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Sample records for adenylate kinase isoform

  1. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  2. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  3. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  4. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Frings, S

    1993-02-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  5. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  6. Subcellular localization of adenylate kinases in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jipeng; Rahlfs, Stefan; Jortzik, Esther; Schirmer, R Heiner; Przyborski, Jude M; Becker, Katja

    2012-09-21

    Adenylate kinases (AK) play a key role in nucleotide signaling processes and energy metabolism by catalyzing the reversible conversion of ATP and AMP to 2 ADP. In the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum this reaction is mediated by AK1, AK2, and a GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (GAK). Here, we describe two additional adenylate kinase-like proteins: PfAKLP1, which is homologous to human AK6, and PfAKLP2. Using GFP-fusion proteins and life cell imaging, we demonstrate a cytosolic localization for PfAK1, PfAKLP1, and PfAKLP2, whereas PfGAK is located in the mitochondrion. PfAK2 is located at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, and this localization is driven by N-myristoylation. PMID:22819813

  7. An intrinsic adenylate kinase activity regulates gating of the ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-12-26

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Like other ABC transporters, it can hydrolyze ATP. Yet while ATP hydrolysis influences channel gating, it has long seemed puzzling that CFTR would require this reaction because anions flow passively through CFTR. Moreover, no other ion channel is known to require the large energy of ATP hydrolysis to gate. We found that CFTR also has adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP <=> ADP + ADP) that regulates gating. When functioning as an adenylate kinase, CFTR showed positive cooperativity for ATP suggesting its two nucleotide binding domains may dimerize. Thus, channel activity could be regulated by two different enzymatic reactions, ATPase and adenylate kinase, that share a common ATP binding site in the second nucleotide binding domain. At physiologic nucleotide concentrations, adenylate kinase activity, rather than ATPase activity may control gating, and therefore involve little energy consumption. PMID:14697202

  8. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  9. Characterization of metal and nucleotide liganded forms of adenylate kinase by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Briand, G; Perrier, V; Kouach, M; Takahashi, M; Gilles, A M; Bârzu, O

    1997-03-15

    Complexes of adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus stearothermophilus with the bisubstrate nucleotide analog P1,P5-di(adenosine 5')-pentaphosphate and with metal ions (Zn2+ and/or Mg2+) were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. P1,P5-di(adenosine 5')-pentaphosphate. adenylate kinase complex was detected in the positive mode at pH as low as 3.8. Binding of nucleotide to adenylate kinase stabilizes the overall structure of the protein and preserves the Zn2+ chelated form of the enzyme from the gram-positive organisms. In this way, it is possible in a single mass spectrometry experiment to screen metal-chelating adenylate kinases, without use of radioactively labeled compounds. Binding of Mg2+ to enzyme via P1,P5-di(adenosine 5')-pentaphosphate was also demonstrated by mass spectrometry. Although no amino acid side chain in adenylate kinase is supposed to interact with Mg2+, Asp93 in porcine muscle cytosolic enzyme, equivalent to Asp84 in the E. coli adenylate kinase, was proposed to stabilize the nucleotide.Mg2+ complex via water molecules. PMID:9056261

  10. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Are the essential lysines essential?

    PubMed

    Tian, G C; Yan, H G; Jiang, R T; Kishi, F; Nakazawa, A; Tsai, M D

    1990-05-01

    Using site-specific mutagenesis, we have probed the structural and functional roles of lysine-21 and lysine-27 of adenylate kinase (AK) from chicken muscle expressed in Escherichia coli. The two residues were chosen since according to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) model [Mildvan, A. S., & Fry, D. C. (1987) Adv. Enzymol. 58, 241-313], they are located near the alpha- and the gamma-phosphates, respectively, of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the AK-MgATP complex. In addition, a lysine residue (Lys-21 in the case of AK) along with a glycine-rich loop is considered "essential" in the catalysis of kinases and other nucleotide binding proteins. The Lys-27 to methionine (K27M) mutant showed only slight increases in kcat and Km, but a substantial increase (1.8 kcal/mol) in the free energy of unfolding, relative to the WT AK. For proper interpretation of the steady-state kinetic data, viscosity-dependent kinetics was used to show that the chemical step is partially rate-limiting in the catalysis of AK. Computer modeling suggested that the folded form of K27M could gain stability (relative to the wild type) via hydrophobic interactions of Met-27 with Val-179 and Phe-183 and/or formation of a charge-transfer complex between Met-27 and Phe-183. The latter was supported by an upfield shift of the methyl protons of Met-27 in 1H NMR. Other than this, the 1H NMR spectrum of K27M is very similar to that of WT, suggesting little perturbation in the global or even local conformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2161682

  11. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  12. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  13. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  14. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  15. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  16. Role of CFTR's intrinsic adenylate kinase activity in gating of the Cl(-) channel.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2007-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl(-)channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. CFTR features the modular design characteristic of ABC transporters, which includes two membrane-spanning domains forming the channel pore, and two ABC nucleotide-binding domains that interact with ATP and contain the enzymatic activity coupled to normal gating. Like other ABC transporters CFTR is an ATPase (ATP + H(2)O --> ADP + Pi). Recent work has shown that CFTR also possesses intrinsic adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP left arrow over right arrow ADP + ADP). This finding raises important questions: How does AMP influence CFTR gating? Why does ADP inhibit CFTR current? Which enzymatic activity gates CFTR in vivo? Are there implications for other ABC transporters? This minireview attempts to shed light on these questions by summarizing recent advances in our understanding of the role of the CFTR adenylate kinase activity for channel gating. PMID:17965924

  17. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  18. Clinico-pathological correlation in adenylate kinase 5 autoimmune limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline S L; Kramer, Joel; Centurion, Alejandro; Dalmau, Josep; Huang, Eric; Cotter, Jennifer A; Geschwind, Michael D

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies associated with autoimmune limbic encephalitis (ALE) have been well-characterized, with intracellular neuronal antibodies being less responsive to immunotherapy than antibodies to cell surface antigens. Adenylate kinase 5 (AK5) is a nucleoside monophosphate kinase vital for neuronal-specific metabolism and is located intracellularly in the cytosol and expressed exclusively in the brain. Antibodies to AK5 had been previously identified but were not known to be associated with human disease prior to the report of two patients with AK5-related ALE (Tuzun et al., 2007). We present the complete clinical picture for one of these patients and the first reported neuropathology for AK5 ALE. PMID:26439959

  19. Adenylate kinase isozyme 2 is essential for growth and development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Murakami, Ryutaro; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2009-05-01

    Adenylate kinases are phylogenetically widespread, highly conserved, and involved in energy metabolism and energy transfer. Of these, adenylate kinase (AK) isozyme 2 is uniquely localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and its physiological role remains largely unknown. In this study, we selected Drosophila melanogaster to analyze its role in vivo. AK isozyme cDNAs were cloned and their gene expressions were characterized in D. melanogaster. The deduced amino acid sequences contain highly conserved motifs for P-loop, NMP binding, and LID domains of AKs. In addition, the effects of AK2 gene knockout on phenotype of AK2 mutants were examined using P-element technology. Although homozygous AK2 mutated embryos developed without any visible defects, their growth ceased and they died before reaching the third instar larval stage. Maternally provided AK2 mRNA was detected in fertilized eggs, and weak AK2 activity was observed in first and second instar larvae of the homozygous AK2 mutants, suggesting that maternally provided AK2 is sufficient for embryonic development. Disappearance of AK2 activity during larval stages resulted in growth arrest and eventual death. These results demonstrate that AK2 plays a critical role in adenine nucleotide metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is essential for growth in D. melanogaster. PMID:19416704

  20. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Richards, David H.; Mitch, William A.; Wilson, Corey J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections, and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary-structure, protein hydrodynamics and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance. Namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  1. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Richards, David H; Mitch, William A; Wilson, Corey J

    2015-10-16

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study, we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary structure, protein hydrodynamics, and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance, namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  2. RNA Mimicry by the Fap7 Adenylate Kinase in Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Réty, Stéphane; Lebaron, Simon; Deschamps, Patrick; Bareille, Joseph; Jombart, Julie; Robert-Paganin, Julien; Delbos, Lila; Chardon, Florian; Zhang, Elodie; Charenton, Clément; Tollervey, David; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    During biogenesis of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, the pre-40S particles are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA to mature 18S rRNA. Amongst the factors involved in this maturation step, Fap7 is unusual, as it both interacts with ribosomal protein Rps14 and harbors adenylate kinase activity, a function not usually associated with ribonucleoprotein assembly. Human hFap7 also regulates Cajal body assembly and cell cycle progression via the p53–MDM2 pathway. This work presents the functional and structural characterization of the Fap7–Rps14 complex. We report that Fap7 association blocks the RNA binding surface of Rps14 and, conversely, Rps14 binding inhibits adenylate kinase activity of Fap7. In addition, the affinity of Fap7 for Rps14 is higher with bound ADP, whereas ATP hydrolysis dissociates the complex. These results suggest that Fap7 chaperones Rps14 assembly into pre-40S particles via RNA mimicry in an ATP-dependent manner. Incorporation of Rps14 by Fap7 leads to a structural rearrangement of the platform domain necessary for the pre-rRNA to acquire a cleavage competent conformation. PMID:24823650

  3. Learning our ABCs: Rad50 directs MRN repair functions via adenylate kinase activity from the conserved ATP binding cassette.

    PubMed

    Williams, R Scott; Tainer, John A

    2007-03-23

    In groundbreaking work, Bhaskara et al. (2007) demonstrate in a recent issue of Molecular Cell that the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex harbors distinct, yet chemically related, ATPase and adenylate kinase catalytic activities that together orchestrate multiple requisite MRN functional and conformational states in dsDNA break repair sensing and signaling with general implications for ABC ATPases. PMID:17386254

  4. A mutation in CFTR modifies the effects of the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A on channel gating.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-12-01

    Mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis. The CFTR anion channel is controlled by ATP binding and enzymatic activity at the two nucleotide-binding domains. CFTR exhibits two types of enzymatic activity: 1), ATPase activity in the presence of ATP and 2), adenylate kinase activity in the presence of ATP plus physiologic concentrations of AMP or ADP. Previous work showed that P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate (Ap(5)A), a specific adenylate kinases inhibitor, inhibited wild-type CFTR. In this study, we report that Ap(5)A increased activity of CFTR with an L1254A mutation. This mutation increased the EC50 for ATP by >10-fold and reduced channel activity by prolonging the closed state. Ap(5)A did not elicit current on its own nor did it alter ATP EC50 or maximal current. However, it changed the relationship between ATP concentration and current. At submaximal ATP concentrations, Ap(5)A stimulated current by stabilizing the channel open state. Whereas previous work indicated that adenylate kinase activity regulated channel opening, our data suggest that Ap(5)A binding may also influence channel closing. These results also suggest that a better understanding of the adenylate kinase activity of CFTR may be of value in developing new therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis. PMID:18805924

  5. A Mutation in CFTR Modifies the Effects of the Adenylate Kinase Inhibitor Ap5A on Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis. The CFTR anion channel is controlled by ATP binding and enzymatic activity at the two nucleotide-binding domains. CFTR exhibits two types of enzymatic activity: 1), ATPase activity in the presence of ATP and 2), adenylate kinase activity in the presence of ATP plus physiologic concentrations of AMP or ADP. Previous work showed that P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′)pentaphosphate (Ap5A), a specific adenylate kinases inhibitor, inhibited wild-type CFTR. In this study, we report that Ap5A increased activity of CFTR with an L1254A mutation. This mutation increased the EC50 for ATP by >10-fold and reduced channel activity by prolonging the closed state. Ap5A did not elicit current on its own nor did it alter ATP EC50 or maximal current. However, it changed the relationship between ATP concentration and current. At submaximal ATP concentrations, Ap5A stimulated current by stabilizing the channel open state. Whereas previous work indicated that adenylate kinase activity regulated channel opening, our data suggest that Ap5A binding may also influence channel closing. These results also suggest that a better understanding of the adenylate kinase activity of CFTR may be of value in developing new therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis. PMID:18805924

  6. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  7. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  8. ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) adenylate kinase cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at separate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Elcock, Adrian H; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-09-20

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP &lrarr2; 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  9. Minimum Free Energy Path of Ligand-Induced Transition in Adenylate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Terada, Tohru; Furuta, Tadaomi; Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale conformational changes in proteins involve barrier-crossing transitions on the complex free energy surfaces of high-dimensional space. Such rare events cannot be efficiently captured by conventional molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that, by combining the on-the-fly string method and the multi-state Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method, the free energy profile of a conformational transition pathway in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase can be characterized in a high-dimensional space. The minimum free energy paths of the conformational transitions in adenylate kinase were explored by the on-the-fly string method in 20-dimensional space spanned by the 20 largest-amplitude principal modes, and the free energy and various kinds of average physical quantities along the pathways were successfully evaluated by the MBAR method. The influence of ligand binding on the pathways was characterized in terms of rigid-body motions of the lid-shaped ATP-binding domain (LID) and the AMP-binding (AMPbd) domains. It was found that the LID domain was able to partially close without the ligand, while the closure of the AMPbd domain required the ligand binding. The transition state ensemble of the ligand bound form was identified as those structures characterized by highly specific binding of the ligand to the AMPbd domain, and was validated by unrestrained MD simulations. It was also found that complete closure of the LID domain required the dehydration of solvents around the P-loop. These findings suggest that the interplay of the two different types of domain motion is an essential feature in the conformational transition of the enzyme. PMID:22685395

  10. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  11. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  12. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding Halobacterium halobium adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Inouye, S; Kawai, M; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Gõ, M; Nakazawa, A

    1996-10-10

    The gene (AK) encoding adenylate kinase (AK) of Halobacterium halobium was cloned. AK consisted of 648 bp and coded for 216 amino acids (aa). S1 mapping and primer extension experiments indicated that the transcription start point (tsp) was located immediately upstream from the start codon. The TAT-like promoter sequence was found at a position 20-24 bp upstream from tsp. The most striking property of the enzyme was a putative Zn finger-like structure with four cysteines. It might contribute to the structural stability of the molecule in high-salt conditions. Phylogenetic analysis indicated two lineages of the AK family, the short and long types which diverged a long time ago, possibly before the separation of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although the H. halobium AK belongs to the long-type AK lineage, it is located in an intermediary position between the two lineages of the phylogenetic tree, indicating early divergence of the gene along the long-type lineage. PMID:8917077

  13. Identification of antifungal niphimycin from Streptomyces sp. KP6107 by screening based on adenylate kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yoon; Kim, Jeong Do; Hong, Jin Sung; Ham, Jong Hyun; Kim, Beom Seok

    2013-07-01

    Microbial culture extracts are used for natural product screening to find antifungal lead compounds. A microbial culture extract library was constructed using 343 actinomycete isolates to examine the value of the adenylate kinase (AK) assay for screening to identify antifungal metabolites that disrupt cell integrity in plant pathogenic fungi. A culture extract of Streptomyces sp. strain KP6107 lysed cells of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici which resulted in high AK activity. The active ingredient N-1 was purified from the culture extract using various chromatographic procedures and identified to be the guanidyl-polyol macrolide antibiotic, niphimycin, which is a potent fungal cell membrane disruptor. Niphimycin showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Alternaria mali, Aspergillus oryzae, Colletotrichum coccodes, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Cercospora canescens, Cylindrocarpon destructans, F. oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum, F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, and Rhizoctonia solani at concentrations of 8-64 µg ml(-1). Anthracnose development in pepper plants was completely inhibited by treatment with 50 µg ml(-1) niphimycin, which was as effective as chlorothalonil. These results show that the AK assay is an efficient and selective tool in screening for cell membrane/wall disruptors of plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:22915202

  14. Energy landscape and multiroute folding of topologically complex proteins adenylate kinase and 2ouf-knot.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfei; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Wang, Wei; Takada, Shoji

    2012-10-30

    While fast folding of small proteins has been relatively well characterized by experiments and theories, much less is known for slow folding of larger proteins, for which recent experiments suggested quite complex and rich folding behaviors. Here, we address how the energy landscape theory can be applied to these slow folding reactions. Combining the perfect-funnel approximation with a multiscale method, we first extended our previous atomic-interaction based coarse grained (AICG) model to take into account local flexibility of protein molecules. Using this model, we then investigated the energy landscapes and folding routes of two proteins with complex topologies: a multidomain protein adenylate kinase (AKE) and a knotted protein 2ouf-knot. In the AKE folding, consistent with experimental results, the kinetic free energy surface showed several substates between the fully unfolded and native states. We characterized the structural features of these substates and transitions among them, finding temperature-dependent multiroute folding. For protein 2ouf-knot, we found that the improved atomic-interaction based coarse-grained model can spontaneously tie a knot and fold the protein with a probability up to 96%. The computed folding rate of the knotted protein was much slower than that of its unknotted counterpart, in agreement with experimental findings. Similar to the AKE case, the 2ouf-knot folding exhibited several substates and transitions among them. Interestingly, we found a dead-end substate that lacks the knot, thus suggesting backtracking mechanisms. PMID:22753508

  15. The DUSP26 phosphatase activator adenylate kinase 2 regulates FADD phosphorylation and cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Lee, Ho-June; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Song-Yi; Choi, Ji-Woo; Su Hwang, Deog; Kim, Key-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Zhang, Jianke; Youn, Hyun-Jo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-02-01

    Adenylate kinase 2 (AK2), which balances adenine nucleotide pool, is a multi-functional protein. Here we show that AK2 negatively regulates tumour cell growth. AK2 forms a complex with dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) phosphatase and stimulates DUSP26 activity independently of its AK activity. AK2/DUSP26 phosphatase protein complex dephosphorylates fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and regulates cell growth. AK2 deficiency enhances cell proliferation and induces tumour formation in a xenograft assay. This anti-growth function of AK2 is associated with its DUSP26-stimulating activity. Downregulation of AK2 is frequently found in tumour cells and human cancer tissues showing high levels of phospho-FADDSer194. Moreover, reconstitution of AK2 in AK2-deficient tumour cells retards both cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. Consistent with this, AK2+/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit enhanced cell proliferation with a significant alteration in phospho-FADDSer191. These results suggest that AK2 is an associated activator of DUSP26 and suppresses cell proliferation by FADD dephosphorylation, postulating AK2 as a negative regulator of tumour growth.

  16. Down-regulation of adenylate kinase 5 in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and rat model.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yujie; Hu, Xiaotong; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-07-15

    Adenylate kinase 5 (AK5) is one member of the AK family and plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Different from the other AKs, AK5 is almost exclusively expressed in the brain. However, its exact biological functions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to explore the expression pattern of AK5 in patients with refractory epilepsy and in a chronic pilocarpine-induced epileptic rat model. Using Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis, we found that AK5 protein was mainly expressed in neurons, demonstrated by colocalization with the dendritic marker, MAP2, which were similar to the corresponding controls. However, the expression of AK5 decreased remarkably in epileptic patients and experimental rats. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the interaction of AK5 with copine VI (CPNE6, a brain specific protein) increased in epileptic patients and rat models. Our results are the first to indicate that the expression of AK5 in epileptic brain tissue may play important roles in epilepsy, especially refractory epilepsy. PMID:27288770

  17. Differential Expression of Adenine Nucleotide Converting Enzymes in Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space: A Potential Role of Adenylate Kinase Isozyme 2 in Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanimura, Ayako; Horiguchi, Taigo; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide dynamics in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) play a key role in oxidative phosphorylation. In a previous study, Drosophila adenylate kinase isozyme 2 (Dak2) knockout was reported to cause developmental lethality at the larval stage in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, two other studies reported that AK2 is a responsible gene for reticular dysgenesis (RD), a human disease that is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency and deafness. Therefore, mitochondrial AK2 may play an important role in hematopoietic differentiation and ontogenesis. Three additional adenine nucleotide metabolizing enzymes, including mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1 and CKMT2) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase isoform D (NDPK-D), have been found in IMS. Although these kinases generate ADP for ATP synthesis, their involvement in RD remains unclear and still an open question. In this study, mRNA and protein expressions of these mitochondrial kinases were firstly examined in mouse ES cells, day 8 embryos, and 7-week-old adult mice. It was found that their expressions are spatiotemporally regulated, and Ak2 is exclusively expressed in bone marrow, which is a major hematopoietic tissue in adults. In subsequent experiments, we identified increased expression of both AK2 and CKMT1 during macrophage differentiation and exclusive production of AK2 during neutrophil differentiation using HL-60 cells as an in vitro model of hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, AK2 knockdown specifically inhibited neutrophil differentiation without affecting macrophage differentiation. These data suggest that AK2 is indispensable for neutrophil differentiation and indicate a possible causative link between AK2 deficiency and neutropenia in RD. PMID:24587121

  18. Role of Rho kinase isoforms in murine allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Liu, P-Y; Kasahara, D I; Williams, A S; Verbout, N G; Halayko, A J; Fedulov, A; Shoji, T; Williams, E S; Noma, K; Shore, S A; Liao, J K

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinases (ROCKs) reduces allergic airway responses in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in these responses. Wildtype (WT) mice and heterozygous ROCK1 and ROCK2 knockout mice (ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-), respectively) were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin. ROCK expression and activation were assessed by western blotting. Airway responsiveness was measured by forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lungs were fixed for histological assessment. Compared with WT mice, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were 50% lower in lungs of ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice, respectively, without changes in the other isoform. In WT lungs, ROCK activation increased after ovalbumin challenge and was sustained for several hours. This activation was reduced in ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) lungs. Airway responsiveness was comparable in WT, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice challenged with PBS. Ovalbumin challenge caused airway hyperresponsiveness in WT, but not ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. Lavage eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-challenged ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) versus WT mice. Ovalbumin-induced changes in lavage interleukin-13, interleukin-5 and lymphocytes were also reduced in ROCK1(+/-) mice. In conclusion, both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are important in regulating allergic airway responses. PMID:21565918

  19. Mapping the Dynamics Landscape of Conformational Transitions in Enzyme: The Adenylate Kinase Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Conformational transition describes the essential dynamics and mechanism of enzymes in pursuing their various functions. The fundamental and practical challenge to researchers is to quantitatively describe the roles of large-scale dynamic transitions for regulating the catalytic processes. In this study, we tackled this challenge by exploring the pathways and free energy landscape of conformational changes in adenylate kinase (AdK), a key ubiquitous enzyme for cellular energy homeostasis. Using explicit long-timescale (up to microseconds) molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, we determined at the atomistic level the intermediate conformational states and mapped the transition pathways of AdK in the presence and absence of ligands. There is clearly chronological operation of the functional domains of AdK. Specifically in the ligand-free AdK, there is no significant energy barrier in the free energy landscape separating the open and closed states. Instead there are multiple intermediate conformational states, which facilitate the rapid transitions of AdK. In the ligand-bound AdK, the closed conformation is energetically most favored with a large energy barrier to open it up, and the conformational population prefers to shift to the closed form coupled with transitions. The results suggest a perspective for a hybrid of conformational selection and induced fit operations of ligand binding to AdK. These observations, depicted in the most comprehensive and quantitative way to date, to our knowledge, emphasize the underlying intrinsic dynamics of AdK and reveal the sophisticated conformational transitions of AdK in fulfilling its enzymatic functions. The developed methodology can also apply to other proteins and biomolecular systems. PMID:26244746

  20. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Rory A.; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated. PMID:26313408

  1. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated. PMID:26313408

  2. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  3. Analysis of Substrates of Protein Kinase C Isoforms in Human Breast Cells By The Traceable Kinase Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyu; Zhao, Xin; Abeyweera, Thushara P.; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    A previous report (Biochemistry 46: 2364–2370, 2007) described the application of The Traceable Kinase Method to identify substrates of PKCα in non-transformed human breast MCF-10A cells. Here, a non-radioactive variation of this method compared the phospho-protein profiles of three traceable PKC isoforms (α, δ and ζ) for the purpose of identifying novel, isoform-selective substrates. Each FLAG-tagged traceable kinase was expressed and co-immunoprecipitated along with high affinity substrates. The isolated kinase and its associated substrates were subjected to an in vitro phosphorylation reaction with traceable kinase-specific N6-phenyl-ATP, and the resulting phospho-proteins were analyzed by Western blot with an antibody that recognizes the phosphorylated PKC consensus site. Phospho-protein profiles generated by PKC-α and -δ were similar and differed markedly from that of PKC-ζ. Mass spectrometry of selected bands revealed known PKC substrates and several potential substrates that included the small GTPase-associated effector protein Cdc42 effector protein-4 (CEP4). Of those potential substrates tested, only CEP4 was phosphorylated by pure PKC-α, –δ, and −ζ isoforms in vitro, and by endogenous PKC isoforms in MCF-10A cells treated with DAG-lactone, a membrane permeable PKC activator. Under these conditions, the stoichiometry of CEP4 phosphorylation was 3.2 ± 0.5 (mol phospho-CEP4/mol CEP4). Following knock-down with isoform-specific shRNA-encoding plasmids, phosphorylation of CEP4 was substantially decreased in response to silencing of each of the three isoforms (PKC–α, –δ, or –ζ), whereas testing of kinase-dead mutants supported a role for only PKC-α and –δ in CEP4 phosphorylation. These findings identify CEP4 as a novel intracellular PKC substrate that is phosphorylated by multiple PKC isoforms. PMID:22897107

  4. Structural characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei adenylate kinase (Adk): Profound asymmetry in the crystal structure of the 'open' state

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, G.W.; Robinson, H.; Abendroth, J.; Staker, B. L.; Myler, P. J.

    2010-04-16

    In all organisms adenylate kinases (Adks) play a vital role in cellular energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. Due to differences in catalytic properties between the Adks found in prokaryotes and in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes, there is interest in targeting this enzyme for new drug therapies against infectious bacterial agents. Here we report the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure for the 220-residue Adk from Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpAdk), the etiological agent responsible for the infectious disease melioidosis. The general structure of apo BpAdk is similar to other Adk structures, composed of a CORE subdomain with peripheral ATP-binding (ATP{sub bd}) and LID subdomains. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit have significantly different conformations, with a backbone RMSD of 1.46 {angstrom}. These two BpAdk conformations may represent 'open' Adk sub-states along the preferential pathway to the 'closed' substrate-bound state.

