less marked at higher doses of UVB exposure (5 MEDs); in the latter condition, a significant reduction in adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response was observed. There was no significant difference in either low- or high-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-treated skin at 1-2 MEDs. These data indicate that the epidermal adenylate cyclase responses are affected in vivo by UVB irradiation, which might be a significant regulatory mechanism of epidermal cyclic AMP systems.

  1. In resting COS1 cells a dominant negative approach shows that specific, anchored PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase isoforms gate the activation, by basal cyclic AMP production, of AKAP-tethered protein kinase A type II located in the centrosomal region.

    PubMed

    McCahill, Angela; McSorley, Theresa; Huston, Elaine; Hill, Elaine V; Lynch, Martin J; Gall, Irene; Keryer, Guy; Lygren, Birgitte; Tasken, Kjetil; van Heeke, Gino; Houslay, Miles D

    2005-09-01

    We employ a novel, dominant negative approach to identify a key role for certain tethered cyclic AMP specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) isoforms in regulating cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) sub-populations in resting COS1 cells. A fraction of PKA is clearly active in resting COS1 cells and this activity increases when cells are treated with the selective PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram. Point mutation of a critical, conserved aspartate residue in the catalytic site of long PDE4A4, PDE4B1, PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 isoforms renders them catalytically inactive. Overexpressed in resting COS1 cells, catalytically inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3, but not PDE4A4 and PDE4B1, are constitutively PKA phosphorylated while overexpressed active versions of all these isoforms are not. Inactive and active versions of all these isoforms are PKA phosphorylated in cells where protein kinase A is maximally activated with forskolin and IBMX. By contrast, rolipram challenge of COS1 cells selectively triggers the PKA phosphorylation of recombinant, active PDE4D3 and PDE4C2 but not recombinant, active PDE4A4 and PDE4B1. Purified, recombinant PDE4D3 and PDE4A4 show a similar dose-dependency for in vitro phosphorylation by PKA. Disruption of the tethering of PKA type-II to PKA anchor proteins (AKAPs), achieved using the peptide Ht31, prevents inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 being constitutively PKA phosphorylated in resting cells as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKA-RII, but not PKA-RI. PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 co-immunoprecipitate from COS1 cell lysates with 250 kDa and 450 kDa AKAPs that tether PKA type-II and not PKA type-I. PKA type-II co-localises with AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. The perinuclear distribution of recombinant, inactive PDE4D3, but not inactive PDE4A4, overlaps with AKAP450 and PKA type-II. The distribution of PKA phosphorylated inactive PDE4D3 also overlaps with that of AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. We propose that a novel role

  2. Combined Inhibition of Both p110α and p110β Isoforms of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Is Required for Sustained Therapeutic Effect in PTEN-Deficient, ER(+) Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hosford, Sarah R; Dillon, Lloye M; Bouley, Stephanie J; Rosati, Rachele; Yang, Wei; Chen, Vivian S; Demidenko, Eugene; Morra, Rocco P; Miller, Todd W

    2016-11-30

    Purpose: Determine the roles of the PI3K isoforms p110α and p110β in PTEN-deficient, estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer, and the therapeutic potential of isoform-selective inhibitors.Experimental Design: Anti-estrogen-sensitive and -resistant PTEN-deficient, ER(+) human breast cancer cell lines, and mice bearing anti-estrogen-resistant xenografts were treated with the anti-estrogen fulvestrant, the p110α inhibitor BYL719, the p110β inhibitor GSK2636771, or combinations. Temporal response to growth factor receptor-initiated signaling, growth, apoptosis, predictive biomarkers, and tumor volumes were measured.Results: p110β primed cells for response to growth factor stimulation. Although p110β inhibition suppressed cell and tumor growth, dual targeting of p110α/β enhanced apoptosis and provided sustained tumor response. The growth of anti-estrogen-sensitive cells was inhibited by fulvestrant, but fulvestrant inconsistently provided additional therapeutic effects beyond PI3K inhibition alone. Treatment-induced decreases in phosphorylation of AKT and Rb were predictive of therapeutic response. Short-term drug treatment induced tumor cell apoptosis and proliferative arrest to induce tumor regression, whereas long-term treatment only suppressed proliferation to provide durable regression.Conclusions: p110β is the dominant PI3K isoform in PTEN-deficient, ER(+) breast cancer cells. Upon p110β inhibition, p110α did not induce significant reactivation of AKT, but combined targeting of p110α/β most effectively induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and provided durable tumor regression. Because apoptosis and tumor regression occurred early but not late in the treatment course, and proliferative arrest was maintained throughout treatment, p110α/β inhibitors may be considered short-term cytotoxic agents and long-term cytostatic agents. Clin Cancer Res; 1-11. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Co-transfection with protein kinase D confers phorbol-ester-mediated inhibition on glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in COS cells transfected to overexpress glucagon receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, E S; Rozengurt, E; Connell, J M; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Glucagon elicited a profound increase in the intracellular cAMP concentration of COS-7 cells which had been transiently transfected with a cDNA encoding the rat glucagon receptor and under conditions where cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was fully inhibited. This was achieved in a dose-dependent fashion with an EC50 of 1.8+/-0.4 nM glucagon. In contrast with previous observations made using hepatocytes [Heyworth, Whetton, Kinsella and Houslay (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 38-42], treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with PMA did not inhibit the ability of glucagon to increase intracellular cAMP levels. PMA-mediated inhibition was not conferred by treatment with okadaic acid, nor by co-transfecting cells with cDNAs encoding various protein kinase C isoforms (PKC-alpha, PKC-betaII and PKC-epsilon) or with the PMA-activated G-protein-receptor kinases GRK2 and GRK3. In contrast, PMA induced the marked inhibition of glucagon-stimulated cAMP production in COS-7 cells that had been co-transfected with a cDNA encoding protein kinase D (PKD). Such inhibition was not due to an action on the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase, as forskolin-stimulated cAMP production was unchanged by PMA treatment of COS cells that had been co-transfected with both the glucagon receptor and PKD. PKD transcripts were detected in RNA isolated from hepatocytes but not from COS-7 cells. Transcripts for GRK2 were present in hepatocytes but not in COS cells, whereas transcripts for GRK3 were not found in either cell type. It is suggested that PKD may play a role in the regulation of glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase. PMID:9291130

  4. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  5. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  6. Interaction of 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin with adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Laurenza, A.; Morris, D.I.; Seamon, K.B.

    1986-05-01

    7-Bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin (BrAcFk) and the 12-tritio derivative (/sup 3/H-BrAckFk) were synthesized as alkylating analogs of forskolin. BrAcFk stimulated adenylate cyclase in human platelet and bovine brain membranes with an EC50 of 50..mu..M and inhibited /sup 3/H-forskolin binding to these membranes with a K/sub i/ of 300 nM. /sup 3/H-forskolin binding was decreased in membranes pretreated for 20 min with 10 ..mu..M BrAcFk. The i,9-dideoxy derivative of BrAcFk did not activate adenylate cyclase or inhibit /sup 3/H-forskolin binding. Proteins labelled by BrAcFk in solubilized preparations from bovine brain and human platelets were identified by fluorography of SDS gels. The two predominant bands labelled in the low and high molecular weight regions had molecular weights of 50,000 and 135,000 daltons respectively. The 135,000 dalton band identified by fluorography coeluted with adenylate cyclase activity on a Dupont GF450 column and has a molecular weight identical to that of the catalytic subunit determined by silver staining of SDS gels. These results suggest that BrAcFk can react covalently with the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase.

  7. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  8. Adenylating Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylation or adenylate-forming enzymes (AEs) are widely found in nature and are responsible for the activation of carboxylic acids to intermediate acyladenylates, which are mixed anhydrides of AMP. In a second reaction, AEs catalyze the transfer of the acyl group of the acyladenylate onto a nucleophilic amino, alcohol, or thiol group of an acceptor molecule leading to amide, ester, and thioester products, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes for more than 60 adenylating enzymes, many of which represent potential drug targets due to their confirmed essentiality or requirement for virulence. Several strategies have been used to develop potent and selective AE inhibitors including high-throughput screening, fragment-based screening, and the rationale design of bisubstrate inhibitors that mimic the acyladenylate. In this review, a comprehensive analysis of the mycobacterial adenylating enzymes will be presented with a focus on the identification of small molecule inhibitors. Specifically, this review will cover the aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (aaRSs), MenE required for menaquinone synthesis, the FadD family of enzymes including the fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAAL) and the fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs) involved in lipid metabolism, and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation enzyme MbtA that is necessary for mycobactin synthesis. Additionally, the enzymes NadE, GuaA, PanC, and MshC involved in the respective synthesis of NAD, guanine, pantothenate, and mycothiol will be discussed as well as BirA that is responsible for biotinylation of the acyl CoA-carboxylases. PMID:22283817

  9. Phorbol esters alter adenylate cyclase responses to vasoactive intestinal peptide and forskolin in the GH cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, S.; Florio, T.; Cronin, M.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester modifies cyclic AMP production in several anterior pituitary cell systems. In the GH cell line from a rat pituitary tumor, exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA: 100 nM) for 30 minutes significantly reduces vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP: 100 nM) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in subsequent membrane preparations to 62 + 4% of control (n = 6 independent studies). In contrast, these same membrane preparations respond to forskolin (1 ..mu..M) with significantly more activity, 130 +/- 6% of controls (n = 6 independent studies). Finally, phorbol ester does not block an inhibitory hormone input into the AC system; somatostatin (100 nM) reduction of VIP-stimulated AC activity is not significantly different in membrane preparations from PMA treated and control cells (n = 3 independent studies). These other findings lead the authors to propose that protein kinase C can modify several sites in the AC complex in anterior pituitary cells.

  10. Arrestin-3 binds c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and JNK2 and facilitates the activation of these ubiquitous JNK isoforms in cells via scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Kaoud, Tamer S; Dalby, Kevin N; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2013-12-27

    Non-visual arrestins scaffold mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are members of MAPK family. Arrestin-3 has been shown to enhance the activation of JNK3, which is expressed mainly in neurons, heart, and testes, in contrast to ubiquitous JNK1 and JNK2. Although all JNKs are activated by MKK4 and MKK7, both of which bind arrestin-3, the ability of arrestin-3 to facilitate the activation of JNK1 and JNK2 has never been reported. Using purified proteins we found that arrestin-3 directly binds JNK1α1 and JNK2α2, interacting with the latter comparably to JNK3α2. Phosphorylation of purified JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 by MKK4 or MKK7 is increased by arrestin-3. Endogenous arrestin-3 interacted with endogenous JNK1/2 in different cell types. Arrestin-3 also enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous JNK1/2 in intact cells upon expression of upstream kinases ASK1, MKK4, or MKK7. We observed a biphasic effect of arrestin-3 concentrations on phosphorylation of JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, arrestin-3 acts as a scaffold, facilitating JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 phosphorylation by MKK4 and MKK7 via bringing JNKs and their activators together. The data suggest that arrestin-3 modulates the activity of ubiquitous JNK1 and JNK2 in non-neuronal cells, impacting the signaling pathway that regulates their proliferation and survival.

  11. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J.; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y.

    2016-01-01

    inner segments. The combined results indicate that glycolysis is regulated by the compartmental expression of hexokinase 2, pyruvate kinase M1, and pyruvate kinase M2 in photoreceptors, whereas the inner retinal neurons exhibit a lower capacity for glycolysis and aerobic glycolysis. Expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase, mitochondria-associated adenylate kinase, and several mitochondria-associated creatine kinase isozymes was highest in the outer retina, whereas expression of cytosolic adenylate kinase and brain creatine kinase was higher in the cones, horizontal cells, and amacrine cells indicating the diversity of ATP-buffering strategies among retinal neurons. Based on the antibody intensities and the COX and LDH activity, Müller glial cells (MGCs) had the lowest capacity for glycolysis, aerobic glycolysis, and OXPHOS. However, they showed high expression of glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate thiokinase, GABA transaminase, and ~P transferring kinases. This suggests that MGCs utilize TCA cycle anaplerosis and cataplerosis to generate GTP and ~P transferring kinases to produce ATP that supports MGC energy requirements. Conclusions Our comprehensive and integrated results reveal that the adult mouse retina expresses numerous isoforms of ATP synthesizing, regulating, and buffering genes; expresses differential cellular and compartmental levels of glycolytic, OXPHOS, TCA cycle, and ~P transferring kinase proteins; and exhibits differential layer-by-layer LDH and COX activity. New insights into cell-specific and compartmental ATP and GTP production, as well as utilization and buffering strategies and their relationship with known retinal and cellular functions, are discussed. Developing therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection and treating retinal deficits and degeneration in a cell-specific manner will require such knowledge. This work provides a platform for future research directed at identifying the molecular targets and

  12. RSK isoforms in cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sulzmaier, Florian J; Ramos, Joe W

    2013-10-15

    Metastasis, the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor to secondary sites throughout the body, is the primary cause of death for patients with cancer. New therapies that prevent invasion and metastasis in combination with current treatments could therefore significantly reduce cancer recurrence and morbidity. Metastasis is driven by altered signaling pathways that induce changes in cell-cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton, integrin function, protease expression, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell survival. The ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of kinases is a group of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) effectors that can regulate these steps of metastasis by phosphorylating both nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. However, our understanding of RSK function in metastasis remains incomplete and is complicated by the fact that the four RSK isoforms perform nonredundant, sometimes opposing functions. Although some isoforms promote cell motility and invasion by altering transcription and integrin activity, others impair cell motility and invasion through effects on the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of RSK action depends both on the isoform and the cancer type. However, despite the variance in RSK-mediated outcomes, chemical inhibition of this group of kinases has proven effective in blocking invasion and metastasis of several solid tumors in preclinical models. RSKs are therefore a promising drug target for antimetastatic cancer treatments that could supplement and improve current therapeutic approaches. This review highlights contradiction and agreement in the current data on the function of RSK isoforms in metastasis and suggests ways forward in developing RSK inhibitors as new antimetastasis drugs.

  13. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  14. Dissecting signalling by individual Akt/PKB isoforms, three steps at once.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Klip, Amira

    2015-09-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB (protein kinase B) is key for mammalian cell growth, survival, metabolism and oncogenic transformation. The diverse level and tissue expression of its three isoforms, Akt1/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ and Akt3/PKBγ, make it daunting to identify isoform-specific actions in vivo and even in isolated tissues/cells. To date, isoform-specific knockout and knockdown have been the best strategies to dissect their individual overall functions. In a recent article in the Biochemical Journal, Kajno et al. reported a new strategy to study isoform selectivity in cell lines. Individual Akt/PKB isoforms in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes are first silenced via shRNA and stable cellular clones lacking one or the other isoform are selected. The stably silenced isoform is then replaced by a mutant engineered to be refractory to inhibition by MK-2206 (Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A)). Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A) are functional and effectively recruited to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The system affords the opportunity to acutely control the activity of the endogenous non-silenced isoform through timely addition of MK-2206. Using this approach, it is confirmed that Akt1/PKBα is the preferred isoform sustaining adipocyte differentiation, but both Akt1/PKBα and Akt2/PKBβ can indistinctly support insulin-dependent FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) nuclear exclusion. Surprisingly, either isoform can also support insulin-dependent glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 translocation to the membrane, in contrast with the preferential role of Akt2/PKBβ assessed by knockdown studies. The new strategy should allow analysis of the plurality of Akt/PKB functions in other cells and in response to other stimuli. It should also be amenable to high-throughput studies to speed up advances in signal transmission by this pivotal kinase.

  15. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  16. Aminoacyl transfer from an adenylate anhydride to polyribonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Imidazole catalysis of phenylalanyl transfer from phenylalanine adenylate to hydroxyl groups of homopolyribonucleotides is studied as a possible chemical model of biochemical aminoacylation of transfer RNA (tRNA). The effect of pH on imidazole-catalyzed transfer of phenylalanyl residues to poly(U) and poly(A) double helix strands, the number of peptide linkages and their lability to base and neutral hydroxylamine, and the nature of adenylate condensation products are investigated. The chemical model entertained exhibits a constraint by not acylating the hydroxyl groups of polyribonucleotides in a double helix. The constraint is consistent with selective biochemical aminoacylation at the tRNA terminus. Interest in imidazole as a model of histidine residue in protoenzymes participating in prebiotic aminoacyl transfer to polyribonucleotides, and in rendering the tRNA a more efficient adaptor, is indicated.

  17. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D; Jensen, Tricia M; Lyuksyutova, Anna I; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset.

  18. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  19. Adenylate cyclase A acting on PKA mediates induction of stalk formation by cyclic diguanylate at the Dictyostelium organizer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Singh, Reema; Cole, Christian; Lawal, Hajara Mohammed; Schilde, Christina; Febrer, Melanie; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of cell movement with cell differentiation is a major feat of embryonic development. The Dictyostelium stalk always forms at the organizing tip, by a mechanism that is not understood. We previously reported that cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), synthesized by diguanylate cyclase A (DgcA), induces stalk formation. Here we used transcriptional profiling of dgca− structures to identify target genes for c-di-GMP, and used these genes to investigate the c-di-GMP signal transduction pathway. We found that knockdown of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in prestalk cells reduced stalk gene induction by c-di-GMP, whereas PKA activation bypassed the c-di-GMP requirement for stalk gene expression. c-di-GMP caused a persistent increase in cAMP, which still occurred in mutants lacking the adenylate cyclases ACG or ACR, or the cAMP phosphodiesterase RegA. However, both inhibition of adenylate cyclase A (ACA) with SQ22536 and incubation of a temperature-sensitive ACA mutant at the restrictive temperature prevented c-di-GMP–induced cAMP synthesis as well as c-di-GMP–induced stalk gene transcription. ACA produces the cAMP pulses that coordinate Dictyostelium morphogenetic cell movement and is highly expressed at the organizing tip. The stalk-less dgca− mutant regained its stalk by expression of a light-activated adenylate cyclase from the ACA promoter and exposure to light, indicating that cAMP is also the intermediate for c-di-GMP in vivo. Our data show that the more widely expressed DgcA activates tip-expressed ACA, which then acts on PKA to induce stalk genes. These results explain why stalk formation in Dictyostelia always initiates at the site of the morphogenetic organizer. PMID:28057864

  20. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  1. [Adenylate cyclase. A possible factor in the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Michankin, B N; Chevchenko, L A; Asseeva, L E

    1992-01-01

    Biological effect of homogenous preparation of Y. pestis adenylate cyclase on eucaryotic cells was studied. Adenylate cyclase, added (7.5 x 10(8) g/ml) to guinea pig macrophages lowers the level of chemiluminescence to 50-70%, has an appreciable cytotoxic effect on peritoneal macrophages and suppresses phosphorylation processes of leucocyte proteins from white mice. The experimental results obtained allow to suggest Y. pestis adenylate cyclase to be a pathogenic factor, contributing to the development of plague infection.

  2. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  3. Akt isoform specific effects in ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Linnerth-Petrik, Nicolle M.; Santry, Lisa A.; Moorehead, Roger; Jücker, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a significant therapeutic problem and novel, effective therapies are needed. Akt is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including ovarian. Mammalian cells express three Akt isoforms which are encoded by distinct genes. Although there are several Akt inhibitors in clinical trials, most indiscriminately target all isoforms. Current in vitro data and animal knockout experiments suggest that the Akt isoforms may have divergent roles. In this paper, we determined the isoform-specific functions of Akt in ovarian cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in ovarian cancer progression in vivo. For in vitro experiments, murine and human ovarian cancer cells were treated with Akt inhibitors and cell viability was assessed. We used two different in vivo approaches to identify the roles of Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression and their influence on the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment. In one experiment, wild-type C57Bl6 mice were orthotopically injected with ID8 cells with stable knockdown of Akt isoforms. In a separate experiment, mice null for Akt 1-3 were orthotopically injected with WT ID8 cells (Figure 1). Our data show that inhibition of Akt1 significantly reduced ovarian cancer cell proliferation and inhibited tumor progression in vivo. Conversely, disruption of Akt2 increased tumor growth. Inhibition of Akt3 had an intermediate phenotype, but also increased growth of ovarian cancer cells. These data suggest that there is minimal redundancy between the Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression. These findings have important implications in the design of Akt inhibitors for the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27533079

  4. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of plant adenylate isopentenyltransferase from Humulus lupulus: distinctive binding affinity for purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsing-Mao; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2010-03-01

    Cytokinins are important plant hormones, and their biosynthesis most begins with the transfer of isopentenyl group from dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to the N6-amino group of adenine by either adenylate isopentenyltransferase (AIPT) or tRNA-IPT. Plant AIPTs use ATP/ADP as an isopentenyl acceptor and bacterial AIPTs prefer AMP, whereas tRNA-IPTs act on specific sites of tRNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of an AIPT-ATP complex from Humulus lupulus (HlAIPT), which is similar to the previous structures of Agrobacterium AIPT and yeast tRNA-IPT. The enzyme is structurally homologous to the NTP-binding kinase family of proteins but forms a solvent-accessible channel that binds to the donor substrate DMAPP, which is directed toward the acceptor substrate ATP/ADP. When measured with isothermal titration calorimetry, some nucleotides displayed different binding affinities to HlAIPT with an order of ATP > dATP approximately ADP > GTP > CTP > UTP. Two basic residues Lys275 and Lys220 in HlAIPT interact with the beta and gamma-phosphate of ATP. By contrast, the interactions are absent in Agrobacterium AIPT because they are replaced by the acidic residues Asp221 and Asp171. Despite its structural similarity to the yeast tRNA-IPT, HlAIPT has evolved with a different binding strategy for adenylate.

  5. Signal-transduction protein P(II) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 senses low adenylate energy charge in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2011-11-15

    P(II) proteins belong to a family of highly conserved signal-transduction proteins that occurs widely in bacteria, archaea and plants. They respond to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-OG (2-oxoglutarate), and control enzymes, transcription factors and transport proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of ADP on in vitro P(II)-signalling properties for the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model for oxygenic phototrophic organisms. Different ADP/ATP ratios strongly affected the properties of P(II) signalling. Increasing ADP antagonized the binding of 2-OG and directly affected the interactions of P(II) with its target proteins. The resulting P(II)-signalling properties indicate that, in mixtures of ADP and ATP, P(II) trimers are occupied by mixtures of adenylate nucleotides. Binding and kinetic activation of NAGK (N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase), the controlling enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, by P(II) was weakened by ADP, but relief from arginine inhibition remained unaffected. On the other hand, ADP enhanced the binding of P(II) to PipX, a co-activator of the transcription factor NtcA and, furthermore, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 2-OG on P(II)-PipX interaction. These results indicate that S. elongatus P(II) directly senses the adenylate energy charge, resulting in target-dependent differential modification of the P(II)-signalling properties.

  6. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  7. A neuron-specific cytoplasmic dynein isoform preferentially transports TrkB signaling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Junghoon; Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Myers, Kenneth R.; Carr, Tiffany M.; Humsi, Michael K.; Rasoul, Bareza A.; Segal, Rosalind A.; Pfister, K. Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the multisubunit motor protein for retrograde movement of diverse cargoes to microtubule minus ends. Here, we investigate the function of dynein variants, defined by different intermediate chain (IC) isoforms, by expressing fluorescent ICs in neuronal cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)–IC incorporates into functional dynein complexes that copurify with membranous organelles. In living PC12 cell neurites, GFP–dynein puncta travel in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. In cultured hippocampal neurons, neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) signaling endosomes are transported by cytoplasmic dynein containing the neuron-specific IC-1B isoform and not by dynein containing the ubiquitous IC-2C isoform. Similarly, organelles containing TrkB isolated from brain by immunoaffinity purification also contain dynein with IC-1 but not IC-2 isoforms. These data demonstrate that the IC isoforms define dynein populations that are selectively recruited to transport distinct cargoes. PMID:18559670

  8. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  9. ICAM-1: isoforms and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Bullard, Daniel C; Barnum, Scott R

    2014-05-15

    ICAM-1 plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, immunological synapse formation, and numerous cellular immune responses. Although considered a single glycoprotein, there are multiple membrane-bound and soluble ICAM-1 isoforms that arise from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage during inflammatory responses. The function and expression of these isoforms on various cell types are poorly understood. In the generation of ICAM-1-deficient mice, two isoform-deficient ICAM-1 mutants were inadvertently produced as a result of alternative splicing. These mice, along with true ICAM-1-deficient mice and newly generated ICAM-1-transgenic mice, have provided the opportunity to begin examining the role of ICAM-1 isoforms (singly or in combination) in various disease settings. In this review, we highlight the sharply contrasting disease phenotypes using ICAM-1 isoform mutant mice. These studies demonstrate that ICAM-1 immunobiology is highly complex but that individual isoforms, aside from the full-length molecule, make significant contributions to disease development and pathogenesis.