  5. A mitochondrial RNAi screen defines cellular bioenergetic determinants and identifies an adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanning, Nathan J.; Looyenga, Brendan D.; Kauffman, Audra L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Sudderth, Jessica; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Altered cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial function are major features of several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Given this important link to human health, we sought to define proteins within mitochondria that are critical for maintaining homeostatic ATP levels. We screened an RNAi library targeting >1,000 nuclear-encoded genes whose protein products localize to the mitochondria in multiple metabolic conditions to examine their effect on cellular ATP levels. We identified a mechanism by which electron transport chain perturbation under glycolytic conditions increased ATP production through enhanced glycolytic flux; thereby highlighting the cellular potential for metabolic plasticity. Additionally, we identified a mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK4) that regulates cellular ATP levels, AMPK signaling, and whose expression significantly correlates with glioma patient survival. As a result, this study maps the bioenergetic landscape of >1,000 mitochondrial proteins in the context of varied metabolic substrates and begins to link key metabolic genes with clinical outcome. PMID:24767988

  6. Associative mechanism for phosphoryl transfer: a molecular dynamics simulation of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase complexed with its substrates.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Harini; Lou, Hongfeng; Kimple, Adam; Vieille, Claire; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-01-01

    The ternary complex of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ECAK) with its substrates adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and Mg-ATP, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP, was studied using molecular dynamics. The starting structure for the simulation was assembled from the crystal structures of ECAK complexed with the bisubstrate analog diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP(5)A) and of Bacillus stearothermophilus adenylate kinase complexed with AP(5)A, Mg(2+), and 4 coordinated water molecules, and by deleting 1 phosphate group from AP(5)A. The interactions of ECAK residues with the various moieties of ATP and AMP were compared to those inferred from NMR, X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and enzyme kinetic studies. The simulation supports the hypothesis that hydrogen bonds between AMP's adenine and the protein are at the origin of the high nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) specificity of AK. The ATP adenine and ribose moieties are only loosely bound to the protein, while the ATP phosphates are strongly bound to surrounding residues. The coordination sphere of Mg(2+), consisting of 4 waters and oxygens of the ATP beta- and gamma-phosphates, stays approximately octahedral during the simulation. The important role of the conserved Lys13 in the P loop in stabilizing the active site by bridging the ATP and AMP phosphates is evident. The influence of Mg(2+), of its coordination waters, and of surrounding charged residues in maintaining the geometry and distances of the AMP alpha-phosphate and ATP beta- and gamma-phosphates is sufficient to support an associative reaction mechanism for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:15521058

  7. Relationship between bacterial virulence and nucleotide metabolism: a mutation in the adenylate kinase gene renders Yersinia pestis avirulent.

    PubMed Central

    Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Ionescu, Mihaela; Chrisova, Petya; Foulon, Jeannine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bârzu, Octavian

    2003-01-01

    Nucleoside monophosphate kinases (NMPKs) are essential catalysts for bacterial growth and multiplication. These enzymes display high primary sequence identities among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, belongs to this family. However, it was previously shown that its thymidylate kinase (TMPKyp) exhibits biochemical properties significantly different from those of its Escherichia coli counterpart [Chenal-Francisque, Tourneux, Carniel, Christova, Li de la Sierra, Barzu and Gilles (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 265, 112-119]. In this work, the adenylate kinase (AK) of Y. pestis (AKyp) was characterized. As with TMPKyp, AKyp displayed a lower thermodynamic stability than other studied AKs. Two mutations in AK (Ser129Phe and Pro87Ser), previously shown to induce a thermosensitive growth defect in E. coli, were introduced into AKyp. The recombinant variants had a lower stability than wild-type AKyp and a higher susceptibility to proteolytic digestion. When the Pro87Ser substitution was introduced into the chromosomal adk gene of Y. pestis, growth of the mutant strain was altered at the non-permissive temperature of 37 degree C. In virulence testings, less than 50 colony forming units (CFU) of wild-type Y. pestis killed 100% of the mice upon subcutaneous infection, whereas bacterial loads as high as 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of the adk mutant were unable to kill any animals. PMID:12879903

  8. Isoform Switch of Pyruvate Kinase M1 Indeed Occurs but Not to Pyruvate Kinase M2 in Human Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Cheng; Yan, Li; Wang, Lin; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yongxing; Shi, Yu; Wang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Muscle type of pyruvate kinase (PKM) is one of the key mediators of the Warburg effect and tumor metabolism. Due to alternative splicing, there are at least 12 known isoforms of the PKM gene, of which PKM1 and PKM2 are two major isoforms with only a 23 amino acid sequenced difference but quite different characteristics and functions. It was previously thought the isoform switch from PKM1 to PKM2 resulted in high PKM2 expression in tumors, providing a great advantage to tumor cells. However, this traditional view was challenged by two recent studies; one study claimed that this isoform switch does not occur during the Warburg effect; the other study asserted that the isoform switch is tissue-specific. Here, we re-analyzed the RNA sequencing data of 25 types of human tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas Data Portal, and confirmed that PKM2 was the major isoform in the tumors and was highly elevated in addition to the entire PKM gene. We further demonstrated that the expression level of PKM1 significantly declined even though there was substantially increased expression of the entire PKM gene. The proportion of PKM1 in total transcript variants also significantly declined in tumors but the proportion of PKM2 did not change accordingly. Therefore, we conclude that the isoform switch of PKM1 does indeed occur, but it switches to other isoforms rather than PKM2. Considering the change in the expression levels of PKM1, PKM2 and the entire PKM gene, we propose that the upregulation of PKM2 is primarily due to elevated transcriptional levels of the entire PKM gene, instead of the isoform switch. PMID:25738776

  9. Dynamic conformational ensembles regulate casein kinase-1 isoforms: Insights from molecular dynamics and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2016-04-01

    Casein kinase-1 (CK1) isoforms actively participate in the down-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway; however recent studies have shown their active roles in oncogenesis of various tissues through this pathway. Functional loss of two isoforms (CK1-α/ε) has been shown to activate the carcinogenic pathway which involves the stabilization of of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Development of anticancer therapeutics is very laborious task and depends upon the structural and conformational details of the target. This study focuses on, how the structural dynamics and conformational changes of two CK1 isoforms are synchronized in carcinogenic pathway. The conformational dynamics in kinases is the responsible for their action as has been supported by the molecular docking experiments. PMID:26788877

  10. Heat-shock protein-25/27 phosphorylation by the delta isoform of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, E T; Peters, C A; Kline, M; Cutler, R E; Shanmugam, M; Hunzicker-Dunn, M

    1998-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) are widely expressed 25-28 kDa proteins whose functions are dynamically regulated by phosphorylation. While recent efforts have clearly delineated a stress-responsive p38 mitogen-activated protein-kinase (MAPK)-dependent kinase pathway culminating in activation of the heat-shock (HSP)-kinases, mitogen-activated protein-kinase-activated protein kinase-2 and -3, not all sHSP phosphorylation events can be explained by the p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. The contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) to sHSP phosphorylation was suggested by early studies but later questioned on the basis of the reported poor ability of purified PKC to phosphorylate sHSP in vitro. The current study re-evaluates the role of PKC in sHSP phosphorylation in the light of the isoform complexity of the PKC family. We evaluated the sHSP phosphorylation status in rat corpora lutea obtained from two stages of pregnancy, mid-pregnancy and late-pregnancy, which express different levels of the novel PKC isoform, PKC-delta. Two-dimensional Western blot analysis showed that HSP-27 was more highly phosphorylated in vivo in corpora lutea of late pregnancy, corresponding to the developmental stage in which PKC-delta is abundant and active. Late-pregnant luteal extracts contained a lipid-sensitive HSP-kinase activity which exactly co-purified with PKC-delta using hydroxyapatite and S-Sepharose column chromatography. To determine whether there might be preferential phosphorylation of sHSP by a particular PKC isoform, purified recombinant PKC isoforms corresponding to those PKC isoforms detected in rat corpora lutea were evaluated for HSP-kinase activity in vitro. Recombinant PKC-delta effectively catalysed the phosphorylation of sHSP in vitro, and PKC-alpha was 30-50% as effective as an HSP-kinase; other PKCs tested (beta1, beta2, epsilon and zeta) were poor HSP-kinases. These results show that select PKC family members can function as direct HSP-kinases in vitro. Moreover, the

  11. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  12. Oda5p, a Novel Axonemal Protein Required for Assembly of the Outer Dynein Arm and an Associated Adenylate KinaseD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wirschell, Maureen; Pazour, Gregory; Yoda, Akinori; Hirono, Masafumi; Kamiya, Ritsu; Witman, George B.

    2004-01-01

    Of the uncloned ODA genes required for outer dynein arm assembly in Chlamydomonas, ODA5 and ODA10 are of particular interest because they do not encode known subunits of the outer arm or the outer dynein arm-docking complex (ODA-DC), and because genetic studies suggest their products interact. Beginning with a tagged oda5 allele, we isolated genomic and cDNA clones of the wild-type gene. ODA5 predicts a novel, 66-kDa coiled-coil protein. Immunoblotting indicates Oda5p is an axonemal component that assembles onto the axoneme independently of the outer arm and ODA-DC and is uniquely missing in oda5 and oda10 axonemes. Oda5p is released from the axoneme by extraction with 0.6 M KCl, but the soluble Oda5p does not cosediment with the outer dynein arm/ODA-DC in sucrose gradients. Quantitative mass spectrometry by using isotope coded affinity tagging revealed that a previously unidentified adenylate kinase is reduced 35–50% in oda5 flagella. Direct enzymatic assays demonstrated a comparable reduction in adenylate kinase activity in oda5 flagella, and also in oda10 flagella, but not in flagella of other oda mutants. We propose that Oda5p is part of a novel axonemal complex that is required for outer arm assembly and anchors adenylate kinase in proximity to the arm. PMID:15064350

  13. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Conformational Transitions of Adenylate Kinase: A Computational Evidence for the Conformational Selection Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jie; Hao, Pei; Li, Yi-Xue; Wang, Jing-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ADK) is a monomeric phosphotransferase enzyme that catalyzes reversible transfer of phosphoryl group from ATP to AMP with a large-scale domain motion. The detailed mechanism for this conformational transition remains unknown. In the current study, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations on both open and closed states of ADK. Based on the structural analyses of the simulation trajectories, we detected over 20 times conformational transitions between the open and closed states of ADK and identified two novel conformations as intermediate states in the catalytic processes. With these findings, we proposed a possible mechanism for the large-scale domain motion of Escherichia coli ADK and its catalytic process: (1) the substrate free ADK adopted an open conformation; (2) ATP bound with LID domain closure; (3) AMP bound with NMP domain closure; (4) phosphoryl transfer occurred with ATP, and AMP converted into two ADPs, and no conformational transition was detected in the enzyme; (5) LID domain opened with one ADP released; (6) another ADP released with NMP domain open. As both open and closed states sampled a wide range of conformation transitions, our simulation strongly supported the conformational selection mechanism for Escherichia coli ADK. PMID:23936827

  14. Effectiveness and limitations of local structural entropy optimization in the thermal stabilization of mesophilic and thermophilic adenylate kinases.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sojin; Bannen, Ryan M; Rutkoski, Thomas J; Phillips, George N; Bae, Euiyoung

    2014-10-01

    Local structural entropy (LSE) is a descriptor for the extent of conformational heterogeneity in short protein sequences that is computed from structural information derived from the Protein Data Bank. Reducing the LSE of a protein sequence by introducing amino acid mutations can result in fewer conformational states and thus a more stable structure, indicating that LSE optimization can be used as a protein stabilization method. Here, we describe a series of LSE optimization experiments designed to stabilize mesophilic and thermophilic adenylate kinases (AKs) and report crystal structures of LSE-optimized AK variants. In the mesophilic AK, thermal stabilization by LSE reduction was effective but limited. Structural analyses of the LSE-optimized mesophilic AK variants revealed a strong correlation between LSE and the apolar buried surface area. Additional mutations designed to introduce noncovalent interactions between distant regions of the polypeptide resulted in further stabilization. Unexpectedly, optimizing the LSE of the thermophilic AK resulted in a decrease in thermal stability. This destabilization was reduced when charged residues were excluded from the possible substitutions during LSE optimization. These observations suggest that stabilization by LSE reduction may result from the optimization of local hydrophobic contacts. The limitations of this process are likely due to ignorance of other interactions that bridge distant regions in a given amino acid sequence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and limitations of LSE optimization as a protein stabilization strategy and highlight the importance and complementarity of local conformational stability and global interactions in protein thermal stability. PMID:24931334

  15. Protein kinase C in pain: Involvement of multiple isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Kandy T.; Mohammad, Husam; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2007-01-01

    Pain is the primary reason that people seek medical care. At present chronic unremitting pain is the third greatest health problem after heart disease and cancer. Chronic pain is an economic burden in lost wages, lost productivity, medical expenses, legal fees and compensation. Chronic pain is defined as a pain of greater than two months duration and can be of an inflammatory or neuropathic origin that can arise following nerve injury or in the absence of any apparent injury. Chronic pain is characterized by an altered pain perception that includes allodynia (a response to a normally non-noxious stimuli), and hyperalgesia (an exaggerated response to a normally noxious stimuli). This type of pain is often insensitive to the traditional pain drugs or surgical intervention and thus the study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to chronic pain are of the up-most importance for the development of a new generation of analgesic agents. Protein kinase C isozymes are under investigation as potential therapeutics for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. The anatomical localization of protein kinase C isozymes in both peripheral and central nervous system sites that process pain have made them the topic of basic science research for close to two decades. This review will outline the research to date on protein kinase C involvement in pain and analgesia. In addition, this review will try to synthesize these works to begin to develop a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of how protein kinase C may function as the master regulator of peripheral and central sensitization that underlies many chronic pain conditions. PMID:17548207

  16. Protein kinase C isoforms at the neuromuscular junction: localization and specific roles in neurotransmission and development

    PubMed Central

    Lanuza, Maria A; Santafe, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Besalduch, Núria; Tomàs, Marta; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Nelson, Phillip G; Tomàs, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C family (PKC) regulates a variety of neural functions including neurotransmitter release. The selective activation of a wide range of PKC isoforms in different cells and domains is likely to contribute to the functional diversity of PKC phosphorylating activity. In this review, we describe the isoform localization, phosphorylation function, regulation and signalling of the PKC family at the neuromuscular junction. Data show the involvement of the PKC family in several important functions at the neuromuscular junction and in particular in the maturation of the synapse and the modulation of neurotransmission in the adult. PMID:24102585

  17. A New Type of Metal-Binding Site in Cobalt- And Zinc-Containing Adenylate Kinases Isolated From Sulfate-Reducers D. Gigas And D. Desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, O.Y.; Bursakov, S.A.; Rocco, G.Di; Trincao, J.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Calvete, J.J.; Brondino, C.; Pereira, A.S.; Lampreia, J.; Tavares, P.; Moura, J.J.G.; Moura, I.

    2009-05-18

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterized in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the 'LID' domain. The sequence {sup 129}Cys-X{sub 5}-His-X{sub 15}-Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  18. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility.

  19. hCINAP is an atypical mammalian nuclear adenylate kinase with an ATPase motif: Structural and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Drakou, Christina E.; Malekkou, Anna; Hayes, Joseph M.; Lederer, Carsten W.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Lamond, Angus I.; Santama, Niovi; Zographos, Spyros E.

    2013-01-01

    Human coilin interacting nuclear ATPase protein (hCINAP) directly interacts with coilin, a marker protein of Cajal Bodies (CBs), nuclear organelles involved in the maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins UsnRNPs and snoRNPs. hCINAP has previously been designated as an adenylate kinase (AK6), but is very atypical as it exhibits unusually broad substrate specificity, structural features characteristic of ATPase/GTPase proteins (Walker motifs A and B) and also intrinsic ATPase activity. Despite its intriguing structure, unique properties and cellular localization, the enzymatic mechanism and biological function of hCINAP have remained poorly characterized. Here, we offer the first high-resolution structure of hCINAP in complex with the substrate ADP (and dADP), the structure of hCINAP with a sulfate ion bound at the AMP binding site, and the structure of the ternary complex hCINAP-Mg2+ADP-Pi. Induced fit docking calculations are used to predict the structure of the hCINAP-Mg2+ATP-AMP ternary complex. Structural analysis suggested a functional role for His79 in the Walker B motif. Kinetic analysis of mutant hCINAP-H79G indicates that His79 affects both AK and ATPase catalytic efficiency and induces homodimer formation. Finally, we show that in vivo expression of hCINAP-H79G in human cells is toxic and drastically deregulates the number and appearance of CBs in the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that hCINAP may not simply regulate nucleotide homeostasis, but may have broader functionality, including control of CB assembly and disassembly in the nucleus of human cells. PMID:22038794

  20. hCINAP is an atypical mammalian nuclear adenylate kinase with an ATPase motif: structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Drakou, Christina E; Malekkou, Anna; Hayes, Joseph M; Lederer, Carsten W; Leonidas, Demetres D; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Lamond, Angus I; Santama, Niovi; Zographos, Spyros E

    2012-01-01

    Human coilin interacting nuclear ATPase protein (hCINAP) directly interacts with coilin, a marker protein of Cajal Bodies (CBs), nuclear organelles involved in the maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins UsnRNPs and snoRNPs. hCINAP has previously been designated as an adenylate kinase (AK6), but is very atypical as it exhibits unusually broad substrate specificity, structural features characteristic of ATPase/GTPase proteins (Walker motifs A and B) and also intrinsic ATPase activity. Despite its intriguing structure, unique properties and cellular localization, the enzymatic mechanism and biological function of hCINAP have remained poorly characterized. Here, we offer the first high-resolution structure of hCINAP in complex with the substrate ADP (and dADP), the structure of hCINAP with a sulfate ion bound at the AMP binding site, and the structure of the ternary complex hCINAP-Mg(2+) ADP-Pi. Induced fit docking calculations are used to predict the structure of the hCINAP-Mg(2+) ATP-AMP ternary complex. Structural analysis suggested a functional role for His79 in the Walker B motif. Kinetic analysis of mutant hCINAP-H79G indicates that His79 affects both AK and ATPase catalytic efficiency and induces homodimer formation. Finally, we show that in vivo expression of hCINAP-H79G in human cells is toxic and drastically deregulates the number and appearance of CBs in the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that hCINAP may not simply regulate nucleotide homeostasis, but may have broader functionality, including control of CB assembly and disassembly in the nucleus of human cells. PMID:22038794

  1. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  2. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  3. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  4. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Howard, Haleigh; Mose, Evangeline; Lam, Raymond; Holman, Patrick; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Walterscheid, Zakk; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription (IPT) domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patient derived xenografts and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirms translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  5. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chakedis, J; French, R; Babicky, M; Jaquish, D; Howard, H; Mose, E; Lam, R; Holman, P; Miyamoto, J; Walterscheid, Z; Lowy, A M

    2016-06-23

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of xenografts derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirm translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing cells, activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  6. Effects of Isoform-selective Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Inhibitors on Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shugg, Ryan P. P.; Thomson, Ashley; Tanabe, Natsuko; Kashishian, Adam; Steiner, Bart H.; Puri, Kamal D.; Pereverzev, Alexey; Lannutti, Brian J.; Jirik, Frank R.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Sims, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) participate in numerous signaling pathways, and control distinct biological functions. Studies using pan-PI3K inhibitors suggest roles for PI3K in osteoclasts, but little is known about specific PI3K isoforms in these cells. Our objective was to determine effects of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors on osteoclasts. The following inhibitors were investigated (targets in parentheses): wortmannin and LY294002 (pan-p110), PIK75 (α), GDC0941 (α, δ), TGX221 (β), AS252424 (γ), and IC87114 (δ). In addition, we characterized a new potent and selective PI3Kδ inhibitor, GS-9820, and explored roles of PI3K isoforms in regulating osteoclast function. Osteoclasts were isolated from long bones of neonatal rats and rabbits. Wortmannin, LY294002, GDC0941, IC87114, and GS-9820 induced a dramatic retraction of osteoclasts within 15–20 min to 65–75% of the initial area. In contrast, there was no significant retraction in response to vehicle, PIK75, TGX221, or AS252424. Moreover, wortmannin and GS-9820, but not PIK75 or TGX221, disrupted actin belts. We examined effects of PI3K inhibitors on osteoclast survival. Whereas PIK75, TGX221, and GS-9820 had no significant effect on basal survival, all blocked RANKL-stimulated survival. When studied on resorbable substrates, osteoclastic resorption was suppressed by wortmannin and inhibitors of PI3Kβ and PI3Kδ, but not other isoforms. These data are consistent with a critical role for PI3Kδ in regulating osteoclast cytoskeleton and resorptive activity. In contrast, multiple PI3K isoforms contribute to the control of osteoclast survival. Thus, the PI3Kδ isoform, which is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, is an attractive target for anti-resorptive therapeutics. PMID:24133210

  7. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  8. Cloning and characterization of a new intestinal inflammation-associated colonic epithelial Ste20-related protein kinase isoform.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Nguyen, H; Dalmasso, G; Sitaraman, S V; Merlin, D

    2007-02-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells respond to inflammatory extracellular stimuli by activating mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which mediates numerous pathophysiological effects, including intestinal inflammation. Here, we show that a novel isoform of SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK/STE20) is involved in this inflammatory signaling cascade. We cloned and characterized a SPAK isoform from inflamed colon tissue, and found that this SPAK isoform lacked the characteristic PAPA box and alphaF loop found in SPAK. Based on genomic sequence analysis the lack of PAPA box and alphaF loop in colonic SPAK isoform was the result of specific splicing that affect exon 1 and exon 7 of the SPAK gene. The SPAK isoform was found in inflamed and non-inflamed colon tissues as well as Caco2-BBE cells, but not in other tissues, such as liver, spleen, brain, prostate and kidney. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the SPAK isoform possessed serine/threonine kinase activity, which could be abolished by a substitution of isoleucine for the lysine at position 34 in the ATP-binding site of the catalytic domain. Treatment of Caco2-BBE cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon gamma, induced expression of the SPAK isoform. Over-expression of the SPAK isoform in Caco2-BBE cells led to nuclear translocation of an N-terminal fragment of the SPAK isoform, as well as activation of p38 MAP kinase signaling cascades and increased intestinal barrier permeability. These findings collectively suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling may induce expression of this novel SPAK isoform in intestinal epithelia, triggering the signaling cascades that govern intestinal inflammation. PMID:17321610

  9. Different Protein Kinase C Isoforms Determine Growth Factor Specificity in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Soh, Jae-Won; Yoshida, Keiko; Eves, Eva M.; Weinstein, I. Bernard; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2000-01-01

    Although mitogenic and differentiating factors often activate a number of common signaling pathways, the mechanisms leading to their distinct cellular outcomes have not been elucidated. In a previous report, we demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) activation by the neurogenic agents fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor is dependent on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas MAP kinase activation in response to the mitogen epidermal growth factor (EGF) is independent of PKCδ in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We now show that EGF activates MAP kinase through a PKCζ-dependent pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and PDK1 in H19-7 cells. PKCζ, like PKCδ, acts upstream of MEK, and PKCζ can potentiate Raf-1 activation by EGF. Inhibition of PKCζ also blocks EGF-induced DNA synthesis as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in H19-7 cells. Finally, in embryonic rat brain hippocampal cell cultures, inhibitors of PKCζ or PKCδ suppress MAP kinase activation by EGF or FGF, respectively, indicating that these factors activate distinct signaling pathways in primary as well as immortalized neural cells. Taken together, these results implicate different PKC isoforms as determinants of growth factor signaling specificity within the same cell. Furthermore, these data provide a mechanism whereby different growth factors can differentially activate a common signaling intermediate and thereby generate biological diversity. PMID:10891480

  10. Fast collapse but slow formation of secondary structure elements in the refolding transition of E. coli adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ratner, V; Amir, D; Kahana, E; Haas, E

    2005-09-23

    The various models proposed for protein folding transition differ in their order of appearance of the basic steps during this process. In this study, steady state and time-resolved dynamic non-radiative excitation energy transfer (FRET and trFRET) combined with site specific labeling experiments were applied in order to characterize the initial transient ensemble of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK) molecules upon shifting conditions from those favoring denaturation to refolding and from folding to denaturing. Three sets of labeled AK mutants were prepared, which were designed to probe the equilibrium and transient distributions of intramolecular segmental end-to-end distances. A 176 residue section (residues 28-203), which spans most of the 214 residue molecule, and two short secondary structure chain segments including an alpha-helix (residues 169-188) and a predominantly beta-strand region (residues 188-203), were labeled. Upon fast change of conditions from denaturing to folding, the end-to-end distance of the 176 residue chain section showed an immediate collapse to a mean value of 26 A. Under the same conditions, the two short secondary structure elements did not respond to this shift within the first ten milliseconds, and retained the characteristics of a fully unfolded state. Within the first 10 ms after changes of the solvent from folding to denaturing, only minor changes were observed at the local environments of residues 203 and 169. The response of these same local environments to the shift of conditions from denaturing to folding occurred within the dead time of the mixing device. Thus, the response of the CORE domain of AK to fast transfer from folding to unfolding conditions is slow at all three conformational levels that were probed, and for at least a few milliseconds the ensemble of folded molecules is maintained under unfolding conditions. A different order of the changes was observed upon initiation of refolding. The AK molecules undergo

  11. Sequential Closure of Loop Structures Forms the Folding Nucleus during the Refolding Transition of the Escherichia coli Adenylate Kinase Molecule.