  10. ICAM-1: Isoforms and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, immunological synapse formation and, numerous cellular immune responses. Although considered a single glycoprotein, there are multiple membrane bound and soluble ICAM-1 isoforms which arise from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage during inflammatory responses. The function and expression of these isoforms on various cell types is poorly understood. In the generation of ICAM-1-deficient mice, two isoform-deficient ICAM-1 mutants were inadvertently produced due to alternative splicing. These mice along with true ICAM-1-deficient mice and newly generated ICAM-1 transgenic mice have provided the opportunity to begin examining the role of ICAM-1 isoforms (singly or in combination) in various disease settings. In this review we highlight the sharply contrasting disease phenotypes using ICAM-1 isoform mutant mice. These studies demonstrate that ICAM-1 immunobiology is highly complex but that individual isoforms, aside from the full-length molecule, make significant contributions to disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:24795464

  11. Mast cells express novel functional IL-15 receptor alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Krause, Hans; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-05-15

    Mast cells previously have been reported to be regulated by IL-15 and to express a distinct IL-15R, termed IL-15RX. To further examine IL-15 binding and signaling in mast cells, we have studied the nature of the IL-15R and some of its biological activities in these cells. In this study, we report the existence of three novel isoforms of the IL-15R alpha chain in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells as a result of an alternative exon-splicing mechanism within the IL-15R alpha gene. These correspond to new mRNA transcripts lacking exon 4; exons 3 and 4; or exons 3, 4, and 5 (IL-15R alpha Delta 4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4,5). After transient transfection in COS-7 cells, all IL-15R alpha isoforms associate with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, the perinuclear space, and the cell membrane. Analysis of glycosylation pattern demonstrates the usage of a single N-glycosylation site, while no O-glycosylation is observed. Importantly, IL-15 binds with high affinity to, and promotes the survival of, murine BA/F3 cells stably transfected with the IL-15R alpha isoforms. Furthermore, we report that signaling mediated by IL-15 binding to the newly identified IL-15R alpha isoforms involves the phosphorylation of STAT3, STAT5, STAT6, Janus kinase 2, and Syk kinase. Taken together, our data indicate that murine mast cells express novel, fully functional IL-15R alpha isoforms, which can explain the selective regulatory effects of IL-15 on these cells.

  12. Glucose Inhibition of Adenylate Cyclase in Intact Cells of Escherichia coli B

    PubMed Central

    Peterkofsky, Alan; Gazdar, Celia

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in E. coli B have demonstrated an inverse correlation between the presence of glucose in the medium and the accumulation of cyclic AMP in the medium. This observation could not be explained by the action of glucose as a repressor of adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) synthesis, as a stabilizer of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) activity, or as a direct inhibitor of adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free preparations. The recent development of an in vivo assay for adenylate cyclase has provided a basis for further exploring the inhibitory action of glucose in intact cells. With this assay it has been possible to show that, while glucose does not affect adenylate cyclase in vitro, it rapidly inhibits the enzyme activity in intact cells. Extensive metabolism of glucose is not required, since α-methylglucoside also inhibits adenylate cyclase in vivo. When cells are grown on glucose as carbon source, some sugars (mannose, glucosamine) substitute for glucose as adenylate cyclase inhibitors while others (e.g., fructose) do not. Dose-response studies indicate that low concentrations of glucose lead to essentially complete inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity while only moderately decreasing intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations. The evidence presented suggests that the decreased cellular cyclic AMP levels resulting from glucose addition can be accounted for by inhibition of adenylate cyclase without any significant effect on cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase or the transport of cyclic AMP from the cells to the medium. PMID:4366761

  13. Microscopical localization on adenylate cyclase: a historical review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Richards, P A; Richards, P D

    1998-03-15

    The histochemistry technique for localizing adenylate cyclase has been developed over the past two decades. Early efforts were directed at overcoming the criticism of the lead capture technique, the inhibition of the enzyme by fixation, and problems associated with the substrate. The introduction of alternative metal ions, strontium and cerium, offered solutions to the criticism of the lead capture technique. The inhibition of the enzyme by the various fixation methods used has been rarely overcome satisfactorily and the use of non-fixed material during incubation is one of the alternatives that has been suggested. The introduction of adenylate (beta-gamma-methylene) diphosphate as an alternative substrate offers a solution to the problems associated with commercially available adenylyl imidodiphosphate. Although no standard medium or method has been accepted by all researchers, the histochemical technique still has a place in the arsenal of the modern cell biologist. The technique localizes the active enzyme, as opposed to the protein, active and nonactive, by immunocytochemistry and the precursors of the protein by in situ hybridization methods.

  14. Adenylate Energy Charge in Escherichia coli During Growth and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Astrid G.; Fall, Lana; Atkinson, Daniel E.

    1971-01-01

    The value of the adenylate energy charge, [(adenosine triphosphate) + ½ (adenosine diphosphate)]/[(adenosine triphosphate) + (adenosine diphosphate) + (adenosine monophosphate)], in Escherichia coli cells during growth is about 0.8. During the stationary phase after cessation of growth, or during starvation in carbon-limited cultures, the energy charge declines slowly to a value of about 0.5, and then falls more rapidly. During the slow decline in energy charge, all the cells are capable of forming colonies, but a rapid fall in viability coincides with the steep drop in energy charge. These results suggest that growth can occur only at energy charge values above about 0.8, that viability is maintained at values between 0.8 and 0.5, and that cells die at values below 0.5. Tabulation of adenylate concentrations previously reported for various organisms and tissues supports the prediction, based on enzyme kinetic observations in vitro, that the energy charge is stabilized near 0.85 in intact metabolizing cells of a wide variety of types. PMID:4333317

  15. Expression of Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms in Native Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Béziau, Delphine M.; Toussaint, Fanny; Blanchette, Alexandre; Dayeh, Nour R.; Charbel, Chimène; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η) based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs) remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA), pulmonary (PA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA). mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA), δ4 (only expressed in MCA), η1 (expressed in all but MA) and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested). The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1) in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found in the

  16. Enantioselectivity of human AMP, dTMP and UMP-CMP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Julie A.C.; Roy, Béatrice; Topalis, Dimitri; Pochet, Sylvie; Périgaud, Christian; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    l-Nucleoside analogues such as lamivudine are active for treating viral infections. Like d-nucleosides, the biological activity of the l-enantiomers requires their stepwise phosphorylation by cellular or viral kinases to give the triphosphate. The enantioselectivity of NMP kinases has not been thoroughly studied, unlike that of deoxyribonucleoside kinases. We have therefore investigated the capacity of l-enantiomers of some natural (d)NMP to act as substrates for the recombinant forms of human uridylate-cytidylate kinase, thymidylate kinase and adenylate kinases 1 and 2. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial adenylate kinases were strictly enantioselective, as they phosphorylated only d-(d)AMP. l-dTMP was a substrate for thymidylate kinase, but with an efficiency 150-fold less than d-dTMP. Both l-dUMP and l-(d)CMP were phosphorylated by UMP-CMP kinase although much less efficiently than their natural counterparts. The stereopreference was conserved with the 2′-azido derivatives of dUMP and dUMP while, unexpectedly, the 2′-azido-d-dCMP was a 4-fold better substrate for UMP-CMP kinase than was CMP. Docking simulations showed that the small differences in the binding of d-(d)NMP to their respective kinases could account for the differences in interactions of the l-isomers with the enzymes. This in vitro information was then used to develop the in vivo activation pathway for l-dT. PMID:17626051

  17. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  18. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  19. Characterization of a novel periodontal ligament-specific periostin isoform.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Tauchi, T; Awata, T; Maeda, K; Kajikawa, T; Yanagita, M; Murakami, S

    2014-09-01

    Periostin is a mesenchymal cell marker predominantly expressed in collagen-rich fibrous connective tissues, including heart valves, tendons, perichondrium, periosteum, and periodontal ligament (PDL). Knockdown of periostin expression in mice results in early-onset periodontitis and failure of cardiac healing after acute myocardial infarction, suggesting that periostin is essential for connective tissue homeostasis and regeneration. However, its role(s) in periodontal tissues has not yet been fully defined. In this study, we describe a novel human isoform of periostin (PDL-POSTN). Isoform-specific analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that PDL-POSTN was predominantly expressed in the PDL, with much lower expression in other tissues and organs. A PDL cell line transfected with PDL-POSTN showed enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity and calcified nodule formation, compared with cells transfected with the full-length periostin isoform. A neutralizing antibody against integrin-αv inhibited both ALPase activity and calcified nodule formation in cells transfected with PDL-POSTN. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that PDL-POSTN bound to integrin αvβ3 more strongly than the common isoform of periostin, resulting in strong activation of the integrin αvβ3-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. These results suggest that PDL-POSTN positively regulates cytodifferentiation and mineralization in PDL cells through integrin αvβ3.

  20. Histamine H3-receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bakker, R A

    2004-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for HA as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in various brain functions, including emotion, cognition, and feeding. The recent cloning of the histamine H3 receptor allowed for the subsequent cloning of a variety of H3 receptor isoforms from different species as well as the H4 receptor. As a result a wide variety of H3-receptor isoforms are now known that display differential brain expression patterns and signalling properties. These recent discoveries are discussed in view of the growing interest of the H3 receptor as a target for the development of potential therapeutics.

  1. Forskolin activation of serotonin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    McNall, S J; Mansour, T E

    1985-05-15

    Properties of forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica are described. Forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free fluke particles to levels more than 30-fold above the basal rate. This activation was not dependent on guanine nucleotides and, upon washing of the particles, was rapidly reversed. Forskolin potentiated the activation of adenylate cyclase by serotonin (5-HT) and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), resulting in both an increase in the maximal level of enzyme activity and a decrease in the apparent activation constant (KA). The 5-HT antagonist 2-bromo-LSD did not inhibit enzyme activation by forskolin. Furthermore, forskolin had no effect on specific [3H]LSD binding to fluke particles. Activation of adenylate cyclase by sodium fluoride or guanine nucleotides was modified in a complex manner by forskolin with both stimulatory and inhibitory effects present. The results suggest that forskolin does not interact directly with the 5-HT receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase. Instead, it appears that forskolin effects are, at least in part, due to its ability to alter the interaction between the regulatory and catalytic components of adenylate cyclase. Incubation of intact flukes with forskolin increased their cAMP levels 2- to 3-fold. The concentration dependence of this response was similar to that for forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in fluke particles, with 300 microM forskolin giving the maximum response. Forskolin and other agents that increased fluke cAMP levels also stimulated fluke motility.

  2. AMPK beta subunits display isoform specific affinities for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Koay, Ann; Woodcroft, Ben; Petrie, Emma J; Yue, Helen; Emanuelle, Shane; Bieri, Michael; Bailey, Michael F; Hargreaves, Mark; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Ralph, Stuart; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R

    2010-08-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimer of catalytic (alpha) and regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits with at least two isoforms for each subunit. AMPK beta1 is widely expressed whilst AMPK beta2 is highly expressed in muscle and both beta isoforms contain a mid-molecule carbohydrate-binding module (beta-CBM). Here we show that beta2-CBM has evolved to contain a Thr insertion and increased affinity for glycogen mimetics with a preference for oligosaccharides containing a single alpha-1,6 branched residue. Deletion of Thr-101 reduces affinity for single alpha-1,6 branched oligosaccharides by 3-fold, while insertion of this residue into the equivalent position in the beta1-CBM sequence increases affinity by 3-fold, confirming the functional importance of this residue.

  3. Alternative splicing isoforms of synaptotagmin VII in the mouse, rat and human.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Mitsunori; Ogata, Yukie; Saegusa, Chika; Kanno, Eiko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2002-07-01

    Synaptotagmin VII (Syt VII) has been proposed to regulate several different types of Ca2+-dependent exocytosis, but its subcellular localization (lysosome or plasma membrane) and the number of alternative splicing isoforms of Syt VII (single or multiple forms) are matters of controversy. In the present study, we show by reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis that mouse Syt VII has one major isoform (Syt VIIalpha), the original Syt VII, and two minor isoforms (Syt VIIbeta and Syt VIIgamma), which contain unique insertions (of 44 and 116 amino acids respectively) in the spacer domain between the transmembrane and C2 domains of Syt VIIalpha. Similar results were obtained with respect to rat and human Syt VII mRNA expression. An antibody against the N-terminal domain of mouse Syt VII [anti-(Syt VII-N)], which specifically recognized recombinant Syt VII but not other Syt isoforms expressed in COS-7 cells, recognized two major, closely co-migrating bands (p58 and p60) and minor bands of approx. 65 kDa in mouse brain. Immunoaffinity purification of proteins that bind the anti-(Syt VII-N) antibody, and peptide sequence analysis revealed that: (i) the major p58 and p60 bands are identified as adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2; (ii) actin-binding protein is localized at the plasma membrane; and (iii) Syt VIIalpha (65 kDa) is the major Syt VII isoform, but with a much lower expression level than previously thought. It was also shown that FLAG-Syt VII-green-fluorescence-protein fusion protein stably expressed in PC12 cells is localized in the perinuclear region (co-localization with TGN38 protein, even after brefeldin A treatment) and in the tips of neurites (co-localization with Syt I), and not in the plasma membrane.

  4. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  5. Functional specificity of PMCA isoforms?

    PubMed

    Domi, Teuta; Di Leva, Francesca; Fedrizzi, Laura; Rimessi, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2007-03-01

    In mammals, four different genes encode four PMCA isoforms. PMCA1 and PMCA4 are expressed ubiquitously. PMCA2 and PMCA3 are expressed prevalently in the central nervous systems. More than 30 variants are generated by mechanisms of alternative splicing. The physiological meaning of the existence of such elevated number of isoforms is not clear, but it would be plausible to relate it to the cell-specific demands of Ca2+ homeostasis. To characterize functional specificity of PMCA variants we have investigated two aspects: the effects of the overexpression of the different PMCA variants on cellular Ca2+ handling and the existence of possible isoform-specific interactions with partner proteins using a yeast two-hybrid technique. The four basic PMCA isoforms were coexpressed in CHO cells together with the Ca2+-sensitive recombinant photoprotein aequorin. The effects of their overexpression on Ca2+ homeostasis were monitored in the living cells. They had revealed that the ubiquitous isoforms 1 and 4 are less effective in reducing the Ca2+ peaks generated by cell stimulation as compared to the neuron-specific isoforms 2 and 3. To establish whether these differences were related to different and new physiological regulators of the pump, the 90 N-terminal residues of PMCA2 and PMCA4 have been used as baits for the search of molecular partners. Screening of a human brain cDNA library with the PMCA4 bait specified the epsilon-isoform of protein 14-3-3, whereas no 14-3-3 epsilon clone was obtained with the PMCA2 bait. Overexpression of PMCA4/14-3-3 epsilon (but not of PMCA2/14-3-3 epsilon) in HeLa cells together with targeted aequorins showed that the ability of the cells to export Ca2+ was impaired. Thus, the interaction with 14-3-3 epsilon inhibited PMCA4 but not PMCA2. The role of PMCA2 has been further characterized by Ca2+ measurements in cells overexpressing different splicing variants. The results indicated that the combination of alternative splicing at two different

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  7. Developmental changes of beta-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase of rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.S.; Boland, S.R.; Schmidt, S.J.

    1985-06-01

    beta-Adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity and binding of the beta-adrenergic antagonist(-)-(/sup 125/I)iodopindolol were studied in rat liver during development of male Fischer 344 rats ages 6-60 days. In liver homogenates maximum adenylate cyclase response to beta-adrenergic agonist (10(-5) M isoproterenol or epinephrine) decreased by 73% (P less than 0.01) between 6 and 60 days, with most of the decrease (56%; P less than 0.01) occurring by 20 days. beta-adrenergic receptor density (Bmax) showed a corresponding decrease of 66% (P less than 0.01) by 20 days without subsequent change. Binding characteristics of stereospecificity, pharmacological specificity, saturability with time, and reversibility were unchanged with age. GTP-, fluoride-, forskolin-, and Mn2+-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities also decreased during development, suggesting a decrease of activity of the catalytic component and/or guanine nucleotide regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that the developmental decrease of beta-adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity may result from decreased numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors. Developmental alterations of nonreceptor components of the enzyme may also contribute to changes of catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase.

  8. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  9. Characterization of RON protein isoforms in pancreatic cancer: implications for biology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Mose, Evangeline; Cheng, Peter; Holman, Patrick; Howard, Haleigh; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Porras, Paula; Walterscheid, Zakk; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Esdar, Christina; Schadt, Oliver; Eickhoff, Jan; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    The RON tyrosine kinase receptor is under investigation as a novel target in pancreatic cancer. While RON mutations are uncommon, RON isoforms are produced in cancer cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this study we sought to: 1) characterize RON isoform expression in pancreatic cancer, 2) investigate mechanisms that regulate isoform expression, and 3) determine how various isoforms effect gene expression, oncogenic phenotypes and responses to RON directed therapies. We quantified RON transcripts in human pancreatic cancer and found expression levels 2500 fold that of normal pancreas with RON isoform expression comprising nearly 50% of total transcript. RNA seq studies revealed that the short form (sfRON) and P5P6 isoforms which have ligand independent activity, induce markedly different patterns of gene expression than wild type RON. We found that transcription of RON isoforms is regulated by promoter hypermethylation as the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine decreased all RON transcripts in a subset of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The viability of sfRON-expressing HPDE cells was reduced by a RON specific small molecule inhibitor, while a therapeutic monoclonal antibody had no demonstrable effects. In summary, RON isoforms may comprise half of total RON transcript in human pancreatic cancer and their expression is regulated at least in part by promoter hypermethylation. RON isoforms activate distinct patterns of gene expression, have transforming activity and differential responses to RON directed therapies. These findings further our understanding of RON biology in pancreatic cancer and have implications for therapeutic strategies to target RON activity. PMID:27323855

  10. Characterization of RON protein isoforms in pancreatic cancer: implications for biology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Mose, Evangeline; Cheng, Peter; Holman, Patrick; Howard, Haleigh; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Porras, Paula; Walterscheid, Zakk; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Esdar, Christina; Schadt, Oliver; Eickhoff, Jan; Lowy, Andrew M

    2016-07-19

    The RON tyrosine kinase receptor is under investigation as a novel target in pancreatic cancer. While RON mutations are uncommon, RON isoforms are produced in cancer cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this study we sought to: 1) characterize RON isoform expression in pancreatic cancer, 2) investigate mechanisms that regulate isoform expression, and 3) determine how various isoforms effect gene expression, oncogenic phenotypes and responses to RON directed therapies. We quantified RON transcripts in human pancreatic cancer and found expression levels 2500 fold that of normal pancreas with RON isoform expression comprising nearly 50% of total transcript. RNA seq studies revealed that the short form (sfRON) and P5P6 isoforms which have ligand independent activity, induce markedly different patterns of gene expression than wild type RON. We found that transcription of RON isoforms is regulated by promoter hypermethylation as the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine decreased all RON transcripts in a subset of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The viability of sfRON-expressing HPDE cells was reduced by a RON specific small molecule inhibitor, while a therapeutic monoclonal antibody had no demonstrable effects. In summary, RON isoforms may comprise half of total RON transcript in human pancreatic cancer and their expression is regulated at least in part by promoter hypermethylation. RON isoforms activate distinct patterns of gene expression, have transforming activity and differential responses to RON directed therapies. These findings further our understanding of RON biology in pancreatic cancer and have implications for therapeutic strategies to target RON activity.

  11. CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is structurally related to other nucleoside monophosphate kinases.

    PubMed

    Bucurenci, N; Sakamoto, H; Briozzo, P; Palibroda, N; Serina, L; Sarfati, R S; Labesse, G; Briand, G; Danchin, A; Bărzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1996-02-02

    CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is a monomeric protein of 225 amino acid residues. The protein exhibits little overall sequence similarities with other known NMP kinases. However, residues involved in binding of substrates and/or in catalysis were found conserved, and sequence comparison suggested conservation of the global fold found in adenylate kinases or in several CMP/UMP kinases. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, crystallized, and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(3), have unit cell parameters a = b = 82.3 A and c = 60.7 A, and diffract x-rays to a 1.9 A resolution. The bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 328 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, which suggests that the single tryptophan residue (Trp30) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Substrate specificity studies showed that CMP kinase from E. coli is active with ATP, dATP, or GTP as donors and with CMP, dCMP, and arabinofuranosyl-CMP as acceptors. This is in contrast with CMP/UMP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, an enzyme active on CMP or UMP but much less active on the corresponding deoxynucleotides. Binding of CMP enhanced the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or ADP, a particularity never described in this family of proteins that might explain inhibition of enzyme activity by excess of nucleoside monophosphate.

  12. Molecular cloning and mRNA distribution of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide in the lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lee, L T O; Tam, J K V; Chan, D W; Chow, B K C

    2009-04-01

    In this article, we report the isolation of a full-length cDNA clone encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from lungfish Protopterus dolloi. When comparing the deduced amino acid sequences, the lungfish PACAP was found to be highly conserved with other vertebrates; however, the PRP shares only lower levels of sequence identity with known PRP sequences. Consistently in phylogenetic analysis, the lungfish PRP, similar to sturgeon PRP, fails to cluster with other PRPs. In addition to the full-length clone, another cDNA encoding a short precursor that lacks the first 32 amino acids of the PRP was also isolated. Interestingly, similar isoforms were also identified in several nonmammalian vertebrates, and it was suggested that exon skipping of PRP/PACAP transcripts was a mechanism that regulated the expression ratio of PACAP to PRP in nonmammalian vertebrates. By real-time PCR, both long and short PRP/PACAP transcripts were found almost exclusively in the brain, and the short isoform is the more abundant transcript (3.7 times more), indicating that PACAP is the major product produced in lungfish brain. The expression patterns of lungfish and previously studied frog PRP/PACAP suggest that the PRP/PACAP gene in the tetrapod lineage may first express in the central nervous system; in the process of evolution, the functions of these peptides diversified and were later found in other tissues.

  13. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  14. Chirally selective, intramolecular interaction observed in an aminoacyl adenylate anhydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between amino acids and nucleotide bases is studied. The proton NMR spectrum of N-acetylphenylalanyl-AMP-anhydride is analyzed H8 and H2 signals, two upfield signals of equal size, and five phenylalanine ring proton signals are observed in the spectrum; the upfield movement of the proton and the racemization of the N-acetyl L-phenylalanine material are examined. The differences in the position of the signals due to the diastereoisomers are investigated. The separation of the D and L amino acyl adenylates using HPLC is described. H-1 NMR spectra of the isomers are examined in order to determine which isomer displays the strongest interaction between the phenyl ring and the adenine ring. The spectra reveal that the L isomer shows the highest upfield change of both H8 and H2 signals. It is noted that the phenyl ring lies over C2 of the adenine ring with the phenyl meta and para protons extended past the adenine ring and the phenyl ortho protons.

  15. Hydrolytic properties of phenylalanyl- and N-acetylphenylalanyl adenylate anhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Senaratne, N.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrolysis of phenylalynyl- and N-acetylephenylalanyl adenylate anhydrides (AcPhe-AMP) is studied experimentally using a new spectrophotometric method. The hydrolysis process was analyzed at low concentrations (0.0001 M), constant temperature of 25 C, constant buffer concentration (0.05 M), and as a function of pH. It is found that while Phe-AMP is susceptible to attack by OH(-), AcPhe-AMP is susceptible to acid decomposition as well. At a pH of 4 to 8, Phe-AMP hydolyzes faster than AcPhe-AMP, but at pH less than four or greater than eight, the blocked form hydrolyzes faster. Both forms are attacked by H2O at the same rate. The rate laws for the various hydrolytic mechanisms and the activation energies for the hydrolyses at pH 7.1 are given in a table, and the possible relevance of the findings to the origin and evolution of the process of protein synthesis is discussed.

  16. Inference of Isoforms from Short Sequence Reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianxing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    Due to alternative splicing events in eukaryotic species, the identification of mRNA isoforms (or splicing variants) is a difficult problem. Traditional experimental methods for this purpose are time consuming and cost ineffective. The emerging RNA-Seq technology provides a possible effective method to address this problem. Although the advantages of RNA-Seq over traditional methods in transcriptome analysis have been confirmed by many studies, the inference of isoforms from millions of short sequence reads (e.g., Illumina/Solexa reads) has remained computationally challenging. In this work, we propose a method to calculate the expression levels of isoforms and infer isoforms from short RNA-Seq reads using exon-intron boundary, transcription start site (TSS) and poly-A site (PAS) information. We first formulate the relationship among exons, isoforms, and single-end reads as a convex quadratic program, and then use an efficient algorithm (called IsoInfer) to search for isoforms. IsoInfer can calculate the expression levels of isoforms accurately if all the isoforms are known and infer novel isoforms from scratch. Our experimental tests on known mouse isoforms with both simulated expression levels and reads demonstrate that IsoInfer is able to calculate the expression levels of isoforms with an accuracy comparable to the state-of-the-art statistical method and a 60 times faster speed. Moreover, our tests on both simulated and real reads show that it achieves a good precision and sensitivity in inferring isoforms when given accurate exon-intron boundary, TSS and PAS information, especially for isoforms whose expression levels are significantly high.

  17. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase attenuates muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling by a PKA-independent mechanism in rat carotid body Type I cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carrie M; Wyatt, Christopher N

    2011-01-31

    Carotid body (CB) Type I cells respond to hypoxia by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. This mechanism leads to increased firing of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) which alters breathing to maintain blood gases within the physiological range. Acetylcholine targets both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in the rat CB, acting postsynaptically on CSN and presynaptically on Type I cells. Muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling is inhibited by the activation of G(i)-coupled receptors including histamine H3 receptors. Here inhibition of adenylate cyclase with SQ22536 mimicked H3 receptor activation. Using Ca²(+) imaging techniques it was observed that inhibition of muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling was independent of protein kinase A (PKA) as PKA inhibitors H89 and KT5720 were without effect on the muscarinic Ca²(+) response. By contrast the Epac (exchange protein activated by cAMP) inhibitor brefeldin A inhibited muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling whereas the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM potentiated Ca²(+) signaling. Thus in Type I cells inhibition of adenylate cyclase inhibited muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling via a PKA-independent pathway that may rely upon modulation of Epac.

  18. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  19. Expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF is differentially regulated by splicing and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dawid G.; Woolard, Jeanette; Amin, Elianna Mohamed; Konopatskaya, Olga; Saleem, Moin A.; Churchill, Amanda J.; Ladomery, Michael R.; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA; hereafter referred to as VEGF) is a key regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Two families of VEGF isoforms are generated by alternate splice-site selection in the terminal exon. Proximal splice-site selection (PSS) in exon 8 results in pro-angiogenic VEGFxxx isoforms (xxx is the number of amino acids), whereas distal splice-site selection (DSS) results in anti-angiogenic VEGFxxxb isoforms. To investigate control of PSS and DSS, we investigated the regulation of isoform expression by extracellular growth factor administration and intracellular splicing factors. In primary epithelial cells VEGFxxxb formed the majority of VEGF isoforms (74%). IGF1, and TNFα treatment favoured PSS (increasing VEGFxxx) whereas TGFβ1 favoured DSS, increasing VEGFxxxb levels. TGFβ1 induced DSS selection was prevented by inhibition of p38 MAPK and the Clk/sty (CDC-like kinase, CLK1) splicing factor kinase family, but not ERK1/2. Clk phosphorylates SR protein splicing factors ASF/SF2, SRp40 and SRp55. To determine whether SR splicing factors alter VEGF splicing, they were overexpressed in epithelial cells, and VEGF isoform production assessed. ASF/SF2, and SRp40 both favoured PSS, whereas SRp55 upregulated VEGFxxxb (DSS) isoforms relative to VEGFxxx. SRp55 knockdown reduced expression of VEGF165b. Moreover, SRp55 bound to a 35 nucleotide region of the 3′UTR immediately downstream of the stop codon in exon 8b. These results identify regulation of splicing by growth and splice factors as a key event in determining the relative pro- versus anti-angiogenic expression of VEGF isoforms, and suggest that p38 MAPK-Clk/sty kinases are responsible for the TGFβ1-induced DSS selection, and identify SRp55 as a key regulatory splice factor. PMID:18843117

  20. Characterization of the purine-reactive site of the rat testis cytosolic adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Braun, T; Wrenn, S M

    1987-06-15

    Naturally soluble rat germ cell adenylate cyclase was inhibited by adenosine and the adenosine analogs, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl adenine (AFA) and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA), all of which inhibited hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclases at the "P" site. The IC50 values for adenosine and DDA were approximately 0.1 and for AFA, 4.0 mM. The onset of adenosine inhibition was very rapid whether adenosine was added to the enzyme reactant mixture at time zero concomitantly with the addition of substrate or after the enzyme had been activated by the addition of substrate. The adenosine analogs, N6-methyladenosine (MeA) and N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (PIA), which interact with plasma membrane receptors ("R" receptors) for hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase, had little effect on the activity of the cytosolic adenylate cyclase. Additionally, aminophylline, which has been shown to competitively antagonize adenosine interactions with the plasma membrane "R" receptors but not "P" site interactions, had no effect upon substrate activation of the soluble enzyme and did not prevent adenosine from inhibiting the activity of the enzyme. These data provide evidence for an adenosine regulatory site on the cytosolic enzyme which resembles the "P" site described for membrane bound-adenylate cyclase.

  1. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  2. Role of ROCK Isoforms in Regulation of Stiffness Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation in Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Htwe, Su S; Cha, Byung H; Yue, Kan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Knox, Alan J; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2017-02-22

    Fibrosis is a major cause of progressive organ dysfunction in several chronic pulmonary diseases. Rho associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK) has shown to be involved in myofibroblast differentiation driven by altered matrix stiffness in fibrotic state. There are two known ROCK isoforms in human, ROCK1 (ROKβ) and ROCK2 (ROKα), but specific role of each isoform in myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis remains unknown. To study this, we developed a Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel based culture system with different stiffness levels relevant to healthy and fibrotic lungs. We have shown that stiff matrix and not soft matrix, can induce myofibroblast differentiation with high αSMA expression. Furthermore, our data confirm that the inhibition of ROCK signalling by a pharmacological inhibitor (i.e. Y27632) attenuates stiffness induced αSMA expression and fibre assembly in myofibroblasts. To assess the role of ROCK isoforms in this process we used siRNA to knock down the expression of each isoform. Our data showed that knocking down either ROCK1 or ROCK2 did not result in a reduction in αSMA expression in myofibroblasts on stiff matrix as opposed to soft matrix where αSMA expression was reduced significantly. Paradoxically, on stiff matrix, the absence of one isoform (particularly ROCK2) exaggerated αSMA expression and led to thick fibre assembly. Moreover complete loss of αSMA fibre assembly was seen only in the absence of both ROCK isoforms suggesting that both isoforms are implicated in this process. Overall our results indicate the differential role of ROCK isoforms in myofibroblast differentiation on soft and stiff matrices.

  3. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  4. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  5. Compartmentalization of mammalian pantothenate kinases.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The pantothenate kinases (PanK) catalyze the first and the rate-limiting step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and regulate the amount of CoA in tissues by differential isoform expression and allosteric interaction with metabolic ligands. The four human and mouse PanK proteins share a homologous carboxy-terminal catalytic domain, but differ in their amino-termini. These unique termini direct the isoforms to different subcellular compartments. PanK1α isoforms were exclusively nuclear, with preferential association with the granular component of the nucleolus during interphase. PanK1α also associated with the perichromosomal region in condensing chromosomes during mitosis. The PanK1β and PanK3 isoforms were cytosolic, with a portion of PanK1β associated with clathrin-associated vesicles and recycling endosomes. Human PanK2, known to associate with mitochondria, was specifically localized to the intermembrane space. Human PanK2 was also detected in the nucleus, and functional nuclear localization and export signals were identified and experimentally confirmed. Nuclear PanK2 trafficked from the nucleus to the mitochondria, but not in the other direction, and was absent from the nucleus during G2 phase of the cell cycle. The localization of human PanK2 in these two compartments was in sharp contrast to mouse PanK2, which was exclusively cytosolic. These data demonstrate that PanK isoforms are differentially compartmentalized allowing them to sense CoA homeostasis in different cellular compartments and enable interaction with regulatory ligands produced in these same locations.

  6. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  7. Synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using the tert-butoxycarbonyl protecting group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, D. W.; Seguin, R.; Saburi, M.; Fendler, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of amino acyl adenylates using N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-protected amino acids is reported. Anhydrous solutions containing N-tert-butoxycarbonyl alanine, phenylalanine, and methionine were combined with the anhydrous mono (tri-n-octylammonium) salt of adenosine 5'-phosphate and the resultant amino acyl adenylates were characterized by means of elemental analysis, and infrared and proton NMR spectroscopy. Amino acyl adenylate yields of up to 60% were obtained with high purity at room temperatures. The reported synthesis is considered to represent a large improvement over previous methods due to the purity of the products, normal temperature requirements, and the stability of the starting compounds, which suggests its use in investigations of prebiotic oligo- and polypeptide synthesis.

  8. Characterization of the norepinephrine-activation of adenylate cyclase suggests a role in memory affirmation pathways. Overexposure to epinephrine inactivates adenylate cyclase, a causal pathway for stress-pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bennun, Alfred

    2010-05-01

    Incubation with noradrenaline (norepinephrine) of isolated membranes of rat's brain corpus striatum and cortex, showed that ionic-magnesium (Mg(2+)) is required for the neurotransmitter activatory response of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) (EC 4.6.1.1)], AC. An Mg(2+)-dependent response to the activatory effects of adrenaline, and subsequent inhibition by calcium, suggest capability for a turnover, associated with cyclic changes in membrane potential and participation in a short-term memory pathway. In the cell, the neurotransmitter by activating AC generates intracellular cyclic AMP. Calcium entrance in the cell inhibits the enzyme. The increment of cyclic AMP activates kinase A and their protein phosphorylating activity, allowing a long-term memory pathway. Hence, consolidating neuronal circuits, related to emotional learning and memory affirmation. The activatory effect relates to an enzyme-noradrenaline complex which may participate in the physiology of the fight or flight response, by prolonged exposure. However, the persistence of an unstable enzyme complex turns the enzyme inactive. Effect concordant, with the observation that prolonged exposure to adrenaline, participates in the etiology of stress triggered pathologies. At the cell physiological level AC responsiveness to hormones could be modulated by the concentration of chelating metabolites. These ones produce the release of free ATP(4-), a negative modulator of AC and the Mg(2+) activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK), thus, allowing an integration of the hormonal response of both enzymes by ionic controls. This effect could supersede the metabolic feedback control by energy charge. Accordingly, maximum hormonal response of both enzymes, to high Mg(2+) and low free ATP(4-), allows a correlation with the known effects of low caloric intake increasing average life expectancy.

  9. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  10. Characterization of p38 MAPK isoforms for drug resistance study using systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Engler, David A.; Matsunami, Risë K.; Su, Jing; Zhang, Le; Chang, Chung-Che (Jeff); Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation plays an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs in treating multiple myeloma (MM). However, how the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in drug resistance, in particular the roles that the various p38 isoforms play, remains largely unknown. Method: To explore the underlying mechanisms, we developed a novel systems biology approach by integrating liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein array data from human MM cell lines with computational pathway models in which the unknown parameters were inferred using a proposed novel algorithm called modularized factor graph. Results: New mechanisms predicted by our models suggest that combined activation of various p38 isoforms may result in drug resistance in MM via regulating the related pathways including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and NFкB pathway. ERK pathway regulating cell growth is synergistically regulated by p38δ isoform, whereas nuclear factor kappa B (NFкB) pathway regulating cell apoptosis is synergistically regulated by p38α isoform. This finding that p38δ isoform promotes the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in MM cells treated with bortezomib was validated by western blotting. Based on the predicted mechanisms, we further screened drug combinations in silico and found that a promising drug combination targeting ERK1/2 and NFκB might reduce the effects of drug resistance in MM cells. This study provides a framework of a systems biology approach to studying drug resistance and drug combination selection. Availability and implementation: RPPA experimental Data and Matlab source codes of modularized factor graph for parameter estimation are freely available online at http://ctsb.is.wfubmc.edu/publications/modularized-factor-graph.php Contact: xizhou@wakehealth.edu or zhanglcq@swu.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  11. Clay catalyzed polymerization of amino acid adenylates and its relationship to biochemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and polymerization of alanine adenylate on montmorillonite at pH 7 when either its interspacial faces or its edger are blocked by an excess of histidine or sodium hexametaphosphate was investigated. Results indicate that alanine adenylate can be adsorbed any place on the interspacial spaces of the clay; however, adsorption of its phosphate part, which is limited to the edges of the clay, is necessary for polymerization to occur. As a result, polymerization takes place only at sites on the interspacial faces bordering the edges.

  12. [The aspects of adenylate cyclase activity regulation in myocardium cell membranes during hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, K Ia; Komar, E S; Lobanok, L M

    1999-01-01

    Nonstimulated and isoproterenol, GTF, GITF, NaF stimulated activities of the adenylate cyclase in sarcolemma in white rats' myocardium was studied after two weeks of hypokinesia. As was established, in restrained animals the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to the specified agents was increased and transition to the bimodal GTF regulation took place. It is hypothesised that involvement of membrane-bound Gi-proteins in the adrenergic effects on cardiomyocytes is one of mechanisms of the cardiotropic effects of restraint and heart distresses.

  13. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  14. [Characteristics of interaction of adenylate cyclase modulators and phosphoinositide cell signaling systems with lipid langmuir monolayers].

    PubMed

    Liakhov, O M; Prokopenko, V V; Prokopenko, R A; Mohylevych, S Ie

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of two groups of bioregulators, which oppositely affect activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphoinositide cellular signaling systems, with the Langmuir monolayer films made of natural lecithin was studied. Most significant influence on the structural and energy characteristics of lipid monolayers was revealed for the group of bioregulators, which inhibit polyphosphoinositide signaling system or/and activate adenylate cyclase signaling system. It is shown, that using the cluster analysis the bioregulators can be divided into two groups according to general orientation of their action on the considered systems of transduction of a signal.

  15. Cell death or survival promoted by alternative isoforms of ErbB4.

    PubMed

    Sundvall, Maria; Veikkolainen, Ville; Kurppa, Kari; Salah, Zaidoun; Tvorogov, Denis; van Zoelen, E Joop; Aqeilan, Rami; Elenius, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    The significance of ErbB4 in tumor biology is poorly understood. The ERBB4 gene is alternatively spliced producing juxtamembrane (JM-a and JM-b) and cytoplasmic (CYT-1 and CYT-2) isoforms. Here, signaling via the two alternative ErbB4 JM isoforms (JM-a CYT-2 and JM-b CYT-2) was compared. Fibroblasts expressing ErbB4 JM-a demonstrated enhanced ErbB4 autophosphorylation, growth, and survival. In contrast, cells overexpressing ErbB4 JM-b underwent starvation-induced death. Both pro- and antisurvival responses to the two ErbB4 isoforms were sensitive to an ErbB kinase inhibitor. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) was identified as an ErbB4 target gene that was differentially regulated by the two ErbB4 isoforms. The soluble intracellular domain of ErbB4, released from the JM-a but not from the JM-b isoform, associated with the transcription factor AP-2 and promoted its potential to enhance PDGFRA transcription. Survival of cells expressing JM-a was suppressed by targeting either PDGFR-α or AP-2, whereas cells expressing JM-b were rescued from cell death by the PDGFR-α agonist, PDGF-BB. These findings indicate that two alternative ErbB4 isoforms may promote antagonistic cellular responses and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ErbB4 kinase activity may lead to either suppression or promotion of cellular growth.

  16. Cell Death or Survival Promoted by Alternative Isoforms of ErbB4

    PubMed Central

    Sundvall, Maria; Veikkolainen, Ville; Kurppa, Kari; Salah, Zaidoun; Tvorogov, Denis; van Zoelen, E. Joop; Aqeilan, Rami

    2010-01-01

    The significance of ErbB4 in tumor biology is poorly understood. The ERBB4 gene is alternatively spliced producing juxtamembrane (JM-a and JM-b) and cytoplasmic (CYT-1 and CYT-2) isoforms. Here, signaling via the two alternative ErbB4 JM isoforms (JM-a CYT-2 and JM-b CYT-2) was compared. Fibroblasts expressing ErbB4 JM-a demonstrated enhanced ErbB4 autophosphorylation, growth, and survival. In contrast, cells overexpressing ErbB4 JM-b underwent starvation-induced death. Both pro- and antisurvival responses to the two ErbB4 isoforms were sensitive to an ErbB kinase inhibitor. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) was identified as an ErbB4 target gene that was differentially regulated by the two ErbB4 isoforms. The soluble intracellular domain of ErbB4, released from the JM-a but not from the JM-b isoform, associated with the transcription factor AP-2 and promoted its potential to enhance PDGFRA transcription. Survival of cells expressing JM-a was suppressed by targeting either PDGFR-α or AP-2, whereas cells expressing JM-b were rescued from cell death by the PDGFR-α agonist, PDGF-BB. These findings indicate that two alternative ErbB4 isoforms may promote antagonistic cellular responses and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ErbB4 kinase activity may lead to either suppression or promotion of cellular growth. PMID:20943952

  17. Amyloid-β peptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloid-β peptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of 4-Iminothiazolidinones for Inhibition of PI3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, Jo-Anne; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Frazzetto, Mark; Zheng, Zhaohua; Jennings, Ian G.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Chalmers, David K.; Thompson, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione, compound 1, has previously shown pan-inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) class I isoforms. We hypothesized the derivatization of the thiazolidinedione core of compound 1 could introduce isoform selectivity. We report the synthesis, characterization, and inhibitory activity of a novel series of 4-iminothiazolidin-2-ones for inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms. Their synthesis was successfully achieved by multiple pathways described in this paper. Initial in vitro data of 28 analogues demonstrated poor inhibition of all class I PI3K isoforms. However, we identified an alternate target, the phosphodiesterases, and present preliminary screening results showing improved inhibitory activity. PMID:23997244

  19. Analysis of Distinct Roles of CaMKK Isoforms Using STO-609-Resistant Mutants in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Hiraoka, Yuri; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2015-06-30

    To assess the isoform specificity of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK)-mediated signaling pathway using a CaMKK inhibitor (STO-609) in living cells, we have established A549 cell lines expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Following serial mutagenesis studies, we have succeeded in obtaining an STO-609-resistant CaMKKα mutant (Ala292Thr/Leu233Phe) and a CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe), which showed sensitivity to STO-609 that was 2-3 orders of magnitude lower without an appreciable effect on kinase activity or CaM requirement. These results are consistent with the results obtained for CaMKK activities in the extracts of A549 cells stably expressing the mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Ionomycin-induced 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation at Thr172 in A549 cells expressing either the wild-type or the STO-609-resistant mutant of CaMKKα was completely suppressed by STO-609 treatment but resistant to the inhibitor in the presence of the CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe). This result strongly suggested that CaMKKβ is responsible for ionomycin-induced AMPK activation, which supported previous reports. In contrast, ionomycin-induced CaMKIV phosphorylation at Thr196 was resistant to STO-609 treatment in A549 cells expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of both CaMKK isoforms, indicating that both CaMKK isoforms are capable of phosphorylating and activating CaMKIV in living cells. Considering these results together, STO-609-resistant CaMKK mutants developed in this study may be useful for distinguishing CaMKK isoform-mediated signaling pathways in combination with the use of an inhibitor compound.

  20. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3’UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth D T; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP ) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP , resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons.

  2. [Isoenzyme spectrum and kinetic properties of pyruvate kinase from the liver of thiamine-deficient rats].

    PubMed

    Konovalenko, O V; Maglysh, S S; Gorbach, Z V

    1990-01-01

    Thiamine-deficiency in animals induced by everyday subcutaneous administration of oxythiamine in a dose of 4, 40 and 100 mg/kg of weight for 10 days results in a decrease of the total activity of pyruvate kinase in the liver tissue and does not affect the mentioned index in the kidney and heart tissues. It is shown that as a result of the enzyme fractionation in the column with DEAE-cellulose the total activity of pyruvate kinase in the liver tissue of rats with thiamine-deficiency decreases due to L-isoform while the content of M-isoform remains unchanged. Thiamine deficiency does not affect kinetic characteristics of the L-isoform, extracted from the liver and this shows the absence of changes in the degree of phosphorylation of pyruvate kinase L-isoform under these conditions.

  3. Hyaluronic acid as capacitation inductor: metabolic changes and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Córdoba, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of hyaluronic acid on bovine cryopreserved spermatozoa compared with heparin as regards the variation of capacitation induction, cellular oxidative metabolism and intracellular signal induced by membrane-associated adenylate cyclase to propose hyaluronic acid as a capacitation inductor. Heparin or hyaluronic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine were used to induce sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction, respectively. 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine was used as a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase inhibitor. The highest percentages of capacitated spermatozoa and live spermatozoa with acrosome integrity were obtained by incubating sperm for 60 min using 1000 μg/ml hyaluronic acid. In these conditions, capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid was lower compared with heparin; nonetheless both glycosaminoglycans promote intracellular changes that allow true acrosome reaction in vitro induced by lysophosphatidylcholine in bovine spermatozoa. Oxygen consumption in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa was significantly higher than in hyaluronic acid-treated spermatozoa. With all treatments, mitochondrial coupling was observed when a specific uncoupler of the respiratory chain was added. The inhibition of membrane-associated adenylate cyclase significantly blocked capacitation induction produced by hyaluronic acid, maintaining a basal sperm oxygen uptake in contrast to heparin effect in which both sperm parameters were inhibited, suggesting that the membrane-associated adenylate cyclase activation is involved in the intracellular signal mechanisms induced by both capacitation inductors, but only regulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa.

  4. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  5. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  6. Topographic separation of adenylate cyclase and hormone receptors in the plasma membrane of toad erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hollenberg, M. D.; Bennett, V.; Cuatrecasas, P.

    1977-01-01

    Brief sonication of whole erythrocyte plasma membranes (ghosts) from toads at 4° does not inactivate adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.1] or destroy the receptor binding properties of hydroxybenzylpindolol or insulin. The hormonal (but not the fluoride-induced) stimulation of this enzyme is, however, lost. Fractionation of the small, resealed membrane fragments (vesicles) on discontinuous sucrose gradients results in the separation of vesicle populations differing grossly in size and protein composition. In addition, the distribution of the β-adrenergic receptor, an insulin binding site, and adenylate cyclase among these vesicles fractions differs. The pattern of distribution of these functional structures can be altered differentially by manipulations of the ghosts before sonication. For example, brief preincubation with isoproterenol leads to a change in the relative distribution of β-receptor (but not adenylate cyclase) among the various vesicle fractions; this effect is not obtained with β-receptor antagonists, which block the isoproterenol effect. Exposure of the ghosts to different temperatures, changes in the divalent cation composition of the medium, or the addition of ATP also leads to changes in the distribution of surface markers of the subsequently formed vesicles. The results indicate gross asymmetries in the distribution of protein components within the plane of the membrane and raise important questions regarding the manner whereby functionally related and coupled components, such as hormone receptors and adenylate cyclase, interact. Images PMID:197522

  7. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  8. Isoform-Specific Localization of A-RAF in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Anton; Ono, Makoto; Goff, Stephen A.; Macaluso, Frank; Wennogle, Lawrence P.

    2000-01-01

    RAF kinase is a family of isoforms including A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF. Despite the important role of RAF in cell growth and proliferation, little evidence exists for isoform-specific function of RAF family members. Using Western analysis and immunogold labeling, A-RAF was selectively localized in highly purified rat liver mitochondria. Two novel human proteins, which interact specifically with A-RAF, were identified, and the full-length sequences are reported. These proteins, referred to as hTOM and hTIM, are similar to components of mitochondrial outer and inner membrane protein-import receptors from lower organisms, implicating their involvement in the mitochondrial transport of A-RAF. hTOM contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, which function in protein-protein interactions. TPR domains are frequently present in proteins involved in cellular transport systems. In contrast, protein 14-3-3, an abundant cytosolic protein that participates in many facets of signal transduction, was found to interact with C-RAF but not with A-RAF N-terminal domain. This information is discussed in view of the important role of mitochondria in cellular functions involving energy balance, proliferation, and apoptosis and the potential role of A-RAF in regulating these systems. PMID:10848612

  9. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  10. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  11. The invasive adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis. Properties and penetration kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E; Farfel, Z; Hanski, E

    1987-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative organism of whooping cough, produces a calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Confer & Eaton [(1982) Science 217, 948-950] have shown that an extract from B. pertussis increases intracellular cyclic AMP levels in neutrophils and suggested that this increase is caused by the bacterial adenylate cyclase which penetrates these cells. We demonstrate in the present study that adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to a partially purified preparation of the bacterial enzyme has properties completely different from those of the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to the invasive enzyme is insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, readily inactivated by acetic anhydride and relatively stable to SDS. Similar properties are exhibited by the bacterial enzyme itself. By contrast, the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme activated by forskolin and guanosine 5'-gamma-thiotriphosphate is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and SDS and relatively stable to acetic anhydride. This strongly supports the notion that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase penetrates cells. Using the partially purified preparation of the invasive enzyme, we have studied the kinetics of its penetration. The intracellular catalytic activity reaches a steady state within 20 min, irrespective of enzyme or cell concentration. Steady-state levels are maintained for at least 2 h provided that the invasive enzyme is present in the incubation medium. Upon its removal, a rapid decrease (t1/2 approximately equal to 15 min) in the intracellular cyclase level is observed. This decrease reflects intracellular inactivation of the bacterial enzyme and is not caused by the release of the enzyme to the cell medium. PMID:2886119

  12. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  13. PI3K isoform dependence of PTEN-deficient tumors can be altered by the genetic context

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Fabienne; Utermark, Tamara; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Qi; Von, Thanh; Roberts, Thomas M.; Zhao, Jean J.