    PubMed

    Orevi, Tomer; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Kathuria, Sagar; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C Robert; Haas, Elisha

    2016-01-12

    The ensemble of conformers of globular protein molecules immediately following transfer from unfolding to folding conditions is assumed to be collapsed though still disordered, as the first steps of the folding pathway are initiated. In order to test the hypothesis that long loop closure transitions are part of the initiation of the folding pathway, our groups are studying the initiation of the folding transition of a model protein by time-resolved excitation energy transfer (trFRET) detected fast kinetics experiments. Site-specific double labeling is used to study the timing of conformational transitions of individual loop forming chain segments at the microsecond time regime. Previously, it was shown that at least three long loops in the Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK) molecule close within the first 5 ms of folding of AK, while the main global folding transition occurs in a time regime of seconds. In order to enhance the time resolution of the kinetics experiments to the microsecond time regime and determine the rate of closure of the two N terminal loops (loop I residues 1-26 and loop II residues 29-72), we applied a continuous flow based double kinetics experiment. These measurements enabled us to obtain a microsecond series of transient time dependent distributions of distances between the ends of the labeled loops. Analysis of the trFRET experiments show that the N terminal loop (loop I) is closed within less than 60 μs after the initiation of refolding. Loop II is also mostly closed within that time step but shows an additional small reduction of the mean end-to-end distance in a second phase at a rate of 0.005 μs(-1). This second phase can either reflect tightening of a loosely closed loop in the ensemble of conformers or may reflect two subpopulations in the ensemble, which differ in the rate of closure of loop II, but not in the rate of closure of loop I. This study shows the very fast closure of long loops in the otherwise disordered backbone

  12. Investigating the role of class-IA PI 3-kinase isoforms in adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Eun; Shepherd, Peter R. Chaussade, Claire

    2009-02-20

    PI 3-kinases, in particular class-IA, are key signalling molecules controlling many cellular processes including growth, proliferation, migration and differentiation. In this study, we have used a collection of isoform selective PI 3-kinase inhibitors to determine whether attenuation of signalling through class-IA PI 3-kinase isoforms will impact adipocyte differentiation. First, we analysed the expression profiles and found that fibroblastic pre-adipocytes express detectable levels of p110{alpha} and p110{delta} and that after differentiation, p110{delta} levels fall while p110{alpha} levels rise, together with C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}. When using specific inhibitors during the differentiation process, we observed that neither p110{beta} nor p110{delta} inhibition, had any significant effect. In contrast PIK-75, a selective p110{alpha} inhibitor completely abolished adipocyte differentiation as assessed by morphology, transcript and protein levels of adipocyte markers. These results indicate that long term treatment with p110{alpha} inhibitors could potentially have a severe impact on fat cell numbers in vivo.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase Isoforms Exhibit Acyl Chain Selectivity for Both Substrate and Lipid Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Anderson, Richard A.; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is mostly produced in the cell by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5K) and has a crucial role in numerous signaling events. Here we demonstrate that in vitro all three isoforms of PIP5K, α, β, and γ, discriminate among substrates with different acyl chains for both the substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) although to different extents, with isoform γ being the most selective. Fully saturated dipalmitoyl-PtdIns4P was a poor substrate for all three isoforms, but both the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl and the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl forms of PtdIns4P were good substrates. Vmax was greater for the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl form compared with the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl form, although for PIP5Kβ the difference was small. For the α and γ isoforms, Km was much lower for 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl PtdIns4P, making this lipid the better substrate of the two under most conditions. Activation of PIP5K by phosphatidic acid is also acyl chain-dependent. Species of phosphatidic acid with two unsaturated acyl chains are much better activators of PIP5K than those containing one saturated and one unsaturated acyl chain. PtdIns is a poor substrate for PIP5K, but it also shows acyl chain selectivity. Curiously, there is no acyl chain discrimination among species of phosphatidic acid in the activation of the phosphorylation of PtdIns. Together, our findings indicate that PIP5K isoforms α, β, and γ act selectively on substrates and activators with different acyl chains. This could be a tightly regulated mechanism of producing physiologically active unsaturated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate species in the cell. PMID:22942276

  14. Characterization of protein kinase C and its isoforms in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beyers, A D; Hanekom, C; Rheeder, A; Strachan, A F; Wooten, M W; Nel, A E

    1988-11-15

    Protein kinase C (PKC) regulates numerous T cell functions and is present in abundance in normal human T cells and certain T cell lines. Although crude Triton X-100 soluble material obtained from T cell pellets contains minimal PKC activity, DEAE chromatography revealed that 12 to 37% of cellular PKC was membrane associated, probably due to removal of an inhibitor through column chromatography. As in other tissues, PKC from lymphoid tissue was phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent and diolein reduced the Ca2+ requirements for enzyme activity. Hydroxylapatite chromatography revealed that T cells possess two major peaks of PKC activity. Although, the enzyme in these peaks had similar m.w. and identical iso-electric mobility, the proteins differed with respect to their autophosphorylation sites and immunoreactivity toward an isoform specific antibody. Furthermore, differences in their activities in the presence of phospholipid, diolein, and limiting amounts of Ca2+ imply that these isoforms may be differentially activated. We discuss optimal conditions for activation of PKC and its isoforms for study of T lymphocyte cellular function. PMID:3263426

  15. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  16. Selective glucocorticoid control of Rho kinase isoforms regulate cell-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Nicola M.; Callahan, Joseph A.; Lo, Daniel H.; Firestone, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    The two Rho kinase isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 are downstream effectors of the small GTPase RhoA, although relatively little is known about potential isoform specific functions or the selective control of their cellular activities. Using Con8 rat mammary epithelial cells, we show that the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone strongly stimulates the level of ROCK2 protein, which accounts for the increase in total cellular ROCK2 activity, whereas, steroid treatment down-regulated ROCK1 specific kinase activity without altering ROCK1 protein levels. In Con8 cells, the glucocorticoid induced formation of tight junctions requires the steroid-mediated down-regulation RhoA and function of the RhoA antagonist Rnd3. Treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 ablated both the glucocorticoid-induced and Rnd3-mediated stimulation in tight junction sealing. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the expression and activity of ROCK1 and ROCK2 can be uncoupled in a signal-dependent manner, and further implicate a new function for ROCK2 in the steroid control of tight junction dynamics. PMID:17240358

  17. Molecular identification and expression of Lyn tyrosine kinase isoforms in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Amy N; Young, Lauren J

    2013-10-01

    Lyn is a tyrosine kinase molecule required for modulation of signalling cascades in cell populations including B lymphocytes of the mammalian immune system. We have characterised the coding domain of the marsupial lyn gene of two macropod marsupials; the Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the Bridled Nailtail Wallaby (Onychogalea fraenata) and show the co-expression of two Lyn isoforms in cells and tissues of these and three other marsupials (Brush-tail Possum, Trichosurus vulpecula; American Grey Short-tailed Opossum, Monodelphis domestica and Red-tailed Phascogale, Phascogale calura). The predicted Lyn proteins (LynA and LynB) were highly conserved across vertebrate species, with amino acid identities of 94% with their human orthologues and conservation of key tyrosine kinase motifs that suggests that marsupial Lyn most likely functions in cell signalling. Comparison of our cDNA data to annotations for Lyn transcripts (available through the Ensembl Genome Browser) for the Tammar Wallaby confirm splice sites for a number of exons in the wallaby transcript that are missing from the current annotation. This is the first report of the expression of kinase signalling molecules that influence immunity in metatherian mammals and provides key information to support ongoing studies of immune regulation in marsupials. PMID:23522727

  18. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  19. Structural and biochemical investigation of two Arabidopsis shikimate kinases: The heat-inducible isoform is thermostable

    SciTech Connect

    Fucile, Geoffrey; Garcia, Christel; Carlsson, Jonas; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Christendat, Dinesh

    2011-10-27

    The expression of plant shikimate kinase (SK; EC 2.7.1.71), an intermediate step in the shikimate pathway to aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, is induced under specific conditions of environmental stress and developmental requirements in an isoform-specific manner. Despite their important physiological role, experimental structures of plant SKs have not been determined and the biochemical nature of plant SK regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two SKs, AtSK1 and AtSK2. We demonstrate that AtSK2 is highly unstable and becomes inactivated at 37 C whereas the heat-induced isoform, AtSK1, is thermostable and fully active under identical conditions at this temperature. We determined the crystal structure of AtSK2, the first SK structure from the plant kingdom, and conducted biophysical characterizations of both AtSK1 and AtSK2 towards understanding this mechanism of thermal regulation. The crystal structure of AtSK2 is generally conserved with bacterial SKs with the addition of a putative regulatory phosphorylation motif forming part of the adenosine triphosphate binding site. The heat-induced isoform, AtSK1, forms a homodimer in solution, the formation of which facilitates its relative thermostability compared to AtSK2. In silico analyses identified AtSK1 site variants that may contribute to AtSK1 stability. Our findings suggest that AtSK1 performs a unique function under heat stress conditions where AtSK2 could become inactivated. We discuss these findings in the context of regulating metabolic flux to competing downstream pathways through SK-mediated control of steady state concentrations of shikimate.

  20. Synaptic activity-related classical protein kinase C isoform localization in the adult rat neuromuscular synapse.

    PubMed

    Besalduch, Núria; Tomàs, Marta; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Tomàs, Josep; Lanuza, Maria Angel

    2010-01-10

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is essential for signal transduction in a variety of cells, including neurons and myocytes, and is involved in both acetylcholine release and muscle fiber contraction. Here, we demonstrate that the increases in synaptic activity by nerve stimulation couple PKC to transmitter release in the rat neuromuscular junction and increase the level of alpha, betaI, and betaII isoforms in the membrane when muscle contraction follows the stimulation. The phosphorylation activity of these classical PKCs also increases. It seems that the muscle has to contract in order to maintain or increase classical PKCs in the membrane. We use immunohistochemistry to show that PKCalpha and PKCbetaI were located in the nerve terminals, whereas PKCalpha and PKCbetaII were located in the postsynaptic and the Schwann cells. Stimulation and contraction do not change these cellular distributions, but our results show that the localization of classical PKC isoforms in the membrane is affected by synaptic activity. PMID:19937712

  1. RAS and RHO families of GTPases directly regulate distinct phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Ralph; de Krijger, Inge; Fritsch, Kornelia; George, Roger; Reason, Beth; Kumar, Madhu S; Diefenbacher, Markus; Stamp, Gordon; Downward, Julian

    2013-05-23

    RAS proteins are important direct activators of p110α, p110γ, and p110δ type I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), interacting via an amino-terminal RAS-binding domain (RBD). Here, we investigate the regulation of the ubiquitous p110β isoform of PI3K, implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, PTEN-loss-driven cancers, and thrombocyte function. Unexpectedly, RAS is unable to interact with p110β, but instead RAC1 and CDC42 from the RHO subfamily of small GTPases bind and activate p110β via its RBD. In fibroblasts, GPCRs couple to PI3K through Dock180/Elmo1-mediated RAC activation and subsequent interaction with p110β. Cells from mice carrying mutations in the p110β RBD show reduced PI3K activity and defective chemotaxis, and these mice are resistant to experimental lung fibrosis. These findings revise our understanding of the regulation of type I PI3K by showing that both RAS and RHO family GTPases directly regulate distinct ubiquitous PI3K isoforms and that RAC activates p110β downstream of GPCRs. PMID:23706742

  2. Multiple Promoters in the WNK1 Gene: One Controls Expression of a Kidney-Specific Kinase-Defective Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Delaloy, Celine; Lu, Jingyu; Houot, Anne-Marie; Disse-Nicodeme, Sandra; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Corvol, Pierre; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    WNK1 is a serine-threonine kinase, the expression of which is affected in pseudohypoaldosteronism type II, a Mendelian form of arterial hypertension. We characterized human WNK1 transcripts to determine the molecular mechanisms governing WNK1 expression. We report the presence of two promoters generating two WNK1 isoforms with a complete kinase domain. Further variations are achieved by the use of two polyadenylation sites and tissue-specific splicing. We also determined the structure of a kidney-specific isoform regulated by a third promoter and starting at a novel exon. This transcript is kinase defective and has a predominant expression in the kidney compared to the other WNK1 isoforms, with, furthermore, a highly restricted expression profile in the distal convoluted tubule. We confirmed that the ubiquitous and kidney-specific promoters are functional in several cells lines and identified core promoters and regulatory elements. In particular, a strong enhancer element upstream from the kidney-specific exon seems specific to renal epithelial cells. Thus, control of human WNK1 gene expression of kinase-active or -deficient isoforms is mediated predominantly through the use of multiple transcription initiation sites and tissue-specific regulatory elements. PMID:14645531

  3. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  4. An isoform-selective, small-molecule inhibitor targets the autoregulatory mechanism of p21-activated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Sean W.; Beeser, Alexander; Fukui, Jami A.; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E. E.; Myers, Cynthia; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoregulatory domains found within kinases may provide more unique targets for chemical inhibitors than the conserved ATP-binding pocket targeted by most inhibitors. The kinase Pak1 contains an autoinhibitory domain that suppresses the catalytic activity of its kinase domain. Pak1 activators relieve this autoinhibition and initiate conformational rearrangements and autophosphorylation events leading to kinase activation. We developed a screen for allosteric inhibitors targeting Pak1 activation and identified the inhibitor IPA-3. Remarkably, pre-activated Pak1 is resistant to IPA-3. IPA-3 also inhibits activation of related Pak isoforms regulated by autoinhibition, but not more distantly related Paks, nor >200 other kinases tested. Pak1 inhibition by IPA-3 in live cells supports a critical role for Pak in PDGF-stimulated Erk activation. These studies illustrate a novel strategy for kinase inhibition and introduce a highly selective, cell-permeable chemical inhibitor of Pak. PMID:18420139

  5. Altered content of AMP-activated protein kinase isoforms in skeletal muscle from spinal cord injured subjects.

    PubMed

    Kostovski, Emil; Boon, Hanneke; Hjeltnes, Nils; Lundell, Leonidas S; Ahlsén, Maria; Chibalin, Alexander V; Krook, Anna; Iversen, Per Ole; Widegren, Ulrika

    2013-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a pivotal regulator of energy homeostasis. Although downstream targets of AMPK are widely characterized, the physiological factors governing isoform expression of this protein kinase are largely unknown. Nerve/contractile activity has a major impact on the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle, therefore likely to influence AMPK isoform expression. Spinal cord injury represents an extreme form of physical inactivity, with concomitant changes in skeletal muscle metabolism. We assessed the influence of longstanding and recent spinal cord injury on protein abundance of AMPK isoforms in human skeletal muscle. We also determined muscle fiber type as a marker of glycolytic or oxidative metabolism. In subjects with longstanding complete injury, protein abundance of the AMPKγ3 subunit, as well as myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa and IIx, were increased, whereas abundance of the AMPKγ1 subunit and MHC I were decreased. Similarly, abundance of AMPKγ3 and MHC IIa proteins were increased, whereas AMPKα2, -β1, and -γ1 subunits and MHC I abundance was decreased during the first year following injury, reflecting a more glycolytic phenotype of the skeletal muscle. However, in incomplete cervical lesions, partial recovery of muscle function attenuated the changes in the isoform profile of AMPK and MHC. Furthermore, exercise training (electrically stimulated leg cycling) partly normalized mRNA expression of AMPK isoforms. Thus, physical activity affects the relative expression of AMPK isoforms. In conclusion, skeletal muscle abundance of AMPK isoforms is related to physical activity and/or muscle fiber type. Thus, physical/neuromuscular activity is an important determinant of isoform abundance of AMPK and MCH. This further underscores the need for physical activity as part of a treatment regimen after spinal cord injury to maintain skeletal muscle metabolism. PMID:24022865

  6. A novel sphingosine-dependent protein kinase (SDK1) specifically phosphorylates certain isoforms of 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed

    Megidish, T; Cooper, J; Zhang, L; Fu, H; Hakomori, S

    1998-08-21

    Protein kinases activated by sphingosine or N,N'-dimethylsphingosine, but not by other lipids, have been detected and are termed sphingosine-dependent protein kinases (SDKs). These SDKs were previously shown to phosphorylate endogenous 14-3-3 proteins (Megidish, T., White, T., Takio, K., Titani, K., Igarashi, Y., and Hakomori, S. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 216, 739-747). We have now partially purified one SDK, termed SDK1, from cytosol of mouse Balb/c 3T3(A31) fibroblasts. SDK1 is a serine kinase with molecular mass 50-60 kDa that is strongly activated by N, N'-dimethylsphingosine and sphingosine, but not by ceramide, sphingosine 1-phosphate, or other sphingo-, phospho-, or glycerolipids tested. Its activity is inhibited by the protein kinase C activator phosphatidylserine. Activity of SDK1 is clearly distinct from other types of serine kinases tested, including casein kinase II, the alpha and zeta isoforms of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated mitogene-activated protein kinase 1 (Erk-1), Erk-2, and Raf-1. SDK1 specifically phosphorylates certain isoforms of 14-3-3 (eta, beta, zeta) but not others (sigma, tau). The phosphorylation site was identified as Ser* in the sequence Arg-Arg-Ser-Ser*-Trp-Arg in 14-3-3 beta. The sigma and tau isoforms of 14-3-3 lack serine at this position, potentially explaining their lack of phosphorylation by SDK1. Interestingly, the phosphorylation site is located on the dimer interface of 14-3-3. Phosphorylation of this site by SDK1 was studied in 14-3-3 mutants. Mutation of a lysine residue, located 9 amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylation site, abolished 14-3-3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate an association between an SDK and 14-3-3 in situ. Exogenous N, N'-dimethylsphingosine stimulates 14-3-3 phosphorylation in Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting that SDK1 may phosphorylate 14-3-3 in situ. These data support a biological role of SDK1 activation and consequent

  7. Pyruvate kinase isoform expression alters nucleotide synthesis to impact cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, Sophia Y.; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Hosios, Aaron M.; Israelsen, William J.; Gui, Dan Y.; Newhouse, Lauren; Ogrodzinski, Martin; Hecht, Vivian; Xu, Kali; Acevedo, Paula N. Marín; Hollern, Daniel P.; Bellinger, Gary; Dayton, Talya L.; Christen, Stefan; Elia, Ilaria; Dinh, Anh T.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Manalis, Scott R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Andrechek, Eran R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic regulation influences cell proliferation. The influence of pyruvate kinase isoforms on tumor cells has been extensively studied, but whether PKM2 is required for normal cell proliferation is unknown. We examine how PKM2-deletion affects proliferation and metabolism in non-transformed, non-immortalized PKM2-expressing primary cells. We find that deletion of PKM2 in primary cells results in PKM1 expression and proliferation arrest. PKM1 expression, rather than PKM2 loss, is responsible for this effect, and proliferation arrest cannot be explained by cell differentiation, senescence, death, changes in gene expression, or prevention of cell growth. Instead, PKM1 expression impairs nucleotide production and the ability to synthesize DNA and progress through the cell cycle. Nucleotide biosynthesis is limiting, as proliferation arrest is characterized by severe thymidine depletion, and supplying exogenous thymine rescues both nucleotide levels and cell proliferation. Thus, PKM1 expression promotes a metabolic state that is unable to support DNA synthesis. PMID:25482511

  8. Isoform-specific regulation of adipocyte differentiation by Akt/protein kinase B{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Tucker, David F.; Kim, Chi Dae; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Bae, Sun Sik

    2008-06-20

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway tightly regulates adipose cell differentiation. Here we show that loss of Akt1/PKB{alpha} in primary mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells results in a defect of adipocyte differentiation. Adipocyte differentiation in vitro and ex vivo was restored in cells lacking both Akt1/PKB{alpha} and Akt2/PKB{beta} by ectopic expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha} but not Akt2/PKB{beta}. Akt1/PKB{alpha} was found to be the major regulator of phosphorylation and nuclear export of FoxO1, whose presence in the nucleus strongly attenuates adipocyte differentiation. Differentiation-induced cell division was significantly abrogated in Akt1/PKB{alpha}-deficient cells, but was restored after forced expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha}. Moreover, expression of p27{sup Kip1}, an inhibitor of the cell cycle, was down regulated in an Akt1/PKB{alpha}-specific manner during adipocyte differentiation. Based on these data, we suggest that the Akt1/PKB{alpha} isoform plays a major role in adipocyte differentiation by regulating FoxO1 and p27{sup Kip1}.

  9. Comparison of fecal pyruvate kinase isoform M2 and calprotectin in acute diarrhea in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Elzbieta; Nowak, Jan K.; Moczko, Jerzy; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Fecal concentrations of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (M2-PK) and calprotectin (FC) serve as biomarkers of inflammation of gastrointestinal mucosa. The value of M2-PK in discriminating between patients with viral and bacterial acute diarrhea (AD) is currently unknown. We analyzed M2-PK and FC concentrations in fifty hospitalized children with AD (29 of which were caused by rotavirus and 21 by Salmonella enteritidis) as well as 32 healthy subjects. There was no difference in the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves plotted for the two tests in differentiating rotaviral from bacterial AD. The sensitivity and specificity of M2-PK at optimal cut-off (20 U/g) were 75.9% and 71.4%, respectively. M2-PK and FC had similar values in distinguishing between children with AD caused by rotavirus and Salmonella enteritidis. The performance of both tests in hospitalized patients did not meet the needs of everyday clinical practice. Moreover, no advantage of fecal tests over the measurement of CRP was documented. PMID:24759699

  10. Couplings between hierarchical conformational dynamics from multi-time correlation functions and two-dimensional lifetime spectra: Application to adenylate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Junichi; Takada, Shoji; Saito, Shinji

    2015-06-07

    An analytical method based on a three-time correlation function and the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) lifetime spectrum is developed to elucidate the time-dependent couplings between the multi-timescale (i.e., hierarchical) conformational dynamics in heterogeneous systems such as proteins. In analogy with 2D NMR, IR, electronic, and fluorescence spectroscopies, the waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra can provide a quantitative description of the dynamical correlations between the conformational motions with different lifetimes. The present method is applied to intrinsic conformational changes of substrate-free adenylate kinase (AKE) using long-time coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the hierarchical conformational dynamics arise from the intra-domain structural transitions among conformational substates of AKE by analyzing the one-time correlation functions and one-dimensional lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances corresponding to single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments with the use of the principal component analysis. In addition, the complicated waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances is attributed to the fact that the time evolution of the couplings between the conformational dynamics depends upon both the spatial and temporal characters of the system. The present method is expected to shed light on the biological relationship among the structure, dynamics, and function.

  11. Fast closure of N-terminal long loops but slow formation of β strands precedes the folding transition state of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Orevi, Tomer; Ben Ishay, Eldad; Gershanov, Sivan Levin; Dalak, Mayan Ben; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2014-05-20

    The nature of the earliest steps of the initiation of the folding pathway of globular proteins is still controversial. To elucidate the role of early closure of long loop structures in the folding transition, we studied the folding kinetics of subdomain structures in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK) using Förster type resonance excitation energy transfer (FRET)-based methods. The overall folding rate of the AK molecule and of several segments that form native β strands is 0.5 ± 0.3 s(-1), in sharp contrast to the 1000-fold faster closure of three long loop structures in the CORE domain. A FRET-based "double kinetics" analysis revealed complex transient changes in the initially closed N-terminal loop structure that then opens and closes again at the end of the folding pathway. The study of subdomain folding in situ suggests a hierarchic ordered folding mechanism, in which early and rapid cross-linking by hydrophobic loop closure provides structural stabilization at the initiation of the folding pathway. PMID:24787383

  12. Couplings between hierarchical conformational dynamics from multi-time correlation functions and two-dimensional lifetime spectra: Application to adenylate kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Junichi; Takada, Shoji; Saito, Shinji

    2015-06-01

    An analytical method based on a three-time correlation function and the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) lifetime spectrum is developed to elucidate the time-dependent couplings between the multi-timescale (i.e., hierarchical) conformational dynamics in heterogeneous systems such as proteins. In analogy with 2D NMR, IR, electronic, and fluorescence spectroscopies, the waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra can provide a quantitative description of the dynamical correlations between the conformational motions with different lifetimes. The present method is applied to intrinsic conformational changes of substrate-free adenylate kinase (AKE) using long-time coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the hierarchical conformational dynamics arise from the intra-domain structural transitions among conformational substates of AKE by analyzing the one-time correlation functions and one-dimensional lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances corresponding to single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments with the use of the principal component analysis. In addition, the complicated waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances is attributed to the fact that the time evolution of the couplings between the conformational dynamics depends upon both the spatial and temporal characters of the system. The present method is expected to shed light on the biological relationship among the structure, dynamics, and function.

  13. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Tsz Yan; Wang, C.C.; Leung, Lai K.

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase. - Highlights: • The pollutant bisphenol A differentially activated PKC isoforms in the placenta. • CRE-binding activity in the nuclear protein of placenta was increased. • Bisphenol A induces CRH mRNA expression in mice.

  14. Synergistic activation of stress-activated protein kinase 1/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK1/JNK) isoforms by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4) and MKK7.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Y; Armstrong, C G; Morrice, N; Paterson, A; Goedert, M; Cohen, P

    2000-01-01

    Stress-activated protein kinase 1 (SAPK1), also called c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), becomes activated in vivo in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines or cellular stresses. Its full activation requires the phosphorylation of a threonine and a tyrosine residue in a Thr-Pro-Tyr motif, which can be catalysed by the protein kinases mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. Here we report that MKK4 shows a striking preference for the tyrosine residue (Tyr-185), and MKK7 a striking preference for the threonine residue (Thr-183) in three SAPK1/JNK1 isoforms tested (JNK1 alpha 1, JNK2 alpha 2 and JNK3 alpha 1). For this reason, MKK4 and MKK7 together produce a synergistic increase in the activity of each SAPK1/JNK isoform in vitro. The MKK7 beta variant, which is several hundred-fold more efficient in activating all three SAPK1/JNK isoforms than is MKK7 alpha', is equally specific for Thr-183. MKK7 also phosphorylates JNK2 alpha 2 at Thr-404 and Ser-407 in vitro, Ser-407 being phosphorylated much more rapidly than Thr-183 in vitro. Thr-404/Ser-407 are phosphorylated in unstimulated human KB cells and HEK-293 cells, and phosphorylation is increased in response to an osmotic stress (0.5 M sorbitol). However, in contrast with Thr-183 and Tyr-185, the phosphorylation of Thr-404 and Ser-407 is not increased in response to other agonists that activate MKK7 and SAPK1/JNK, suggesting that phosphorylation of these residues is catalysed by another protein kinase, such as CK2, which also phosphorylates Thr-404 and Ser-407 in vitro. MKK3, MKK4 and MKK6 all show a strong preference for phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue of the Thr-Gly-Tyr motifs in their known substrates SAPK2a/p38, SAPK3/p38 gamma and SAPK4/p38 delta. MKK7 also phosphorylates SAPK2a/p38 at a low rate (but not SAPK3/p38 gamma or SAPK4/p38 delta), and phosphorylation occurs exclusively at the tyrosine residue, demonstrating that MKK7 is intrinsically a 'dual-specific' protein kinase. PMID:11062067

  15. Event Detection and Sub-state Discovery from Bio-molecular Simulations Using Higher-Order Statistics: Application To Enzyme Adenylate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations at milli-second and longer timescales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Since post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory data-sets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA) (PLoS One 6(1): e15827), for partitioning the conformational landscape into a hierarchy of functionally relevant sub-states. The unique capabilities of QAA are enabled by exploiting anharmonicity in the form of fourth-order statistics for characterizing atomic fluctuations. In this paper, we extend QAA for analyzing long time-scale simulations online. In particular, we present HOST4MD - a higher-order statistical toolbox for molecular dynamics simulations, which (1) identifies key dynamical events as simulations are in progress, (2) explores potential sub-states and (3) identifies conformational transitions that enable the protein to access those sub-states. We demonstrate HOST4MD on micro-second time-scale simulations of the enzyme adenylate kinase in its apo state. HOST4MD identifies several conformational events in these simulations, revealing how the intrinsic coupling between the three sub-domains (LID, CORE and NMP) changes during the simulations. Further, it also identifies an inherent asymmetry in the opening/closing of the two binding sites. We anticipate HOST4MD will provide a powerful and extensible framework for detecting biophysically relevant conformational coordinates from long time-scale simulations. PMID:22733562

  16. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  17. Acetylation Targets the M2 Isoform of Pyruvate Kinase for Degradation through Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy and Promotes Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Lei; Li, Dong; Zhao, Di; Lin, Ruiting; Chu, Yajing; Zhang, Heng; Zha, Zhengyu; Liu, Ying; Li, Zi; Xu, Yanping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Yiran; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Most tumor cells take up more glucose than normal cells but metabolize glucose via glycolysis even in the presence of normal levels of oxygen, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. Tumor cells commonly express the embryonic M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) that may contribute to the metabolism shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that PKM2 is acetylated on lysine 305 and that this acetylation is stimulated by high glucose concentration. PKM2 K305 acetylation decreases PKM2 enzyme activity and promotes its lysosomal-dependent degradation via chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Acetylation increases PKM2 interaction with HSC70, a chaperone for CMA, and association with lysosomes. Ectopic expression of an acetylation mimetic K305Q mutant accumulates glycolytic intermediates and promotes cell proliferation and tumor growth. These results reveal an acetylation regulation of pyruvate kinase and the link between lysine acetylation and CMA. PMID:21700219

  18. Characterization and differential expression of protein kinase C isoforms in PC12 cells. Differentiation parallels an increase in PKC beta II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, M W; Seibenhener, M L; Soh, Y; Ewald, S J; White, K R; Lloyd, E D; Olivier, A; Parker, P J

    1992-02-17

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment of PC12 cells induced a 2.8-fold increase in protein kinase C activity concomitant with differentiation and acquisition of neuritis. PKC protein isoforms were separated by sequential chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel/hydroxylapatite. A broad peak of PKC activity eluted which corresponded to the alpha PKC isoform. In control cells, message for all six PKC isoforms was detected and expressed as epsilon greater than zeta = gamma greater than delta greater than beta greater than alpha. Western blot of whole cell lysates revealed a large increase in the beta II, while slight changes were observed for the other five PKC isoforms during treatment (1-14 days) with NGF (50 ng/ml). In parallel, coordinate changes in the expression of the individual transcripts for the six isoforms occurred during NGF treatment. Induction and accumulation of PKC beta II may play a role in maintenance of neuronal morphology. PMID:1544425

  19. Specific isoforms of protein kinase C are essential for prevention of folate-resistant neural tube defects by inositol.