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of isoform-selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer therapy. Using conditional deletion of the p110 catalytic isoforms of PI3K to predict sensitivity of cancer types to such inhibitors, we and others have demonstrated that tumors deficient of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) are often dependent on the p110β isoform of PI3K. Because human cancers usually arise due to multiple genetic events, determining whether other genetic alterations might alter the p110 isoform requirements of PTEN-null tumors becomes a critical question. To investigate further the roles of p110 isoforms in PTEN-deficient tumors, we used a mouse model of ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma driven by concomitant activation of the rat sarcoma protein Kras, which is known to activate p110α, and loss of PTEN. In this model, ablation of p110β had no effect on tumor growth, whereas p110α ablation blocked tumor formation. Because ablation of PTEN alone is often p110β dependent, we wondered if the same held true in the ovary. Because PTEN loss alone in the ovary did not result in tumor formation, we tested PI3K isoform dependence in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells deficient in both PTEN and p53. These cells were indeed p110β dependent, whereas OSEs expressing activated Kras with or without PTEN loss were p110α dependent. Furthermore, isoform-selective inhibitors showed a similar pattern of the isoform dependence in established KrasG12D/PTEN-deficient tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that, whereas in some tissues PTEN-null tumors appear to inherently depend on p110β, the p110 isoform reliance of PTEN-deficient tumors may be altered by concurrent mutations that activate p110α. PMID:24737887

  14. PKC Isoform Expression in Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that modeled (MMG) and true (USA Space Shuttle Missions STS-54 and STS-56) microgravity (MG) inhibit human lymphocyte locomotion, Modeled MG also suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Activation of PKC by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) restored the microgravity-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion as well as activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas calcium ionophore (ionomycin) was unable to restore these functions. Based on these results we hypothesized that MG-induced changes in lymphocyte functions are caused by a fundamental defect in signal transduction mechanism. This defect may be localized either at the PKC level or upstream of PKC, most likely, at the cell membrane level. In this study we examined the expression of PKC isoforms alpha, epsilon and delta in PBMC cultured in rotating wall vessel bioreactor, developed at NASA JSC, which models microgravity by sustaining cells in continuous free fall. The assessment of the isoforms was performed by FACS analysis following cell permeabilization. A decrease in the expression of isoforms epsilon and delta, but not isoform a, was observed in PBMC cultured in microgravity conditions. These data suggest that MMG might selectively affect the expression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC Molecular analysis confirm selective suppression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC.

  15. Ultra-deep sequencing of ribosome-associated poly-adenylated RNA in early Drosophila embryos reveals hundreds of conserved translated sORFs.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Hu, Chuansheng; Bai, Ling; Li, Hua; Li, Mingfa; Zhao, Xiaodong; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    There is growing recognition that small open reading frames (sORFs) encoding peptides shorter than 100 amino acids are an important class of functional elements in the eukaryotic genome, with several already identified to play critical roles in growth, development, and disease. However, our understanding of their biological importance has been hindered owing to the significant technical challenges limiting their annotation. Here we combined ultra-deep sequencing of ribosome-associated poly-adenylated RNAs with rigorous conservation analysis to identify a comprehensive population of translated sORFs during early Drosophila embryogenesis. In total, we identify 399 sORFs, including those previously annotated but without evidence of translational capacity, those found within transcripts previously classified as non-coding, and those not previously known to be transcribed. Further, we find, for the first time, evidence for translation of many sORFs with different isoforms, suggesting their regulation is as complex as longer ORFs. Furthermore, many sORFs are found not associated with ribosomes in late-stage Drosophila S2 cells, suggesting that many of the translated sORFs may have stage-specific functions during embryogenesis. These results thus provide the first comprehensive annotation of the sORFs present during early Drosophila embryogenesis, a necessary basis for a detailed delineation of their function in embryogenesis and other biological processes.

  16. Functional Analysis of the Short Isoform of Orf Virus Protein OV20.0

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yeu-Yang; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Cheng, Sun-Fang; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Chou, Chia-Chi; Liu, Ya-Fen; Chang, Wei-Shan; Wong, Min-Liang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Orf virus (ORFV) OV20.0L is an ortholog of vaccinia virus (VACV) gene E3L. The function of VACV E3 protein as a virulence factor is well studied, but OV20.0 has received less attention. Here we show that like VACV E3L, OV20.0L encodes two proteins, a full-length protein and a shorter form (sh20). The shorter sh20 is an N-terminally truncated OV20.0 isoform generated when a downstream AUG codon is used for initiating translation. These isoforms differed in cellular localization, with full-length OV20.0 and sh20 found throughout the cell and predominantly in the cytoplasm, respectively. Nonetheless, both OV20.0 isoforms were able to bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) and dsRNA. Moreover, both isoforms strongly inhibited PKR activation as shown by decreased phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α subunit and protection of Sindbis virus infection against the activity of interferon (IFN). In spite of this apparent conservation of function in vitro, a recombinant ORFV that was able to express only the sh20 isoform was attenuated in a mouse model. IMPORTANCE The OV20.0 protein of orf virus (ORFV) has two isoforms and contributes to virulence, but the roles of the two forms are not known. This study shows that the shorter isoform (sh20) arises due to use of a downstream initiation codon and is amino-terminally truncated. The sh20 form also differs in expression kinetics and cellular localization from full-length OV20.0. Similar to the full-length isoform, sh20 is able to bind dsRNA and PKR, inactivate PKR, and thus act as an antagonist of the interferon response in vitro. In vivo, however, wild-type OV20.0 could not be replaced with sh20 alone without a loss of virulence, suggesting that the functions of the isoforms are not simply redundant. PMID:25694596

  17. Key Role of the Adenylate Moiety and Integrity of the Adenylate-Binding Site for the NAD(+)/H Binding to Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Calogero, Alessandra Maria; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein with pro-life and pro-death activities, which plays critical roles in mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent apoptosis. Defects in AIF structure or expression can cause mitochondrial abnormalities leading to mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration. The mechanism of AIF-induced apoptosis was extensively investigated, whereas the mitochondrial function of AIF is poorly understood. A unique feature of AIF is the ability to form a tight, air-stable charge-transfer (CT) complex upon reaction with NADH and to undergo a conformational switch leading to dimerization, proposed to be important for its vital and lethal functions. Although some aspects of interaction of AIF with NAD(+)/H have been analyzed, its precise mechanism is not fully understood. We investigated how the oxidized and photoreduced wild-type and G307A and -E variants of murine AIF associate with NAD(+)/H and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN(+)/H) to determine the role of the adenylate moiety in the binding process. Our results indicate that (i) the adenylate moiety of NAD(+)/H is crucial for the association with AIF and for the subsequent structural reorganization of the complex, but not for protein dimerization, (ii) FAD reduction rather than binding of NAD(+)/H to AIF initiates conformational rearrangement, and (iii) alteration of the adenylate-binding site by the G307E (equivalent to a pathological G308E mutation in human AIF) or G307A replacements decrease the affinity and association rate of NAD(+)/H, which, in turn, perturbs CT complex formation and protein dimerization but has no influence on the conformational switch in the regulatory peptide.

  18. Smad phospho-isoforms direct context-dependent TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Better understanding of TGF-β signaling has deepened our appreciation of normal epithelial cell homeostasis and its dysfunction in such human disorders as cancer and fibrosis. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, possess intermediate linker regions connecting Mad homology domains. Membrane-bound, cytoplasmic, and nuclear protein kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create C-tail (C), the linker (L), or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p, phospho-) isoforms. According to domain-specific phosphorylation, distinct transcriptional responses, and selective metabolism, Smad phospho-isoform pathways can be grouped into 4 types: cytostatic pSmad3C signaling, mitogenic pSmad3L (Ser-213) signaling, invasive/fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C or pSmad3L (Ser-204)/C signaling, and mitogenic/migratory pSmad2/3L (Thr-220/179)/C signaling. We outline how responses to TGF-β change through the multiple Smad phospho-isoforms as normal epithelial cells mature from stem cells through progenitors to differentiated cells, and further reflect upon how constitutive Ras-activating mutants favor the Smad phospho-isoform pathway promoting tumor progression. Finally, clinical analyses of reversible Smad phospho-isoform signaling during human carcinogenesis could assess effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing human cancer risk. Spatiotemporally separate, functionally different Smad phospho-isoforms have been identified in specific cells and tissues, answering long-standing questions about context-dependent TGF-β signaling.

  19. Membrane-associated Ras dimers are isoform-specific: K-Ras dimers differ from H-Ras dimers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunbum; Muratcioglu, Serena; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-06-15

    Are the dimer structures of active Ras isoforms similar? This question is significant since Ras can activate its effectors as a monomer; however, as a dimer, it promotes Raf's activation and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cell signalling. In the present study, we model possible catalytic domain dimer interfaces of membrane-anchored GTP-bound K-Ras4B and H-Ras, and compare their conformations. The active helical dimers formed by the allosteric lobe are isoform-specific: K-Ras4B-GTP favours the α3 and α4 interface; H-Ras-GTP favours α4 and α5. Both isoforms also populate a stable β-sheet dimer interface formed by the effector lobe; a less stable β-sandwich interface is sustained by salt bridges of the β-sheet side chains. Raf's high-affinity β-sheet interaction is promoted by the active helical interface. Collectively, Ras isoforms' dimer conformations are not uniform; instead, the isoform-specific dimers reflect the favoured interactions of the HVRs (hypervariable regions) with cell membrane microdomains, biasing the effector-binding site orientations, thus isoform binding selectivity.

  20. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  1. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-07

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes.

  2. Enhancement of adenylate cyclase activity by phorbol ester: effects on the inhibitory pathway in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-05-01

    12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances the apparent V/sub max/ of adenylate cyclase (AC) in S49 lymphoma cells. This effect does not result from an increased rate of activation of the catalytic subunit by the stimulatory GTP binding transducer protein (G/sub s/). In wild type (WT) membranes this enhancement seems to involve a GTP binding protein since TPA enhances forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 30% in the presence of GTP (10 ..mu..M) or Gpp(NH)p (1 ..mu..M) but not in the absence of guanine nucleotide. The authors obtain comparable results in the cyc- variant that lacks the GTP binding subunit of G/sub s/ responsible for stimulating AC, suggesting the importance of a different GTP binding protein. Blockade of the activity of the inhibitory GTP binding protein (G/sub i/) by high concentrations of Mg/sup + +/ (approx.100 mM) or Mn/sup + +/ (approx.1 mM) abolishes the effect of TPA to enhance AC activity in WT membranes. The time course of Gpp(NH)p-mediated inhibition of AC reveals a characteristic lag prior to steady state, indicative of the rate of G/sub i/ activation; TPA increases this lag 3-4 fold. The authors conclude that reduction in the rate of activation of G/sub i/ by guanine nucleotide is one mechanism by which phorbol esters enhance guanine nucleotide-dependent activity of AC, hypothetically via the phosphorylation of G/sub i/ by protein kinase C.

  3. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  4. The binding mode of human nucleoside diphosphate kinase B to single-strand DNA.

    PubMed

    Agou, F; Raveh, S; Véron, M

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction of the human isoform B of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDP kinase B) with the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) present in the promoter element of the c-myc oncogene. The DNA-binding properties of NDP kinase B and other NDP kinases are compared and the nucleotide requirement for binding are discussed. Using quantitative methods, we identified the DNA-binding sites on the protein and we proposed a structural model for a complex of one hexameric NDP kinase B with an oligonucleotide.

  5. Isoform specificity of the Na/K-ATPase association and regulation by phospholemman.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, Julie; Despa, Sanda; Han, Fei; Hou, Zhanjia; Robia, Seth L; Lingrel, Jerry B; Bers, Donald M

    2009-09-25

    Phospholemman (PLM) phosphorylation mediates enhanced Na/K-ATPase (NKA) function during adrenergic stimulation of the heart. Multiple NKA isoforms exist, and their function/regulation may differ. We combined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and functional measurements to investigate isoform specificity of the NKA-PLM interaction. FRET was measured as the increase in the donor fluorescence (CFP-NKA-alpha1 or CFP-NKA-alpha2) during progressive acceptor (PLM-YFP) photobleach in HEK-293 cells. Both pairs exhibited robust FRET (maximum of 23.6 +/- 3.4% for NKA-alpha1 and 27.5 +/- 2.5% for NKA-alpha2). Donor fluorescence depended linearly on acceptor fluorescence, indicating a 1:1 PLM:NKA stoichiometry for both isoforms. PLM phosphorylation induced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C activation drastically reduced the FRET with both NKA isoforms. However, submaximal cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation had less effect on PLM-NKA-alpha2 versus PLM-NKA-alpha1. Surprisingly, ouabain virtually abolished NKA-PLM FRET but only partially reduced co-immunoprecipitation. PLM-CFP also showed FRET to PLM-YFP, but the relationship during progressive photobleach was highly nonlinear, indicating oligomers involving >or=3 monomers. Using cardiac myocytes from wild-type mice and mice where NKA-alpha1 is ouabain-sensitive and NKA-alpha2 is ouabain-resistant, we assessed the effects of PLM phosphorylation on NKA-alpha1 and NKA-alpha2 function. Isoproterenol enhanced internal Na(+) affinity of both isoforms (K((1/2)) decreased from 18.1 +/- 2.0 to 11.5 +/- 1.9 mm for NKA-alpha1 and from 16.4 +/- 2.5 to 10.4 +/- 1.5 mm for NKA-alpha2) without altering maximum transport rate (V(max)). Protein kinase C activation also decreased K((1/2)) for both NKA-alpha1 and NKA-alpha2 (to 9.4 +/- 1.0 and 9.1 +/- 1.1 mm, respectively) but increased V(max) only for NKA-alpha2 (1.9 +/- 0.4 versus 1.2 +/- 0.5 mm/min). In conclusion, PLM associates with and modulates both NKA

  6. Influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic receptor adenylate cyclase coupling in brain and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, the influence of four volatile anesthetics (enflurane, isoflurane, diethyl ether, and chloroform) on (1) muscarinic receptor binding parameters and (2) muscarnic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity was examined using membranes isolated from rat brain and heart. Membranes were equilibrated with each of the four anesthetics for 30 minutes and then during the binding assay. The data obtained can be summarized as follows: (1) volatile anesthetics increased receptor affinity for a radiolabeled antagonists, ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)MS), by decreasing its rate of dissociation in brain stem, but not in cardiac, membranes, (2) volatile anesthetics decreased high affinity ({sup 3}H)Oxotremorine-M binding, (3) volatile anesthetics depressed or eliminated the guanine nucleotide sensitivity of agonist binding. The influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic regulation of adenylate cyclase enzyme activity was studied using {alpha}({sup 32}P)ATP as the substrate.

  7. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  8. A SPAK isoform switch modulates renal salt transport and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, James A.; Mutig, Kerim; Nelson, Joshua H.; Saritas, Turgay; Hoorn, Ewout J.; Yang, Chao-Ling; Rogers, Shaunessy; Curry, Joshua; Delpire, Eric; Bachmann, Sebastian; Ellison, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The renal thick ascending limb (TAL) and distal convoluted tubule (DCT) play central roles in salt homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. An emerging model suggests that bumetanide and thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporters (NKCC2 and NCC) along these segments are phosphorylated and activated by WNK kinases, via SPAK and OSR1. Here, we show that a kidney-specific SPAK isoform, which lacks the kinase domain, inhibits phosphorylation of NCC and NKCC2 by full-length SPAK, in vitro. Kidney-specific SPAK is highly expressed along the TAL, whereas full-length SPAK is more highly expressed along the DCT. As predicted from the differential expression, SPAK knockout in animals has divergent effects along TAL and DCT, with increased phosphorylated NKCC2 along TAL and decreased phosphorylated NCC along DCT. In mice, extracellular fluid volume depletion shifts SPAK isoform abundance to favor NaCl retention along both segments, indicating that a SPAK isoform switch modulates sodium avidity along the distal nephron. PMID:21907141

  9. Loss of Functionally Redundant p38 Isoforms in T Cells Enhances Regulatory T Cell Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Morisada; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Petrova, Tsvetana; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Jiménez-Andrade, Guillermina Yanek; Sano, Yasuyo; Choo, Min-Kyung; Seavitt, John; Venigalla, Ram K. C.; Otsu, Kinya; Georgopoulos, Katia; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Park, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein kinase p38 mediates innate resistance to environmental stress and microbial infection. Four p38 isoforms exist in mammals and may have been co-opted for new roles in adaptive immunity. Murine T cells deficient in p38α, the ubiquitously expressed p38 isoform, showed no readily apparent cell-autonomous defects while expressing elevated amounts of another isoform, p38β. Mice with T cells simultaneously lacking p38α and p38β displayed lymphoid atrophy and elevated Foxp3+ regulatory T cell frequencies. Double deficiency of p38α and p38β in naïve CD4+ T cells resulted in an attenuation of MAPK-activated protein kinase (MK)-dependent mTOR signaling after T cell receptor engagement, and enhanced their differentiation into regulatory T cells under appropriate inducing conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of the p38-MK-mTOR signaling module produced similar effects, revealing potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:28011639

  10. Characterization of endogenous human promyelocytic leukemia isoforms.

    PubMed

    Condemine, Wilfried; Takahashi, Yuki; Zhu, Jun; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Guegan, Sarah; Janin, Anne; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) has been implicated in a variety of functions, including control of TP53 function and modulation of cellular senescence. Sumolated PML is the organizer of mature PML bodies, recruiting a variety of proteins onto these nuclear domains. The PML gene is predicted to encode a variety of protein isoforms. Overexpression of only one of them, PML-IV, promotes senescence in human diploid fibroblasts, whereas PML-III was proposed to specifically interact with the centrosome. We show that all PML isoform proteins are expressed in cell lines or primary cells. Unexpectedly, we found that PML-III, PML-IV, and PML-V are quantitatively minor isoforms compared with PML-I/II and could not confirm the centrosomal targeting of PML-III. Stable expression of each isoform, in a pml-null background, yields distinct subcellular localization patterns, suggesting that, like in other RBCC/TRIM proteins, the COOH-terminal domains of PML are involved in interactions with specific cellular components. Only the isoform-specific sequences of PML-I and PML-V are highly conserved between man and mouse. That PML-I contains all conserved exons and is more abundantly expressed than PML-IV suggests that it is a critical contributor to PML function(s).

  11. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  12. Regulation of NKCC2 activity by inhibitory SPAK isoforms: KS-SPAK is a more potent inhibitor than SPAK2

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae J.; Curry, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    The cation cotransporters Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter 1 and 2 (NKCC1 and NKCC2) and Na+-Cl cotransporter (NCC) are phosphorylated and activated by the kinases Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and oxidative stress-responsive kinase (OSR1), and their targeted disruption in mice causes phenotypes resembling the human disorders Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome, reflecting reduced NKCC2 and NCC activity, respectively. We previously cloned a kinase-inactive kidney-specific SPAK isoform, kidney-specific (KS)-SPAK, which lacks the majority of the kinase domain present in full-length SPAK. Another putative inactive SPAK isoform, SPAK2, which only lacks the initial portion of the kinase domain, is also highly expressed in kidney. The functional relevance of inactive SPAK isoforms is unclear. Here, we tested whether KS-SPAK and SPAK2 differentially affect cation cotransporter activity. While KS-SPAK and SPAK2 both strongly inhibited NKCC1 activity, SPAK2 was a much weaker inhibitor of NKCC2 activity. Removal of the catalytic loop from SPAK2 resulted in an inhibitory effect on NKCC2 similar to that of KS-SPAK. Full-length SPAK is phosphorylated and activated by members of the with-no-lysine[K] (WNK) kinase family. Mutation of a WNK phosphorylation in KS-SPAK did not alter its ability to inhibit NKCC2 activity. In contrast, we found that residues involved in KS-SPAK interactions with cation cotransporters are required for it to inhibit cotransporter activity. Finally, both KS-SPAK and SPAK2 associated with NKCC2, as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation. Together, these data identify the structural basis for the differential effects of KS-SPAK and SPAK2 on cation cotransporter activity that may be physiologically important. PMID:24133122

  13. Identification of kinases, phosphatases, and phosphorylation sites in human and porcine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Brett R; Gray, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Multiple inter-connected signaling pathways, involving kinases and phosphatases, form a framework that controls sperm motility, function, and fertilizing ability. Methods that give a broad view of the proteomic landscape may prove valuable in uncovering new crosstalk connections, as well as in discovering new proteins within this regulatory framework. A multi-immunoblotting strategy was utilized to evaluate this concept on human and porcine spermatozoa samples. In human and porcine spermatozoa, a diversity of kinases were identified including protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase B (PKB), isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), calmodulin-dependent kinases (CAMK), casein kinase (CK), and isoforms of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3). Several phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase (PP)-1, PP2A, PP2C, and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (MKP-1), were identified in human spermatozoa. The phosphorylation epitopes recognized belonged to members of the MAPK family, in addition to α and β isoforms of GSK3 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Proteomic approaches that allow a broad view may aid in understanding the crosstalk between signaling systems in spermatozoal physiology.

  14. Integrated exome and transcriptome sequencing reveals ZAK isoform usage in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; McCleland, Mark; Stawiski, Eric W.; Gnad, Florian; Mayba, Oleg; Haverty, Peter M.; Durinck, Steffen; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Klijn, Christiaan; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Lawrence, Michael; Liu, Hanbin; Wan, Yinan; Chopra, Vivek; Yaylaoglu, Murat B.; Yuan, Wenlin; Ha, Connie; Gilbert, Houston N.; Reeder, Jens; Pau, Gregoire; Stinson, Jeremy; Stern, Howard M.; Manning, Gerard; Wu, Thomas D.; Neve, Richard M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Firestein, Ron; Zhang, Zemin

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, yet the underlying genomic alterations remain poorly understood. Here we perform exome and transcriptome sequencing and SNP array assays to characterize 51 primary gastric tumours and 32 cell lines. Meta-analysis of exome data and previously published data sets reveals 24 significantly mutated genes in microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours and 16 in microsatellite instable (MSI) tumours. Over half the patients in our collection could potentially benefit from targeted therapies. We identify 55 splice site mutations accompanied by aberrant splicing products, in addition to mutation-independent differential isoform usage in tumours. ZAK kinase isoform TV1 is preferentially upregulated in gastric tumours and cell lines relative to normal samples. This pattern is also observed in colorectal, bladder and breast cancers. Overexpression of this particular isoform activates multiple cancer-related transcription factor reporters, while depletion of ZAK in gastric cell lines inhibits proliferation. These results reveal the spectrum of genomic and transcriptomic alterations in gastric cancer, and identify isoform-specific oncogenic properties of ZAK. PMID:24807215

  15. Opposing functions of TFII-I spliced isoforms in growth factor-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hakre, Shweta; Tussie-Luna, María Isabel; Ashworth, Todd; Novina, Carl D; Settleman, Jeffrey; Sharp, Phillip A; Roy, Ananda L

    2006-10-20

    Multifunctional transcription factor TFII-I has two spliced isoforms (Delta and beta) in murine fibroblasts. Here we show that these isoforms have distinct subcellular localization and mutually exclusive transcription functions in the context of growth factor signaling. In the absence of signaling, TFII-Ibeta is nuclear and recruited to the c-fos promoter in vivo. But upon growth factor stimulation, the promoter recruitment is abolished and it is exported out of the nucleus. Moreover, isoform-specific silencing of TFII-Ibeta results in transcriptional activation of the c-fos gene. In contrast, TFII-IDelta is largely cytoplasmic in the resting state but translocates to the nucleus upon growth factor signaling, undergoes signal-induced recruitment to the same site on the c-fos promoter, and activates the gene. Importantly, activated TFII-IDelta interacts with Erk1/2 (MAPK) kinase in the cell cytoplasm and imports the Erk1/2 to the nucleus, thereby transducing growth factor signaling. Our results identify a unique growth factor signaling pathway controlled by opposing activities of two TFII-I spliced isoforms.

  16. Design of isoform-selective phospholipase D inhibitors that modulate cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A; Selvy, Paige E; Buck, Jason R; Cho, Hyekyung P; Criswell, Tracy L; Thomas, Ashley L; Armstrong, Michelle D; Arteaga, Carlos L; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an essential enzyme responsible for the production of the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid participates in both G protein-coupled receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction networks. The lack of potent and isoform-selective inhibitors has limited progress in defining the cellular roles of PLD. We used a diversity-oriented synthetic approach and developed a library of PLD inhibitors with considerable pharmacological characterization. Here we report the rigorous evaluation of that library, which contains highly potent inhibitors, including the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors. Specific members of this series inhibit isoforms with > 100-fold selectivity both in vitro and in cells. A subset of inhibitors was shown to block invasiveness in metastatic breast cancer models. These findings demonstrate the power of diversity-oriented synthesis combined with biochemical assays and mass spectrometric lipid profiling of cellular responses to develop the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors—a new class of antimetastatic agents. PMID:19136975

  17. CGX1037 is a novel PKC isoform delta selective inhibitor in platelets.

    PubMed

    Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Kostyak, John C; Swindle, John; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Platelets upon activation change their shape, aggregate and secrete alpha and dense granule contents among which ADP acts as a feedback activator. Different Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms have specific non-redundant roles in mediating platelet responses including secretion and thrombus formation. Murine platelets lacking specific PKC isoforms have been used to evaluate the isoform specific functions. Novel PKC isoform δ has been shown to play an important role in some pathological processes. Lack of specific inhibitors for PKCδ has restricted analysis of its role in various cells. The current study was carried out to evaluate a novel small molecule PKCδ inhibitor, CGX1037 in platelets. Platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and western blotting experiments were performed to evaluate CGX1037. In human platelets, CGX1037 inhibited PAR4-mediated phosphorylation on PKD2, a PKCδ-specific substrate. Pre-treatment of human or murine platelets with CGX1037 inhibited PAR4-mediated dense granule secretion whereas it potentiated GPVI-mediated dense granule secretion similar to the responses observed in murine platelets lacking PKCδ· Furthermore, pre-treatment of platelets from PKCδ(-/-) mice with CGX1037 had no significant additive effect on platelet responses suggesting the specificity of CGX1037. Hence, we show that CGX1037 is a selective small molecule inhibitor of PKCδ in platelets.

  18. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions.

  19. Regulation of the viability of Nf1 deficient cells by PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Ling; Parris, Toshima; Huang, Junchi; Yi, Bo; Helou, Khalil; Chen, Changyan

    2014-11-15

    Suppression of protein kinase C (PKC) is known to be synthetically lethal with ras mutations in various types of cancer cells. The studies also showed that blockade of PKC affected the viability of Nf1 deficient cells. Since PKC family consists of more than 10 isoforms, our study aimed at identifying which isoform(s) played the crucial role in sensitizing Nf1 deficient cells to apoptosis. Using genetic and chemical PKC inhibitors, we demonstrated that the concurrent inhibition of PKC α and β induced Nf1 deficient ST or 96.2 cells, but not SNF02.2 cells with a normal Nf1 or ST cells ectopically expressing Nf1 effective domain gene, to apoptosis. In this process, PKC δ in Nf1 deficient cells, but not in ST/Nf1 cells, was upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. Furthermore, caspase 3 was cleaved and cytochrome c was released to the cytosol. Thus, it appeared that PKC δ and α/β are the crucial components for sustaining the aberrant Ras signaling and further viability of Nf1 deficient cells. The abrogation of these two isoforms activated their opponent PKC δ for switching on the caspase 3-governed apoptotic machinery.

  20. Adenylate cyclase and the search for new compounds with the clinical profile of lithium.

    PubMed

    Belmaker, R H

    1984-01-01

    It is possible to evaluate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex in the human periphery by measuring the plasma cyclic AMP rise after adrenergic agonists. A clinical trial of the beta 2 adrenergic agonist salbutamol in depression provided an opportunity to test whether adrenergic receptor subsensitivity does occur during clinical antidepressant treatment. After 1 and 3 weeks of oral salbutamol treatment, depression scores declined significantly in 11 depressed patients, while the plasma cyclic AMP response to i.v. salbutamol declined over 60%. The results support the concept that receptor sensitivity changes occur during human antidepressant therapy. Data are presented that Li, too, markedly reduces activity of beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase in humans. The effect was evaluated by studying the effect of Li at therapeutic serum concentrations on the plasma cyclic AMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine. The Li effect is specific, since the plasma cyclic AMP response to glucagon is not inhibited. In rat cortical slices Li inhibition of noradrenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation is clearly demonstrable only at concentrations close to 2 mM Li. However, fresh human brain slices from edges of surgically-removed tumors show Li inhibition at 1 mM Li concentrations. These results imply that in brain as well as periphery, human noradrenergic adenylate cyclase is inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of Li. Demeclocyclin, a tetracycline-derived antibiotic, was found to inhibit noradrenaline-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat cortical slices and to inhibit amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats in an open field. Clinical trials should search for new compounds with the clinical profile of Li.

  1. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  2. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  3. Redundancy in the World of MAP Kinases: All for One

    PubMed Central

    Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Frémin, Christophe; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector components of the prototypical ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and is essential for embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. ERK1 and ERK2 homologs share similar biochemical properties but whether they exert specific physiological functions or act redundantly has been a matter of controversy. However, recent studies now provide compelling evidence in support of functionally redundant roles of ERK1 and ERK2 in embryonic development and physiology. In this review, we present a critical assessment of the evidence for the functional specificity or redundancy of MAP kinase isoforms. We focus on the ERK1/ERK2 pathway but also discuss the case of JNK and p38 isoforms. PMID:27446918

  4. Adenylate Cyclase Activity Not Found in Soybean Hypocotyl and Onion Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yunghans, Wayne N.; Morré, D. James

    1977-01-01

    Tissue, homogenates, and purified cell fractions prepared from hypocotyls of a dicot, soybean (Glycine max), and meristematic tissue of a monocot, onion (Allium cepa), were examined critically for evidence of adenylate cyclase activity. Three assay methods were used: chemical analysis, isotope dilution analysis, and enzyme cytochemistry. In both crude extracts or whole tissue, as well as purified membranes, with or without auxin, no adenylate cyclase was detected by any of the three methods. For plasma membranes, the specific activity was less than 1/40 or 1/25,000 that of rat liver plasma membranes, depending on the assay procedure, i.e. below the limits of detection. Using comparable methods, we could detect neither cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate nor the phosphodiesterase responsible for its degradation in either purified membranes or homogenates. The results suggest that hormone responses in plants are not generally mediated by a mechanism involving the obligate production of cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate by a plasma membrane associated adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:16660026

  5. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  6. Relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase inhibition in the rabbit myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.

    1985-11-01

    The muscarinic receptor-binding properties of a series of muscarinic drugs were compared with their effects on adenylate cyclase in membranes of the rabbit myocardium. When measured by competitive inhibition of (TH)-N-methylscopolamine binding, the competition curves of the various agonists were adequately described by the ternary complex model. This model assumes that the receptor can bind reversibly with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the membrane and that the affinity of the agonist for the receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein complex is higher than that for the free receptor. A satisfactory fit of the ternary complex model to the data could only be achieved assuming that very little receptor is precoupled with the guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the absence of agonist. There was good agreement between the efficacy of each agonist as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the estimate of the positive cooperativity between the binding of the agonist receptor complex and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (0.1 mM) had no significant effect on the binding of (TH)N-methylscopolamine but caused an increase in the concentration of the various agonists required for half-maximal receptor occupancy. There was good correlation between efficacy as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the influence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate on binding properties.

  7. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  8. Persistent stimulation of adenylate cyclase and urea transport by an AVP photolabel

    SciTech Connect

    Eggena, P.; Ma, C.L.; Fahrenholz, F.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a photoaffinity label for arginine vasopressin receptors, (Phe2, Phe(p-N3)3)AVP (N3-AVP), on urea permeability and adenylate cyclase activity have been investigated in the toad urinary bladder. This compound, when activated by ultraviolet light, induced a maximal and persistent increase in the urea permeability of the intact bladder and a persistent increase in the adenylate cyclase activity of toad bladder epithelial cell homogenates. Covalent attachment of the analogue to target tissue during photolysis was equivalent at 4 and 20 degrees C. Bladders exposed to N3-AVP in the presence of AVP during photolysis were substantially less permeable to urea than controls that had been exposed to N3-AVP alone. These findings constitute further evidence in support of the previous suggestion that N3-AVP binds covalently to AVP receptors and, in addition, demonstrates that N3-AVP evokes a persistent increase in adenylate cyclase activity which, in turn, triggers a persistent increase in bladder permeability to urea.

  9. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  10. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Daniel; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis. PMID:28144348

  11. Myosin isoforms in female human detrusor.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, M P; Manaves, V; Martin, A F; Shott, S; Brubaker, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document the relative proportions of two isoforms of myosin heavy chain in detrusor smooth muscle of women with detrusor overactivity and in asymptomatic controls. Women aged 35-65 with documented detrusor overactivity and without a history of neurologic disease, prior incontinence surgery, elevated post-void residual urine volume, or indwelling urinary catheter were eligible for the study. Full-thickness biopsies of extraperitoneal bladder dome were obtained at the time of laparotomy in six patients with documented detrusor overactivity and in a control group of eight continent patients. Biopsies were frozen in liquid nitrogen, crushed with a frozen mortar and pestle at -80 degrees C, and homogenized in buffer, and the extracts were electrophoresed on 6% polyacrylamide sodium dodecyl sulfate gels and stained with Coomassie blue. The gels were de-stained and then the protein bands were scanned with a densitometer. The mean patient age was 48 years (range, 36-59). Seven patients were Caucasian and seven patients were African American. Detrusor smooth muscle contains a mean of 34% (range, 27-43%) SM1 and 66% (range, 57-73%) SM2 isoforms. There was no difference in isoform composition when patients were compared according to urogynecologic diagnosis or according to race. In detrusor biopsies from women, approximately 34% of myosin is of the SM1 isoform and approximately 66% is of the SM2 isoform. This ratio is relatively constant in the two races studied and unchanged in women with detrusor overactivity. Animal models utilizing outlet obstruction of the bladder to provoke detrusor instability and detrusor hypertrophy are known to alter myosin isoform distribution and may not be appropriate models of detrusor instability in human females.

  12. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  13. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  14. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase via protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Koji; Cao, Xia; Yamauchi, Masako; Kozaki, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kambe, Fukushi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated possible involvement of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). When osteoblastic MG63 cells were cultured in serum-deprived media, Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK alpha-subunit was markedly increased. Treatment of the cells with PGE2 significantly reduced the phosphorylation. Ser-79 phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct target for AMPK, was also reduced by PGE2. On the other hand, PGE2 reciprocally increased Ser-485 phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit that could be associated with inhibition of AMPK activity. These effects of PGE2 were mimicked by PGE2 receptor EP2 and EP4 agonists and forskolin, but not by EP1 and EP3 agonists, and the effects were suppressed by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Additionally, the PGE2 effects were duplicated in primary calvarial osteoblasts. Together, the present study demonstrates that PGE2 negatively regulates AMPK activity via activation of protein kinase A signaling pathway.

  17. Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Kang, Seong A.; Gestaut, Daniel R.; Graczyk, Beth; Davis, Trisha N.; Sabatini, David M.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, we demonstrate the separations of protein complex isoforms of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 and 2) and the subcomplexes and different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex. The high efficiency capillary isoelectric focusing separation allowed for resolution of protein complexes and subcomplexes similar in size and biochemical composition. By performing separations with native buffers and reduced temperature (15°C) we were able to maintain the complex integrity of the more thermolabile mTORC2 during isoelectric focusing and detection (< 45 min). Increasing the separation temperature allowed us to monitor dissociation of the Dam1 complex into its subcomplexes (25°C) and eventually its individual protein components (30°C). The separation of two different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex, generated from an in vitro kinase assay with Mps1 kinase, was straightforward due to the large pI shift upon multiple phosphorylation events. The separation of the protein complex isoforms of mTORC, on the other hand, required the addition of a small pI range (4 – 6.5) of ampholytes to improve resolution and stability of the complexes. We show that native capillary isoelectric focusing is a powerful method for the difficult separations of large, similar, unstable protein complexes. This method shows potential for differentiation of protein complex isoform and subcomplex compositions, post-translational modifications, architectures, stabilities, equilibria, and relative abundances under biologically relevant conditions. PMID:20614870

  18. Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes.

    PubMed

    Fonslow, Bryan R; Kang, Seong A; Gestaut, Daniel R; Graczyk, Beth; Davis, Trisha N; Sabatini, David M; Yates, John R

    2010-08-01

    Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, we demonstrate the separations of protein complex isoforms of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 and 2) and the subcomplexes and different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex. The high efficiency capillary isoelectric focusing separation allowed for resolution of protein complexes and subcomplexes similar in size and biochemical composition. By performing separations with native buffers and reduced temperature (15 degrees C) we were able to maintain the complex integrity of the more thermolabile mTORC2 during isoelectric focusing and detection (<45 min). Increasing the separation temperature allowed us to monitor dissociation of the Dam1 complex into its subcomplexes (25 degrees C) and eventually its individual protein components (30 degrees C). The separation of two different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex, generated from an in vitro kinase assay with Mps1 kinase, was straightforward due to the large pI shift upon multiple phosphorylation events. The separation of the protein complex isoforms of mTORC, on the other hand, required the addition of a small pI range (4-6.5) of ampholytes to improve resolution and stability of the complexes. We show that native capillary isoelectric focusing is a powerful method for the difficult separations of large, similar, unstable protein complexes. This method shows potential for differentiation of protein complex isoform and subcomplex compositions, post-translational modifications, architectures, stabilities, equilibria, and relative abundances under biologically relevant conditions.

  19. Isoform-selective disruption of AKAP-localized PKA using hydrocarbon stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiao; Ho, Tienhuei G; Bertinetti, Daniela; Neddermann, Matthias; Franz, Eugen; Mo, Gary C H; Schendowich, Lewis P; Sukhu, Avinash; Spelts, Raybun C; Zhang, Jin; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kennedy, Eileen J

    2014-03-21

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) play an important role in the spatial and temporal regulation of protein kinase A (PKA) by scaffolding critical intracellular signaling complexes. Here we report the design of conformationally constrained peptides that disrupt interactions between PKA and AKAPs in an isoform-selective manner. Peptides derived from the A Kinase Binding (AKB) domain of several AKAPs were chemically modified to contain an all-hydrocarbon staple and target the docking/dimerization domain of PKA-R, thereby occluding AKAP interactions. The peptides are cell-permeable against diverse human cell lines, are highly isoform-selective for PKA-RII, and can effectively inhibit interactions between AKAPs and PKA-RII in intact cells. These peptides can be applied as useful reagents in cell-based studies to selectively disrupt AKAP-localized PKA-RII activity and block AKAP signaling complexes. In summary, the novel hydrocarbon-stapled peptides developed in this study represent a new class of AKAP disruptors to study compartmentalized RII-regulated PKA signaling in cells.

  20. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  1. Structure and characterization of AAT-1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eiko; Ishizaki, Ray; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-05-01

    A novel protein, AAT-1, was identified as a AMY-1-binding protein and three splicing variants of AAT-1, AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma were identified. The function of AAT-1 is thought to be related to spermatogenesis. In this study, we further identified other splicing isoforms of AAT-1, AAT-1L, AAT-1M and AAT-1S, consisting of 767, 603 and 252 amino acids, respectively. These isoforms were found to use a promoter different from that used by AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma in the aat-1 gene, which contains 20 exons. Only 60 amino acids in the C-terminal portion of AAT-1 derived from exons 15-17 are common among AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S and AAT-1alpha. While AAT-1alpha is specifically expressed in the testis, AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S were found to be differentially expressed in human tissues. All of the isoforms of AAT-1 were found to bind to and colocalized with AMY-1 in human cells. While AAT-1L and AAT-1M were found to be localized diffusely in the cytoplasm, AAT-1S, like AAT-1alpha, was found to be localized in the mitochondria-like structure, suggesting different roles of AAT-1 isoforms in cells.

  2. Rho-Kinase in Development and Heart Failure: Insights From Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianjian; Zhang, Lumin; Wei, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) belongs to the AGC (protein kinase A/protein kinase G/protein kinase C, PKA/PKG/PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases and is a major downstream effector of small GTPase RhoA. Rho-kinase is involved in a wide range of fundamental cellular functions such as contraction, adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on the major common activators, the high degree of homology within the kinase domain, and studies from overexpression with kinase constructs and chemical inhibitors (e.g., Y27632 and fasudil), which inhibit both ROCK1 and ROCK2. Gene targeting and RNA interference approaches allow further dissection of distinct cellular, physiologic, and pathophysiologic functions of the two ROCK isoforms. This review focuses on the current understanding of ROCK isoform biology, with a particular emphasis on their functions in mouse development and the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:21327630

  3. Protein kinase d in the cardiovascular system: emerging roles in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Avkiran, Metin; Rowland, Alexandra J; Cuello, Friederike; Haworth, Robert S

    2008-02-01

    The protein kinase D (PKD) family is a recent addition to the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase group of serine/threonine kinases, within the protein kinase complement of the mammalian genome. Relative to their alphabetically superior cousins in the AGC group of kinases, namely the various isoforms of protein kinase A, protein kinase B/Akt, and protein kinase C, PKD family members have to date received limited attention from cardiovascular investigators. Nevertheless, increasing evidence now points toward important roles for PKD-mediated signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system, particularly in the regulation of myocardial contraction, hypertrophy and remodeling. This review provides a primer on PKD signaling, using information gained from studies in multiple cell types, and discusses recent data that suggest novel functions for PKD-mediated pathways in the heart and the circulation.

  4. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  5. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-06

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5' and 3' untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5' untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3' untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels.

  6. Effect of mitomycin C on the activation of adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1986-09-01

    Isoproterenol (IPN)-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure of AH130 cells to mitomycin C (MMC). The enhancement was also observed in prostaglandin E1-, guanine nucleotide analog-, NaF-, cholera toxin- and forskolin-stimulated activities of the enzyme but not in manganese-stimulated activity. In addition, even when the cells pretreated with islet-activating protein were exposed to MMC, IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced. Anaerobic exposure of AH130 cells to MMC somewhat inhibited IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase in contrast with aerobic exposure. Exposure of cells to adriamycin also caused enhancement of IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase but exposure to nitrogen mustard inhibited the enzyme stimulation by IPN. The enhancing effect of MMC was lost by the combined treatment with alpha-tocopherol. From these results, it was shown that MMC modulated the activity of adenylate cyclase, probably through alterations in membrane structure.

  7. Isoform-specific monoubiquitination, endocytosis, and degradation of alternatively spliced ErbB4 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Paatero, Ilkka; Gaudio, Eugenio; Melino, Gerry; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I; Elenius, Klaus

    2008-03-18

    Endocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation serve as a well characterized mechanism to fine-tune and down-regulate EGFR signaling. However, other members of the EGFR/ErbB receptor family have been reported to be endocytosis-impaired. Here we demonstrate that endocytosis of ErbB4 is regulated in an isoform-specific manner: CYT-1 isoforms were efficiently endocytosed whereas CYT-2 isoforms were endocytosis-impaired. CYT-1 isoforms in endocytic vesicles colocalized with Rab5 and Rab7 indicating trafficking via early endosomes to late endosomal/lysosomal structures. A PPXY motif within the CYT-1-specific sequence that lacks from CYT-2 was necessary both for ubiquitination and endocytosis of CYT-1 isoforms and provided a binding site for a WW domain-containing ubiquitin ligase Itch. Itch catalyzed ubiquitination of ErbB4 CYT-1, promoted its localization into intracellular vesicles, and stimulated degradation of ErbB4 CYT-1. Dominant negative Itch suppressed ErbB4 CYT-1 endocytosis and degradation. These data indicate that ErbB4 isoforms differ in endocytosis and degradation by a mechanism mediated by CYT-1-specific PPXY motif interacting with a WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  8. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth DT; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP, resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23996525

  9. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  10. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  11. On the dynamics of the adenylate energy system: homeorhesis vs homeostasis.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M; Cortés, Jesús M; Valero, Edelmira; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim; Malaina, Iker; Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical energy is the fundamental element that maintains both the adequate turnover of the biomolecular structures and the functional metabolic viability of unicellular organisms. The levels of ATP, ADP and AMP reflect roughly the energetic status of the cell, and a precise ratio relating them was proposed by Atkinson as the adenylate energy charge (AEC). Under growth-phase conditions, cells maintain the AEC within narrow physiological values, despite extremely large fluctuations in the adenine nucleotides concentration. Intensive experimental studies have shown that these AEC values are preserved in a wide variety of organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Here, to understand some of the functional elements involved in the cellular energy status, we present a computational model conformed by some key essential parts of the adenylate energy system. Specifically, we have considered (I) the main synthesis process of ATP from ADP, (II) the main catalyzed phosphotransfer reaction for interconversion of ATP, ADP and AMP, (III) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP yielding ADP, and (IV) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP providing AMP. This leads to a dynamic metabolic model (with the form of a delayed differential system) in which the enzymatic rate equations and all the physiological kinetic parameters have been explicitly considered and experimentally tested in vitro. Our central hypothesis is that cells are characterized by changing energy dynamics (homeorhesis). The results show that the AEC presents stable transitions between steady states and periodic oscillations and, in agreement with experimental data these oscillations range within the narrow AEC window. Furthermore, the model shows sustained oscillations in the Gibbs free energy and in the total nucleotide pool. The present study provides a step forward towards the understanding of the fundamental principles and quantitative laws governing the adenylate energy system, which is a fundamental element for

  12. On the Dynamics of the Adenylate Energy System: Homeorhesis vs Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Valero, Edelmira; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim; Malaina, Iker; Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical energy is the fundamental element that maintains both the adequate turnover of the biomolecular structures and the functional metabolic viability of unicellular organisms. The levels of ATP, ADP and AMP reflect roughly the energetic status of the cell, and a precise ratio relating them was proposed by Atkinson as the adenylate energy charge (AEC). Under growth-phase conditions, cells maintain the AEC within narrow physiological values, despite extremely large fluctuations in the adenine nucleotides concentration. Intensive experimental studies have shown that these AEC values are preserved in a wide variety of organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Here, to understand some of the functional elements involved in the cellular energy status, we present a computational model conformed by some key essential parts of the adenylate energy system. Specifically, we have considered (I) the main synthesis process of ATP from ADP, (II) the main catalyzed phosphotransfer reaction for interconversion of ATP, ADP and AMP, (III) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP yielding ADP, and (IV) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP providing AMP. This leads to a dynamic metabolic model (with the form of a delayed differential system) in which the enzymatic rate equations and all the physiological kinetic parameters have been explicitly considered and experimentally tested in vitro. Our central hypothesis is that cells are characterized by changing energy dynamics (homeorhesis). The results show that the AEC presents stable transitions between steady states and periodic oscillations and, in agreement with experimental data these oscillations range within the narrow AEC window. Furthermore, the model shows sustained oscillations in the Gibbs free energy and in the total nucleotide pool. The present study provides a step forward towards the understanding of the fundamental principles and quantitative laws governing the adenylate energy system, which is a fundamental element for

  13. Hydroxamate-based colorimetric assay to assess amide bond formation by adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Hara, Ryotaro; Suzuki, Ryohei; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrated the usefulness of a hydroxamate-based colorimetric assay for predicting amide bond formation (through an aminoacyl-AMP intermediate) by the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases. By using a typical adenylation domain of tyrocidine synthetase (involved in tyrocidine biosynthesis), we confirmed the correlation between the absorbance at 490 nm of the l-Trp-hydroxamate-Fe(3+) complex and the formation of l-Trp-l-Pro, where l-Pro was used instead of hydroxylamine. Furthermore, this assay was adapted to the adenylation domains of surfactin synthetase (involved in surfactin biosynthesis) and bacitracin synthetase (involved in bacitracin biosynthesis). Consequently, the formation of various aminoacyl l-Pro formations was observed.

  14. Presence of hormonally-sensitive adenylate cyclase receptors in capillary-enriched fractions from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Baca, G M; Palmer, G C

    1978-01-01

    The 10 000 g particulate fraction from capillary-enriched fractions isolated from rat cerebral cortex was shown to possess an adenylate cyclase highly sensitive to activation by sodium fluoride, norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoproterenol and dopamine. To a lesser extent histamine and three dopamine agonists, namely M-7 (5,6-dihydroxy-2-dimethylamino tetralin), ET-495 (methane sulfonate of pyribedil), and S-584 (metabolite of pyribedil) stimulated the enzyme preparation. The action of norepinephrine was blocked by propanolol while phenotolamine and haloperidol were relatively ineffective except at highest concentrations. Phentolamine and propanolol at only highest concentrations (10(-4) M) antagonized the action of dopamine. Haloperidol was seen to be a potent inhibitor of either dopamine- or dopamine agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase. No effects on the enzyme were observed with methoxamine, octopamine or serotonin. These preliminary data suggest the presence of a mixed population of receptors for adenylate cyclase in rat brain capillaries.

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) dilates cerebellar arteries through activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive (K ATP) K (+) channels.

    PubMed

    Koide, Masayo; Syed, Arsalan U; Braas, Karen M; May, Victor; Wellman, George C

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent vasodilator of numerous vascular beds, including cerebral arteries. Although PACAP-induced cerebral artery dilation is suggested to be cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent, the downstream intracellular signaling pathways are still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the role of smooth muscle K(+) channels and hypothesized that PACAP-mediated increases in cAMP levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activity result in the coordinate activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels for cerebral artery dilation. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we observed that PACAP enhanced whole-cell KATP channel activity and transient BK channel currents in freshly isolated rat cerebellar artery myocytes. The increased frequency of transient BK currents following PACAP treatment is indicative of increased intracellular Ca(2+) release events termed Ca(2+) sparks. Consistent with the electrophysiology data, the PACAP-induced vasodilations of cannulated cerebellar artery preparations were attenuated by approximately 50 % in the presence of glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker) or paxilline (a BK channel blocker). Further, in the presence of both blockers, PACAP failed to cause vasodilation. In conclusion, our results indicate that PACAP causes cerebellar artery dilation through two mechanisms: (1) KATP channel activation and (2) enhanced BK channel activity, likely through increased Ca(2+) spark frequency.

  16. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R

    2011-11-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus-truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets.

  17. ROCK in CNS: Different Roles of Isoforms and Therapeutic Target for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ai, Nana; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is a serine-threonine kinase originally identified as a crucial regulator of actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have defined new functions of ROCK as a critical component of diverse signaling pathways in neurons. In addition, inhibition of ROCK causes several biological events such as increase of neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration, and activation of prosurvival Akt. Thus, it has attracted scientist's strong attentions and considered ROCK as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington';s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, ROCK has two highly homologous isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Accumulated evidences indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might involve in distinct cellular functions in central nervous system (CNS) and neurodegenerative processes. This review summarizes recent updates regarding ROCK isoformspecific functions in CNS and the progress of ROCK inhibitors in preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Analysis of protein isoforms: can we do it better?