    PubMed

    Cogram, Patricia; Hynes, Andrew; Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2004-01-01

    A proportion of neural tube defects (NTDs) can be prevented by maternal folic acid supplementation, although some cases are unresponsive. The curly tail mutant mouse provides a model of folate-resistant NTDs, in which defects can be prevented by inositol therapy in early pregnancy. Hence, inositol represents a possible novel adjunct therapy to prevent human NTDs. The present study investigated the molecular mechanism by which inositol prevents mouse NTDs. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is known to be essential, and we examined neurulation-stage embryos for PKC expression and applied PKC inhibitors to curly tail embryos developing in culture. Although all known PKC isoforms were detected in the closing neural tube, use of chemical PKC inhibitors identified a particular requirement for 'conventional' PKC isoforms. Peptide inhibitors offer selective inhibition of individual PKCs, and we demonstrated isoform-specific inhibition of PKC in embryonic cell cultures. Application of peptide inhibitors to neurulation-stage embryos revealed an absolute dependence on the activity of PKCbetaI and gamma for prevention of NTDs by inositol, and partial dependence on PKCzeta, whereas other PKCs (alpha, betaII delta, and epsilon) were dispensable. To investigate the cellular action of inositol and PKCs in NTD prevention, we examined cell proliferation in curly tail embryos. Defective proliferation of hindgut cells is a key component of the pathogenic sequence leading to NTDs in curly tail. Hindgut cell proliferation was stimulated specifically by inositol, an effect that required activation of PKCbetaI. Our findings reveal an essential role of specific PKC isoforms in mediating the prevention of mouse NTDs by inositol. PMID:14613966

  20. Early closure of a long loop in the refolding of adenylate kinase: a possible key role of non-local interactions in the initial folding steps.

    PubMed

    Orevi, Tomer; Ben Ishay, Eldad; Pirchi, Menachem; Jacob, Maik H; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2009-01-30

    Most globular protein chains, when transferred from high to low denaturant concentrations, collapse instantly before they refold to their native state. The initial compaction of the protein molecule is assumed to have a key effect on the folding pathway, but it is not known whether the earliest structures formed during or instantly after collapse are defined by local or by non-local interactions--that is, by secondary structural elements or by loop closure of long segments of the protein chain. Stable closure of one or several long loops can reduce the chain entropy at a very early stage and can prevent the protein from following non-productive pathways whose number grows exponentially with the length of the protein chain. In Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK), about seven long loops define the topology of the native structure. We selected four loop-forming sections of the chain and probed the time course of loop formation during refolding of AK. We labeled the termini of the loop segments with tryptophan and cysteine-5-amidosalicylic acid. This donor-acceptor pair of probes used with fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET) is suitable for detecting very short distances and thus is able to distinguish between random and specific compactions. Refolding of AK was initiated by stopped-flow mixing, followed simultaneously by donor and acceptor fluorescence, and analyzed in terms of energy transfer efficiency and distance. In the collapsed state of AK, observed after the 5-ms dead time of the instrument, one of the selected segments shows a native-like separation of its termini; it forms a loop already in the collapsed state. A second segment that includes the first but is longer by 15 residues shows an almost native-like separation of its termini. In contrast, a segment that is shorter but part of the second segment shows a distance separation of its termini as high as a segment that spans almost the whole protein chain. We conclude

  1. Phosphagen kinase of the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila. Cloning and expression of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial isoforms of taurocyamine kinase.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Tanaka, Kumiko; Bailly, Xavier; Zal, Franck; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2005-10-30

    The giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila lives at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos Rift. The large size and high growth rate of R. pachyptila is supported by an endosymbiotic relationship with a chemosynthetic bacterium. Elucidation of the regulation of energy metabolism of the giant tubeworm remains an interesting problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the cDNA sequence of phosphagen kinase, one of the most important enzymes in energy metabolism, and to characterize its function. Two phosphagen kinase cDNA sequences amplified from the cDNA library of R. pachyptila showed high derived amino acid sequence identity (74%) with those of cytoplasmic taurocyamine kinase (TK) and mitochondrial TK from an annelid Arenicola brasiliensis. The cytoplasmic form of the Riftia recombinant enzyme showed stronger activity for the substrates taurocyamine and also considerable activity for lombricine (21% that of taurocyamine). The mitochondrial form, which was structurally similar to mitochondrial creatine kinase, showed stronger activity for taurocyamine, and a broader activity for various guanidine compounds: glycocyamine (35% that of taurocyamine), lombricine (31%) and arginine (3%). Both forms showed no activity for creatine. The difference in substrate specificities between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms might be attributable to the large difference in the amino acid sequence of the GS region and/or several key amino acid residues for establishing guanidine substrate specificity. Based on these results, we conclude that Riftia contains at least two forms of TK as phosphagen kinase. We also report the kinetic parameters, Km and kcat, of Arenicola and Riftia TKs for the first time. The Km values for taurocyamine of Arenicola and Riftia TKs ranged from 0.9 to 4.0 mM and appear to be comparable to those of other annelid-specific enzymes, lombricine kinase and glycocyamine kinase, but are significantly lower than those of

  2. A Novel Isoform of the B Cell Tyrosine Kinase BTK Protects Breast Cancer Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eifert, Cheryl; Wang, Xianhui; Kokabee, Leila; Kourtidis, Antonis; Jain, Ritu; Gerdes, Michael J.; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases orchestrate key cellular signaling pathways and their dysregulation is often associated with cellular transformation. Several recent cases in which inhibitors of tyrosine kinases have been successfully used as anticancer agents have underscored the importance of this class of proteins in the development of targeted cancer therapies. We have carried out a large-scale loss-of-function analysis of the human tyrosine kinases using RNA interference to identify novel survival factors for breast cancer cells. In addition to kinases with known roles in breast and other cancers, we identified several kinases that were previously unknown to be required for breast cancer cell survival. The most surprising of these was the cytosolic, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), which has been extensively studied in B cell development. Down regulation of this protein with RNAi or inhibition with pharmacological inhibitors causes apoptosis; overexpression inhibits apoptosis induced by Doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. Our results surprisingly show that BTK is expressed in several breast cancer cell lines and tumors. The predominant form of BTK found in tumor cells is transcribed from an alternative promoter and results in a protein with an amino-terminal extension. This alternate form of BTK is expressed at significantly higher levels in tumorigenic breast cells than in normal breast cells. Since this protein is a survival factor for these cells, it represents both a potential marker and novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:23913792

  3. The Kinase Activity-deficient Isoform of the Protein Araf Antagonizes Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (Ras/MAPK) Signaling in the Zebrafish Embryo*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Cong; Liu, Xingfeng; Meng, Anming

    2015-01-01

    Raf kinases are important components of the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk pathway and also cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Araf kinase has been demonstrated to inhibit TGF-β/Smad2 signaling by directly phosphorylating and accelerating degradation of activated Smad2. In this study, we show that the araf gene expresses in zebrafish embryos to produce a shorter transcript variant, araf-tv2, in addition to the full-length variant araf-tv1. araf-tv2 is predicted to encode a C-terminally truncated peptide without the kinase activity domain. Araf-tv2 can physically associate with Araf-tv1 but does not antagonize the inhibitory effect of Araf-tv1 on TGF-β/Smad2 signaling. Instead, Araf-tv2 interacts strongly with Kras and Nras, ultimately blocking MAPK activation by these Ras proteins. In zebrafish embryos, overexpression of araf-tv2 is sufficient to inhibit Fgf/Ras-promoted Erk activation, mesodermal induction, dorsal development, and neuroectodermal posteriorization. Therefore, different isoforms of Araf may participate in similar developmental processes but by regulating different signaling pathways. PMID:26306042

  4. Targeting Human Central Nervous System Protein Kinases: An Isoform Selective p38αMAPK Inhibitor That Attenuates Disease Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first kinase inhibitor drug approval in 2001 initiated a remarkable decade of tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs for oncology indications, but a void exists for serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor drugs and central nervous system indications. Stress kinases are of special interest in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders due to their involvement in synaptic dysfunction and complex disease susceptibility. Clinical and preclinical evidence implicates the stress related kinase p38αMAPK as a potential neurotherapeutic target, but isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor candidates are lacking and the mixed kinase inhibitor drugs that are promising in peripheral tissue disease indications have limitations for neurologic indications. Therefore, pursuit of the neurotherapeutic hypothesis requires kinase isoform selective inhibitors with appropriate neuropharmacology features. Synaptic dysfunction disorders offer a potential for enhanced pharmacological efficacy due to stress-induced activation of p38αMAPK in both neurons and glia, the interacting cellular components of the synaptic pathophysiological axis, to be modulated. We report a novel isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor, MW01-18-150SRM (=MW150), that is efficacious in suppression of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory deficits in two distinct synaptic dysfunction mouse models. A synthetic scheme for biocompatible product and positive outcomes from pharmacological screens are presented. The high-resolution crystallographic structure of the p38αMAPK/MW150 complex documents active site binding, reveals a potential low energy conformation of the bound inhibitor, and suggests a structural explanation for MW150’s exquisite target selectivity. As far as we are aware, MW150 is without precedent as an isoform selective p38MAPK inhibitor or as a kinase inhibitor capable of modulating in vivo stress related behavior. PMID:25676389

  5. R-subunit Isoform Specificity in Protein Kinase A: Distinct Features of Protein Interfaces in PKA Types I and II by Amide H/2H exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ganesh S.; Hotchko, Matthew; Brown, Simon H.J.; Ten Eyck, Lynn F.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The two isoforms (RI and RII) of the regulatory (R) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) are similar in sequence yet have different biochemical properties and physiological functions. To further understand the molecular basis for R-isoform-specificity, the interactions of the RIIβ isoform with the PKA catalytic (C) subunit were analyzed by amide H/2H exchange mass spectrometry to compare solvent accessibility of RIIβ and the C subunit in their free and complexed states. Direct mapping of the RIIβ-C interface revealed important differences between the intersubunit interfaces in the type I and type II holoenzyme complexes. These differences are seen in both the R-subunits as well as the C-subunit. Unlike the type I isoform, the type II isoform complexes require both cAMP-binding domains, and ATP is not obligatory for high affinity interactions with the C-subunit. Surprisingly, the C-subunit mediates distinct, overlapping surfaces of interaction with the two R-isoforms despite a strong homology in sequence and similarity in domain organization. Identification of a remote allosteric site on the C-subunit that is essential for interactions with RII, but not RI subunits, further highlights the considerable diversity in interfaces found in higher order protein complexes mediated by the C-subunit of PKA. PMID:17942118

  6. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. PMID:26687711

  7. Low-intensity contraction activates the alpha1-isoform of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Satsuki; Ebihara, Ken; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sato, Kenji; Fushiki, Tohru; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses two catalytic subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has been implicated in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction activates the alpha2-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha2), but this activation may occur with or without activation of the alpha1-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha1), suggesting that AMPKalpha2 is the major isoform responsible for contraction-induced metabolic events in skeletal muscle. We report for the first time that AMPKalpha1, but not AMPKalpha2, can be activated in contracting skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were isolated and incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing pyruvate. In muscles stimulated to contract at a frequency of 1 and 2 Hz during the last 2 min of incubation, AMPKalpha1 activity increased twofold and AMPKalpha2 activity remained unchanged. Muscle stimulation did not change the muscle AMP concentration or the AMP-to-ATP ratio. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of Thr(172) of the alpha-subunit, the primary activation site. Muscle stimulation increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, and the rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport. In contrast, increasing the frequency (>or=5 Hz) or duration (>or=5 min) of contraction activated AMPKalpha1 and AMPKalpha2 and increased AMP concentration and the AMP/ATP ratio. These results suggest that 1) AMPKalpha1 is the predominant isoform activated by AMP-independent phosphorylation in low-intensity contracting muscle, 2) AMPKalpha2 is activated by an AMP-dependent mechanism in high-intensity contracting muscle, and 3) activation of each isoform enhances glucose transport and ACC phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. PMID:16249251

  8. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25912635

  9. The p110α Isoform of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase is Essential for Cone Photoreceptor Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V.S.; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Anderson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of lipid kinases that phosphorylates the 3'OH of the inositol ring of phosphoinositides (PIs). They are responsible for coordinating a diverse range of cellular functions. Class IA PI3K is a heterodimeric protein composed of a regulatory p85 and a catalytic p110 subunit. In this study, we conditionally deleted the p110α-subunit of PI3K in cone photoreceptor cells using the Cre-loxP system. Cone photoreceptors allow for color vision in bright light (daylight vision). Cone-specific deletion of p110α resulted in cone degeneration. Our studies suggest that PI3K signaling is essential for cone photoreceptor functions. PMID:25742742

  10. Oncogenic activation of the PI3-kinase p110β isoform via the tumor-derived PIK3Cβ(D1067V) kinase domain mutation.

    PubMed

    Pazarentzos, E; Giannikopoulos, P; Hrustanovic, G; St John, J; Olivas, V R; Gubens, M A; Balassanian, R; Weissman, J; Polkinghorn, W; Bivona, T G

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway occurs widely in human cancers. Although somatic mutations in the PI3K pathway genes PIK3CA and PTEN are known to drive PI3K pathway activation and cancer growth, the significance of somatic mutations in other PI3K pathway genes is less clear. Here, we establish the signaling and oncogenic properties of a recurrent somatic mutation in the PI3K p110β isoform that resides within its kinase domain (PIK3Cβ(D1067V)). We initially observed PIK3Cβ(D1067V) by exome sequencing analysis of an EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor biopsy from a patient with acquired erlotinib resistance. On the basis of this finding, we hypothesized that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) might function as a novel tumor-promoting genetic alteration, and potentially an oncogene, in certain cancers. Consistent with this hypothesis, analysis of additional tumor exome data sets revealed the presence of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) at low frequency in other patient tumor samples (including renal cell carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, thyroid carcinoma and endometrial carcinoma). Functional studies revealed that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) promoted PI3K pathway signaling, enhanced cell growth in vitro, and was sufficient for tumor formation in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of PIK3Cβ with TGX-221 (isoform-selective p110β inhibitor) specifically suppressed growth in patient-derived renal-cell carcinoma cells with endogenous PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and in NIH-3T3 and human EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells engineered to express this mutant PI3K. In the EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells, expression of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) also promoted erlotinib resistance. Our data establish a novel oncogenic form of PI3K, revealing the signaling and oncogenic properties of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and its potential therapeutic relevance in cancer. Our findings provide new insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying PI3K pathway activation in

  11. Non–Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Isoform Is a Viable Molecular Target in Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Moitra, Jaideep; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Sammani, Saad; Turner, Jerry R.; Chiang, Eddie T.; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Singleton, Patrick A.; Huang, Yong; Lussier, Yves A.; Watterson, D. Martin; Dudek, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and mechanical ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), major causes of acute respiratory failure with elevated morbidity and mortality, are characterized by significant pulmonary inflammation and alveolar/vascular barrier dysfunction. Previous studies highlighted the role of the non–muscle myosin light chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK) as an essential element of the inflammatory response, with variants in the MYLK gene that contribute to ALI susceptibility. To define nmMLCK involvement further in acute inflammatory syndromes, we used two murine models of inflammatory lung injury, induced by either an intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS model) or mechanical ventilation with increased tidal volumes (the VILI model). Intravenous delivery of the membrane-permeant MLC kinase peptide inhibitor, PIK, produced a dose-dependent attenuation of both LPS-induced lung inflammation and VILI (∼50% reductions in alveolar/vascular permeability and leukocyte influx). Intravenous injections of nmMLCK silencing RNA, either directly or as cargo within angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) antibody–conjugated liposomes (to target the pulmonary vasculature selectively), decreased nmMLCK lung expression (∼70% reduction) and significantly attenuated LPS-induced and VILI-induced lung inflammation (∼40% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein). Compared with wild-type mice, nmMLCK knockout mice were significantly protected from VILI, with significant reductions in VILI-induced gene expression in biological pathways such as nrf2-mediated oxidative stress, coagulation, p53-signaling, leukocyte extravasation, and IL-6–signaling. These studies validate nmMLCK as an attractive target for ameliorating the adverse effects of dysregulated lung inflammation. PMID:20139351

  12. A single residue substitution accounts for the significant difference in thermostability between two isoforms of human cytosolic creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huihui; Gao, Yan-Song; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Chen, Zhe; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Yan, Yong-Bin; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) helps maintain homeostasis of intracellular ATP level by catalyzing the reversible phosphotransfer between ATP and phosphocreatine. In humans, there are two cytosolic CK isoforms, the muscle-type (M) and the brain-type (B), which frequently function as homodimers (hMMCK and hBBCK). Interestingly, these isoenzymes exhibit significantly different thermostabilities, despite high similarity in amino acid sequences and tertiary structures. In order to investigate the mechanism of this phenomenon, in this work, we first used domain swapping and site-directed mutagenesis to search for the key residues responsible for the isoenzyme-specific thermostability. Strikingly, the difference in thermostability was found to principally arise from one single residue substitution at position 36 (Pro in hBBCK vs. Leu in hMMCK). We then engaged the molecular dynamics simulations to study the molecular mechanism. The calculations imply that the P36L substitution introduces additional local interactions around residue 36 and thus further stabilizes the dimer interface through a complex interaction network, which rationalizes the observation that hMMCK is more resistant to thermal inactivation than hBBCK. We finally confirmed this molecular explanation through thermal inactivation assays on Asp36 mutants that were proposed to devastate the local interactions and thus the dimer associations in both isoenzymes. PMID:26879258

  13. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  14. Coordinated changes of adenylate energy charge and ATP/ADP: use in ecotoxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Thébault, M T; Raffin, J P; Picado, A M; Mendonça, E; Skorkowski, E F; Le Gal, Y

    2000-05-01

    The coordinated variations of the adenylate energy charge and ATP/ADP ratio were modeled and a function that depends on the numerical value of the adenylate kinase-catalyzed reaction has been derived. The model allows sensitive detection of the effects of xenobiotics on adenylate kinase and its cellular environment and offers a robust estimation of the direct or indirect effects of pollutants on the adenylate kinase system: data obtained in laboratory studies on shrimp exposed to cadmium and in field studies on oysters either exposed to polychloro-biphenyl compounds or located in a heavily polluted area indicate that xenobiotics affect the adenylate kinase reaction directly or by changing its cellular environment. These results demonstrate that application of the model to the treatment of ecotoxicological data allows detection of energetic changes that would have been missed by simple analysis of the usual energetic parameters, and should overcome problems encountered in using energetic parameters during assessment of pollution monitoring. PMID:10805989

  15. Altered Subcellular Localization of Tumor-Specific Cyclin E Isoforms Affects Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Complex Formation and Proteasomal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delk, Nikki A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2009-01-01

    In tumors, alternative translation and posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of full-length cyclin E (EL) produces tumorigenic low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms that lack a portion of the EL amino-terminus containing a nuclear localization sequence. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMW-E isoforms have altered subcellular localization. To explore our hypothesis, we compared EL versus LMW-E localization in cell lysates and in vivo using fractionation and protein complementation assays. Our results reveal that LMW-E isoforms preferentially accumulate in the cytoplasm where they bind the cyclin E kinase partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), and have associated kinase activity. The nuclear ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 targets Cdk2-bound cyclin E for degradation; thus, we examined if altered subcellular localization affected LMW-E degradation. We found that cytoplasmic LMW-E/Cdk2 was less susceptible to Fbw7-mediated degradation. One implication of our findings is that altered LMW-E and LMW-E/Cdk2 subcellular localization may lead to aberrant LMW-E protein interactions, regulation, and activity, ultimately contributing to LMW-E tumorigenicity. PMID:19318554

  16. Neuroprotection via pro-survival protein kinase C isoforms associated with Bcl-2 family members.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Orly; Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Chillag-Talmor, Orly; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2004-09-01

    This study provides new insights into neuroprotection involving interaction of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway with Bcl-2 family proteins. Using a model of serum deprivation, we investigated the mechanism by which the anti-Parkinson/monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor drug, rasagiline, exerts its neuroprotective effect in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Here, we report that rasagiline (0.1-10 microM) decreased apoptosis via multiple protection mechanisms, including the stimulation of PKC phosphorylation; up-regulation of PKCalpha and PKC mRNAs, induction of Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNAs; and down-regulation of Bad and Bax mRNAs. Moreover, rasagiline inhibited the cleavage and activation of procaspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), whereas the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reversed these actions. Similarly, rasagiline decreased serum-free-induced levels of the important regulator of cell death, Bad, which was also blocked by GF109203X, indicating the involvement of PKC in rasagiline-induced cell survival. Furthermore, these studies have established that PKC- and Bcl-2-dependent neuroprotective activity of rasagiline is dependent on its propargyl moiety, because propargylamine had similar effects with the same potency. PMID:15247150

  17. Succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-Phosphate (SAICAR) Activates Pyruvate Kinase Isoform M2 (PKM2) in Its Dimeric Form.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Tokuda, Joshua M; Pollack, Lois; Bowman, Gregory D; Lee, Young-Sam

    2016-08-23

    Human pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolytic enzyme isoform implicated in cancer. Malignant cancer cells have higher levels of dimeric PKM2, which is regarded as an inactive form of tetrameric pyruvate kinase. This perceived inactivity has fueled controversy about how the dimeric form of pyruvate kinase might contribute to cancer. Here we investigate enzymatic properties of PKM2(G415R), a variant derived from a cancer patient, which we show by size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering to be a dimer that cannot form a tetramer in solution. Although PKM2(G415R) binds to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), unlike the wild type this PKM2 variant shows no activation by FBP. In contrast, PKM2(G415R) is activated by succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-phosphate (SAICAR), an endogenous metabolite that we previously showed correlates with an increased level of cell proliferation and promotes protein kinase activity of PKM2. Our results demonstrate an important and unexpected enzymatic activity of the PKM2 dimer that likely has a key role in cancer progression. PMID:27481063

  18. A Direct Interaction between Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Specific β-Tubulin Isoforms Regulates Tubulin Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Bernard M. H.; Spain, Victoria A.; Leinster, Veronica H. L.; Chia, Ruth; Beilina, Alexandra; Cho, Hyun J.; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Urban, Mary K.; Sancho, Rosa M.; Ramírez, Marian Blanca; Biskup, Saskia; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cai, Huaibin; Cookson, Mark R.; Berwick, Daniel C.; Harvey, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2, encoding the multifunctional protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), are a common cause of Parkinson disease. LRRK2 has been suggested to influence the cytoskeleton as LRRK2 mutants reduce neurite outgrowth and cause an accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau. This might cause alterations in the dynamic instability of microtubules suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Here, we describe a direct interaction between LRRK2 and β-tubulin. This interaction is conferred by the LRRK2 Roc domain and is disrupted by the familial R1441G mutation and artificial Roc domain mutations that mimic autophosphorylation. LRRK2 selectively interacts with three β-tubulin isoforms: TUBB, TUBB4, and TUBB6, one of which (TUBB4) is mutated in the movement disorder dystonia type 4 (DYT4). Binding specificity is determined by lysine 362 and alanine 364 of β-tubulin. Molecular modeling was used to map the interaction surface to the luminal face of microtubule protofibrils in close proximity to the lysine 40 acetylation site in α-tubulin. This location is predicted to be poorly accessible within mature stabilized microtubules, but exposed in dynamic microtubule populations. Consistent with this finding, endogenous LRRK2 displays a preferential localization to dynamic microtubules within growth cones, rather than adjacent axonal microtubule bundles. This interaction is functionally relevant to microtubule dynamics, as mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from LRRK2 knock-out mice display increased microtubule acetylation. Taken together, our data shed light on the nature of the LRRK2-tubulin interaction, and indicate that alterations in microtubule stability caused by changes in LRRK2 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:24275654

  19. Adenylate-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Stefan; Naismith, James H

    2009-12-01

    Thioesters, amides, and esters are common chemical building blocks in a wide array of natural products. The formation of these bonds can be catalyzed in a variety of ways. For chemists, the use of an activating group is a common strategy and adenylate enzymes are exemplars of this approach. Adenylating enzymes activate the otherwise unreactive carboxylic acid by transforming the normal hydroxyl leaving group into adenosine monophosphate. Recently there have been a number of studies of such enzymes and in this review we suggest a new classification scheme. The review highlights the diversity in enzyme fold, active site architecture, and metal coordination that has evolved to catalyze this particular reaction. PMID:19836944

  20. Urochordate Ascidians Possess a Single Isoform of Aurora Kinase That Localizes to the Midbody via TPX2 in Eggs and Cleavage Stage Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hebras, Celine; McDougall, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Aurora kinases are key proteins found throughout the eukaryotes that control mitotic progression. Vertebrate Aurora-A and B kinases are thought to have evolved from a single Aurora-kinase isoform closest to that found in present day urochordates. In urochordate ascidians Aurora binds both TPX2 (a vertebrate AURKA partner) and INCENP (a vertebrate AURKB partner) and localizes to centrosomes and spindle microtubules as well as chromosomes and midbody during both meiosis and mitosis. Ascidian Aurora also displays this localization pattern during mitosis in echinoderms, strengthening the idea that non-vertebrate deuterostomes such as the urochordates and echinoderms possess a single form of Aurora kinase that has properties of vertebrate Aurora-kinase A and B. In the ascidian, TPX2 localizes to the centrosome and the spindle poles also as in vertebrates. However, we were surprised to find that TPX2 also localized strongly to the midbody in ascidian eggs and embryos. We thus examined more closely Aurora localization to the midbody by creating two separate point mutations of ascidian Aurora predicted to perturb binding to TPX2. Both forms of mutated Aurora behaved as predicted: neither localized to spindle poles where TPX2 is enriched. Interestingly, neither form of mutated Aurora localized to the midbody where TPX2 is also enriched, suggesting that ascidian Aurora midbody localization required TPX2 binding in ascidians. Functional analysis revealed that inhibition of Aurora kinase with a pharmacological inhibitor or with a dominant negative kinase dead form of Aurora caused cytokinesis failure and perturbed midbody formation during polar body extrusion. Our data support the view that vertebrate Aurora-A and B kinases evolved from a single non-vertebrate deuterostome ancestor. Moreover, since TPX2 localizes to the midbody in ascidian eggs and cleavage stage embryos it may be worthwhile re-assessing whether Aurora A kinase or TPX2 localize to the midbody in eggs and

  1. Ca2+ Influx and Tyrosine Kinases Trigger Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT) Endocytosis. Cell Physiology and Expression of the CD11b/CD18 Integrin Major Determinants of the Entry Route

    PubMed Central

    Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Gómez-Bilbao, Geraxane; Ostolaza, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Humans infected with Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough bacterium, show evidences of impaired host defenses. This pathogenic bacterium produces a unique adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) which enters human phagocytes and catalyzes the unregulated formation of cAMP, hampering important bactericidal functions of these immune cells that eventually cause cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Additionally, ACT permeabilizes cells through pore formation in the target cell membrane. Recently, we demonstrated that ACT is internalised into macrophages together with other membrane components, such as the integrin CD11b/CD18 (CR3), its receptor in these immune cells, and GM1. The goal of this study was to determine whether ACT uptake is restricted to receptor-bearing macrophages or on the contrary may also take place into cells devoid of receptor and gain more insights on the signalling involved. Here, we show that ACT is rapidly eliminated from the cell membrane of either CR3-positive as negative cells, though through different entry routes, which depends in part, on the target cell physiology and characteristics. ACT-induced Ca2+ influx and activation of non-receptor Tyr kinases into the target cell appear to be common master denominators in the different endocytic strategies activated by this toxin. Very importantly, we show that, upon incubation with ACT, target cells are capable of repairing the cell membrane, which suggests the mounting of an anti-toxin cell repair-response, very likely involving the toxin elimination from the cell surface. PMID:24058533

  2. HC fragment (C-terminal portion of the heavy chain) of tetanus toxin activates protein kinase C isoforms and phosphoproteins involved in signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Gil, C; Chaib-Oukadour, I; Blasi, J; Aguilera, J

    2001-01-01

    A recent report [Gil, Chaib-Oukadour, Pelliccioni and Aguilera (2000) FEBS Lett. 481, 177-182] describes activation of signal transduction pathways by tetanus toxin (TeTx), a Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidase synthesized by the Clostridium tetani bacillus, which is responsible for tetanus disease. In the present work, specific activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and of intracellular signal-transduction pathways, which include nerve-growth-factor (NGF) receptor trkA, phospholipase C(PLC)gamma-1 and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2, by the recombinant C-terminal portion of the TeTx heavy chain (H(C)-TeTx) is reported. The activation of PKC isoforms was assessed through their translocation from the soluble (cytosolic) compartment to the membranous compartment, showing that clear translocation of PKC-alpha, -beta, -gamma and -delta isoforms exists, whereas PKC-epsilon showed a slight decrease in its soluble fraction immunoreactivity. The PKC-zeta isoform showed no consistent response. Using immunoprecipitation assays against phosphotyrosine residues, time- and dose-dependent increases in tyrosine phosphorylation were observed in the trkA receptor, PLCgamma-1 and ERK-1/2. The effects shown by the H(C)-TeTx fragment on tyrosine phosphorylation were compared with the effects produced by NGF. The trkA and ERK-1/2 activation were corroborated using phospho-specific antibodies against trkA phosphorylated on Tyr(490), and antibodies against Thr/Tyr phosphorylated ERK-1/2. Moreover, PLCgamma-1 phosphorylation was supported by its H(C)-TeTx-induced translocation to the membranous compartment, an event related to PLCgamma-1 activation. Since H(C)-TeTx is the domain responsible for membrane binding and lacks catalytic activity, the activations described here must be exclusively triggered by the interaction of TeTx with a membrane component. PMID:11336640

  3. Calpain cleavage of the B isoform of Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase separates the catalytic domain from the membrane anchoring domain.

    PubMed Central

    Pattni, Krupa; Millard, Thomas H; Banting, George

    2003-01-01

    Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] is one of the key intracellular second messengers in cells and mobilizes Ca2+ stores in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). Ins(1,4,5)P3 has a short half-life within the cell, and is rapidly metabolized through one of two pathways, one of which involves further phosphorylation of the inositol ring: Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase (IP3-3K) phosphorylates Ins(1,4,5)P3, resulting in the formation of inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4]. There are three known isoforms of IP3-3K, designated IP3-3KA, IP3-3KB and IP3-3KC. These have differing N-termini, but highly conserved C-termini harbouring the catalytic domain. The three IP3-3K isoforms have different subcellular locations and the B-kinase is uniquely present in both cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. As it is the N-terminus of the B-kinase that differs most from the A- and C-kinases, we have hypothesized that this portion of the protein may be responsible for membrane localization. Although there are no known membrane-targeting protein motifs within the sequence of IP3-3KB, it is found to be tightly associated with the ER membrane. Here, we show that specific regions of the N-terminus of IP3-3KB are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane localization of the protein. We also report that, in the presence of Ca2+, the kinase domain of IP3-3KB is cleaved from the membrane-anchoring region by calpain. PMID:12906709

  4. Effects of depolarization and NMDA antagonists on the role survival of cerebellar granule cells: a pivotal role for protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lin, W W; Wang, C W; Chuang, D M

    1997-06-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) grown in high-K+ (25 mM; K25) medium progressively differentiate in vitro. Differentiation is noticeable after 3-4 days in vitro (DIV) and reach a mature stage after 8 DIV. Longer cultivation of CGCs (>13 DIV) triggers the processes of spontaneous cell death. However, if cultured in normal physiological K concentration (5 mM; K5), a significant proportion of the cells dies by the end of the first week in culture. To address the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the development of CGCs, we measured the kinase activity as well as the protein level of the kinase isoforms. As the K25 CGC culture proceeded, the PKC activity time-dependently increased by 3.2-fold, reaching a steady state at 8 DIV. Western blot analysis using PKC isoform-specific antibodies revealed an increase in levels of PKC alpha, gamma, mu, lambda, and iota from 2 to 8 DIV. A slight increase or decrease at 4 DIV was observed for PKC epsilon and betaII, respectively, whereas no significant change was observed for betaI. The isoforms of delta, theta, eta, and zeta were not detected. Comparing the 14 DIV cultures with the 10 DIV cultures, the immunoreactivities of PKC iota and epsilon were decreased, those of PKC alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, and lambda were unchanged, whereas that of PKC mu was still increased. In K5 cultures, the immunoreactivity of each PKC isoform at 2-4 DIV was similar to that observed in K25 cells, although no remarkable differentiation features were observed. Coordinated with the appearance of cell death at 8 DIV in low-K+ cultures, levels of PKC alpha, mu, lambda, and iota, but not the others, were markedly decreased. The NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 and 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid markedly prevented the age-induced apoptosis of CGCs, and the cells survived >18 DIV under these conditions. The cytoprotective effect of MK-801 was concomitant with the increases in levels of PKC gamma, lambda, iota, and mu at 10 and 14 DIV

  5. Phosphonate analogues of aminoacyl adenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, C C; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    Phosphonomethyl analogues of glycyl phosphate and valyl phosphate, i.e. NH2-CHR-CO-CH2-PO(OH)2, were synthesized and esterified with adenosine to give analogues of aminoacyl adenylates. The interaction of these adenylate analogues with valyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli was studied by fluorescence titration. The analogue of valyl phosphate has an affinity for the enzyme comparable with that of valine, but that of valyl adenylate is bound much less tightly than either valyl adenylate or corresponding derivative of valinol. The affinity of the analogue of glycyl adenylate was too low to be measured. We conclude that this enzyme interacts specifically with both the side chain and the anhydride linkage of the adenylate intermediate. PMID:743207

  6. The specificity of the protein kinase C alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms as assessed by an unnatural alcohol-appended peptide library.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, X; Curley, K; Lawrence, D S

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies using conventional peptide-based libraries have demonstrated that homologous protein-processing enzymes [e.g. the alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms of protein kinase (PKC)] typically display identical amino acid consensus sequences. These observations have hampered the acquisition of selective synthetic substrates for the individual members of these enzyme families. We describe here a parallel synthesis strategy, readily adaptable to the preparation of large libraries, that has led to the emergence of the first examples of selective substrates for the conventional PKC isoforms. In addition, we have found that a wide variety of structurally diverse N-appended alcohol-containing residues, including tyrosine, serve as substrates for the PKC alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms. This broad active-site substrate specificity with respect to both natural and unnatural residues may prove to be especially applicable to the construction of transition-state analogues and suicide substrates, species that often require the presence of structurally elaborate functionality. PMID:10903131

  7. Isoform-specific interactions between meprin metalloproteases and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A: significance in acute and chronic kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie V.; Bastidas, Adam C.; Newman, Robert H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes of kidney proximal tubules. Meprins are implicated in ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced renal injury and diabetic nephropathy. The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway modulates extracellular matrix metabolism in diabetic kidneys. The present study evaluated isoform-specific interactions between the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA C) and meprins. To this end, cytosolic-enriched kidney proteins from meprin αβ double knockout mice, and purified forms of recombinant mouse PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2, were incubated with activated forms of either homomeric meprin A or meprin B. The cleaved protein products were subjected to SDS-PAGE and analyzed by Coomassie staining and Western blot analysis. While meprin A only cleaved PKA Cβ1, meprin B cleaved all three PKA C isoforms. Analysis of the proteolytic fragments by mass spectrometry revealed that meprin A and B cleave the PKA C isoforms at defined sites, resulting in unique cleavage products. Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics demonstrated that meprin B-mediated cleavage of PKA Cα occurs at a rate consistent with that of other physiologically relevant meprin substrates. Meprin cleavage decreased the kinase activity of PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2. PKA C levels were higher in diabetic kidneys, with evidence of in vivo fragmentation in wild-type diabetic kidneys. Confocal microscopy showed localization of meprin A in the glomeruli of diabetic kidneys. At 3 h post-IR, PKA C levels in proximal tubules decreased compared with distal tubules, which lack meprins. These data suggest that meprins may impact kidney injury, in part, via modulation of PKA signaling pathways. PMID:25354939

  8. Crystal Structures of Human Choline Kinase Isoforms in Complex with Hemicholinium-3 Single Amino Acid near the Active Site Influences Inhibitor Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bum Soo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Tempel, Wolfram; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dimov, Svetoslav; Vedadi, Masoud; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-07-06

    Human choline kinase (ChoK) catalyzes the first reaction in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and exists as ChoK{alpha} ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) and ChoK{beta} isoforms. Recent studies suggest that ChoK is implicated in tumorigenesis and emerging as an attractive target for anticancer chemotherapy. To extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChoK inhibition, we have determined the high resolution x-ray structures of the ChoK{alpha}1 and ChoK{beta} isoforms in complex with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a known inhibitor of ChoK. In both structures, HC-3 bound at the conserved hydrophobic groove on the C-terminal lobe. One of the HC-3 oxazinium rings complexed with ChoK{alpha}1 occupied the choline-binding pocket, providing a structural explanation for its inhibitory action. Interestingly, the HC-3 molecule co-crystallized with ChoK{beta} was phosphorylated in the choline binding site. This phosphorylation, albeit occurring at a very slow rate, was confirmed experimentally by mass spectroscopy and radioactive assays. Detailed kinetic studies revealed that HC-3 is a much more potent inhibitor for ChoK{alpha} isoforms ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) compared with ChoK{beta}. Mutational studies based on the structures of both inhibitor-bound ChoK complexes demonstrated that Leu-401 of ChoK{alpha}2 (equivalent to Leu-419 of ChoK{alpha}1), or the corresponding residue Phe-352 of ChoK{beta}, which is one of the hydrophobic residues neighboring the active site, influences the plasticity of the HC-3-binding groove, thereby playing a key role in HC-3 sensitivity and phosphorylation.

  9. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-07-15

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca(2+)- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations ("spiking") at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K(+) depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca(2+)]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca(2+)]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  10. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca2+- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations (“spiking”) at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K+ depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca2+]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca2+]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  11. Human 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase (isoform 1, brain): kinetic properties of the adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase domains.

    PubMed

    Lansdon, Eric B; Fisher, Andrew J; Segel, Irwin H

    2004-04-13

    Recombinant human 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) synthetase, isoform 1 (brain), was purified to near-homogeneity from an Escherichia coli expression system and kinetically characterized. The native enzyme, a dimer with each 71 kDa subunit containing an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase and an adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase domain, catalyzes the overall formation of PAPS from ATP and inorganic sulfate. The protein is active as isolated, but activity is enhanced by treatment with dithiothreitol. APS kinase activity displayed the characteristic substrate inhibition by APS (K(I) of 47.9 microM at saturating MgATP). The maximum attainable activity of 0.12 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1) was observed at an APS concentration ([APS](opt)) of 15 microM. The theoretical K(m) for APS (at saturating MgATP) and the K(m) for MgATP (at [APS](opt)) were 4.2 microM and 0.14 mM, respectively. At likely cellular levels of MgATP (2.5 mM) and sulfate (0.4 mM), the overall endogenous rate of PAPS formation under optimum assay conditions was 0.09 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). Upon addition of pure Penicillium chrysogenum APS kinase in excess, the overall rate increased to 0.47 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). The kinetic constants of the ATP sulfurylase domain were as follows: V(max,f) = 0.77 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1), K(mA(MgATP)) = 0.15 mM, K(ia(MgATP)) = 1 mM, K(mB(sulfate)) = 0.16 mM, V(max,r) = 18.7 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1), K(mQ(APS)) = 4.8 microM, K(iq(APS)) = 18 nM, and K(mP(PPi)) = 34.6 microM. The (a) imbalance between ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activities, (b) accumulation of APS in solution during the overall reaction, (c) rate acceleration provided by exogenous APS kinase, and (d) availability of both active sites to exogenous APS all argue against APS channeling. Molybdate, selenate, chromate ("chromium VI"), arsenate, tungstate, chlorate, and perchlorate bind to the ATP sulfurylase domain, with the

  12. An integrin-targeted, pan-isoform, phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor, SF1126, has activity against multiple myeloma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Terakedis, Breanne; Bersagel, Leif; Li, Zhi Hua; Mahadevan, Daruka; Garlich, Joseph R.; Trudel, Suzanne; Makale, Milan T.; Durden, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple reports point to an important role for the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and AKT signaling pathways in tumor survival and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma (MM). The goals of our study were: (1) to generate the preclinical results necessary to justify a Phase I clinical trial of SF1126 in hematopoietic malignancies including multiple myeloma, and (2) to begin combining pan PI-3 kinase inhibitors with other agents to augment antitumor activity of this class of agent in preparation for combination therapy in Phase I/II trials. Methods We determined the in vitro activity of SF1126 with16 human MM cell lines. In vivo tumor growth suppression was determined with human myeloma (MM.1R) xenografts in athymic mice. In addition, we provide evidence that SF1126 has pharmacodynamic activity in the treatment of patients with MM. Results SF1126 was cytotoxic to all tested MM lines and potency was augmented by the addition of bortezomib. SF1126 affected MM.1R cell line signaling in vitro, inhibiting phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK, and the hypoxic stabilization of HIF1α. Tumor growth was 94% inhibited, with a marked decrease in both cellular proliferation (PCNA immunostaining) and angiogenesis (tumor microvessel density via CD31 immunostaining). Our clinical results demonstrate pharmacodynamic knockdown of p-AKT in primary patient derived MM tumor cells in vivo. Conclusions Our results establish three important points: (1) SF1126, a pan PI-3 kinase inhibitor has potent antitumor activity against multiple myeloma in vitro and in vivo, (2) SF1126 displays augmented antimyeloma activity when combined with proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib/Velcade®, and (3) SF1126 blocks the IGF-1 induced activation of AKT in primary MM tumor cells isolated from SF1126 treated patients The results support the ongoing early Phase I clinical trial in MM and suggest a future Phase I trial in combination with bortezomib in hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:23355037

  13. Distinct functionality of dishevelled isoforms on Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CamKII) in Xenopus gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Gentzel, Marc; Schille, Carolin; Rauschenberger, Verena; Schambony, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Wnt ligands trigger the activation of a variety of β-catenin–dependent and β-catenin–independent intracellular signaling cascades. Despite the variations in intracellular signaling, Wnt pathways share the effector proteins frizzled, dishevelled, and β-arrestin. It is unclear how the specific activation of individual branches and the integration of multiple signals are achieved. We hypothesized that the composition of dishevelled–β-arrestin protein complexes contributes to signal specificity and identified CamKII as an interaction partner of the dishevelled–β-arrestin protein complex by quantitative functional proteomics. Specifically, we found that CamKII isoforms interact differentially with the three vertebrate dishevelled proteins. Dvl1 is required for the activation of CamKII and PKC in the Wnt/Ca2+ pathway. However, CamKII interacts with Dvl2 but not with Dvl1, and Dvl2 is necessary to mediate CamKII function downstream of Dvl1 in convergent extension movements in Xenopus gastrulation. Our findings indicate that the different Dvl proteins and the composition of dishevelled–β-arrestin protein complexes contribute to the specific activation of individual branches of Wnt signaling. PMID:25568338

  14. DNA Unwinding Functions of Minute Virus of Mice NS1 Protein Are Modulated Specifically by the Lambda Isoform of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Dettwiler, Sabine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.

    1999-01-01

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice NS1 protein is a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of processes during virus propagation, ranging from viral DNA replication to promoter regulation and cytotoxic action to the host cell. Since NS1 becomes phosphorylated during infection, it was proposed that the different tasks of this protein might be regulated in a coordinated manner by phosphorylation. Indeed, comparing biochemical functions of native NS1 with its dephosphorylated counterpart showed that site-specific nicking of the origin and the helicase and ATPase activities are remarkably reduced upon NS1 dephosphorylation while site-specific affinity of the protein to the origin became enhanced. As a consequence, the dephosphorylated polypeptide is deficient for initiation of DNA replication. By adding fractionated cell extracts to a kinase-free in vitro replication system, the combination of two protein components containing members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family was found to rescue the replication activity of the dephosphorylated NS1 protein upon addition of PKC cofactors. One of these components, termed HA-1, also stimulated NS1 helicase function in response to acidic lipids but not phorbol esters, indicating the involvement of atypical PKC isoforms in the modulation of this NS1 function (J. P. F. Nüesch, S. Dettwiler, R. Corbau, and J. Rommelaere, J. Virol. 72:9966–9977, 1998). The present study led to the identification of atypical PKCλ/ι as the active component of HA-1 responsible for the regulation of NS1 DNA unwinding and replicative functions. Moreover, a target PKCλ phosphorylation site was localized at S473 of NS1. By site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this residue is essential for NS1 helicase activity but not promoter regulation, suggesting a possible modulation of NS1 functions by PKCλ phosphorylation at residue S473. PMID:10438831

  15. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  16. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Martijn J.; van de Bree, Jolet E.; Bodde, Hanna E.; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b–/– mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2bf/f and Camk2bT287A), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b–/– mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate cause differential activation of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent isoforms of protein kinase C in rat colonocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, M; Wali, R K; Hartmann, S C; Niedziela, S M; Roy, H K; Tien, X Y; Sitrin, M D; Brasitus, T A

    1995-01-01

    Considerable evidence that alterations in protein kinase C (PKC) are intimately involved in important physiologic and pathologic processes in many cells, including colonic epithelial cells, has accumulated. In this regard, phorbol esters, a class of potent PKC activators, have been found to induce a number of cellular events in normal or transformed colonocytes. In addition, our laboratory has demonstrated that the major active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, also rapidly (seconds-minutes) activated PKC and increased intracellular calcium in isolated rat colonocytes. These acute responses, however, were lost in vitamin D deficiency and partially restored with the in vivo repletion of 1,25(OH)2D3. The Ca(2+)-independent or novel isoforms of PKC expressed in the rat colon and the isoform-specific responses of PKC to acute treatment with phorbol esters or 1,25(OH)2D3 have not been previously characterized. Moreover, the effects of vitamin D status on PKC isoform expression, distribution, and response to agonists are also unknown. In the present experiments, in addition to PKC-alpha, rat colonocytes were found to express the novel isoforms delta, epsilon, and zeta by Western blotting using isoform-specific PKC antibodies. The tumor-promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate, caused time- and concentration-dependent translocations of all these isoforms except PKC-zeta. In vitamin D deficiency, there were no alterations in colonic PKC isoform expression but significant changes in the subcellular distribution of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -zeta. Acute treatment of colonocytes from D-sufficient, but not D-deficient, rats with 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a rapid transient redistribution of only PKC-alpha from the soluble to the particulate fraction. The alterations in PKC isoform distribution and PKC-alpha responsiveness to 1,25(OH)2D3 in vitamin D deficiency were partially, but significantly, restored with 5-7 d in vivo repletion of this secosteroid. Both 12

  18. Aggregates of cAMP-dependent kinase isoforms characterize different areas in the developing central nervous system of the chicken, Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Caretta, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) acts mainly through cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA). In mammals and reptiles, the PKA regulatory isoforms (RI and RII) are differentially distributed among the various brain areas and cell types, according to the age of the animal. Since PKA distribution may be an additional marker for homologous areas, PKA regulatory subunit types RI and RII were examined in the chicken brain, a species not yet investigated. Chicken brains were examined from prehatching to adult age, by means of immunohistochemistry and biochemical characterization. Most PKA regulatory subunits were segregated in discrete non-soluble clusters that contained either RI or RII. While RII aggregates were present also in non-neuronal cells, RI aggregates were detected only in neurons of some brain areas that are mainly related to the telencephalon. They appeared later than RII aggregates; their presence and location varied during development. RI aggregates were detected first in the olfactory bulb, around embryonic day 14; within 3 days they appeared in the hyperpallium and nidopallium, where the most intense labeling was observed in the perihatching period. Fainter RI aggregates persisted up to 3 years in the olfactory bulb and nidopallium caudale. Less intense RI aggregates were present for a shorter time, from 2 weeks to 3 months, in the septal nuclei, thalamic medial nuclei, periventricular hypothalamus, optic tectum periventricular area, brainstem reticular formation and spinal cord substantia gelatinosa. RI aggregates were not detected in many brain areas including the arcopallium, striatum and cranial nerve nuclei. RII distribution showed less variation during development. From embryonic day 12, some insoluble RII aggregates were detected in the brain; however, only minor modifications were observed in positive structures once they started to harbor insoluble RII aggregates. The present results suggest that the

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  20. Distinct Activation Mechanisms of NF-κB Regulator Inhibitor of NF-κB Kinase (IKK) by Isoforms of the Cell Death Regulator Cellular FLICE-like Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP)*

    PubMed Central

    Baratchian, Mehdi; Davis, Christopher A.; Shimizu, Akira; Escors, David; Bagnéris, Claire; Barrett, Tracey; Collins, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    The viral FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) protein from Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus activates the NF-κB pathway by forming a stable complex with a central region (amino acids 150–272) of the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKK) γ subunits, thereby activating IKK. Cellular FLIP (cFLIP) forms are also known to activate the NF-κB pathway via IKK activation. Here we demonstrate that cFLIPL, cFLIPS, and their proteolytic product p22-FLIP all require the C-terminal region of NEMO/IKKγ (amino acids 272–419) and its ubiquitin binding function for activation of the IKK kinase (or kinase complex), but none form a stable complex with IKKγ. Our results further reveal that cFLIPL requires the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex and the kinase TAK1 for activation of the IKK kinase. Similarly, cFLIPS and p22-FLIP also require TAK1 but do not require LUBAC. In contrast, these isoforms are both components of complexes that incorporate Fas-associated death domain and RIP1, which appear essential for kinase activation. This conservation of IKK activation among the cFLIP family using different mechanisms suggests that the mechanism plays a critical role in their function. PMID:26865630

  1. New Isoform of Cardiac Myosin Light Chain Kinase and the Role of Cardiac Myosin Phosphorylation in α1-Adrenoceptor Mediated Inotropic Response

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Masaya; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Goto, Itaru; Fujita, Satoshi; Konishi, Katsuhisa; Mizutani, Hideo; Dohi, Kaoru; Hartshorne, David J.; Itoh, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) plays an obligatory role in maintaining the phosphorylation levels of regulatory myosin light chain (MLC2), which is thought to be crucial for regulation of cardiac function. To test this hypothesis, the role played by ventricular MLC2 (MLC2v) phosphorylation was investigated in the phenylephrine-induced increase in twitch tension using the naturally-occurring mouse strain, C57BL/6N, in which cMLCK is down regulated. Methods and Results By Western blot and nanoLC-MS/MS analysis, cMLCKs with molecular mass of 61-kDa (cMLCK-2) and/or 86-kDa were identified in mice heart. Among various mouse strains, C57BL/6N expressed cMLCK-2 alone and the closest relative strain C57BL/6J expressed both cMLCKs. The levels of MLC2v phosphorylation was significantly lower in C57BL/6N than in C57BL/6J. The papillary muscle twitch tension induced by electrical field stimulation was smaller in C57BL/6N than C57BL/6J. Phenylephrine had no effect on MLC2v phosphorylation in either strains but increased the twitch tension more potently in C57BL/6J than in C57BL/6N. Calyculin A increased papillary muscle MLC2v phosphorylation to a similar extent in both strains but increased the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response only in C57BL/6N. There was a significant positive correlation between the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response and the levels of MLC2v phosphorylation within ranges of 15–30%. Conclusions We identified a new isoform of cMLCK with a molecular mass of 61kDa(cMLCK-2) in mouse heart. In the C57BL/6N strain, only cMLCK-2 was expressed and the basal MLC2v phosphorylation levels and the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response were both smaller. We suggest that a lower phenylephrine-induced inotropic response may be caused by the lower basal MLC2v phosphorylation levels in this strain. PMID:26512720

  2. The Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3α and β Isoforms Differentially Regulates Interleukin-12p40 Expression in Endothelial Cells Stimulated with Peptidoglycan from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Huante-Mendoza, Alejandro; Bravo-Patiño, Alejandro; Valdez-Alarcón, Juan J.; Finlay, B. Brett; Baizabal-Aguirre, Víctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active regulatory enzyme that is important in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric diseases. While GSK3α is usually important in neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases GSK3β is fundamental in the inflammatory response caused by bacterial components. Peptidoglycan (PGN), one of the most abundant cell-wall structures of Gram-positive bacteria, is an important inducer of inflammation. To evaluate whether inhibition of GSK3α and GSK3β activity in bovine endothelial cells (BEC) regulates the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12p40, we treated BEC with SDS-purified PGN from Staphylococcus aureus. We found that PGN triggered a TLR2/PI3K/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of GSK3α at Ser21, GSK3β at Ser9, and NF-κB p65 subunit (p65) at Ser536, and the phosphorylation of GSK3α was consistently higher than that of GSK3β. The expression of IL-12p40 was inhibited in BEC stimulated with PGN and pre-treated with a specific neutralizing anti-TLR2 antibody that targets the extracellular domain of TLR2 or by the addition of Akt-i IV (an Akt inhibitor). Inhibition of GSK3α and GSK3β with LiCl or SB216763 induced an increase in IL-12p40 mRNA and protein. The effect of each isoform on IL-12p40 expression was evaluated by siRNA-gene expression silencing of GSK3α and GSK3β. GSK3α gene silencing resulted in a marked increase in IL-12p40 mRNA and protein while GSK3β gene silencing had the opposite effect on IL-12p40 expression. These results indicate that the TLR2/PI3K/Akt-dependent inhibition of GSK3α activity also plays an important role in the inflammatory response caused by stimulation of BEC with PGN from S. aureus. PMID:26200352

  3. Urotensin-II Receptor Stimulation of Cardiac L-type Ca2+ Channels Requires the βγ Subunits of Gi/o-protein and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-dependent Protein Kinase C β1 Isoform*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Ying, Jiaoqian; Jiang, Dongsheng; Chang, Zhigang; Li, Hua; Zhang, Guoqiang; Gong, Shan; Jiang, Xinghong; Tao, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that urotensin-II (U-II) plays important roles in cardiovascular actions including cardiac positive inotropic effects and increasing cardiac output. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects of U-II in cardiomyocytes still remain unknown. We show by electrophysiological studies that U-II dose-dependently potentiates L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa,L) in adult rat ventricular myocytes. This effect was U-II receptor (U-IIR)-dependent and was associated with a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation. Intracellular application of guanosine-5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) and pertussis toxin pretreatment both abolished the stimulatory effects of U-II. Dialysis of cells with the QEHA peptide, but not scrambled peptide SKEE, blocked the U-II-induced response. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin as well as the class I PI3K antagonist CH132799 blocked the U-II-induced ICa,L response. Protein kinase C antagonists calphostin C and chelerythrine chloride as well as dialysis of cells with 1,2bis(2aminophenoxy)ethaneN,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid abolished the U-II-induced responses, whereas PKCα inhibition or PKA blockade had no effect. Exposure of ventricular myocytes to U-II markedly increased membrane PKCβ1 expression, whereas inhibition of PKCβ1 pharmacologically or by shRNA targeting abolished the U-II-induced ICa,L response. Functionally, we observed a significant increase in the amplitude of sarcomere shortening induced by U-II; blockade of U-IIR as well as PKCβ inhibition abolished this effect, whereas Bay K8644 mimicked the U-II response. Taken together, our results indicate that U-II potentiates ICa,L through the βγ subunits of Gi/o-protein and downstream activation of the class I PI3K-dependent PKCβ1 isoform. This occurred via the activation of U-IIR and contributes to the positive inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes. PMID:25678708

  4. Adenylate cyclase in Arthrospira platensis responds to light through transcription.

    PubMed

    Kashith, M; Keerthana, B; Sriram, S; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-08-19

    Cyclic 3',5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, but its role in higher plants was in doubt due to its very low concentration. In this study we wanted to look at the flux of cAMP in response to light in algae, considered to be the more primitive form of photosynthetic organisms. While it did not fluctuate very much in the tested green algae, in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis its level was closely linked to exposure to light. The expression from cyaC, the major isoform of adenylate cyclase was strongly influenced by exposure of the cells to light. There was about 300 fold enhancement of cyaC transcripts in cells exposed to light compared to the transcripts in cells in the dark. Although post-translational regulation of adenylate cyclase activity has been widely known, our studies suggest that transcriptional control could also be an important aspect of its regulation in A. platensis. PMID:27311855

  5. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  6. ISOFORM-SPECIFIC BINDING OF 14-3-3 PROTEINS TO NITRATE REDUCTASE AND THE BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 RECEPTOR KINASE SIGNALING COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 14-3-3 proteins are known to bind many different soluble protein clients, but less is known about binding to integral membrane proteins, and in both cases the issue of isoform specificity remains largely unexplored. Using an array of anti-14-3-3 antibodies and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE...