    PubMed

    Stastna, Miroslava; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2012-10-01

    Protein isoforms/splice variants can play important roles in various biological processes and can potentially be used as biomarkers or therapeutic targets/mediators. Thus, there is a need for efficient and, importantly, accurate methods to distinguish and quantify specific protein isoforms. Since protein isoforms can share a high percentage of amino acid sequence homology and dramatically differ in their cellular concentration, the task for accuracy and efficiency in methodology and instrumentation is challenging. The analysis of intact proteins has been perceived to provide a more accurate and complete result for isoform identification/quantification in comparison to analysis of the corresponding peptides that arise from protein enzymatic digestion. Recently, novel approaches have been explored and developed that can possess the accuracy and reliability important for protein isoform differentiation and isoform-specific peptide targeting. In this review, we discuss the recent development in methodology and instrumentation for enhanced detection of protein isoforms as well as the examples of their biological importance.

  19. Structural Basis of Dscam Isoform Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Meijers,R.; Puettmann-Holgado, R.; Skiniotis, G.; Liu, J.; Walz, T.; Wang, J.; Schmucker, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Dscam gene gives rise to thousands of diverse cell surface receptors1 thought to provide homophilic and heterophilic recognition specificity for neuronal wiring and immune responses. Mutually exclusive splicing allows for the generation of sequence variability in three immunoglobulin ecto-domains, D2, D3 and D7. We report X-ray structures of the amino-terminal four immunoglobulin domains (D1-D4) of two distinct Dscam isoforms. The structures reveal a horseshoe configuration, with variable residues of D2 and D3 constituting two independent surface epitopes on either side of the receptor. Both isoforms engage in homo-dimerization coupling variable domain D2 with D2, and D3 with D3. These interactions involve symmetric, antiparallel pairing of identical peptide segments from epitope I that are unique to each isoform. Structure-guided mutagenesis and swapping of peptide segments confirm that epitope I, but not epitope II, confers homophilic binding specificity of full-length Dscam receptors. Phylogenetic analysis shows strong selection of matching peptide sequences only for epitope I. We propose that peptide complementarity of variable residues in epitope I of Dscam is essential for homophilic binding specificity.

  20. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Thomas, Chris M G; Wodzig, Will K W H; Olthaar, André J; Jaeken, Jaak; Sweep, Fred C G J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2011-04-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns of five classic galactosemia patients with POI were compared to the pattern obtained in two patients with a primary glycosylation disorder (phosphomannomutase-2-deficient congenital disorders of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG) and POI, and in five postmenopausal women as controls. We used FPLC chromatofocussing with measurement of FSH concentration per fraction, and discovered that there were no significant differences between galactosemia patients, PMM2-CDG patients and postmenopausal controls. Our results do not support that FSH dysfunction due to a less acidic isoform pattern because of hypoglycosylation is a key mechanism of POI in this disease.

  1. All Akt Isoforms (Akt1, Akt2, Akt3) Are Involved in Normal Hearing, but Only Akt2 and Akt3 Are Involved in Auditory Hair Cell Survival in the Mammalian Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Yves; Levano, Soledad; Radojevic, Vesna; Naldi, Arianne Monge; Setz, Cristian; Ryan, Allen F.; Pak, Kwang; Hemmings, Brian A.; Bodmer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The kinase Akt is a key downstream mediator of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathway and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Akt comprises three isoforms each encoded by a separate gene. There is evidence to indicate that Akt is involved in the survival and protection of auditory hair cells in vitro. However, little is known about the physiological role of Akt in the inner ear—especially in the intact animal. To elucidate this issue, we first analyzed the mRNA expression of the three Akt isoforms in the inner ear of C57/BL6 mice by real-time PCR. Next, we tested the susceptibility to gentamicin-induced auditory hair cell loss in isoform-specific Akt knockout mice compared to wild-types (C57/BL6) in vitro. To analyze the effect of gene deletion in vivo, hearing and cochlear microanatomy were evaluated in Akt isoform knockout animals. In this study, we found that all three Akt isoforms are expressed in the cochlea. Our results further indicate that Akt2 and Akt3 enhance hair cell resistance to ototoxicity, while Akt1 does not. Finally, we determined that untreated Akt1 and Akt2/Akt3 double knockout mice display significant hearing loss, indicating a role for these isoforms in normal hearing. Taken together, our results indicate that each of the Akt isoforms plays a distinct role in the mammalian inner ear. PMID:25811375

  2. Toxicity of Cry1A toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis to CF1 cells does not involve activation of adenylate cyclase/PKA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Leivi; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Martínez de Castro, Diana L; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce Cry toxins that are able to kill insect pests. Different models explaining the mode of action of these toxins have been proposed. The pore formation model proposes that the toxin creates pores in the membrane of the larval midgut cells after interaction with different receptors such as cadherin, aminopeptidase N and alkaline phosphatase and that this pore formation activity is responsible for the toxicity of these proteins. The alternative model proposes that interaction with cadherin receptor triggers an intracellular cascade response involving protein G, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, it was shown that Cry toxins induce a defense response in the larvae involving the activation of mitogen-activated kinases such as MAPK p38 in different insect orders. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins and a collection of mutants from these toxins in the insect cell line CF1 from Choristoneura fumiferana, that is naturally sensitive to these toxins. Our results show that both toxins induced permeability of K(+) ions into the cells. The initial response after intoxication with Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins involves the activation of a defense response that involves the phosphorylation of MAPK p38. Analysis of activation of PKA and AC activities indicated that the signal transduction involving PKA, AC and cAMP was not activated during Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac intoxication. In contrast we show that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activate apoptosis. These data indicate that Cry toxins can induce an apoptotic death response not related with AC/PKA activation. Since Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins affected K(+) ion permeability into the cells, and that mutant toxins affected in pore formation are not toxic to CF1, we propose that pore formation activity of the toxins is responsible of triggering cell death response in CF1cells.

  3. Phosphorylation and isoform use in p120-catenin during development and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Yeon; Oh, Il-Hoan; McCrea, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    P120-catenin is essential to vertebrate development, modulating cadherin and small-GTPase functions, and growing evidence points also to roles in the nucleus. A complexity in addressing p120-catenin’s functions is its many isoforms, including optional splicing events, alternative points of translational initiation, and secondary modifications. In this review, we focus upon how choices in the initiation of protein translation, or the earlier splicing of the RNA transcript, relates to primary sequences that harbor established or putative regulatory phosphorylation sites. While certain p120 phosphorylation events arise via known kinases/ phosphatases and have defined outcomes, in most cases the functional consequences are still to be established. In this review, we provide examples of p120-isoforms as they relate to phosphorylation events, and thereby to isoform dependent protein-protein associations and downstream functions. We also provide a view of upstream pathways that determine p120’s phosphorylation state, thereby having an impact upon development and disease. Because other members of the p120 subfamily undergo similar processing and phosphorylation, as well as related catenins of the plakophilin subfamily, what is learned regarding p120 will by extension have wide relevance in vertebrates. PMID:26477567

  4. 55K isoform of CDK9 associates with Ku70 and is involved in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongbing; Herrmann, Christine H.; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-06-25

    Positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a cellular protein kinase that is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional elongation of protein coding genes. P-TEFb is a set of different molecular complexes, each containing CDK9 as the catalytic subunit. There are two isoforms of the CDK9 protein - the major 42 KDa CDK9 isoform and the minor 55KDa isoform that is translated from an in-frame mRNA that arises from an upstream transcriptional start site. We found that shRNA depletion of the 55K CDK9 protein in HeLa cells induces apoptosis and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). The levels of apoptosis and DSBs induced by the depletion were reduced by expression of a 55K CDK9 protein variant resistant to the shRNA, indicating that these phenotypes are the consequence of depletion of the 55K protein and not off-target effects. We also found that the 55K CDK9 protein, but not the 42K CDK9 protein, specifically associates with Ku70, a protein involved in DSB repair. Our findings suggest that the 55K CDK9 protein may function in repair of DNA through an association with Ku70.

  5. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways used by interleukin 1 in tissues in vivo: activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1 and 2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, A; Davis, W; Carter, W G; Saklatvala, J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of interleukin 1 (IL-1) are mediated by the activation of protein kinase signalling pathways, which have been well characterized in cultured cells. We have investigated the activation of these pathways in rabbit liver and other tissues after the systemic administration of IL-1alpha. In liver there was 30-40-fold activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and 5-fold activation of both JNK kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. IL-1alpha also caused 2-3-fold activation of p38 MAPK and degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB ('IkappaB'), although no activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (p42/44 MAPK) was observed. The use of antibodies against specific JNK isoforms showed that, in liver, short (p46) JNK1 and long (p54) JNK2 are the predominant forms activated, with smaller amounts of long JNK1 and short JNK2. No active JNK3 was detected. A similar pattern of JNK activation was seen in lung, spleen, skeletal muscle and kidney. Significant JNK3 activity was detectable only in the brain, although little activation of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1alpha was observed in this tissue. This distribution of active JNK isoforms probably results from a different expression of JNKs within the tissues, rather than from a selective activation of isoforms. We conclude that IL-1alpha might activate a more restricted set of signalling pathways in tissues in vivo than it does in cultured cells, where ERK and JNK3 activation are often observed. Cultured cells might represent a 'repair' phenotype that undergoes a broader set of responses to the cytokine. PMID:11139391

  6. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in motor neurons: effect of axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    1997-11-20

    Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent (CaM) protein kinase II isoforms are present in the nervous system in high amounts, many aspects of in vivo expression, localization, and function remain unexplored. During development, CaM kinase IIalpha and IIbeta are differentially expressed. Here, we examined CaM kinase II isoforms in Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic motor neurons before and after axotomy. We cut the L4-5 spinal nerves unilaterally and exposed the proximal nerve stumps to a fluoroprobe, to retrogradely label the neurons of origin. Anti-CaM kinase IIbeta antibody showed immunoreactivity in motor neurons, which decreased to low levels by 4 days after axotomy. We found a similar response by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. The decrease in expression of mRNA and protein was confined to fluorescent motor neurons. For CaM kinase IIalpha, in situ hybridization showed that the mRNA was in sciatic motor neurons, with a density unaffected by axotomy. However, these neurons were also enlarged, suggesting an up-regulation of expression. Northern blots confirmed an mRNA increase. We were unable to find CaM kinase IIalpha immunoreactivity before or after axotomy in sciatic motor neuron cell bodies, suggesting that CaM kinase IIalpha is in the axons or dendrites, or otherwise unavailable to the antibody. Using rats with crush lesions, we radiolabeled axonal proteins being synthesized in the cell body and used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blots to identify CaM kinase IIalpha as a component of slow axonal transport. This differential regulation and expression of kinase isoforms suggests separate and unique intracellular roles. Because we find CaM kinase IIbeta down-regulates during axonal regrowth, its role in these neurons may be related to synaptic transmission. CaM kinase IIalpha appears to support axonal regrowth.

  7. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of α-hydroxyacyl-AMS inhibitors of amino acid adenylation enzymes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tony D; Mohandas, Poornima; Chiriac, Maria I; Bythrow, Glennon V; Quadri, Luis E N; Tan, Derek S

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial natural-product virulence factors is emerging as a promising antibiotic target. Many such natural products are produced by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) from amino acid precursors. To develop selective inhibitors of these pathways, we have previously described aminoacyl-AMS (sulfamoyladenosine) macrocycles that inhibit NRPS amino acid adenylation domains but not mechanistically-related aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To improve the cell permeability of these inhibitors, we explore herein replacement of the α-amino group with an α-hydroxy group. In both macrocycles and corresponding linear congeners, this leads to decreased biochemical inhibition of the cysteine adenylation domain of the Yersina pestis siderophore synthetase HMWP2, which we attribute to loss of an electrostatic interaction with a conserved active-site aspartate. However, inhibitory activity can be regained by installing a cognate β-thiol moiety in the linear series. This provides a path forward to develop selective, cell-penetrant inhibitors of the biosynthesis of virulence factors to probe their biological functions and potential as therapeutic targets.

  8. Adenylate Cyclase AcyA Regulates Development, Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Fungal Virulence in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunlong; Qin, Qiuping; Liu, Yinghang; Zhang, Limei; Liang, Linlin; Lan, Huahui; Chen, Chihao; You, Yunchao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens of crops and animals. The carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxins produced by this pathogen cause a health problem to human and animals. Since cyclic AMP signaling controls a range of physiological processes, like fungal development and infection when responding to extracellular stimuli in fungal pathogens, in this study, we investigated the function of adenylate cyclase, a core component of cAMP signaling, in aflatoxins biosynthesis and virulence on plant seeds in A. flavus. A gene replacement strategy was used to generate the deletion mutant of acyA that encodes the adenylate cyclase. Severe defects in fungal growth, sporulation and sclerotia formation were observed in the acyA deletion mutant. The defect in radical growth could be partially rescued by exogenous cAMP analog. The acyA mutant was also significantly reduced in aflatoxins production and virulence. Similar to the former studies in other fungi, The acyA mutant showed enhancing tolerance to oxidative stress, but more sensitive to heat stress. Overall, the pleiotropic defects of the acyA deletion mutant indicates that the cAMP-PKA pathway is involved in fungal development, aflatoxins biosynthesis and plant seed invasion in A. flavus. PMID:28066725

  9. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  10. Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Donato, Gina M; Hsia, Hung-Lun J; Green, Candace S; Hewlett, Erik L

    2005-11-01

    Bordetella hinzii is a commensal respiratory microorganism in poultry but is increasingly being recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although associated with a variety of disease states, practically nothing is known about the mechanisms employed by this bacterium. In this study, we show by DNA sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR that both commensal and clinical strains of B. hinzii possess and transcriptionally express cyaA, the gene encoding adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) in other pathogenic Bordetella species. By Western blotting, we also found that B. hinzii produces full-length ACT protein in quantities that are comparable to those made by B. pertussis. In contrast to B. pertussis ACT, however, ACT from B. hinzii is less extractable from whole bacteria, nonhemolytic, has a 50-fold reduction in adenylate cyclase activity, and is unable to elevate cyclic AMP levels in host macrophages (nontoxic). The decrease in enzymatic activity is attributable, at least in part, to a decreased binding affinity of B. hinzii ACT for calmodulin, the eukaryotic activator of B. pertussis ACT. In addition, we demonstrate that the lack of intoxication by B. hinzii ACT may be due to the absence of expression of cyaC, the gene encoding the accessory protein required for the acylation of B. pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism.

  11. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  12. Adenylate cyclase regulation in the spermatogenic cell plasma membrane: Modulating effects of TPA and TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    This research was designed to compare the effects of TPA, a phorbol ester, and TCDD in a spermatogenic cell population, a target of TCDD toxicity. Membrane-bound adenylate cyclase activity was used an index of membrane function, and was quantified by the amount of {sup 32}P-cAMP formed from {sup 32}P-ATP following chromatographic separation. Exposure to male germ cells in-vitro to TPA and TCDD followed by direct measurement of enzyme activity was used to investigate the potential of each agent to perturb membrane function. TPA and TCDD consistently inhibited adenylate cyclase activity at the levels of G{sub s}-catalytic unit coupling and hormone-receptor activation, as measured by the stimulation of enzyme activity by concomitant addition of forskolin and GTP and FSH and GTP, respectively. The effect on coupling required at least 60 minutes of exposure to TPA or TCDD. Concentration-response curves demonstrated a progressive desensitization with increasing TPA concentration, while TCDD exhibited consistent inhibition over the same concentration range.

  13. Binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to solubilized preparations of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Seamon, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to proteins solubilized from bovine brain membranes was studied by precipitating proteins with polyethylene glycol and separating (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to protein from free (/sup 3/H)forskolin by rapid filtration. The K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to solubilized proteins was 14 nM which was similar to that for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites in membranes from rat brain and human platelets. Forskolin analogs competed for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites with the same rank potency in both brain membranes and in proteins solubilized from brain membranes. (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to proteins solubilized from membranes with a Bmax of 38 fmolmg protein which increased to 94 fmolmg protein when GppNHp was included in the binding assay. In contrast, GppNHp had no effect on (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to proteins solubilized from membranes preactivated with GppNHp. Solubilized adenylate cyclase from non-preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 130 pmolmgmin which was increased 7-fold by GppNHp. In contrast, adenylate cyclase from preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 850 pmolmgmin which was not stimulated by GppNHp or forskolin

  14. Increase in the amount of adenylate cyclase in rat gastrocnemius muscle after denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchida, S.; Yoshida, H.

    1989-01-01

    After section of the sciatic nerve, the basal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat gastrocnemius muscle increased 6-7 times per membrane protein and about 2 times per whole muscle in the following 30 or 40 days. The AC activity in the muscle 30 days after denervation was increased about 4 times by folskolin. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) also increased the adenylate cyclase activity in the denervated muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin to cells isolated from gastrocnemius muscle was examined to determine the amount of AC molecules. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding by increasing amounts of unlabeled forskolin gave a sigmoid curve with a IC/sub 50/ value of 3/times/10/sup /minus/7/M. Results showed that the number of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites per cell was higher on the denervated side than on the control side, like the basal AC activity. The IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition by unlabeled forskolin of binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin were similar to muscles on the control and denervated sides. These results suggest that an increase in the AC activity induced by denervation was due to an increase in the numbers of AC molecules in the muscle.

  15. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  16. Crystal structure of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate.

    PubMed Central

    Arnez, J G; Harris, D C; Mitschler, A; Rees, B; Francklyn, C S; Moras, D

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structure at 2.6 A of the histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate has been determined. The enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular weight of 94 kDa and belongs to the class II of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). The asymmetric unit is composed of two homodimers. Each monomer consists of two domains. The N-terminal catalytic core domain contains a six-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet sitting on two alpha-helices, which can be superposed with the catalytic domains of yeast AspRS, and GlyRS and SerRS from Thermus thermophilus with a root-mean-square difference on the C alpha atoms of 1.7-1.9 A. The active sites of all four monomers are occupied by histidyl-adenylate, which apparently forms during crystallization. The 100 residue C-terminal alpha/beta domain resembles half of a beta-barrel, and provides an independent domain oriented to contact the anticodon stem and part of the anticodon loop of tRNA(His). The modular domain organization of histidyl-tRNA synthetase reiterates a repeated theme in aaRS, and its structure should provide insight into the ability of certain aaRS to aminoacylate minihelices and other non-tRNA molecules. Images PMID:7556055

  17. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  18. Clinical development of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is commonly deregulated in cancer. In recent years, the results of the first phase I clinical trials with PI3K inhibitors have become available. In comparison to other targeted agents such v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) inhibitors in melanoma or crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) translocated tumors, the number of objective responses to PI3K inhibitors is less dramatic. In this review we propose possible strategies to optimize the clinical development of PI3K inhibitors: by exploring the potential role of PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors in improving the therapeutic index, molecular characterization as a basis for patient selection, and the relevance of performing serial tumor biopsies to understand the associated mechanisms of drug resistance. The main focus of this review will be on PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors by describing the functions of different PI3K isoforms, the preclinical activity of selective PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors and the early clinical data of these compounds. PMID:23232172

  19. In vivo and in vitro models of demyelinating disease: activation of the adenylate cyclase system influences JHM virus expression in explanted rat oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beushausen, S; Narindrasorasak, S; Sanwal, B D; Dales, S

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of JHM virus (JHMV) tropism for rat oligodendrocytes, as one of the primary host cells in the central nervous system, is maintained after explanation (S. Beushausen and S. Dales, Virology 141:89-101, 1985). The temporal correlation between onset of resistance to JHMV infection in vivo, completion of myelination, and maturation of the central nervous system can be simulated in vitro by inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation (Beushausen and Dales, Virology, 1985). Stimulation of differentiation through the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels suggests a possible connection between activation of the adenylate cyclase system and coronavirus expression. Chromatographic analysis of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in cytosol extracts prepared from astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed that both glial cell types were deficient in protein kinase I, indicating that expression of coronavirus in differentiated cells was not contingent upon the presence of protein kinase I. However, treatment with N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP) resulted in a severalfold enhancement of the free regulatory subunit (RI) in oligodendrocytes but not in astrocytes. The RII subunit in both neural cell types was relatively unaffected. Rapid increase in RI due to dbcAMP treatment was correlated with inhibition of JHMV expression. Other differentiation inducers, including 8-Br cAMP and forskolin which, by contrast, caused a decrease in detectable RI, also blocked JHMV expression. This apparent anomaly can be attributed to an increased turnover of RI due to destabilization of the molecule which occurs upon site-specific binding of the cyclic nucleotides. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the state of oligodendrocyte differentiation manifested with the modulation of RI regulates JHMV expression. The differentiation process did not affect either virus adsorption or sequestration but appeared to inhibit the

  20. Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4: structure, function, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Naz, Farha; Anjum, Farah; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2013-11-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) causing their detachment from the microtubules thereby increasing microtubule dynamics and facilitating cell division, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, etc. The MARK4 gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms, L and S that differ in their C-terminal region. These isoforms are differentially regulated in human tissues including central nervous system. MARK4L is a 752-residue-long polypeptide that is divided into three distinct domains: (1) protein kinase domain (59-314), (2) ubiquitin-associated domain (322-369), and (3) kinase-associated domain (703-752) plus 54 residues (649-703) involved in the proper folding and function of the enzyme. In addition, residues 65-73 are considered to be the ATP-binding domain and Lys88 is considered as ATP-binding site. Asp181 has been proposed to be the active site of MARK4 that is activated by phosphorylation of Thr214 side chain. The isoform MARK4S is highly expressed in the normal brain and is presumably involved in neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, the isoform MARK4L is upregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells and gliomas suggesting its involvement in cell cycle. Several biological functions are also associated with MARK4 including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, and positive regulation of programmed cell death. Therefore, MARK4 is considered as the most suitable target for structure-based rational drug design. Our sequence, structure- and function-based analysis should be helpful for better understanding of mechanisms of regulation of microtubule dynamics and MARK4 associated diseases.

  1. Experience-dependent regulation of TrkB isoforms in rodent visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Bethany K; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2009-04-01

    Within primary visual cortex (V1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its high-affinity receptor TrkB is important for normal development and experience-dependent plasticity. TrkB is expressed in several alternatively spliced isoforms, including full-length TrkB (TrkB.FL), and several truncated isoforms (TrkB.T1, TrkB.T2, and TrkB.T4) that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These isoforms are important components of BDNF signaling, yet little is known about the developmental or experience-dependent regulation of their expression. Using immunohistochemistry, we found TrkB.FL and TrkB.T1 expressed in interneurons and pyramidal neurons within V1, but not in cortical astrocytes. We used real-time PCR to quantify the changes in mRNA expression of BDNF, the four TrkB isoforms, and the low-affinity receptor P75NTR during normal development, and in response to visual deprivation at two different ages. BDNF expression increased between postnatal days 10 (P10) and P30, and was rapidly down-regulated by 3 days of visual deprivation during both the pre-critical period (P14-P17) and the critical period (P18-P21). Over the same developmental period, expression of each TrkB isoform was regulated independently; TrkB.T1 increased, TrkB.FL and TrkB.T2 decreased, and TrkB.T4 showed transient changes. Neither brief visual deprivation nor prolonged dark-rearing induced changes in either TrkB.FL or TrkB.T1 expression. However, TrkB.T4 expression was reduced by brief visual deprivation, whereas TrkB.T4, TrkB.T2 and P75(NTR) were up-regulated by prolonged dark-rearing into the critical period. Our data indicate that TrkB isoform expression can be selectively regulated by visual experience, and may contribute to experience-dependent cortical plasticity.

  2. Isoform-specific dynamic translocation of PKC by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation in live cells

    PubMed Central

    O-Uchi, Jin; Sorenson, Jaime; Jhun, Bong Sook; Mishra, Jyotsna; Hurst, Stephen; Williams, Kaleef; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Lopes, Coeli M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays key roles in the regulation of signal transduction and cellular function in various cell types. At least ten PKC isoforms have been identified and intracellular localization and trafficking of these individual isoforms are important for regulation of enzyme activity and substrate specificity. PKC can be activated at downstream of Gq-protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) signaling and translocated to the various cellular compartments including plasma membrane (PM). Recent reports suggested that a different type of GqPCRs would activate different PKC isoforms (classic, novel and atypical PKCs) with different trafficking patterns. However, the knowledge of isoform-specific activation of PKC by each GqPCR is limited. α1-Adrenoceptor (α1-AR) is the one of the GqPCR highly expressed in the cardiovascular system. In this study, we examined the isoform-specific dynamic translocation of PKC in living HEK293T cells by α1-AR stimulation (α1-ARS). Rat PKCα, βI, βII, δ, ε and ζ fused with GFP at C-term were co-transfected with human α1A-AR into HEK293T cells. The isoform-specific dynamic translocation of PKC in living HEK293T cells by α1-ARS using phenylephrine was measured by confocal microscopy. Before stimulation, GFP-PKCs were localized at cytosolic region. α1-ARS strongly and rapidly translocated a classical PKC (cPKC), PKCα, (< 30s) to PM, with PKCα returning diffusively into the cytosol within 5 min. α1-ARS rapidly translocated other cPKCs, PKCβI and PKCβII, to the PM (<30s), with sustained membrane localization. One of novel PKCs (nPKCs), PKCε, but not another nPKC, PKCδ, was translocated by α1-AR stimulation to the PM (<30s) and its membrane localization was also sustained. Finally, α1-AR stimulation did not cause a diacylglycerol-insensitive atypical PKC, PKCζ translocation. Our data suggest that PKCα, β and ε activation may underlie physiological and pathophysiological responses of α1-AR signaling for the

  3. Divergent roles of CXCR3 isoforms in promoting cancer stem-like cell survival and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchun; Reader, Jocelyn C; Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Kochel, Tyler; Fulton, Amy M

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that several chemokine receptors including CXCR3 contribute to metastasis of breast and other cancers, however, in order to target CXCR3 effectively, it is critical to understand the relative contribution of each CXCR3 isoform. Furthermore, the possible contribution of either major CXCR3 isoform (CXCR3-A, CXCR3-B) to cancer stem cell behavior has not been reported. We employed primary invasive ductal carcinomas, a panel of breast cell lines, and a xenograft model of metastatic breast cancer to examine the role of CXCR3 isoforms in the behavior of breast cancer stem-like cells and the contribution of each isoform to metastasis. In primary human breast cancer specimens as well as established breast cancer cell lines, CXCR3-A is more highly expressed than CXCR3-B. Conversely, immortalized normal MCF10A cells express more CXCR3-B relative to CXCR3-A. Overexpression of CXCR3-B in MDA-MB-231 basal-like cells inhibits CXCR3 ligand-stimulated proliferation, which is accompanied by reduced ligand-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and p38 kinases. Likewise, metastatic capacity is reduced in vivo by higher levels of CXCR3-B, and migratory and invasive properties are inhibited in vitro; conversely, silencing of CXCR3-B enhances lung colonization. In contrast to the anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative roles of CXCR3-B in the non-stem cell population, this isoform supports a cancer stem-like cell phenotype. CXCR3-B is markedly elevated in mammosphere-forming parental cells and overexpressing CXCR3-B further enhances mammosphere-forming potential as well as growth in soft agar; stem-like behavior is inhibited in MDA-MB-231shCXCR3-B cells. Targeting of both CXCR3 isoforms may be important to block the stem cell-promoting actions of CXCR3-B, while inhibiting the pro-proliferative and metastasis-promoting functions of CXCR3-A.