  7. Uridylation and adenylation of RNAs.

    PubMed

    Song, JianBo; Song, Jun; Mo, BeiXin; Chen, XueMei

    2015-11-01

    The posttranscriptional addition of nontemplated nucleotides to the 3' ends of RNA molecules can have a significant impact on their stability and biological function. It has been recently discovered that nontemplated addition of uridine or adenosine to the 3' ends of RNAs occurs in different organisms ranging from algae to humans, and on different kinds of RNAs, such as histone mRNAs, mRNA fragments, U6 snRNA, mature small RNAs and their precursors etc. These modifications may lead to different outcomes, such as increasing RNA decay, promoting or inhibiting RNA processing, or changing RNA activity. Growing pieces of evidence have revealed that such modifications can be RNA sequence-specific and subjected to temporal or spatial regulation in development. RNA tailing and its outcomes have been associated with human diseases such as cancer. Here, we review recent developments in RNA uridylation and adenylation and discuss the future prospects in this research area. PMID:26563174

  8. Short-term Mg deficiency upregulates protein kinase C isoforms in cardiovascular tissues and cells; relation to NF-kB, cytokines, ceramide salvage sphingolipid pathway and PKC-zeta: hypothesis and review

    PubMed Central

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Zhang, Aimin; Li, Wenyan; Zheng, Tao; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2014-01-01

    Numerous recent,epidemiological studies reveal that Western populations are growing more and more deficient in daily Mg intake which have been linked to etiology of cardiovascular (CV) diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that a major missing link to this dilemma may reside within the sphingolipid-ceramide pathways. For the past 25 years , our labs have been focusing on these pathways in Mg-deficient mammals. The objective of this paper is two-fold: 1) to test various hypotheses and 2) to review the current status of the field and how protein kinase C isoforms may be pivotal to solving some of the CV attributes of Mg deficiency. Below, we test the hypotheses that: 1) short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (MgD) would result in the upregulation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in left ventricular (LV) and aortic smooth muscle (ASM) and serum; 2) MgD would result in a release of select cytokines and an upregulation of NF-kB in LV and ASM, and in primary cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (PCASMC); 3) MgD would result in an activation of the sphingolipid salvage pathway in LV and ASM, and in PCASMC; 4) MgD would result in a synthesis of sphingosine, but not sphinganine, in PCASMC which could be inhibited by fumonisin B1 (FB) an inhibitor of ceramide synthase (CS), but not scyphostatin an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase); 5) incubation of PCASMC (in low Mg2+) with the PKC-mimic PMA would result in release and synthesis of NF-kB, cytokines, and ceramide but not sphingosine. The new data indicate that short-term MgD (10% normal dietary intake) result in an upregulation of all three classes of PKC isoforms in LV, aortic muscle and in serum coupled to the upregulation of ceramide, NF-kB activation, and cytokines. High degrees of linear correlation were found to exist between upregulation of PKC isoforms, p65 and cytokine release, suggesting cross-talk between these molecules and molecular pathways. Our experiments with PCASMCs demonstrated

  9. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Colleen A; Hayeß, Katrin; Andrade, Francisco H

    2005-01-01

    Background Creatine kinase (CK) links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2) the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK) isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity. PMID:16107216

  10. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1HOP1 Receptor Activation Coordinates Multiple Neurotrophic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor; Lutz, Eve; MacKenzie, Christopher; Schutz, Kristin C.; Dozark, Kate; Braas, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    MAPK and Akt pathways are predominant mediators of trophic signaling for many neuronal systems. Among the vasoactive intestinal peptide/secretin/glucagon family of related peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) binding to specific PAC1 receptor isoforms can engage multiple signaling pathways and promote neuroprotection through mechanisms that are not well understood. Using a primary sympathetic neuronal system, the current studies demonstrate that PACAP activation of PAC1HOP1 receptors engages both MAPK and Akt neurotrophic pathways in an integrated program to facilitate neuronal survival after growth factor withdrawal. PACAP not only stimulated prosurvival ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation but also abrogated SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK signaling in parallel. In contrast to the potent and rapid effects of PACAP in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, PACAP stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a late phase of PAC1HOP1 receptor signaling. From inhibitor and immunoprecipitation analyses, the PACAP/PAC1HOP1 receptor-mediated Akt responses did not represent transactivation mechanisms but appeared to depend on Gαq/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ activity and vesicular internalization pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ-selective inhibitors blocked PACAP-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary neuronal cultures and in PAC1HOP1-overexpressing cell lines; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the receptor effectors attenuated PACAP-mediated Akt activation. Similarly, perturbation of endocytic pathways also blocked Akt phosphorylation. Between ERK and Akt pathways, PACAP-stimulated Akt signaling was the primary cascade that attenuated cultured neuron apoptosis after growth factor withdrawal. The partitioning of PACAP-mediated Akt signaling in endosomes may be a key mechanism contributing to the high spatial and temporal specificity in signal transduction necessary for survival pathways. PMID:20093365

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation is regulated by PGE2 through differential activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiveland, Charlotte Ramstad Kassem, Moustapha; Lea, Tor

    2008-05-01

    The conditions used for in vitro differentiation of hMSCs contain substances that affect the activity and expression of cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX1/COX2) and thereby the synthesis of prostanoids. hMSC constitutively produce PGE2 when cultivated in vitro. In this study we have investigated effects of PGE2 on proliferation of hMSC. We here demonstrate that one of the main control molecules in the Wnt pathway, GSK-3{beta}, is phosphorylated at the negative regulatory site ser-9 after treating the cells with PGE2. This phosphorylation is mediated by elevation of cAMP and subsequent activation of PKA. Furthermore, PGE2 treatment leads to enhanced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, thus influencing cell proliferation. The presence of two PKA isoforms, types I and II, prompted us to investigate their individual contribution in PGE2-mediated regulation of proliferation. Specific activation of PKA type II with synthetic cAMP analogues, resulted in enhancement of proliferation. On the other side, we found that treatment of hMSC with high concentrations of PGE2 inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cells in G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, an effect we found to be mediated by PKA I. Hence, the two different PKA isoforms seem to have opposing functions in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation in these cells.

  12. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  13. The Rational Design of Selective Benzoxazepin Inhibitors of the α-Isoform of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Culminating in the Identification of (S)-2-((2-(1-Isopropyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)-5,6-dihydrobenzo[f]imidazo[1,2-d][1,4]oxazepin-9-yl)oxy)propanamide (GDC-0326).

    PubMed

    Heffron, Timothy P; Heald, Robert A; Ndubaku, Chudi; Wei, BinQing; Augistin, Martin; Do, Steven; Edgar, Kyle; Eigenbrot, Charles; Friedman, Lori; Gancia, Emanuela; Jackson, Philip S; Jones, Graham; Kolesnikov, Aleksander; Lee, Leslie B; Lesnick, John D; Lewis, Cristina; McLean, Neville; Mörtl, Mario; Nonomiya, Jim; Pang, Jodie; Price, Steve; Prior, Wei Wei; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Staben, Steven T; Steinbacher, Stefan; Tsui, Vickie; Wallin, Jeffrey; Sampath, Deepak; Olivero, Alan G

    2016-02-11

    Inhibitors of the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoform PI3Kα have received substantial attention for their potential use in cancer therapy. Despite the particular attraction of targeting PI3Kα, achieving selectivity for the inhibition of this isoform has proved challenging. Herein we report the discovery of inhibitors of PI3Kα that have selectivity over the other class I isoforms and all other kinases tested. In GDC-0032 (3, taselisib), we previously minimized inhibition of PI3Kβ relative to the other class I insoforms. Subsequently, we extended our efforts to identify PI3Kα-specific inhibitors using PI3Kα crystal structures to inform the design of benzoxazepin inhibitors with selectivity for PI3Kα through interactions with a nonconserved residue. Several molecules selective for PI3Kα relative to the other class I isoforms, as well as other kinases, were identified. Optimization of properties related to drug metabolism then culminated in the identification of the clinical candidate GDC-0326 (4). PMID:26741947

  14. Discovery of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide activators of the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Saunders, Michael; Pearce, Scott; Foulks, Jason M; Parnell, K Mark; Clifford, Adrianne; Nix, Rebecca N; Bullough, Jeremy; Hendrickson, Thomas F; Wright, Kevin; McCullar, Michael V; Kanner, Steven B; Ho, Koc-Kan

    2014-01-15

    Activators of the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) are currently attracting significant interest as potential anticancer therapies. They may achieve a novel antiproliferation response in cancer cells through modulation of the classic 'Warburg effect' characteristic of aberrant metabolism. In this Letter, we describe the optimization of a weakly active screening hit to a structurally novel series of small molecule 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamides as potent PKM2 activators. PMID:24374270

  15. Human inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase isoform B (IP3KB) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein specifically enriched at cortical actin filaments and at invaginations of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Fliegert, Ralf; Ernst, Olga; Brehm, Maria A; Fanick, Werner; Windhorst, Sabine; Lin, Hongying; Giehler, Susanne; Hein, Jamin; Lin, Yuan-Na; Mayr, Georg W

    2011-02-11

    Recent studies have shown that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase isoform B (IP3KB) possesses important roles in the development of immune cells. IP3KB can be targeted to multiple cellular compartments, among them nuclear localization and binding in close proximity to the plasma membrane. The B isoform is the only IP3K that is almost ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. Detailed mechanisms of its targeting regulation will be important in understanding the role of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) phosphorylation on subcellular calcium signaling and compartment-specific initiation of pathways leading to regulatory active higher phosphorylated inositol phosphates. Here, we identified an exportin 1-dependent nuclear export signal ((134)LQRELQNVQV) and characterized the amino acids responsible for nuclear localization of IP3KB ((129)RKLR). These two targeting domains regulate the amount of nuclear IP3KB in cells. We also demonstrated that the localization of IP3KB at the plasma membrane is due to its binding to cortical actin structures. Intriguingly, all three of these targeting activities reside in one small polypeptide segment (amino acids 104-165), which acts as a multitargeting domain (MTD). Finally, a hitherto unknown subnuclear localization of IP3KB could be demonstrated in rapidly growing H1299 cells. IP3KB is specifically enriched at nuclear invaginations extending perpendicular between the apical and basal surface of the nucleus of these flat cells. Such nuclear invaginations are known to be involved in Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling of the nucleus. Our findings indicate that IP3KB not only regulates cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals by phosphorylation of subplasmalemmal and cytoplasmic Ins(1,4,5)P(3) but may also be involved in modulating nuclear Ca(2+) signals generated from these nuclear envelope invaginations. PMID:21148483

  16. Upregulation of cAMP-specific PDE-4 activity following ligation of the TCR complex on thymocytes is blocked by selective inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosyl kinases.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Rena, G; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms present in murine thymocytes are the cGMP-stimulated PDE activity (PDE-2) and the cAMP-specific PDE activity (PDE-4), and that these isoforms are differentially regulated following ligation of the TCR (Michie, A.M., Lobban, M. D., Mueller, T., Harnett, M. M., and Houslay, M.D. [1996] Cell. Signalling 8, 97-110). We show here that the anti-CD3-stimulated elevation in PDE-4 activity in murine thymocytes is dependent on protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated signals as the TCR-coupled increase in PDE-4 activity can be abrogated by both the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and the PKC selective inhibitors chelerythrine and staurosporine. Moreover, the PKC-activating phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) caused an increase in PDE-4 activity, similar to that observed in cells challenged with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and which was not additive with cochallenge using anti-CD3 antibodies. Both the PMA- and the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated increases in PDE-4 activity were blocked by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Despite the upregulation of PDE-4 activity consequent to TCR ligation, intracellular cAMP levels increased on challenge of thymocytes with anti-CD3 antibody, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity was also increased by TCR ligation. It is suggested that the anti-CD3-mediated increase in PDE-4 activity was owing to a rapid PKC-dependent induction of PDE-4 activity following crosslinking of the TCR complex. This identifies "crosstalk" occurring between the PKA and PKC signaling pathways initiated by ligation of the antigen receptor in murine thymocytes. That both adenylate cyclase and PDE-4 activities were increased may indicate the presence of compartmentalized cAMP responses present in these cells. PMID:9515165

  17. DAF-16/FoxO Directly Regulates an Atypical AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Gamma Isoform to Mediate the Effects of Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling on Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tullet, Jennifer M. A.; Araiz, Caroline; Sanders, Matthew J.; Au, Catherine; Benedetto, Alexandre; Papatheodorou, Irene; Clark, Emily; Schmeisser, Kathrin; Jones, Daniel; Schuster, Eugene F.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gems, David

    2014-01-01

    The DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor controls growth, metabolism and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. The large number of genes that it regulates has been an obstacle to understanding its function. However, recent analysis of transcript and chromatin profiling implies that DAF-16 regulates relatively few genes directly, and that many of these encode other regulatory proteins. We have investigated the regulation by DAF-16 of genes encoding the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has α, β and γ subunits. C. elegans has 5 genes encoding putative AMP-binding regulatory γ subunits, aakg-1-5. aakg-4 and aakg-5 are closely related, atypical isoforms, with orthologs throughout the Chromadorea class of nematodes. We report that ∼75% of total γ subunit mRNA encodes these 2 divergent isoforms, which lack consensus AMP-binding residues, suggesting AMP-independent kinase activity. DAF-16 directly activates expression of aakg-4, reduction of which suppresses longevity in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. This implies that an increase in the activity of AMPK containing the AAKG-4 γ subunit caused by direct activation by DAF-16 slows aging in daf-2 mutants. Knock down of aakg-4 expression caused a transient decrease in activation of expression in multiple DAF-16 target genes. This, taken together with previous evidence that AMPK promotes DAF-16 activity, implies the action of these two metabolic regulators in a positive feedback loop that accelerates the induction of DAF-16 target gene expression. The AMPK β subunit, aakb-1, also proved to be up-regulated by DAF-16, but had no effect on lifespan. These findings reveal key features of the architecture of the gene-regulatory network centered on DAF-16, and raise the possibility that activation of AMP-independent AMPK in nutritionally replete daf-2 mutant adults slows aging in C. elegans. Evidence of activation of AMPK subunits in mammals suggests that such FoxO-AMPK interactions may be evolutionarily conserved

  18. DAF-16/FoxO directly regulates an atypical AMP-activated protein kinase gamma isoform to mediate the effects of insulin/IGF-1 signaling on aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tullet, Jennifer M A; Araiz, Caroline; Sanders, Matthew J; Au, Catherine; Benedetto, Alexandre; Papatheodorou, Irene; Clark, Emily; Schmeisser, Kathrin; Jones, Daniel; Schuster, Eugene F; Thornton, Janet M; Gems, David

    2014-02-01

    The DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor controls growth, metabolism and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. The large number of genes that it regulates has been an obstacle to understanding its function. However, recent analysis of transcript and chromatin profiling implies that DAF-16 regulates relatively few genes directly, and that many of these encode other regulatory proteins. We have investigated the regulation by DAF-16 of genes encoding the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has α, β and γ subunits. C. elegans has 5 genes encoding putative AMP-binding regulatory γ subunits, aakg-1-5. aakg-4 and aakg-5 are closely related, atypical isoforms, with orthologs throughout the Chromadorea class of nematodes. We report that ∼75% of total γ subunit mRNA encodes these 2 divergent isoforms, which lack consensus AMP-binding residues, suggesting AMP-independent kinase activity. DAF-16 directly activates expression of aakg-4, reduction of which suppresses longevity in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. This implies that an increase in the activity of AMPK containing the AAKG-4 γ subunit caused by direct activation by DAF-16 slows aging in daf-2 mutants. Knock down of aakg-4 expression caused a transient decrease in activation of expression in multiple DAF-16 target genes. This, taken together with previous evidence that AMPK promotes DAF-16 activity, implies the action of these two metabolic regulators in a positive feedback loop that accelerates the induction of DAF-16 target gene expression. The AMPK β subunit, aakb-1, also proved to be up-regulated by DAF-16, but had no effect on lifespan. These findings reveal key features of the architecture of the gene-regulatory network centered on DAF-16, and raise the possibility that activation of AMP-independent AMPK in nutritionally replete daf-2 mutant adults slows aging in C. elegans. Evidence of activation of AMPK subunits in mammals suggests that such FoxO-AMPK interactions may be evolutionarily conserved

  19. Comparative theoretical study of the binding of luciferyl-adenylate and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Vieira, João; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of a study employing a computational approach to study the binding of (D/L)-luciferyl-adenlyates and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase. A semi-empirical/molecular mechanics methodology was used to study the interaction between these ligands and active site molecules. All adenylates are complexed with the enzyme, mostly due to electrostatic interactions with cationic residues. Dehydroluciferyl-adenylate is expected to be a competitive inhibitor of luciferyl-adenylate, as their binding mechanism and affinity to luciferase are very similar. Both luciferyl-adenylates adopt the L-orientation in the active site of luciferase.

  20. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  1. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta isoform is expressed in motor neurons during axon outgrowth and is part of slow axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2002-03-15

    Previously, we identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta (CaMKIIbeta) mRNA in spinal motor neurons with 372 bp inserted in what corresponds to the "association" domain of the protein. This was interesting because known additions and deletions to CaMKIIbeta mRNA are usually less than 100 bp in size and found in the "variable" region. Changes in the association domain of CaMKIIbeta could influence substrate specificity, activity or intracellular targeting. We show that three variations of this insert are found in CNS neurons or sciatic motor neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats. We used PCR and nucleic acid sequencing to identify inserts of 114, 243, or 372 bases. We also show that addition of the 372 bases is associated with outgrowth of the axon (the standard CaMKIIbeta downregulates when axon outgrowth occurs). Radiolabeling, immunoblots, and 2D PAGE identified this larger CaMKIIbeta as part of the group of soluble proteins moving at the slowest rate of axonal transport (SCa) in sciatic motor neurons (similar1 mm/day). This group is composed mainly of structural proteins (e.g., tubulin) used to assemble the cytoskeleton of regrowing axons. PMID:11891785

  2. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  3. Differential distribution of phospholipase C beta isoforms and diaglycerol kinase beta in rodents cerebella corroborates the division of unipolar brush cells into two major subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masahiko; Martina, Marco; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Sublineage diversification of specific neural cell classes occurs in complex as well as simply organized regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems; the significance of the phenomenon, however, remains insufficiently understood. The unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are glutamatergic cerebellar interneurons that occur at high density in vestibulocerebellum. As they are classified into subsets that differ in chemical phenotypes, intrinsic properties, and lobular distribution, they represent a valuable neuronal model to study subclass diversification. In this study we show that cerebellar UBCs of adult rats and mice form two subclasses – type I and type II UBCs - defined by somatodendritic expression of calretinin (CR), mGluR1α, phospholipases PLCβ1 and PLCβ4, and diacylglycerol kinase-beta (DGKβ). We demonstrate that PLCβ1 is associated only with the CR+ type I UBCs while PLCβ4 and DGKβ are exclusively present in mGluR1α+ type II UBCs. Notably, all PLCβ4+ UBCs, representing about 2/3 of entire UBC population, also express mGluR1α. Furthermore, our data show that the sum of CR+ type I UBCs and mGluR1α+ type II UBCs accounts for the entire UBC class identified with Tbr2 immunolabeling. The two UBC subtypes also show a very different albeit somehow overlapping topographical distribution as illustrated by detailed cerebellar maps in this study. Our data not only complement and extend the previous knowledge on the diversity and subclass specificity of the chemical phenotypes within the UBC population but provide a new angle to the understanding of the signaling networks in type I and type II UBCs. PMID:23503970

  4. Differential distribution of phospholipase C beta isoforms and diaglycerol kinase-beta in rodents cerebella corroborates the division of unipolar brush cells into two major subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masahiko; Martina, Marco; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Sublineage diversification of specific neural cell classes occurs in complex as well as simply organized regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems; the significance of the phenomenon, however, remains insufficiently understood. The unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are glutamatergic cerebellar interneurons that occur at high density in vestibulocerebellum. As they are classified into subsets that differ in chemical phenotypes, intrinsic properties, and lobular distribution, they represent a valuable neuronal model to study subclass diversification. In this study, we show that cerebellar UBCs of adult rats and mice form two subclasses-type I and type II UBCs-defined by somatodendritic expression of calretinin (CR), mGluR1α, phospholipases PLCβ1 and PLCβ4, and diacylglycerol kinase-beta (DGKβ). We demonstrate that PLCβ1 is associated only with the CR(+) type I UBCs, while PLCβ4 and DGKβ are exclusively present in mGluR1α(+) type II UBCs. Notably, all PLCβ4(+) UBCs, representing about 2/3 of entire UBC population, also express mGluR1α. Furthermore, our data show that the sum of CR(+) type I UBCs and mGluR1α(+) type II UBCs accounts for the entire UBC class identified with Tbr2 immunolabeling. The two UBC subtypes also show a very different albeit somehow overlapping topographical distribution as illustrated by detailed cerebellar maps in this study. Our data not only complement and extend the previous knowledge on the diversity and subclass specificity of the chemical phenotypes within the UBC population, but also provide a new angle to the understanding of the signaling networks in type I and type II UBCs. PMID:23503970

  5. Investigation of potential mechanisms regulating protein expression of hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms 2 and 4 by fatty acids and thyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Holness, Mark J; Bulmer, Karen; Smith, Nicholas D; Sugden, Mary C

    2003-01-01

    Liver contains two pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), namely PDK2 and PDK4, which regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Starvation increases hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression, the latter occurring, in part, via a mechanism involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha). High-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism, which increase circulating lipid supply, enhance hepatic PDK2 protein expression, but these increases are insufficient to account for observed increases in hepatic PDK activity. Enhanced expression of PDK4, but not PDK2, occurs in part via a mechanism involving PPAR-alpha. Heterodimerization partners for retinoid X receptors (RXRs) include PPARalpha and thyroid-hormone receptors (TRs). We therefore investigated the responses of hepatic PDK protein expression to high-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism in relation to hepatic lipid delivery and disposal. High-fat feeding increased hepatic PDK2, but not PDK4, protein expression whereas hyperthyroidism increased both hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression. Both manipulations decreased the sensitivity of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) to suppression by malonyl-CoA, but only hyperthyrodism elevated plasma fatty acid and ketone-body concentrations and CPT I maximal activity. Administration of the selective PPAR-alpha activator WY14,643 significantly increased PDK4 protein to a similar extent in both control and high-fat-fed rats, but WY14,643 treatment and hyperthyroidism did not have additive effects on hepatic PDK4 protein expression. PPARalpha activation did not influence hepatic PDK2 protein expression in euthyroid rats, suggesting that up-regulation of PDK2 by hyperthyroidism does not involve PPARalpha, but attenuated the effect of hyperthyroidism to increase hepatic PDK2 expression. The results indicate that hepatic PDK4 up-regulation can be achieved by heterodimerization of either PPARalpha or

  6. Activation of AMPK alpha and gamma-isoform complexes in the intact ischemic rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in modulating cellular metabolic processes. AMPK, a serine-threonine kinase, is a heterotrimeric complex of catalytic alpha-subunits and regulatory beta- and gamma-subunits with multiple isoforms. Mutations in the cardiac gamma(2)-isoform have bee...

  7. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B.; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M.; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of “toxin-coated bacteria” proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or “free” in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca2+-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system. PMID:26346097

  8. Adenylation of maternally inherited microRNAs by Wispy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mihye; Choi, Yeon; Kim, Kijun; Jin, Hua; Lim, Jaechul; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Yang, Jihye; Jeong, Minsun; Giraldez, Antonio J; Yang, Hui; Patel, Dinshaw J; Kim, V Narry

    2014-12-01

    Early development depends heavily on accurate control of maternally inherited mRNAs, and yet it remains unknown how maternal microRNAs are regulated during maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). We here find that maternal microRNAs are highly adenylated at their 3' ends in mature oocytes and early embryos. Maternal microRNA adenylation is widely conserved in fly, sea urchin, and mouse. We identify Wispy, a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase, as the enzyme responsible for microRNA adenylation in flies. Knockout of wispy abrogates adenylation and results in microRNA accumulation in eggs, whereas overexpression of Wispy increases adenylation and reduces microRNA levels in S2 cells. Wispy interacts with Ago1 through protein-protein interaction, which may allow the effective and selective adenylation of microRNAs. Thus, adenylation may contribute to the clearance of maternally deposited microRNAs during MZT. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the regulation of maternal microRNAs and illustrates the importance of RNA tailing in development. PMID:25454948

  9. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    PubMed

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed. PMID:23947014

  10. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  11. Regulation of Plant Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase by Adenylate Nucleotides 1

    PubMed Central

    Eastwell, Kenneth C.; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    The assay of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.2) does not follow ideal zero-order kinetics when assayed in a crude extract from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germ. Our results show that the lack of ideality is the consequence of contamination by ATPase and adenylate kinase. These enzyme activities generate significant amounts of ADP and AMP in the assay mixture, thus limiting the availability of ATP for the carboxylase reaction. Moreover, ADP and AMP are competitive inhibitors, with respect to ATP, of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Similar relationships between adenylate nucleotides and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are found in isolated chloroplasts. There is no evidence that acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in the extracts of the plant systems examined is altered by covalent modification, such as a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. A scheme is presented that illustrates the dependency of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthesis on the energy demands of the chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:16662980

  12. Tropomyosin isoforms and reagents

    PubMed Central

    Schevzov, Galina; Whittaker, Shane P; Fath, Thomas; Lin, Jim JC

    2011-01-01

    Tropomyosins are rod-like dimers which form head-to-tail polymers along the length of actin filaments and regulate the access of actin binding proteins to the filaments.1 The diversity of tropomyosin isoforms, over 40 in mammals, and their role in an increasing number of biological processes presents a challenge both to experienced researchers and those new to this field. The increased appreciation that the role of these isoforms expands beyond that of simply stabilizing actin filaments has lead to a surge of reagents and techniques to study their function and mechanisms of action. This report is designed to provide a basic guide to the genes and proteins and the availability of reagents which allow effective study of this family of proteins. We highlight the value of combining multiple techniques to better evaluate the function of different tm isoforms and discuss the limitations of selected reagents. Brief background material is included to demystify some of the unfortunate complexity regarding this multi-gene family of proteins including the unconventional nomenclature of the isoforms and the evolutionary relationships of isoforms between species. Additionally, we present step-by-step detailed experimental protocols used in our laboratory to assist new comers to the field and experts alike. PMID:22069507

  13. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7(3H)-ones as novel series of potent β isoform selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robert M; Erhard, Karl; Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Lin, Hong; McSurdy-Freed, Jeanelle; Plant, Ramona; Raha, Kaushik; Rominger, Cynthia M; Schaber, Michael D; Spengler, Michael D; Moore, Michael L; Yu, Hongyi; Luengo, Juan I; Tedesco, Rosanna; Rivero, Ralph A

    2012-05-01

    A series of 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7(3H)-ones with excellent enzyme inhibition, improved isoform selectivity, and excellent inhibition of downstream phosphorylation of AKT has been identified. Several compounds in the series demonstrated potent (∼ 0.100 μM IC(50)) growth inhibition in a PTEN deficient cancer cell line. PMID:22475557

  14. Glucagon and adenylate cyclase: binding studies and requirements for activation.

    PubMed

    Levey, G S; Fletcher, M A; Klein, I

    1975-01-01

    Solubilization of myocardial adenylate cyclase abolished responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, two of the hormones which activate the membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase freed of detergent by DEAE-cellulose chromatography continues to remain unresponsive to hormone stimulation. However, adding purified bovine brain phospholipids--phosphotidylserine and monophosphatidylinositol--restored responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, respectively. 125-i-glucagon binding appeared to be independent of phospholipid, since equal binding was observed in the presence or absence of detergent and in the presence or absence of phospholipids. Chromatography of the solubilized preparation on Sephadex G-100 WAS CHARACTERIZED BY 125-I-glucagon binding and fluoride-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity appearing in the fractions consistent with the void volume, suggesting a molecular weight greater than 100,000 for the receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. Prior incubation of the binding peak with 125-I-glucagon and rechromatography of the bound glucagon on Sephadex G-100 shifted its elution to a later fraction consistent with a smaller-molecular-weight peak. The molecular weight of this material was 24,000 to 28,000, as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The latter findings are consistent with a dissociable receptor site for glucagon on myocardial adenylate cyclase. PMID:165684

  15. Identification of sea urchin sperm adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of sea urchin sperm yielded approximately 20 major proteins. One of these proteins, of Mr 190,000, was purified and used to immunize rabbits. After absorption with living sperm, the serum reacted monospecifically on one- and two-dimensional Western immunoblots with the Mr 190,000 protein. The anti-190-kD serum inhibited 94% of the adenylate cyclase (AC) activity of the CaM eluate. An immunoaffinity column removed 95% of the AC activity, and the purified (but inactive) Mr 190,000 protein was eluted from the column. The antiserum also inhibited 23% of the activity of bovine brain CaM-sensitive AC and 90% of the activity of horse sperm CaM-sensitive AC. These data support the hypothesis that the Mr 190,000 protein is sea urchin sperm AC. Although this AC bound to CaM, it was not possible to demonstrate directly a Ca2+ or CaM sensitivity. However, two CaM antagonists, calmidazolium and chlorpromazine, both inhibited AC activity, and the inhibition was released by added CaM, suggesting the possibility of regulation of this AC by CaM. Indirect immunofluorescence showed the Mr 190,000 protein to be highly concentrated on only the proximal half of the sea urchin sperm flagellum. This asymmetric localization of AC may be important to its function in flagellar motility. This is the first report of the identification of an AC from animal spermatozoa. PMID:2121742

  16. The turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenergic receptor couples to both adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C via distinct G-protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Vaziri, C; Walker, T R; Milligan, G; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    By contrast with mammalian beta-adrenergic receptors, the avian isoform elicits two distinct effector responses, activation of adenylate cyclase and polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) leading to the accumulation of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol phosphates. We have investigated the mechanisms of beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in turkey erythrocytes. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist isoprenaline exhibits a 30-fold lower EC50 than that for PLC activation, which may indicate a marked receptor reserve for the former effector. Similar Ki values were obtained for the inhibition of both responses by four beta-adrenergic antagonists, arguing that a single receptor population is responsible for both effects. Antibodies raised against G-protein peptide sequences were used to show that the identity of the G-protein mediating the PLC response was an avian homologue of G11, the level of expression of which was very similar to that of the stimulatory G-protein of adenylate cyclase, Gs. Thus a single population of beta-adrenergic receptors apparently interacts with distinct G-proteins to activate different effectors. The stoichiometries of the receptor-G-protein-effector interactions are therefore similar for both second-messenger responses and the data are discussed in terms of the different efficacies observed for each response. Images Figure 4 PMID:7998968

  17. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  18. DNA signals at isoform promoters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  19. Insect Stage-Specific Receptor Adenylate Cyclases Are Localized to Distinct Subdomains of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagellar Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saada, Edwin A.; Kabututu, Z. Pius; Lopez, Miguel; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Oberholzer, Michael; Riestra, Angelica; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Trypanosoma brucei flagellum (synonymous with cilium) plays important roles in host-parasite interactions. Several studies have identified virulence factors and signaling proteins in the flagellar membrane of bloodstream-stage T. brucei, but less is known about flagellar membrane proteins in procyclic, insect-stage parasites. Here we report on the identification of several receptor-type flagellar adenylate cyclases (ACs) that are specifically upregulated in procyclic T. brucei parasites. Identification of insect stage-specific ACs is novel, as previously studied ACs were constitutively expressed or confined to bloodstream-stage parasites. We show that procyclic stage-specific ACs are glycosylated, surface-exposed proteins that dimerize and possess catalytic activity. We used gene-specific tags to examine the distribution of individual AC isoforms. All ACs examined localized to the flagellum. Notably, however, while some ACs were distributed along the length of the flagellum, others specifically localized to the flagellum tip. These are the first transmembrane domain proteins to be localized specifically at the flagellum tip in T. brucei, emphasizing that the flagellum membrane is organized into specific subdomains. Deletion analysis reveals that C-terminal sequences are critical for targeting ACs to the flagellum, and sequence comparisons suggest that differential subflagellar localization might be specified by isoform-specific C termini. Our combined results suggest insect stage-specific roles for a subset of flagellar adenylate cyclases and support a microdomain model for flagellar cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in T. brucei. In this model, cAMP production is compartmentalized through differential localization of individual ACs, thereby allowing diverse cellular responses to be controlled by a common signaling molecule. PMID:24879126

  20. Neurohypophyseal Hormone-Responsive Adenylate Cyclase from Mammalian Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Douša, Thomas; Hechter, Oscar; Schwartz, Irving L.; Walter, Roderich

    1971-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to evaluate the direct stimulatory effects of neurohypophyseal hormones upon adenylate cyclase activity in a cell-free, particulate fraction derived from the kidney medulla of various mammalian species. The relative affinity of neurohypophyseal hormones for the receptor component of the adenylate cyclase system (as defined by the concentration of hormone required for half-maximal stimulation) had the order [8-arginine]-vasopressin > [8-lysine]-vasopressin ≫ oxytocin (AVP > LVP ≫ OT) for rat, mouse, rabbit, and ox; in the pig, the order was LVP > AVP ≫ OT. The relative affinities of the three hormones in rat and pig cyclase systems were found to correspond with the relative antidiuretic potencies of these hormones in the intact rat and pig. These findings show that the renal receptor for neurohypophyseal hormones in a particular species exhibits the highest affinity for the specific antidiuretic hormone that occurs naturally in that species. Some of the molecular requirements for the stimulation of rabbit adenylate cyclase were defined by studies of several neurohypophyseal analogs possessing structural changes in positions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 9. This investigation introduces the particulate preparation of renal medullary adenylate cyclase as a tool for the analysis of neurohypophyseal hormone-receptor interactions and indicates that this preparation can be adapted to serve as an in vitro bioassay system for antidiuretic hormonal activity. PMID:4331557

  1. Alternative splicing results in RET isoforms with distinct trafficking properties

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas S.; Rodrigues, David M.; Hyndman, Brandy D.; Crupi, Mathieu J. F.; Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Mulligan, Lois M.

    2012-01-01

    RET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is essential for spermatogenesis, development of the sensory, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems and the kidneys, as well as for maintenance of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. RET is alternatively spliced to encode multiple isoforms that differ in their C-terminal amino acids. The RET9 and RET51 isoforms display unique levels of autophosphorylation and have differential interactions with adaptor proteins. They induce distinct gene expression patterns, promote different levels of cell differentiation and transformation, and play unique roles in development. Here we present a comprehensive study of the subcellular localization and trafficking of RET isoforms. We show that immature RET9 accumulates intracellularly in the Golgi, whereas RET51 is efficiently matured and present in relatively higher amounts on the plasma membrane. RET51 is internalized faster after ligand binding and undergoes recycling back to the plasma membrane. This differential trafficking of RET isoforms produces a more rapid and longer duration of signaling through the extracellular-signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway downstream of RET51 relative to RET9. Together these differences in trafficking properties contribute to some of the functional differences previously observed between RET9 and RET51 and establish the important role of intracellular trafficking in modulating and maintaining RET signaling. PMID:22875993

  2. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J.; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y.

    2016-01-01

    inner segments. The combined results indicate that glycolysis is regulated by the compartmental expression of hexokinase 2, pyruvate kinase M1, and pyruvate kinase M2 in photoreceptors, whereas the inner retinal neurons exhibit a lower capacity for glycolysis and aerobic glycolysis. Expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase, mitochondria-associated adenylate kinase, and several mitochondria-associated creatine kinase isozymes was highest in the outer retina, whereas expression of cytosolic adenylate kinase and brain creatine kinase was higher in the cones, horizontal cells, and amacrine cells indicating the diversity of ATP-buffering strategies among retinal neurons. Based on the antibody intensities and the COX and LDH activity, Müller glial cells (MGCs) had the lowest capacity for glycolysis, aerobic glycolysis, and OXPHOS. However, they showed high expression of glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate thiokinase, GABA transaminase, and ~P transferring kinases. This suggests that MGCs utilize TCA cycle anaplerosis and cataplerosis to generate GTP and ~P transferring kinases to produce ATP that supports MGC energy requirements. Conclusions Our comprehensive and integrated results reveal that the adult mouse retina expresses numerous isoforms of ATP synthesizing, regulating, and buffering genes; expresses differential cellular and compartmental levels of glycolytic, OXPHOS, TCA cycle, and ~P transferring kinase proteins; and exhibits differential layer-by-layer LDH and COX activity. New insights into cell-specific and compartmental ATP and GTP production, as well as utilization and buffering strategies and their relationship with known retinal and cellular functions, are discussed. Developing therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection and treating retinal deficits and degeneration in a cell-specific manner will require such knowledge. This work provides a platform for future research directed at identifying the molecular targets and

  3. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  4. Arrestin-3 Binds c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 1 (JNK1) and JNK2 and Facilitates the Activation of These Ubiquitous JNK Isoforms in Cells via Scaffolding*

    PubMed Central

    Kook, Seunghyi; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-visual arrestins scaffold mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are members of MAPK family. Arrestin-3 has been shown to enhance the activation of JNK3, which is expressed mainly in neurons, heart, and testes, in contrast to ubiquitous JNK1 and JNK2. Although all JNKs are activated by MKK4 and MKK7, both of which bind arrestin-3, the ability of arrestin-3 to facilitate the activation of JNK1 and JNK2 has never been reported. Using purified proteins we found that arrestin-3 directly binds JNK1α1 and JNK2α2, interacting with the latter comparably to JNK3α2. Phosphorylation of purified JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 by MKK4 or MKK7 is increased by arrestin-3. Endogenous arrestin-3 interacted with endogenous JNK1/2 in different cell types. Arrestin-3 also enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous JNK1/2 in intact cells upon expression of upstream kinases ASK1, MKK4, or MKK7. We observed a biphasic effect of arrestin-3 concentrations on phosphorylation of JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, arrestin-3 acts as a scaffold, facilitating JNK1α1 and JNK2α2 phosphorylation by MKK4 and MKK7 via bringing JNKs and their activators together. The data suggest that arrestin-3 modulates the activity of ubiquitous JNK1 and JNK2 in non-neuronal cells, impacting the signaling pathway that regulates their proliferation and survival. PMID:24257757

  5. Dissecting signalling by individual Akt/PKB isoforms, three steps at once.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Klip, Amira

    2015-09-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB (protein kinase B) is key for mammalian cell growth, survival, metabolism and oncogenic transformation. The diverse level and tissue expression of its three isoforms, Akt1/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ and Akt3/PKBγ, make it daunting to identify isoform-specific actions in vivo and even in isolated tissues/cells. To date, isoform-specific knockout and knockdown have been the best strategies to dissect their individual overall functions. In a recent article in the Biochemical Journal, Kajno et al. reported a new strategy to study isoform selectivity in cell lines. Individual Akt/PKB isoforms in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes are first silenced via shRNA and stable cellular clones lacking one or the other isoform are selected. The stably silenced isoform is then replaced by a mutant engineered to be refractory to inhibition by MK-2206 (Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A)). Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A) are functional and effectively recruited to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The system affords the opportunity to acutely control the activity of the endogenous non-silenced isoform through timely addition of MK-2206. Using this approach, it is confirmed that Akt1/PKBα is the preferred isoform sustaining adipocyte differentiation, but both Akt1/PKBα and Akt2/PKBβ can indistinctly support insulin-dependent FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) nuclear exclusion. Surprisingly, either isoform can also support insulin-dependent glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 translocation to the membrane, in contrast with the preferential role of Akt2/PKBβ assessed by knockdown studies. The new strategy should allow analysis of the plurality of Akt/PKB functions in other cells and in response to other stimuli. It should also be amenable to high-throughput studies to speed up advances in signal transmission by this pivotal kinase. PMID:26348913

  6. Aminoacyl transfer from an adenylate anhydride to polyribonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Imidazole catalysis of phenylalanyl transfer from phenylalanine adenylate to hydroxyl groups of homopolyribonucleotides is studied as a possible chemical model of biochemical aminoacylation of transfer RNA (tRNA). The effect of pH on imidazole-catalyzed transfer of phenylalanyl residues to poly(U) and poly(A) double helix strands, the number of peptide linkages and their lability to base and neutral hydroxylamine, and the nature of adenylate condensation products are investigated. The chemical model entertained exhibits a constraint by not acylating the hydroxyl groups of polyribonucleotides in a double helix. The constraint is consistent with selective biochemical aminoacylation at the tRNA terminus. Interest in imidazole as a model of histidine residue in protoenzymes participating in prebiotic aminoacyl transfer to polyribonucleotides, and in rendering the tRNA a more efficient adaptor, is indicated.

  7. Mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase by Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V; Cuatrecasas, P

    1975-06-01

    The kinetics and properties of the activation of adenylate cyclase by cholera enterotoxin have been examined primarily in toad erythrocytes, but also in avian erythrocytes, rat fat cells and cultured melanoma cells. When cholera toxin is incubated with intact cells it stimulates adenylate cyclase activity, as measured in the subsequently isolated plasma membranes, according to a triphasic time course. This consists of a true lag period of about 30 min, followed by a stage of exponentially increasing adenylate cyclase activity which continues for 110 to 130 min, and finally a period of slow activation which may extend as long as 30 hr in cultured melanoma cells. The progressive activation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin is interrupted by cell lysis; continued incubation of the isolated membranes under nearly identical conditions does not lead to further activation of the enzyme. The delay in the action of the toxin is not grossly dependent of the number of toxin-receptor (GM1 ganglioside) complexes, and is still seen upon adding a second dose of toxin to partially stimulated cells. Direct measurements indicate negligible intracellular levels of biologically active radioiodinated toxin in either a soluble or a nuclear-bound form. The effects are not prevented by Actinomycin D (20 mug/ml), uromycin (30 mug/ml), cycloheximide (30 mug/ml), sodium fluoride (10 mM) or sodium azide (1 mM); KCN, however, almost completely prevents the action of cholera toxin. The action of the toxin is temperature dependent, occurring at very slow or negligible rates below certain critical temperatures, the values of which depend on the specific animal species. Thetransition for toad erythrocytes occurs at 15 to 17 degrees C, while rat adipocytes and turkey erythrocytes demonstrate a discontinuity at 26 to 30 degrees C. The temperature effects are evident during the lag period as well as during the exponential phase of activation. The rate of decay of the stimulated adenylate

  8. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  9. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explain observed abnormalities of phosphorylase activation and sarcoplasmic reticulum function. PMID:6271806

  10. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  11. Adenylate cyclase mediates olfactory transduction for a wide variety of odorants.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G; Nakamura, T; Gold, G H

    1989-01-01

    An odor-stimulated adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] is thought to mediate olfactory transduction in vertebrates. However, it is not known whether the adenylate cyclase serves this function for all odorants or for only certain classes of odorants. To investigate this question, we have compared the abilities of 35 odorants to stimulate the adenylate cyclase and to elicit an electrophysiological response. We report a strong positive correlation between the magnitude of adenylate cyclase stimulation and the summated electrical response of the olfactory epithelium (electro-olfactogram) evoked by individual odorants. We also show that the adenylate cyclase stimulator forskolin equally attenuates the electro-olfactogram response for all odorants tested. These data provide evidence that the adenylate cyclase mediates transduction for a wide variety of odorants. PMID:2787513

  12. Yeast mating pheromone alpha factor inhibits adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, H; Thorner, J

    1980-01-01

    The pheromone alpha factor, secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells of the alpha mating type, serves to synchronize the opposite mating type (a cells) at G1 as a prelude to fusion of the two cell types. We found that, in vitro, alpha factor inhibited the membrane-bound adenylate cyclase of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, one class (ste5) of a cell mutants that grow normally at either 23 degrees or 34 degrees C but that are unable to respond to alpha factor or to mate at the higher temperature possessed an adenylate cyclase activity that was not inhibited by alpha factor at 34 degrees C but was fully sensitive to inhibition at 23 degrees C. Furthermore, addition of cyclic AMP to a cell culture medium shortened the period of pheromone-induced G1 arrest. We conclude that inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by alpha factor may constitute, at least in part, the biochemical mode of action of the pheromone in vivo. PMID:6246513

  13. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  14. Signal-transduction protein P(II) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 senses low adenylate energy charge in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2011-11-15

    P(II) proteins belong to a family of highly conserved signal-transduction proteins that occurs widely in bacteria, archaea and plants. They respond to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-OG (2-oxoglutarate), and control enzymes, transcription factors and transport proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of ADP on in vitro P(II)-signalling properties for the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model for oxygenic phototrophic organisms. Different ADP/ATP ratios strongly affected the properties of P(II) signalling. Increasing ADP antagonized the binding of 2-OG and directly affected the interactions of P(II) with its target proteins. The resulting P(II)-signalling properties indicate that, in mixtures of ADP and ATP, P(II) trimers are occupied by mixtures of adenylate nucleotides. Binding and kinetic activation of NAGK (N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase), the controlling enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, by P(II) was weakened by ADP, but relief from arginine inhibition remained unaffected. On the other hand, ADP enhanced the binding of P(II) to PipX, a co-activator of the transcription factor NtcA and, furthermore, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 2-OG on P(II)-PipX interaction. These results indicate that S. elongatus P(II) directly senses the adenylate energy charge, resulting in target-dependent differential modification of the P(II)-signalling properties. PMID:21774788

  15. Rearrangement of energetic and substrate utilization networks compensate for chronic myocardial creatine kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras P; Hoyer, Kirsten; Tian, Rong; Zhang, Song; Nemutlu, Emirhan; Spindler, Matthias; Ingwall, Joanne S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity of the cellular bioenergetic system is fundamental to every organ function, stress adaptation and disease tolerance. Here, remodelling of phosphotransfer and substrate utilization networks in response to chronic creatine kinase (CK) deficiency, a hallmark of cardiovascular disease, has been revealed in transgenic mouse models lacking either cytosolic M-CK (M-CK−/−) or both M-CK and sarcomeric mitochondrial CK (M-CK/ScCKmit−/−) isoforms. The dynamic metabolomic signatures of these adaptations have also been defined. Tracking perturbations in metabolic dynamics with 18O and 13C isotopes and 31P NMR and mass spectrometry demonstrate that hearts lacking M-CK have lower phosphocreatine (PCr) turnover but increased glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) turnover, glucose utilization and inorganic phosphate compartmentation with normal ATP γ-phosphoryl dynamics. Hearts lacking both M-CK and sarcomeric mitochondrial CK have diminished PCr turnover, total phosphotransfer capacity and intracellular energetic communication but increased dynamics of β-phosphoryls of ADP/ATP, G-6-P and γ-/β-phosphoryls of GTP, indicating redistribution of flux through adenylate kinase (AK), glycolytic and guanine nucleotide phosphotransfer circuits. Higher glycolytic and mitochondrial capacities and increased glucose tolerance contributed to metabolic resilience of M-CK/ScCKmit−/− mice. Multivariate analysis revealed unique metabolomic signatures for M-CK−/− and M-CK/ScCKmit−/− hearts suggesting that rearrangements in phosphotransfer and substrate utilization networks provide compensation for genetic CK deficiency. This new information highlights the significance of integrated CK-, AK-, guanine nucleotide- and glycolytic enzyme-catalysed phosphotransfer networks in supporting the adaptivity and robustness of the cellular energetic system. PMID:21878522

  16. Phorbol esters induce death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells with altered expression of protein kinase C isoforms. Role for p53-independent induction of gadd-45 in initiating death.

    PubMed Central

    de Vente, J E; Kukoly, C A; Bryant, W O; Posekany, K J; Chen, J; Fletcher, D J; Parker, P J; Pettit, G J; Lozano, G; Cook, P P

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulates growth, differentiation and apoptosis in a cell-specific fashion. Overexpression of PKC-alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells (MCF-7-PKC-alpha cell) leads to expression of a more transformed phenotype. The response of MCF-7 and MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells to phorbol esters (TPA) was examined. TPA-treated MCF-7 cells demonstrated a modest cytostatic response associated with a G1 arrest that was accompanied by Cip1 expression and retinoblastoma hypophosphorylation. While p53 was detected in MCF-7 cells, evidence for TPA-induced stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity was not evident. In contrast, TPA treatment induced death of MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells. Bryostatin 1, another PKC activator, exerted modest cytostatic effects on MCF-7 cells while producing a cytotoxic response at low doses in MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells that waned at higher concentrations. TPA-treated MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells accumulated in G2/M, did not express p53, displayed decreased Cip1 expression, and demonstrated a reduction in retinoblastoma hypophosphorylation. TPA-treated MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells expressed gadd-45 which occurred before the onset of apoptosis. Thus, alterations in the PKC pathway can modulate the decision of a breast cancer cell to undergo death or differentiation. In addition, these data show that PKC activation can induce expression of gadd45 in a p53-independent fashion. Images PMID:7560079

  17. Differential recruitment of PKC isoforms in HeLa cells during redox stress

    PubMed Central

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Rizzuto, Rosario; Pinton, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a major transducer of several intracellular pathways. In confirmation of this important role, PKCs exhibit high molecular heterogeneity, because they occur in at least 10 different isoforms differing in biochemical properties and sensitivity to activators. In this report we focused on the ability of different redox agents to induce modification of intracellular distribution of specific PKC isoforms in HeLa cells. To this end we utilized a panel of green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeras and a high-speed digital imaging system. We observed a remarkable complexity of PKC signalling patterns occurring during redox stress with marked differences among PKC isoforms also belonging to the same subgroup. Moreover our results suggest that modifications of the intracellular redox state can modulate the responsiveness of specific PKC isoforms and, in turn, change the sensitivity of the different isoforms to cell stimulation. PMID:18229448

  18. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  19. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  20. Preferential elevation of protein kinase C isoform beta II and diacylglycerol levels in the aorta and heart of diabetic rats: differential reversibility to glycemic control by islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Inoguchi, T; Battan, R; Handler, E; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W; King, G L

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we have measured protein kinase C (PKC) specific activities and total diacylglycerol (DAG) level in the aorta and heart of rats, which showed that after 2 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, membranous PKC specific activity and total DAG content were increased significantly by 88% and 40% in the aorta and by 21% and 72% in the heart, respectively. Hyperglycemia was identified as being a causal factor since elevated glucose levels increased DAG levels in cultured aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Analysis by immunoblotting revealed that only alpha and beta II PKC isoenzymes are detected in these two tissues and vascular cells among those studied. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, beta II isoenzyme is preferentially increased in both aorta and heart, whereas PKC alpha did not change significantly. The increases in membranous PKC specific activity and DAG level are observed in both spontaneous diabetes-prone diabetic BB rats as well as in STZ-induced diabetic BB and Sprague-Dawley rats, which persisted for up to 5 weeks. After 2 weeks of diabetes without treatment, the normalization of blood glucose levels for up to 3 weeks with islet cell transplants in STZ-induced diabetic BB rats reversed the biochemical changes only in the heart, but not in the aorta. These results suggest that PKC activity and DAG level may be persistently activated in the macrovascular tissues from diabetic animals and indicate a possible role for these biochemical parameters in the development of diabetic chronic vascular complications. Images PMID:1438315

  1. Preferential elevation of protein kinase C isoform beta II and diacylglycerol levels in the aorta and heart of diabetic rats: differential reversibility to glycemic control by islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inoguchi, T; Battan, R; Handler, E; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W; King, G L

    1992-11-15

    In the present study, we have measured protein kinase C (PKC) specific activities and total diacylglycerol (DAG) level in the aorta and heart of rats, which showed that after 2 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, membranous PKC specific activity and total DAG content were increased significantly by 88% and 40% in the aorta and by 21% and 72% in the heart, respectively. Hyperglycemia was identified as being a causal factor since elevated glucose levels increased DAG levels in cultured aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Analysis by immunoblotting revealed that only alpha and beta II PKC isoenzymes are detected in these two tissues and vascular cells among those studied. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, beta II isoenzyme is preferentially increased in both aorta and heart, whereas PKC alpha did not change significantly. The increases in membranous PKC specific activity and DAG level are observed in both spontaneous diabetes-prone diabetic BB rats as well as in STZ-induced diabetic BB and Sprague-Dawley rats, which persisted for up to 5 weeks. After 2 weeks of diabetes without treatment, the normalization of blood glucose levels for up to 3 weeks with islet cell transplants in STZ-induced diabetic BB rats reversed the biochemical changes only in the heart, but not in the aorta. These results suggest that PKC activity and DAG level may be persistently activated in the macrovascular tissues from diabetic animals and indicate a possible role for these biochemical parameters in the development of diabetic chronic vascular complications. PMID:1438315

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys-174, Asp-179 and Asp-191 in the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Deprez, J; Vertommen, D; Di Pietro, A; Hue, L; Rider, M H

    1997-01-01

    In a structural model of the 2-kinase domain of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase based on the analogy with adenylate kinase, Lys-174, Asp-179 and Asp-191 residues are located in the putative active site. Asp-179 and Asp-191 are conserved in all known 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase sequences. In contrast, Lys-174 is conserved except in a yeast isoenzyme, fbp26, where it is replaced by glycine. Yeast fbp26 possesses fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase activity, but is devoid of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity. Mutation of Asp-179 and Asp-191 of the rat liver isoenzyme to alanine increased the Km of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase for fructose 6-phosphate 2000- and 1000-fold respectively, whereas mutation of Lys-174 to glycine decreased the Vmax of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase more than 4000-fold. In contrast, none of the mutations affected the kinetic parameters of fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase. CD and fluorescence measurements indicated that the mutations had no effect on the structure and stability of the recombinant proteins. The results show that Asp-179 and Asp-191 participate in fructose 6-phosphate binding, whereas Lys-174 is important for catalysis. Therefore the natural mutation of Lys-174 to glycine in the fbp26 yeast isoenzyme could explain the lack of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity. These results support a novel 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase structure model based on adenylate kinase. PMID:9032446

  3. Expression of Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms in Native Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Béziau, Delphine M.; Toussaint, Fanny; Blanchette, Alexandre; Dayeh, Nour R.; Charbel, Chimène; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η) based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs) remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA), pulmonary (PA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA). mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA), δ4 (only expressed in MCA), η1 (expressed in all but MA) and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested). The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1) in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found in the

  4. Chirally selective, intramolecular interaction observed in an aminoacyl adenylate anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, James C.; Hall, Leo M.; Mullins, Dail W.; Watkins, Charles L.