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and PACAP-receptor type 1 expression in rat and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, M L; Modesti, A; Palumbo, C; Ulisse, S; Fabbri, A; Piccione, E; Frajese, G; Moretti, C

    2000-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), the new hypophysiotropic factor member of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/secretin/glucagon/GHRH family of neuropeptides, exerts its biological action by interacting with both PACAP-selective type I receptors (PAC1) and type II receptors (VPAC1), which bind both PACAP and VIP. The placenta is a site of production of hypophysiotropic factors that participate in the control of local hormone production, as well as the respective hypothalamic-pituitary neurohormones. In the present study, we show the expression of PACAP gene and irPACAP distribution within rat and human placental tissues, by means of RT-PCR and immunohystochemical experiments. In both rat and human placenta, we evaluated the expression of PAC1 gene by Northern hybridization analysis performed with a 32P-labeled 706 nt complementary DNA probe, derived from the full-length coding region of the rPAC1 complementary DNA. The results of these experiments demonstrate the presence, in both human and rat placenta, of a 7.5-kb transcript similar in size to those detected in the ovary, brain, and hypothalamus. Alternative splicing of two exons occurs in human and rat PAC1 gene generating splice variants with variable tissue-specific expression. To ascertain which of the splice variants were expressed in placental tissue we performed RT-nested PCR using primers flanking the insertion sequence termed hip/hop cassette in rat or SV1/SV2 box in human gene. Electrophoretic analysis of the PCR products showed a different pattern of expression of messenger RNA splicing variants in human and rat placenta. In particular, the rat placenta expresses the short PAC1 receptor (PAC1short), the rPAC1-hip or hop (which are indistinguishable with the primers used), and the rPAC1-hip-hop, whereas the human placenta expresses only the PAC1SV1 (or SV2) variant, structurally homologous to the rat PAC1 hip (or hop). Sequence analysis of the human PCR-amplified PAC1

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatases from amphioxus, hagfish, and ray: divergence of tissue-specific isoform genes in the early evolution of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ono-Koyanagi, K; Suga, H; Katoh, K; Miyata, T

    2000-03-01

    Since separation from fungi and plants, multicellular animals evolved a variety of gene families involved in cell-cell communication from a limited number of ancestral precursors by gene duplications in two separate periods of animal evolution. In the very early evolution of animals before the separation of parazoans and eumetazoans, animals underwent extensive gene duplications by which different subtypes (subfamilies) with distinct functions diverged. The multiplicity of members (isoforms) in the same subtype increased by further gene duplications (isoform duplications) in the first half of chordate evolution before the fish-tetrapod split; different isoforms are virtually identical in structure and function but differ in tissue distribution. From cloning and phylogenetic analyses of four subfamilies of the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) family, we recently showed extensive isoform duplications in a limited period around or just before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. To obtain a reliable estimate for the divergence time of vertebrate isoforms, we have conducted isolation of cDNAs encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) from Branchiostoma belcheri, an amphioxus, Eptatretus burgeri, a hagfish, and Potamotrygon motoro, a ray. We obtained 33 different cDNAs in total, most of which belong to known PTP subfamilies. The phylogenetic analyses of five subfamilies based on the maximum likelihood method revealed frequent isoform duplications in a period around or just before the gnathostome-cyclostome split. An evolutionary implication was discussed in relation to the Cambrian explosion.

  6. Leucine-rich repeats and carboxyl terminus are required for interaction of yeast adenylate cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Choe, H R; Nishida, Y; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Ohnishi, S; Tamaoki, T; Kataoka, T

    1990-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding adenylate cyclase has been analyzed by deletion and insertion mutagenesis to localize regions required for activation by the Sa. cerevisiae RAS2 protein. The NH2-terminal 657 amino acids were found to be dispensable for the activation. However, almost all 2-amino acid insertions in the middle 600 residues comprising leucine-rich repeats and deletions in the COOH-terminal 66 residues completely abolished activation by the RAS2 protein, whereas insertion mutations in the other regions generally had no effect. Chimeric adenylate cyclases were constructed by swapping the upstream and downstream portions surrounding the catalytic domains between the Sa. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylate cyclases and examined for activation by the RAS2 protein. We found that the fusion containing both the NH2-terminal 1600 residues and the COOH-terminal 66 residues of the Sa. cerevisiae cyclase rendered the catalytic domain of the Sc. pombe cyclase, which otherwise did not respond to RAS proteins, activatable by the RAS2 protein. Thus the leucine-rich repeats and the COOH terminus of the Sa. cerevisiae adenylate cyclase appear to be required for interaction with RAS proteins. Images PMID:2247439

  7. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  8. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis block the entry of Bacillus anthracis adenylate cyclase toxin but not that of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Leppla, S H; Hewlett, E L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis produce extracytoplasmic adenylate cyclase toxins (AC toxins) with shared features including activation by calmodulin and the ability to enter target cells and catalyze intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) production from host ATP. The two AC toxins were evaluated for sensitivities to a series of inhibitors of known uptake mechanisms. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament function, abrogated the cAMP response to B. anthracis AC toxin (93%) but not the cAMP response elicited by B. pertussis AC toxin. B. anthracis-mediated intoxication of CHO cells was completely inhibited by ammonium chloride (30 mM) and chloroquine (0.1 mM), whereas the cAMP accumulation produced by B. pertussis AC toxin remained unchanged. The block of target cell intoxication by cytochalasin D could be bypassed when cells were first treated with anthrax AC toxin and then exposed to an acidic medium. These data indicate that despite enzymatic similarities, these two AC toxins intoxicate target cells by different mechanisms, with anthrax AC toxin entering by means of receptor-mediated endocytosis into acidic compartments and B. pertussis AC toxin using a separate, and as yet undefined, mechanism. PMID:2895741

  9. Regulation of CDPK isoforms during tuber development.

    PubMed

    Raíces, Marcela; Gargantini, Pablo Rubén; Chinchilla, Delphine; Crespi, Martín; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Ulloa, Rita María

    2003-07-01

    CDPK activities present during tuber development were analysed. A high CDPK activity was detected in the soluble fraction of early stolons and a lower one was detected in soluble and particulate fractions of induced stolons. The early and late CDPK activities displayed diverse specificity for in vitro substrates and different subcellular distribution. Western blot analysis revealed two CDPKs of 55 and 60 kDa that follow a precise spatial and temporal profile of expression. The 55 kDa protein was only detected in early-elongating stolons and the 60 kDa one was induced upon stolon swelling, correlating with early and late CDPK activities. A new member of the potato CDPK family, StCDPK3, was identified from a stolon cDNA library. Gene specific RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene is only expressed in early stolons, while the previously identified StCDPK1 is expressed upon stolon swelling. This expression profile suggests that StCDPK3 could correspond to the 55 kDa isoform while StCDPK1 could encode the 60 kDa isoform present in swelling stolons. StCDPK1 has myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus possibly involved in its dual intracellular localization. Transient expression studies with wild-type and mutated forms of StCDPK1 fused to GFP were used to show that subcellular localization of this isoform is controlled by myristoylation and palmitoylation. Altogether, our data suggest that sequential activation of StCDPK3 and StCDPK1 and the subcellular localisation of StCDPK1 might be critical regulatory steps of calcium signalling during potato tuber development.

  10. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  11. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  12. The function of Drosophila p53 isoforms in apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B; Rotelli, M; Dixon, M; Calvi, B R

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is a major mediator of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and is a crucial suppressor of tumor formation. In a variety of organisms, p53 and its paralogs, p63 and p73, each encode multiple protein isoforms through alternative splicing, promoters, and translation start sites. The function of these isoforms in development and disease are still being defined. Here, we evaluate the apoptotic potential of multiple isoforms of the single p53 gene in the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster. Most previous studies have focused on the p53A isoform, but it has been recently shown that a larger p53B isoform can induce apoptosis when overexpressed. It has remained unclear, however, whether one or both isoforms are required for the apoptotic response to genotoxic stress. We show that p53B is a much more potent inducer of apoptosis than p53A when overexpressed. Overexpression of two newly identified short isoforms perturbed development and inhibited the apoptotic response to ionizing radiation. Analysis of physiological protein expression indicated that p53A is the most abundant isoform, and that both p53A and p53B can form a complex and co-localize to sub-nuclear compartments. In contrast to the overexpression results, new isoform-specific loss-of-function mutants indicated that it is the shorter p53A isoform, not full-length p53B, that is the primary mediator of pro-apoptotic gene transcription and apoptosis after ionizing radiation. Together, our data show that it is the shorter p53A isoform that mediates the apoptotic response to DNA damage, and further suggest that p53B and shorter isoforms have specialized functions. PMID:25882045

  13. Adenylation-Dependent Conformation and Unfolding Pathways of the NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase from the Thermophile Thermus scotoductus

    PubMed Central

    Georlette, Daphné; Blaise, Vinciane; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Damien, Benjamin; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigridur H.; Depiereux, Eric; Gerday, Charles; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Feller, Georges

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years, an increased attention has been focused on NAD+-dependent DNA ligases. This is mostly due to their potential use as antibiotic targets, because effective inhibition of these essential enzymes would result in the death of the bacterium. However, development of an efficient drug requires that the conformational modifications involved in the catalysis of NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are understood. From this perspective, we have investigated the conformational changes occurring in the thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD+-DNA ligase upon adenylation, as well as the effect of cofactor binding on protein resistance to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results indicate that cofactor binding induces conformational rearrangement within the active site and promotes a compaction of the enzyme. These data support an induced “open-closure” process upon adenylation, leading to the formation of the catalytically active enzyme that is able to bind DNA. These conformational changes are likely to be associated with the protein function, preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes between deadenylated ligases and DNA. In addition, enzyme adenylation significantly increases resistance of the protein to thermal denaturation and GdmCl-induced unfolding, establishing a thermodynamic link between ligand binding and increased conformational stability. Finally, chemical unfolding of deadenylated and adenylated enzyme is accompanied by accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and premolten globule states. Maximal populations of these intermediates are shifted toward higher GdmCl concentrations in the case of the adenylated ligase. These data provide further insights into the properties of partially folded intermediates. PMID:14747344

  14. The Paradoxical Signals of Two TrkC Receptor Isoforms Supports a Rationale for Novel Therapeutic Strategies in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Barcelona, Pablo F.; Galan, Alba; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Teske, Katrina; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Bertram, Lisa; Wang, Jing; Yousefi, Masoud; Rush, Robert; Fabian, Marc; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Full length TrkC (TrkC-FL) is a receptor tyrosine kinase whose mRNA can be spliced to a truncated TrkC.T1 isoform lacking the kinase domain. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) activates TrkC-FL to maintain motor neuron health and function and TrkC.T1 to produce neurotoxic TNF-α; hence resulting in opposing pathways. In mouse and human ALS spinal cord, the reduction of miR-128 that destabilizes TrkC.T1 mRNA results in up-regulated TrkC.T1 and TNF-α in astrocytes. We exploited conformational differences to develop an agonistic mAb 2B7 that selectively activates TrkC-FL, to circumvent TrkC.T1 activation. In mouse ALS, 2B7 activates spinal cord TrkC-FL signals, improves spinal cord motor neuron phenotype and function, and significantly prolongs life-span. Our results elucidate biological paradoxes of receptor isoforms and their role in disease progression, validate the concept of selectively targeting conformational epitopes in naturally occurring isoforms, and may guide the development of pro-neuroprotective (TrkC-FL) and anti-neurotoxic (TrkC.T1) therapeutic strategies. PMID:27695040

  15. VEGFA splicing: divergent isoforms regulate spermatogonial stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Kevin M.; Clopton, Debra T.; Lu, Ningxia; Pohlmeier, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being well-known for regulating angiogenesis in both normal and tumorigenic environments, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) has been recently implicated in male fertility, namely in the maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells (SSC). The VEGFA gene can be spliced into multiple distinct isoforms that are either angiogenic or antiangiogenic in nature. Although studies have demonstrated the alternative splicing of VEGFA, including the divergent roles of the two isoform family types, many investigations do not differentiate between them. Data concerning VEGFA in the mammalian testis are limited, but the various angiogenic isoforms appear to promote seminiferous cord formation and to form a gradient across which cells may migrate. Treatment with either antiangiogenic isoforms of VEGFA or with inhibitors to angiogenic signaling impair these processes. Serendipitously, expression of KDR, the primary receptor for both types of VEGFA isoforms, was observed on male germ cells. These findings led to further investigation of the way that VEGFA elicits avascular functions within testes. Following treatment of donor perinatal male mice with either antiangiogenic VEGFA165b or angiogenic VEGFA164 isoforms, seminiferous tubules were less colonized following transplantation with cells from VEGFA165b-treated donors. Thus, VEGFA165b and possibly other antiangiogenic isoforms of VEGFA reduce SSC number either by promoting premature differentiation, inducing cell death, or by preventing SSC formation. Thus, angiogenic isoforms of VEGFA are hypothesized to promote SSC self-renewal, and the divergent isoforms are thought to balance one another to maintain SSC homeostasis in vivo. PMID:26553653

  16. Nociceptor beta II, delta, and epsilon isoforms of PKC differentially mediate paclitaxel-induced spontaneous and evoked pain.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2015-03-18

    As one of the most effective and frequently used chemotherapeutic agents, paclitaxel produces peripheral neuropathy (paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy or PIPN) that negatively affects chemotherapy and persists after cancer therapy. The mechanisms underlying this dose-limiting side effect remain to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the role of nociceptor protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in PIPN. Employing multiple complementary approaches, we have identified a subset of PKC isoforms, namely βII, δ, and ϵ, were activated by paclitaxel in the isolated primary afferent sensory neurons. Persistent activation of PKCβII, PKCδ, and PKCϵ was also observed in the dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic treatment with paclitaxel in a mouse model of PIPN. Isoform-selective inhibitors of PKCβII, PKCδ, and PKCϵ given intrathecally dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Surprisingly, spinal inhibition of PKCβII and PKCδ, but not PKCϵ, blocked the spontaneous pain induced by paclitaxel. These data suggest that a subset of nociceptor PKC isoforms differentially contribute to spontaneous and evoked pain in PIPN, although it is not clear whether PKCϵ in other regions regulates spontaneous pain in PIPN. The findings can potentially offer new selective targets for pharmacological intervention of PIPN.

  17. Involvement of yeast HSP90 isoforms in response to stress and cell death induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Fernandes, Angela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A S; Ludovico, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2α by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress.

  18. Diacylglycerol Kinases (DGKs): Novel Targets for Improving T Cell Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Matthew J.; Moon, Edmund K.; Johnson, Bryon D.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of DGK, DGKα, and DGKζ, specifically regulate the pool of DAG that is generated as a second messenger after stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Deletion of either isoform in mouse models results in T cells bearing a hyperresponsive phenotype and enhanced T cell activity against malignancy. Whereas, DGKζ appears to be the dominant isoform in T cells, rationale exists for targeting both isoforms individually or coordinately. Additional work is needed to rigorously identify the molecular changes that result from deletion of DGKs in order to understand how DAG contributes to T cell activation, the effect of DGK inhibition in human T cells, and to rationally develop combined immunotherapeutic strategies that target DGKs. PMID:27800476

  19. Colorimetric determination of pyrophosphate anion and its application to adenylation enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    Katano, Hajime; Watanabe, Hiro; Takakuwa, Masahiro; Maruyama, Chitose; Hamano, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    A colorimetric pyrophosphate assay based on the formation and reduction of the 18-molybdopyrophosphate ([(P2O7)Mo18O54](4-)) anion in an acetonitrile-water mixed solvent was modified and improved. The [(P2O7)Mo18O54](4-) anion is precipitated from the acetonitrile-water solution containing MoO4(2-) and HCl, and is re-dissolved in neat acetonitrile or propylene carbonate. This separation process decreases the interference by ATP, and prevents a yellow coloration of the reducing agent, ascorbic acid, due to excess Mo(VI) species. In the organic solvent, the [(P2O7)Mo18O54](4-) anion is reduced to a more intense blue molybdopyrophosphate species. The application of the colorimetry to the assay of adenylation enzymes is also described in this note.

  20. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase: relative activity of constituents and metabolites of marihuana.

    PubMed

    Howlett, A C

    1987-05-01

    delta 9Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to inhibit the activity of adenylate cyclase in the N18TG2 clone of murine neuroblastoma cells. The concentration of delta 9THC exhibiting half-maximal inhibition was 500 nM. delta 8Tetrahydrocannabinol was less active, and cannabinol was only partially active. Cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, olivetol and compounds having a reduced length of the C3 alkyl side chain were inactive. The metabolites of delta 8THC and delta 9THC hydroxylated at the C11 position were more potent than the parent drugs. However, hydroxylation at the C8 position of the terpenoid ring resulted in loss of activity. Compounds hydroxylated along the C3 alkyl side chain were equally efficacious but less potent than delta 9THC. These findings are compared to the pharmacology of cannabinoids reported for psychological effects in humans and behavioral effects in a variety of animal models.

  1. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  3. Active-site modifications of adenylation domains lead to hydrolysis of upstream nonribosomal peptidyl thioester intermediates.

    PubMed

    Uguru, Gabriel C; Milne, Claire; Borg, Matthew; Flett, Fiona; Smith, Colin P; Micklefield, Jason

    2004-04-28

    Site-directed mutagenesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) adenylation (A) domains was investigated as a means to engineer new calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA) in Streptomyces coelicolor. Single- and double-point mutants of the CDA NRPS module 7, A-domain were generated, which were predicted to alter the specificity of this domain from Asp to Asn. The double-point mutant produced a new peptide CDA2a-7N containing Asn at position 7 as expected. However, in both the single- and the double-point mutants, significant hydrolysis of the CDA-6mer intermediate was evident. One explanation for this is that the mutant module 7 A-domain activates Asn instead of Asp; however, the Asn-thioester intermediate is only weakly recognized by the upstream C-domain acceptor site (a), allowing a water molecule to intercept the hexapeptidyl intermediate in the donor site (d).

  4. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  5. Engineering the Substrate Specificity of the DhbE Adenylation Domain by Yeast Cell Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Grimes, Kimberly D.; Zhao, Bo; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Yin, Jun

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The adenylation (A) domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) activate aryl acids or amino acids to launch their transfer through the NRPS assembly line for the biosynthesis of many medicinally important natural products. In order to expand the substrate pool of NRPSs, we developed a method based on yeast cell surface display to engineer the substrate specificities of the A-domains. We acquired A-domain mutants of DhbE that have 11- and 6-fold increases in kcat/Km with nonnative substrates 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 2-aminobenzoic acid, respectively and corresponding 3- and 33-fold decreases in kcat/Km values with the native substrate 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, resulting in a dramatic switch in substrate specificity of up to 200-fold. Our study demonstrates that yeast display can be used as a high throughput selection platform to reprogram the “nonribosomal code” of A-domains. PMID:23352143

  6. Histamine-, norepinephrine-, and dopamine-sensitive central adenylate cyclases: effects of chlorpromazine derivatives and butaclamol.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C; Wagner, H R; Palmer, S J; Manian, A A

    1978-06-01

    A series of recently available derivatives (quaternary and hydroxylated) of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and butaclamol were evaluated with respect to antagonism of norepinephrine- (NE) (rat cerebral cortex), dopamine- (DA) (rat striatum) and histamine- (H) sensitive (rabbit cerebral cortex) adenylate cyclases. With incubated tissue slices (rat and rabbit cortices) CPZ-CH3, 7-OH-CPZ-CH3, beta-OH-CPZ and butaclamol displayed a capacity to inhibit either NE- or H- induced accumulation of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP). With the broken cellular enzyme responsive to DA, rather potent inhibition of enzyme activity (IC50 less than 24 micron) occurred with butaclamol, beta-OH-CPZ, 7,8,beta-triOH-CPZ, 7,8-dioxo-beta-OH-CPZ and 3,7,8-triOH-CPZ. It is concluded that the metabolites of CPZ contribute to the central therapeutic and/or side effects of the parent compound.

  7. Lacrimal gland PKC isoforms are differentially involved in agonist-induced protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Zoukhri, D; Hodges, R R; Sergheraert, C; Toker, A; Dartt, D A

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized and N-myristoylated peptides derived from the pseudosubstrate sequences of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon [Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28), Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153), and Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164)], three isoforms present in rat lacrimal gland, and a peptide derived from the sequence of the endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase A [Myr-PKI-(17-25)]. Lacrimal gland acini were preincubated for 60 min with the myristoylated peptides (10(-10) to 3 x 10(-7) M), then protein secretion was stimulated with a phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (10(-6) M); vasoactive intestinal peptide (10(-8) M); a cholinergic agonist, carbachol (10(-5) M); or an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (10(-4) M), for 20 min. In intact lacrimal gland acini, Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) inhibited phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-induced protein secretion. This effect was not reproduced by the acetylated peptide or by the myristoylated PKI, which inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced protein secretion, a response mediated by protein kinase A. Carbachol-induced protein secretion was inhibited by all three peptides. In contrast, phenylephrine-induced protein secretion was inhibited only by Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164), whereas Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) and Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153) had a stimulatory effect. None of these myristoylated peptides affected the calcium increase evoked by cholinergic or alpha 1-adrenergic agonists. We concluded that phorbol ester- and receptor-induced protein secretion involve different PKC isoforms in lacrimal gland.

  8. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  9. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in rat brown fat

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.; Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Catecholamines stimulate thermogenesis in rat brown fat through a mechanism which involves binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR), stimulation of adenylate cyclase (AC) and culminating with uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. The authors characterized BAR, AC and cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase in CDF (F-344) interscapular brown fat. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/)Iodopindolol binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 41.8 +/- 12.0 fmol BAR/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 118 +/- 15 pM. Binding was both specific and stereospecific. Competition with 1-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 6.7 nM) was 15 times more potent than d-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 103 nM). Competition with isoproterenol (K/sub d/ = 79 nM) was 10 times more potent than epinephrine (K/sub d/ = 820 nM) which was 35 times more potent than norepinephrine (K/sub d/ = 2.9 x 10/sup -5/ M) suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Cyt c oxidase activity was assessed in brown fat mitochrondrial preparations. The ratio of BAR to cyt c activity was 959 +/- 275 nmol BAR/mol cyc c/min. Isoproterenol (0.1 mM) stimulated AC activity was 24 times GTP (0.1 mM) stimulated AC (98.5 vs 40.7 pmol cAMP/min/mg). NaF-stimulated AC was nine times basal activity (90.5 vs 11.3 pmol cAMP/min/mg). These data demonstrate the presence of a beta-/sub 2/-type BAR coupled to adenylate cyclase in rat brown fat.

  10. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  11. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  12. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase in Complex with the Inhibitor STO-609*

    PubMed Central

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Takagi, Tetsuo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Suzuki, Atsushi; Lee, Suni; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Kadowaki, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) kinase (CaMKK) is a member of the CaMK cascade that mediates the response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. CaMKK phosphorylates and activates CaMKI and CaMKIV, which directly activate transcription factors. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of the catalytic kinase domain of the human CaMKKβ isoform complexed with its selective inhibitor, STO-609. The structure revealed that CaMKKβ lacks the αD helix and that the equivalent region displays a hydrophobic molecular surface, which may reflect its unique substrate recognition and autoinhibition. Although CaMKKβ lacks the activation loop phosphorylation site, the activation loop is folded in an active-state conformation, which is stabilized by a number of interactions between amino acid residues conserved among the CaMKK isoforms. An in vitro analysis of the kinase activity confirmed the intrinsic activity of the CaMKKβ kinase domain. Structure and sequence analyses of the STO-609-binding site revealed amino acid replacements that may affect the inhibitor binding. Indeed, mutagenesis demonstrated that the CaMKKβ residue Pro274, which replaces the conserved acidic residue of other protein kinases, is an important determinant for the selective inhibition by STO-609. Therefore, the present structure provides a molecular basis for clarifying the known biochemical properties of CaMKKβ and for designing novel inhibitors targeting CaMKKβ and the related protein kinases. PMID:21504895

  14. SPAK/OSR1 regulate NKCC1 and WNK activity: analysis of WNK isoform interactions and activation by T-loop trans-autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Thastrup, Jacob O.; Rafiqi, Fatema H.; Vitari, Alberto C.; Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Deak, Maria; Mehellou, Youcef; Alessi, Dario R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the WNK [with no lysine (K) kinase] family instigate hypertension and pain perception disorders. Of the four WNK isoforms, much of the focus has been on WNK1, which is activated in response to osmotic stress by phosphorylation of its T-loop residue (Ser382). WNK isoforms phosphorylate and activate the related SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1) protein kinases. In the present study, we first describe the generation of double-knockin ES (embryonic stem) cells, where SPAK and OSR1 cannot be activated by WNK1. We establish that NKCC1 (Na+/K+/2Cl− co-transporter 1), a proposed target of the WNK pathway, is not phosphorylated or activated in a knockin that is deficient in SPAK/OSR1 activity. We also observe that activity of WNK1 and WNK3 are markedly elevated in the knockin cells, demonstrating that SPAK/OSR1 significantly influences WNK activity. Phosphorylation of another regulatory serine residue, Ser1261, in WNK1 is unaffected in knockin cells, indicating that this is not phosphorylated by SPAK/OSR1. We show that WNK isoforms interact via a C-terminal CCD (coiled-coil domain) and identify point mutations of conserved residues within this domain that ablate the ability of WNK isoforms to interact. Employing these mutants, we demonstrate that interaction of WNK isoforms is not essential for their T-loop phosphorylation and activation, at least for overexpressed WNK isoforms. Moreover, we finally establish that full-length WNK1, WNK2 and WNK3, but not WNK4, are capable of directly phosphorylating Ser382 of WNK1 in vitro. This supports the notion that T-loop phosphorylation of WNK isoforms is controlled by trans-autophosphorylation. These results provide novel insights into the WNK signal transduction pathway and provide genetic evidence confirming the essential role that SPAK/OSR1 play in controlling NKCC1 function. They also reveal a role in which the downstream SPAK/OSR1 enzymes markedly

  15. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A.; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S.; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A.; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light [1, 2] including circadian entrainment [3], sleep induction [4], the pupillary light response (PLR) [5], and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light) [6]. How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails [7]. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments [7]. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  16. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W; Wood, Matthew J A; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-09-21

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light including circadian entrainment, sleep induction, the pupillary light response (PLR), and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light). How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors.

  17. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  18. Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation in Human Hsp90β Affects Interaction with Clients and the Cochaperone Cdc37.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh T N; Knieß, Robert A; Daturpalli, Soumya; Le Breton, Laura; Ke, Xiangyu; Chen, Xuemei; Mayer, Matthias P

    2017-03-10

    The 90-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp90s) assist the maturation of many key regulators of signal transduction pathways and cellular control circuits like protein kinases and transcription factors and chaperone their stability and activity. In this function, Hsp90s cooperate with some 30 cochaperones and they are themselves subject to regulation by numerous post-translational modifications. In vertebrates, two major isoforms exist in the cytosol, Hsp90α and Hsp90β, which share a high degree of sequence identity and are expressed in tissue- and environmental condition-dependent manner. We identified an isoform-specific phosphorylation site in human Hsp90β. This phosphorylation site seems to be linked to vertebrate evolution since it is not found in invertebrata but in all tetrapoda and many but not all fish species. We provide data suggesting that this phosphorylation is important for the activation of Hsp90 clients like glucocorticoid receptor and a protein kinase. Replacement of the phosphorylation site by glutamate affects the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 and interaction with the kinase-specific cochaperone Cdc37.

  19. Distinct roles of AKT isoforms in regulating β1-integrin activity, migration, and invasion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virtakoivu, Reetta; Pellinen, Teijo; Rantala, Juha K.; Perälä, Merja; Ivaska, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    AKT1 and AKT2 kinases have been shown to play opposite roles in breast cancer migration and invasion. In this study, an RNA interference screen for integrin activity inhibitors identified AKT1 as an inhibitor of β1-integrin activity in prostate cancer. Validation experiments investigating all three AKT isoforms demonstrated that, unlike in breast cancer, both AKT1 and AKT2 function as negative regulators of cell migration and invasion in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Down-regulation of AKT1 and AKT2, but not AKT3, induced activation of cell surface β1-integrins and enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion. Silencing of AKT1 and AKT2 also resulted in increased focal adhesion size. Importantly, the mechanisms involved in integrin activity regulation were distinct for the two AKT isoforms. Silencing of AKT1 relieved feedback suppression of the expression and activity of several receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR and MET, with established cross-talk with β1-integrins. Silencing of AKT2, on the other hand, induced up-regulation of the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family, and overexpression of miR-200 was sufficient to induce integrin activity and cell migration in PC3 cells. Taken together, these data define an inhibitory role for both AKT1 and AKT2 in prostate cancer migration and invasion and highlight the cell type–specific actions of AKT kinases in the regulation of cell motility. PMID:22809628

  20. Role of Non-receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinases During Phospholipase C-γ1 Related Uterine Contractions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Phillippe, Mark; Sweet, Leigh M.; Bradley, Diana F.; Engle, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Activated phospholipase Cγ1 (PLC-γ1), produced in response to tyrosine phosphorylation, appears to play an important role during uterine contractions. These studies sought to determine which non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of PLC-γ1 in uterine tissue from the rat. In vitro uterine contraction studies were performed utilizing isoform specific PTK inhibitors. Western blots were performed utilizing antibodies to phosphotyrosine-PLC-γ1, total PLC-γ1, c-Src kinase and Lck kinase. Spontaneous, stretch-stimulated, and bpV(phen) (a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) enhanced uterine contractions were significantly suppressed in response to Damnacanthal (a Lck kinase inhibitor) and PP1 (a c-Src kinase inhibitor); whereas, several other PTK isoform inhibitors had no significant effect. Damnacanthal and PP1 also significantly suppressed bpV(phen)-enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 compared to other PTK isoform inhibitors. Western blots confirmed expression of the Lck and c-Src kinases in uterine tissue. In conclusion, the Lck and c-Src kinases appear to play an important role in regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 and contractile activity in the rat uterus. PMID:19208792

  1. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Roppenser, Bernhard; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Canadien, Veronica; Xu, Risheng; Devreotes, Peter N; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  2. Isoform-Specific Biased Agonism of Histamine H3 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Cook, Anna E; Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Bosnyak, Sanja; Brady, Ryan; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Mocaer, Elisabeth; Summers, Roger J; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    The human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) is subject to extensive gene splicing that gives rise to a large number of functional and nonfunctional isoforms. Despite the general acceptance that G protein-coupled receptors can adopt different ligand-induced conformations that give rise to biased signaling, this has not been studied for the H3R; further, it is unknown whether splice variants of the same receptor engender the same or differential biased signaling. Herein, we profiled the pharmacology of histamine receptor agonists at the two most abundant hH3R splice variants (hH3R445 and hH3R365) across seven signaling endpoints. Both isoforms engender biased signaling, notably for 4-[3-(benzyloxy)propyl]-1H-imidazole (proxyfan) [e.g., strong bias toward phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) via the full-length receptor] and its congener 3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propyl-(4-iodophenyl)-methyl ether (iodoproxyfan), which are strongly consistent with the former's designation as a "protean" agonist. The 80 amino acid IL3 deleted isoform hH3R365 is more permissive in its signaling than hH3R445: 2-(1H-imidazol-5-yl)ethyl imidothiocarbamate (imetit), proxyfan, and iodoproxyfan were all markedly biased away from calcium signaling, and principal component analysis of the full data set revealed divergent profiles for all five agonists. However, most interesting was the identification of differential biased signaling between the two isoforms. Strikingly, hH3R365 was completely unable to stimulate GSK3β phosphorylation, an endpoint robustly activated by the full-length receptor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative example of differential biased signaling via isoforms of the same G protein-coupled receptor that are simultaneously expressed in vivo and gives rise to the possibility of selective pharmacological targeting of individual receptor splice variants.

  3. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  4. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  5. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF.

  6. Comparative study of protein tyrosine phosphatase-epsilon isoforms: membrane localization confers specificity in cellular signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J N; Elson, A; Lammers, R; Rømer, J; Clausen, J T; Møller, K B; Møller, N P

    2001-01-01

    To study the influence of subcellular localization as a determinant of signal transduction specificity, we assessed the effects of wild-type transmembrane and cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) epsilon on tyrosine kinase signalling in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (BHK-IR). The efficiency by which differently localized PTPepsilon and PTPalpha variants attenuated insulin-induced cell rounding and detachment was determined in a functional clonal-selection assay and in stable cell lines. Compared with the corresponding receptor-type PTPs, the cytoplasmic PTPs (cytPTPs) were considerably less efficient in generating insulin-resistant clones, and exceptionally high compensatory expression levels were required to counteract phosphotyrosine-based signal transduction. Targeting of cytPTPepsilon to the plasma membrane via the Lck-tyrosine kinase dual acylation motif restored high rescue efficiency and abolished the need for high cytPTPepsilon levels. Consistent with these results, expression levels and subcellular localization of PTPepsilon were also found to determine the phosphorylation level of cellular proteins including focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Furthermore, PTPepsilon stabilized binding of phosphorylated FAK to Src, suggesting this complex as a possible mediator of the PTPepsilon inhibitory response to insulin-induced cell rounding and detachment in BHK-IR cells. Taken together, the present localization-function study indicates that transcriptional control of the subcellular localization of PTPepsilon may provide a molecular mechanism that determines PTPepsilon substrate selectivity and isoform-specific function. PMID:11237862

  7. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  8. A cost-effective method for Illumina small RNA-Seq library preparation using T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Deep sequencing is a powerful tool for novel small RNA discovery. Illumina small RNA sequencing library preparation requires a pre-adenylated 3’ end adapter containing a 5’,5’-adenyl pyrophosphoryl moiety. In the absence of ATP, this adapter can be ligated to the 3’ hydroxyl group of small RNA, while RNA self-ligation and concatenation are repressed. Pre-adenylated adapters are one of the most essential and costly components required for library preparation, and few are commercially available. Results We demonstrate that DNA oligo with 5’ phosphate and 3’ amine groups can be enzymatically adenylated by T4 RNA ligase 1 to generate customized pre-adenylated adapters. We have constructed and sequenced a small RNA library for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using the T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapter. Conclusion We provide an efficient and low-cost method for small RNA sequencing library preparation, which takes two days to complete and costs around $20 per library. This protocol has been tested in several plant species for small RNA sequencing including sweet potato, pepper, watermelon, and cowpea, and could be readily applied to any RNA samples. PMID:22995534

  9. Method of empirical dependences in estimation and prediction of activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Moshkova, Albina N.; Erlykina, Elena I.; Khvatova, Elena M.

    2016-04-01

    Creatine kinase is a key enzyme of energy metabolism in the brain. There are known cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase exists as a mixture of two oligomeric forms - dimer and octamer. The aim of investigation was to study catalytic properties of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase and using of the method of empirical dependences for the possible prediction of the activity of these enzymes in cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was revealed to be accompanied with the changes of the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes and oligomeric state of mitochondrial isoform. There were made the models of multiple regression that permit to study the activity of creatine kinase system in cerebral ischemia using a calculating method. Therefore, the mathematical method of empirical dependences can be applied for estimation and prediction of the functional state of the brain by the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia.

  10. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Monika B; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a hereditary progressive disorder and the most frequent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). PKAN patients present with a progressive movement disorder, dysarthria, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. In magnetic resonance imaging, PKAN patients exhibit the pathognonomic "eye of the tiger" sign in the globus pallidus which corresponds to iron accumulation and gliosis as shown in neuropathological examinations. The discovery of the disease causing mutations in PANK2 has linked the disorder to coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. PANK2 is the only one out of four PANK genes encoding an isoform which localizes to mitochondria. At least two other NBIA genes (PLA2G6, C19orf12) encode proteins that share with PANK2 a mitochondrial localization and all are suggested to play a role in lipid homeostasis. With no causal therapy available for PKAN until now, only symptomatic treatment is possible. A multi-centre retrospective study with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with NBIA revealed a significant improvement of dystonia. Recently, studies in the PANK Drosophila model "fumble" revealed improvement by the compound pantethine which is hypothesized to feed an alternate CoA biosynthesis pathway. In addition, pilot studies with the iron chelator deferiprone that crosses the blood brain barrier showed a good safety profile and some indication of efficacy. An adequately powered randomized clinical trial will start in 2012. This review summarizes clinical presentation, neuropathology and pathogenesis of PKAN.

  11. Differences in the C-terminus contribute to variations in trafficking between rat and human 5-HT(2A) receptor isoforms: identification of a primate-specific tripeptide ASK motif that confers GRK-2 and beta arrestin-2 interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Aditi; Sankar, Shobhana; Panicker, Mitradas M

    2010-02-01

    Internalization and recycling of G-protein coupled receptors are important cellular processes regulating receptor function. These are receptor-subtype and cell type-specific. Although important, trafficking variations between receptor isoforms of different species has received limited attention. We report here, differences in internalization and recycling between rat and human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) isoforms expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells in response to serotonin. Although the human and rat 5-HT(2A)Rs differ by only a few amino acids, the human receptor takes longer to recycle to the cell surface after internalization, with the additional involvement of beta arrestin-2 and G-protein receptor kinase 2. The interaction of beta arrestin-2 with the human receptor causes the delay in recycling and is dependent on a primate-specific ASK motif present in the C-terminus of the receptor. Conversion of this motif to NCT, the corresponding sequence present in the rat isoform, results in the human isoform trafficking like the rat receptor. Replacing the serine 457 with alanine in the ASK motif of human isoform resulted in faster recycling, although with continued arrestin-dependent internalization. This study establishes significant differences between the two isoforms with important implications in our understanding of the human 5-HT(2A)R functions; and indicates that extrapolating results from non-human receptor isoforms to human subtypes is not without caveats.

  12. Adenylation by testis-specific cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase, PAPOLB/TPAP, is essential for spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    KASHIWABARA, Shin-ichi; TSURUTA, Satsuki; OKADA, Keitaro; YAMAOKA, Yutaro; BABA, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The testis-specific cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase PAPOLB/TPAP is essential for spermatogenesis. Although this enzyme is responsible for poly(A) tail extension of a subset of mRNAs in round spermatids, the stability and translational efficiency of these mRNAs are unaffected by the absence of PAPOLB. To clarify the functional importance of this enzyme’s adenylation activity, we produced PAPOLB-null mice expressing a polyadenylation-defective PAPOLB mutant (PAPOLBD114A), in which the catalytic Asp at residue 114 was mutated to Ala. Introducing PAPOLBD114A failed to rescue PAPOLB-null phenotypes, such as reduced expression of haploid-specific mRNAs, spermiogenesis arrest, and male infertility. These results suggest that PAPOLB regulates spermatogenesis through its adenylation activity. PMID:27647534

  13. Cu-free cycloaddition for identifying catalytic active adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yekui; Yin, Jun

    2008-10-15

    To engineer the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), we developed a method to display NRPS modules on M13 phages and select catalytically active adenylation (A) domains that would load azide functionalized substrate analogs to the neighboring peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains. Biotin conjugated difluorinated cyclooctyne was used for copper free cycloaddition with an azide substituted substrate attached to PCP. Biotin-labeled phages were selected by binding to streptavidin.

  14. ets-2 Is a Target for an Akt (Protein Kinase B)/Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway in Macrophages of motheaten-viable Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James L.; Schaffner, Alicia E.; Hofmeister, Joseph K.; Hartman, Matthew; Wei, Guo; Forsthoefel, David; Hume, David A.; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor ets-2 was phosphorylated at residue threonine 72 in a colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)- and mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent manner in macrophages isolated from motheaten-viable (me-v) mice. The CSF-1 and ets-2 target genes coding for Bcl-x, urokinase plasminogen activator, and scavenger receptor were also expressed at high levels independent of CSF-1 addition to me-v cells. Akt (protein kinase B) was constitutively active in me-v macrophages, and an Akt immunoprecipitate catalyzed phosphorylation of ets-2 at threonine 72. The p54 isoform of c-jun N-terminal kinase–stress-activated kinase (JNK- SAPK) coimmunoprecipitated with Akt from me-v macrophages, and treatment of me-v cells with the specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell survival, Akt and JNK kinase activities, ets-2 phosphorylation, and Bcl-x mRNA expression. Therefore, ets-2 is a target for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt–JNK action, and the JNK p54 isoform is an ets-2 kinase in macrophages. Constitutive ets-2 activity may contribute to the pathology of me-v mice by increasing expression of genes like the Bcl-x gene that promote macrophage survival. PMID:11027273

  15. Selective induction of alternatively spliced FynT isoform by TNF facilitates persistent inflammatory responses in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chingli; Low, Clara Y. B.; Wong, Siew Ying; Lai, Mitchell K. P.; Tan, Michelle G. K.

    2017-01-01

    Fyn tyrosine kinase has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have previously reported that upregulation of the FynT isoform in AD brains was partly associated with astrocyte activation. In this study, we demonstrated selective FynT induction in murine cortex and primary astrocyte culture after prolonged exposure to inflammatory stimulants, suggesting that FynT may mediate persistent neuroinflammation. To delineate the functional role of astrocytic FynT in association with TNF-mediated inflammatory responses, immortalized normal human astrocytes (iNHA) stably expressing FynT kinase constitutively active (FynT-CA) or kinase dead (FynT-KD) mutants were treated with TNF and compared for inflammatory responses using high-throughput real-time RT-PCR and Luminex multi-analyte immunoassays. FynT-CA but not FynT-KD mutant exhibited drastic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines after prolonged exposure to TNF, which could be attenuated by treating with Fyn kinase inhibitor PP2 or silencing via FynT-specific DsiRNA. FynT kinase activity-dependent induction of PKCδ expression, PKCδ phosphorylation, as well as NFκB activation was detected at the late phase but not the early phase of TNF signaling. In conclusion, selective FynT induction by TNF may facilitate persistent inflammatory responses in astrocytes, which is highly relevant to chronic neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases including but not limited to AD. PMID:28266558

  16. Structure of the adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein didomain of the Microcystis aeruginosa microcystin synthetase McyG.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Feng; Dai, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Kang; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Ren, Yan-Min; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Microcystins, which are the most common cause of hepatotoxicity associated with cyanobacterial water blooms, are assembled in vivo on a large multienzyme complex via a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase (NRPS/PKS). The biosynthesis of microcystin in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 starts with the enzyme McyG, which contains an adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein (A-PCP) didomain for loading the starter unit to assemble the side chain of an Adda residue. However, the catalytic mechanism remains unclear. Here, the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the McyG A-PCP didomain complexed with the catalytic intermediate L-phenylalanyl-adenylate (L-Phe-AMP) is reported. Each asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, one of which consists of the A-PCP didomain and the other of which comprises only the A domain. Structural analyses suggest that Val227 is likely to be critical for the selection of hydrophobic substrates. Moreover, two distinct interfaces demonstrating variable crosstalk between the PCP domain and the A domain were observed. A catalytic cycle for the adenylation and peptide transfer of the A-PCP didomain is proposed.

  17. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  18. Structure of the RNA 30-Phosphate Cyclase-Adenylate Intermediate Illuminates Nucleotide Specificity and Covalent Nucleotidyl Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Smith, P; Shuman, S

    2010-01-01

    RNA 3-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) synthesizes RNA 2,3 cyclic phosphate ends via three steps: reaction with ATP to form a covalent RtcA-AMP intermediate; transfer of adenylate to an RNA 3-phosphate to form RNA(3)pp(5)A; and attack of the vicinal O2 on the 3-phosphorus to form a 2,3 cyclic phosphate. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RtcA-AMP intermediate, which reveals the mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer. Adenylate is linked via a phosphoamide bond to the His309 N{var_epsilon} atom. A network of hydrogen bonds to the ribose O2 and O3 accounts for the stringent ribonucleotide preference. Adenine is sandwiched in a hydrophobic pocket between Tyr284 and Pro131 and the preference for adenine is enforced by Phe135, which packs against the purine C2 edge. Two sulfates bound near the adenylate plausibly mimic the 3-terminal and penultimate phosphates of RNA. The structure illuminates how the four {alpha}2/{beta}4 domains contribute to substrate binding and catalysis.

  19. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  20. Adenylate pool and energy charge in human lymphocytes and granulocytes irradiated at 632 nm (HeNe laser)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognani, Lorenzo; Venturelli, T.; Volpi, N.; Zirilli, O.

    1995-05-01

    Aim of this report was to investigate the adenylate pool and the energy charge in human white blood cells exposed to increasing time (15, 30 and 60 min) of HeNe laser treatment. EDTA treated human blood diluted 1:1 with 0.88% KCl was added (1:5) with NaCl-dextran solution to allow sedimentation of red blood cells. 6 ml of the white cells floating in the supernatant were layered on 3 ml of Lymphoprep in plastic tubes and each tube was centrifuged (from 50 to 5000 X g for 5 min). Granulocytes were concentrated in the lower phase, whilst lymphocytes were in the intermediated phase. After further purification cytological homogeneity was tested by a cell counter. Granulocytes and lymphocytes were irradiated at +22°C with HeNe (Space, Valfivre equipment). On these population ATP was tested by luminometric procedure, the adenylate pool was separated by HPLC (Jasco) on neutralyzed perchloric extracts. ATP concentration increased in lymphocytes (+63.9%, p < 0.01) and in granulocytes (+25.0%, p < 0.05) after 60 min irradiation. The adenylate pool (tested by HPLC) does not change significatively in lymphocytes or granulocytes after 30 min irradiation, whilst in 60 min irradiated lymphocytes and granulocytes a significative increment was observed in nucleotide concentration. No changes were observed in energy charge according to Atkinson.

  1. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: Cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Lawton, R.G.; Gnegy, M.E. )

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. {sup 125}I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca{sup 2+} dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  2. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  3. Properties of the separated catalytic and regulatory units of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, S; Neer, E J

    1980-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase from bovine brain cortex was solubilized with 14 mM cholate and 1 M (NH4)2SO4. Gel filtration over a column of Sepharose 6B separated the catalytic unit (CU) from a factor (G/F) that confers responsiveness to 5'-guanylyl imidophosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. The separated CU, which elutes with a Kav, of 0.48 +/- 0.01 (n=5), is not responsive to p[NH]ppG or fluoride and is relatively inactive when Mg . ATP is the substrate but activated 8-15-fold by Mn2+. The separated G/F elutes with a Kav of 0.70 +/- 0.02 (n=4). It restores the responsiveness of the CU to p[NH]ppG and fluoride. Activation of the enzyme by p[NH]ppG before solubilization does not decrease the amount of G/F eluting with a Kav of 0.7. Therefore, the G/F is probably present in brain cortex in excess over the CU. p[NH]ppG stabilizes the G/F but not the CU against thermal inactivation, suggesting that it interacts with G/F and not with CU. Incubation of the G/F with p[NH]ppG before addition of CU markedly increases the rate of activation of the reconstituted enzyme by p[NH]ppG. We propose, therefore, that the rate-limiting step in adenylate cyclase activation is a process in G/F alone and not a slow conformational change in CU or a slow association of G/F with CU. Binding of p[NH]ppG to the isolated G/F appears to be readily reversible; the ability of fully activated G/F to stimulate CU can be blocked if GDP is added before CU. In contrast, after the CU has been activated by interaction with G/F, GDP cannot reverse the activation. This suggests that association with the CU increases the affinity of G/F for p[NH]ppG. PMID:6935648

  4. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  5. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  6. Myosin VI small insert isoform maintains exocytosis by tethering secretory granules to the cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Vanesa M; Papadopulos, Andreas; Malintan, Nancy T; Martin, Sally; Wallis, Tristan; Gormal, Rachel S; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2013-02-04

    Before undergoing neuroexocytosis, secretory granules (SGs) are mobilized and tethered to the cortical actin network by an unknown mechanism. Using an SG pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, we found that myosin VI was recruited to SGs in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Interfering with myosin VI function in PC12 cells reduced the density of SGs near the plasma membrane without affecting their biogenesis. Myosin VI knockdown selectively impaired a late phase of exocytosis, consistent with a replenishment defect. This exocytic defect was selectively rescued by expression of the myosin VI small insert (SI) isoform, which efficiently tethered SGs to the cortical actin network. These myosin VI SI-specific effects were prevented by deletion of a c-Src kinase phosphorylation DYD motif, identified in silico. Myosin VI SI thus recruits SGs to the cortical actin network, potentially via c-Src phosphorylation, thereby maintaining an active pool of SGs near the plasma membrane.

  7. Assembly