    1985-06-01

    All earthly creatures use only L-amino acids in template directed protein synthesis. The reason for this exclusive use of the L-isomer is not yet apparent, although recent experiments by Usher and his colleagues have shown some stereoselctivity in the aminoacylation of di- and polynucleotides [1 3]. We have separately reported on intramolecular interactions between hydrophobic amino acid side chains and the adenine ring in aminoacyl adenylates [4]. There was a preferential association of Phe > Leu = Ile > Val with the adenine in these studies, but we made no attempts to address the question of D, L selectivity. Recently, in1H NMR studies of N-acetylphenylalanyl adenylate anhydride, we noticed evidence that both D- and L-isomers of the amino acid were present and, furthermore, that one isomer seemed to be associating with the adenine ring more strongly than the other. Using HPLC, we have separated the two diastereoisomers and have enzymatically determined that the isomer which associates more strongly is the biologically important one, the L-isomer. We present those studies here and discuss the evolutionary significance of this finding.

  5. Adenylate Energy Charge in Escherichia coli During Growth and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Astrid G.; Fall, Lana; Atkinson, Daniel E.

    1971-01-01

    The value of the adenylate energy charge, [(adenosine triphosphate) + ½ (adenosine diphosphate)]/[(adenosine triphosphate) + (adenosine diphosphate) + (adenosine monophosphate)], in Escherichia coli cells during growth is about 0.8. During the stationary phase after cessation of growth, or during starvation in carbon-limited cultures, the energy charge declines slowly to a value of about 0.5, and then falls more rapidly. During the slow decline in energy charge, all the cells are capable of forming colonies, but a rapid fall in viability coincides with the steep drop in energy charge. These results suggest that growth can occur only at energy charge values above about 0.8, that viability is maintained at values between 0.8 and 0.5, and that cells die at values below 0.5. Tabulation of adenylate concentrations previously reported for various organisms and tissues supports the prediction, based on enzyme kinetic observations in vitro, that the energy charge is stabilized near 0.85 in intact metabolizing cells of a wide variety of types. PMID:4333317

  6. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  7. Differential Roles of PML Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Maroui, Mohamed Ali; Mascle, Xavier H; Aubry, Muriel; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is fused to the retinoic acid receptor alpha in patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Treatment of APL patients with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) reverses the disease phenotype by a process involving the degradation of the fusion protein via its PML moiety. Several PML isoforms are generated from a single PML gene by alternative splicing. They share the same N-terminal region containing the RBCC/tripartite motif but differ in their C-terminal sequences. Recent studies of all the PML isoforms reveal the specific functions of each. Here, we review the nomenclature and structural organization of the PML isoforms in order to clarify the various designations and classifications found in different databases. The functions of the PML isoforms and their differential roles in antiviral defense also are reviewed. Finally, the key players involved in the degradation of the PML isoforms in response to As2O3 or other inducers are discussed. PMID:23734343

  8. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  9. Response of liver and kidney adenylate kinase to fasting and refeeding in three strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Chinn-Norris, E; Russell, P J; Lopez, A; Urias, L

    1986-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the AK isozymes in liver and kidney were studied in three strains of mice. Our studies showed that changes in total AK activity and AK isozyme patterns were associated with fasting and refeeding. The AK isozyme changes were strain-dependent, differing in kind and degree among the three strains. It was concluded that species, strain and individual isozyme identities should be included in studies defining changes of enzyme activity owing to changes in physiological conditions. PMID:3015484

  10. Comparative inhibition patterns of adenylate kinases from mammals, bird, fish and microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, A; Taulane, J P; Russell, P J

    1994-03-01

    The S8 inhibitions of AKs from six different sources were studied in mammals, birds, fish, and a microorganism. All AKs tested were inhibited by S8. Except for carp, all inhibited AKs from those tested were reactivated by DTT. Inhibitions of AKs by other hydrophobic inhibitors, NEM, butanol and ethanol were also studied. The inhibitions by S8 suggest that the hydrophobic pockets in the AKs cover a wide phylogenetic range. All inhibitions by S8 are reactivated by DTT. Unlike the inhibitions by S8, the characteristics of inhibitions by the other hydrophobic inhibitors differed among the AK sources tested and none was the irreversible type. The data suggest that no covalent bonds were formed with NEM. Similarly, the ability to reactivate the inhibitions by DTT differed among the AK sources. The possibility that the hydrophobic domains in the AKs may serve as part of an enzyme activity control mechanism is discussed. PMID:7749617

  11. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that

  12. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  13. The Adenylate Cyclase Toxins of Bacillus anthracis and Bordetella pertussis Promote Th2 Cell Development by Shaping T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Benagiano, Marisa; Capitani, Nagaja; Zornetta, Irene; Ladant, Daniel; Montecucco, Cesare; D'Elios, Mario M.; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2009-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of bacterial adenylate cyclase toxins has been ascribed to their capacity, largely mediated by cAMP, to modulate APC activation, resulting in the expression of Th2–driving cytokines. On the other hand, cAMP has been demonstrated to induce a Th2 bias when present during T cell priming, suggesting that bacterial cAMP elevating toxins may directly affect the Th1/Th2 balance. Here we have investigated the effects on human CD4+ T cell differentiation of two adenylate cyclase toxins, Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (ET) and Bordetella pertussis CyaA, which differ in structure, mode of cell entry, and subcellular localization. We show that low concentrations of ET and CyaA, but not of their genetically detoxified adenylate cyclase defective counterparts, potently promote Th2 cell differentiation by inducing expression of the master Th2 transcription factors, c-maf and GATA-3. We also present evidence that the Th2–polarizing concentrations of ET and CyaA selectively inhibit TCR–dependent activation of Akt1, which is required for Th1 cell differentiation, while enhancing the activation of two TCR–signaling mediators, Vav1 and p38, implicated in Th2 cell differentiation. This is at variance from the immunosuppressive toxin concentrations, which interfere with the earliest step in TCR signaling, activation of the tyrosine kinase Lck, resulting in impaired CD3ζ phosphorylation and inhibition of TCR coupling to ZAP-70 and Erk activation. These results demonstrate that, notwithstanding their differences in their intracellular localization, which result in focalized cAMP production, both toxins directly affect the Th1/Th2 balance by interfering with the same steps in TCR signaling, and suggest that their adjuvanticity is likely to result from their combined effects on APC and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, our results strongly support the key role of cAMP in the adjuvanticity of these toxins. PMID:19266022

  14. Molecular cloning and mRNA distribution of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide in the lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lee, L T O; Tam, J K V; Chan, D W; Chow, B K C

    2009-04-01

    In this article, we report the isolation of a full-length cDNA clone encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from lungfish Protopterus dolloi. When comparing the deduced amino acid sequences, the lungfish PACAP was found to be highly conserved with other vertebrates; however, the PRP shares only lower levels of sequence identity with known PRP sequences. Consistently in phylogenetic analysis, the lungfish PRP, similar to sturgeon PRP, fails to cluster with other PRPs. In addition to the full-length clone, another cDNA encoding a short precursor that lacks the first 32 amino acids of the PRP was also isolated. Interestingly, similar isoforms were also identified in several nonmammalian vertebrates, and it was suggested that exon skipping of PRP/PACAP transcripts was a mechanism that regulated the expression ratio of PACAP to PRP in nonmammalian vertebrates. By real-time PCR, both long and short PRP/PACAP transcripts were found almost exclusively in the brain, and the short isoform is the more abundant transcript (3.7 times more), indicating that PACAP is the major product produced in lungfish brain. The expression patterns of lungfish and previously studied frog PRP/PACAP suggest that the PRP/PACAP gene in the tetrapod lineage may first express in the central nervous system; in the process of evolution, the functions of these peptides diversified and were later found in other tissues. PMID:19456341

  15. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hector, Ralph D; Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  16. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C.; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3’-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  17. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  18. Analysis of the Linker Region Joining the Adenylation and Carrier Protein Domains of the Modular Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Drake, Eric J.; Makin, Thomas A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) are multi-modular proteins capable of producing important peptide natural products. Using an assembly-line process the amino acid substrate and peptide intermediates are passed between the active sites of different catalytic domains of the NRPS while bound covalently to a peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain. Examination of the linker sequences that join the NRPS adenylation and PCP domains identified several conserved proline residues that are not found in standalone adenylation domains. We examined the roles of these proline residues and neighboring conserved sequences through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the adenylation domain and the fully reconstituted NRPS pathway. In particular, we identified a conserved LPxP motif at the start of the adenylation-PCP linker. The LPxP motif interacts with a region on the adenylation domain to stabilize a critical catalytic lysine residue belonging to the A10 motif that immediately precedes the linker. Further, this interaction with the C-terminal sub-domain of the adenylation domain may coordinate movement of the PCP with the conformational change of the adenylation domain. Through this work, we extend the conserved A10 motif of the adenylation domain and identify residues that enable proper adenylation domain function. PMID:24975514

  19. Distinct roles of class IA PI3K isoforms in primary and immortalised macrophages.

    PubMed

    Papakonstanti, Evangelia A; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Bilancio, Antonio; Burns, Emily; Nock, Gemma E; Houseman, Benjamin; Shokat, Kevan; Ridley, Anne J; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2008-12-15

    The class IA isoforms of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p110alpha, p110beta and p110delta) often have non-redundant functions in a given cell type. However, for reasons that are unclear, the role of a specific PI3K isoform can vary between cell types. Here, we compare the relative contributions of PI3K isoforms in primary and immortalised macrophages. In primary macrophages stimulated with the tyrosine kinase ligand colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), all class IA PI3K isoforms participate in the regulation of Rac1, whereas p110delta selectively controls the activities of Akt, RhoA and PTEN, in addition to controlling proliferation and chemotaxis. The prominent role of p110delta in these cells correlates with it being the main PI3K isoform that is recruited to the activated CSF1 receptor (CSF1R). In immortalised BAC1.2F5 macrophages, however, the CSF1R also engages p110alpha, which takes up a more prominent role in CSF1R signalling, in processes including Akt phosphorylation and regulation of DNA synthesis. Cell migration, however, remains dependent mainly on p110delta. In other immortalised macrophage cell lines, such as IC-21 and J774.2, p110alpha also becomes more prominently involved in CSF1-induced Akt phosphorylation, at the expense of p110delta.These data show that PI3K isoforms can be differentially regulated in distinct cellular contexts, with the dominant role of the p110delta isoform in Akt phosphorylation and proliferation being lost upon cell immortalisation. These findings suggest that p110delta-selective PI3K inhibitors may be more effective in inflammation than in cancer. PMID:19033389

  20. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-01-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  1. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-10-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  2. Chirally selective, intramolecular interaction observed in an aminoacyl adenylate anhydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between amino acids and nucleotide bases is studied. The proton NMR spectrum of N-acetylphenylalanyl-AMP-anhydride is analyzed H8 and H2 signals, two upfield signals of equal size, and five phenylalanine ring proton signals are observed in the spectrum; the upfield movement of the proton and the racemization of the N-acetyl L-phenylalanine material are examined. The differences in the position of the signals due to the diastereoisomers are investigated. The separation of the D and L amino acyl adenylates using HPLC is described. H-1 NMR spectra of the isomers are examined in order to determine which isomer displays the strongest interaction between the phenyl ring and the adenine ring. The spectra reveal that the L isomer shows the highest upfield change of both H8 and H2 signals. It is noted that the phenyl ring lies over C2 of the adenine ring with the phenyl meta and para protons extended past the adenine ring and the phenyl ortho protons.

  3. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase inactivation by the host cell.

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa-Ron, A; Rogel, A; Hanski, E

    1989-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis produces a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) which acts as a toxin capable of penetrating eukaryotic cells and generating high levels of intracellular cyclic AMP. Transfer of target cells into B. pertussis AC-free medium leads to a rapid decay in the intracellular AC activity, implying that the invasive enzyme is unstable in the host cytoplasm. We report here that treatment of human lymphocytes with a glycolysis inhibitor and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation completely blocked the intracellular inactivation of B. pertussis AC. Lymphocyte lysates inactivated all forms of B. pertussis AC in the presence of exogenous ATP. This inactivation was associated with degradation of an 125I-labelled 200 kDa form of B. pertussis AC. It appears that ATP is required for the proteolytic pathway, but not as an energy source, since non-hydrolysable ATP analogues supported inactivation and complete degradation of the enzyme. The possibility that binding of ATP to B. pertussis AC renders it susceptible to degradation by the host cell protease is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2554887

  4. Snapshots of tRNA sulphuration via an adenylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Numata, Tomoyuki; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Fukai, Shuya; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nureki, Osamu

    2006-07-27

    Uridine at the first anticodon position (U34) of glutamate, lysine and glutamine transfer RNAs is universally modified by thiouridylase into 2-thiouridine (s2U34), which is crucial for precise translation by restricting codon-anticodon wobble during protein synthesis on the ribosome. However, it remains unclear how the enzyme incorporates reactive sulphur into the correct position of the uridine base. Here we present the crystal structures of the MnmA thiouridylase-tRNA complex in three discrete forms, which provide snapshots of the sequential chemical reactions during RNA sulphuration. On enzyme activation, an alpha-helix overhanging the active site is restructured into an idiosyncratic beta-hairpin-containing loop, which packs the flipped-out U34 deeply into the catalytic pocket and triggers the activation of the catalytic cysteine residues. The adenylated RNA intermediate is trapped. Thus, the active closed-conformation of the complex ensures accurate sulphur incorporation into the activated uridine carbon by forming a catalytic chamber to prevent solvent from accessing the catalytic site. The structures of the complex with glutamate tRNA further reveal how MnmA specifically recognizes its three different tRNA substrates. These findings provide the structural basis for a general mechanism whereby an enzyme incorporates a reactive atom at a precise position in a biological molecule. PMID:16871210

  5. The adenylate cyclase receptor complex and aqueous humor formation.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, J.; Sears, M.

    1984-01-01

    The secretory tissue of the eye, the ciliary processes, contains an enzyme receptor complex, composed of membrane proteins, the catalytic moiety of the enzyme adenylate cyclase, a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein (or N protein), and other features. The enzyme can be activated by well-known neurohumoral or humoral agents, catecholamines, glycoprotein hormones produced by the hypothalamic pituitary axis, and other related compounds, including placental gonadotropin, organic fluorides, and forskolin, a diterpene. These compounds cause the ciliary epithelia to produce cyclic AMP at an accelerated rate. Cyclic AMP, as a second messenger, causes, either directly or indirectly, a decrease in the net rate of aqueous humor inflow that may be modulated by cofactors. Clinical syndromes fit the experimental data so that an integrated explanation can be given for the reduced intraocular pressure witnessed under certain central nervous system and adrenergic influences. The molecular biology of this concept provides important leads for future investigations that bear directly both upon the regulation of intraocular pressure and upon glaucoma. Images FIG. 11 PMID:6093393

  6. hMENA(11a), a hMENA isoform sending survival signals.

    PubMed

    Trono, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Nisticò, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Human MENA(11a) (hMENA(11a)), an epithelial-associated isoform of the actin binding protein enabled homolog (ENAH, also known as mammalian ENA [MENA]), is upregulated and phosphorylated following the activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 1, HER2, and HER3. Here, we reveal a novel role of this isoform in sustaining cell survival and propose hMENA(11a) as a marker of HER3 activation and resistance to phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibition therapies. PMID:27308605

  7. Diacylglycerol Kinase Inhibition and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Allahdadi, Kyan J; Tostes, Rita C A; Webb, R Clinton

    2009-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), a family of lipid kinases, convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). Acting as a second messenger, DG activates protein kinase C (PKC). PA, a signaling lipid, regulates diverse functions involved in physiological responses. Since DGK modulates two lipid second messengers, DG and PA, regulation of DGK could induce related cellular responses. Currently, there are 10 mammalian isoforms of DGK that are categorized into five groups based on their structural features. These diverse isoforms of DGK are considered to activate distinct cellular functions according to extracellular stimuli. Each DGK isoform is thought to play various roles inside the cell, depending on its subcellular localization (nuclear, ER, Golgi complex or cytoplasm). In vascular smooth muscle, vasoconstrictors such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and norepinephrine stimulate contraction by increasing inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), calcium, DG and PKC activity. Inhibition of DGK could increase DG availability and decrease PA levels, as well as alter intracellular responses, including calcium-mediated and PKC-mediated vascular contraction. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate a role of DGK in vascular function. Selective inhibition of DGK isoforms may represent a novel therapeutic approach in vascular dysfunction. PMID:21547002

  8. Inference of Isoforms from Short Sequence Reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianxing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    Due to alternative splicing events in eukaryotic species, the identification of mRNA isoforms (or splicing variants) is a difficult problem. Traditional experimental methods for this purpose are time consuming and cost ineffective. The emerging RNA-Seq technology provides a possible effective method to address this problem. Although the advantages of RNA-Seq over traditional methods in transcriptome analysis have been confirmed by many studies, the inference of isoforms from millions of short sequence reads (e.g., Illumina/Solexa reads) has remained computationally challenging. In this work, we propose a method to calculate the expression levels of isoforms and infer isoforms from short RNA-Seq reads using exon-intron boundary, transcription start site (TSS) and poly-A site (PAS) information. We first formulate the relationship among exons, isoforms, and single-end reads as a convex quadratic program, and then use an efficient algorithm (called IsoInfer) to search for isoforms. IsoInfer can calculate the expression levels of isoforms accurately if all the isoforms are known and infer novel isoforms from scratch. Our experimental tests on known mouse isoforms with both simulated expression levels and reads demonstrate that IsoInfer is able to calculate the expression levels of isoforms with an accuracy comparable to the state-of-the-art statistical method and a 60 times faster speed. Moreover, our tests on both simulated and real reads show that it achieves a good precision and sensitivity in inferring isoforms when given accurate exon-intron boundary, TSS and PAS information, especially for isoforms whose expression levels are significantly high.

  9. Adenylate cyclase in prothoracic glands during the last larval instar of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Gu, S H; Chow, Y S

    2001-04-27

    We have previously reported that the absence of prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) signal transduction during the early last larval instar of Bombyx mori plays a role in leading to very low ecdysteroid levels in the hemolymph, inactivation of the corpora allata, as well as larval-pupal transformation. In the present study, adenylate cyclase was characterized in crude preparations of prothoracic gland cell membranes in an effort to localize the cause of refractoriness to PTTH. It was found that cyclase activity of the prothoracic glands from the day 6 last instar showed activation responses to fluoride, a guanine nucleotide analogue, as well as calmodulin (CaM) in dose-dependent fashions. The additive effects of day 5 prothoracic gland adenylate cyclase stimulation by fluoride and CaM imply that there may exist Gs protein-dependent and CaM-dependent forms of adenylate cyclase. For day 1 last instar prothoracic glands, which showed no response to stimulation by PTTH in either cAMP generation or ecdysteroidogenesis, adenylate cyclase activity exhibited far less responsiveness to Ca(2+)/CaM than did that from day 5 glands. These findings suggest that day 1 prothoracic glands may possess some lesions in the receptor-Ca(2+) influx-adenylate cyclase signal transduction pathway and these impairments in PTTH signal transduction may be, at least in part, responsible for decreased ecdysteroidogenesis. PMID:11267904

  10. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  11. ADENYLATE ENERGY CHARGE AND ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS AS INDICATORS OF STRESS IN THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, TREATED WITH DREDGED MATERIAL UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adenylate energy charge is an indication of the amount of energy available to an organism from the adenylate pool. t is calculated from measured concentrations of three adenine nucleotides, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP...

  12. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  13. Role of Adenylate Cyclase 1 in Retinofugal Map Development

    PubMed Central

    Dhande, Onkar S.; Bhatt, Shivani; Anishchenko, Anastacia; Elstrott, Justin; Iwasato, Takuji; Swindell, Eric C.; Xu, Hong-Ping; Jamrich, Milan; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Feller, Marla B.; Crair, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of topographic maps of the sensory periphery is sensitive to the disruption of adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1) signaling. AC1 catalyzes the production of cAMP in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner, and AC1 mutant mice (AC1−/−) have disordered visual and somatotopic maps. However, the broad expression of AC1 in the brain and the promiscuous nature of cAMP signaling have frustrated attempts to determine the underlying mechanism of AC1-dependent map development. In the mammalian visual system, the initial coarse targeting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) projections to the superior colliculus (SC) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is guided by molecular cues, and the subsequent refinement of these crude projections occurs via an activity-dependent process that depends on spontaneous retinal waves. Here, we show that AC1−/− mice have normal retinal waves but disrupted map refinement. We demonstrate that AC1 is required for the emergence of dense and focused termination zones and elimination of inaccurately targeted collaterals at the level of individual retinofugal arbors. Conditional deletion of AC1 in the retina recapitulates map defects, indicating that the locus of map disruptions in the SC and dorsal LGN of AC1−/− mice is presynaptic. Finally, map defects in mice without AC1 and disrupted retinal waves (AC1−/−;β2−/− double KO mice) are no worse than those in mice lacking only β2−/−, but loss of AC1 occludes map recovery in β2−/− mice during the second postnatal week. These results suggest that AC1 in RGC axons mediates the development of retinotopy and eye-specific segregation in the SC and dorsal LGN. PMID:22102330

  14. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation. PMID:24646224

  15. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  16. ADENYLATE CYCLASE REGULATES ELONGATION OF MAMMALIAN PRIMARY CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; van der Hoorn, Frans A.

    2011-01-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1–2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:19576885

  17. Involvement of endogenous antioxidant systems in the protective activity of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damages in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Douiri, Salma; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Hamdi, Yosra; Cubì, Roger; Basille, Magali; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Vaudry, David; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2016-06-01

    Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damages caused by oxidative stress. Nevertheless, astroglial cell viability and functionality can be affected by significant oxidative stress. We have previously shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent glioprotective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced apoptosis in cultured astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of PACAP against oxidative-generated alteration of astrocytic antioxidant systems. Incubation of cells with subnanomolar concentrations of PACAP inhibited H2 O2 -evoked reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial respiratory burst, and caspase-3 mRNA level increase. PACAP also stimulated SOD and catalase activities in a concentration-dependent manner, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of H2 O2 on the activity of these two antioxidant enzymes. The protective action of PACAP against H2 O2 -evoked inhibition of antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A, PKC, and MAP-kinase dependent. In the presence of H2 O2 , the SOD blocker NaCN and the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole, both suppressed the protective effects of PACAP on SOD and catalase activities, mitochondrial function, and cell survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-apoptotic effect of PACAP on astroglial cells can account for the activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and reduction in respiration rate, thus preserving mitochondrial integrity and preventing caspase-3 expression provoked by oxidative stress. Considering its powerful anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties, the PACAPergic signaling system should thus be considered for the development of new therapeutical approaches to cure various pathologies involving oxidative neurodegeneration. We propose the following cascade for the

  18. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  19. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  20. Convergent phosphomodulation of the major neuronal dendritic potassium channel Kv4.2 by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Raeesa P; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Shepherd, Andrew J; Merrill, Ronald; Planer, William; Bruchas, Michael R; Strack, Stefan; Mohapatra, Durga P

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is secreted by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the brain and spinal cord, in response to pathological conditions such as stroke, seizures, chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PACAP has been shown to exert various neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects. However, direct influence of PACAP on the function of intrinsically excitable ion channels that are critical to both hyperexcitation as well as cell death, remain largely unexplored. The major dendritic K(+) channel Kv4.2 is a critical regulator of neuronal excitability, back-propagating action potentials in the dendrites, and modulation of synaptic inputs. We identified, cloned and characterized the downstream signaling originating from the activation of three PACAP receptor (PAC1) isoforms that are expressed in rodent hippocampal neurons that also exhibit abundant expression of Kv4.2 protein. Activation of PAC1 by PACAP leads to phosphorylation of Kv4.2 and downregulation of channel currents, which can be attenuated by inhibition of either PKA or ERK1/2 activity. Mechanistically, this dynamic downregulation of Kv4.2 function is a consequence of reduction in the density of surface channels, without any influence on the voltage-dependence of channel activation. Interestingly, PKA-induced effects on Kv4.2 were mediated by ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the channel at two critical residues, but not by direct channel phosphorylation by PKA, suggesting a convergent phosphomodulatory signaling cascade. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel GPCR-channel signaling crosstalk between PACAP/PAC1 and Kv4.2 channel in a manner that could lead to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:26456351

  1. Versican V1 Isoform Induces Neuronal Differentiation and Promotes Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yaojiong; Sheng, Wang; Chen, Liwen; Dong, Haiheng; Lee, Vivian; Lu, Fred; Wong, C. Shun; Lu, Wei-Yang; Yang, Burton B.

    2004-01-01

    The chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican is one of the major extracellular components in the developing and adult brain. Here, we show that isoforms of versican play different roles in neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. Expression of versican V1 isoform in PC12 cells induced complete differentiation, whereas expression of V2 induced an aborted differentiation accompanied by apoptosis. V1 promoted neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons, but V2 failed to do so. V1 transfection enhanced expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and integrins, and facilitated sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK phosphorylation. Blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor, β1 integrin, or Src significantly inhibited neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that versican V1 isoform also promoted differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons. Our results have implications for understanding how versican regulates neuronal development, function, and repair. PMID:14978219

  2. Cooperative phenomena in binding and activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, A; Krin, E; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Danchin, A; Glaser, P; Bârzu, O

    1993-01-25

    The catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase located within the first 400 amino acids of the protein can be cleaved by trypsin in two subdomains (T25 and T18) corresponding to ATP-(T25) and calmodulin (CaM)-(T18) binding sites. Reassociation of subdomains by CaM is a cooperative process, which is a unique case among CaM-activated enzymes. To understand better the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we used several approaches such as partial deletions of the adenylate cyclase gene, isolation of peptides of various size, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. We found that a stretch of 72 amino acid residues overlapping the carboxyl terminus of T25 and the amino terminus of T18 accounts for 90% of the binding energy of adenylate cyclase-CaM complex. The hydrophobic "side" of the helical region situated around Trp242 plays a major role in the interaction of adenylate cyclase with CaM, whereas basic residues that alternate with acidic residues in bacterial enzyme play a much less important role. The amino-terminal half of the catalytic domain of adenylate cyclase contributes only 10% to the binding energy of CaM, whereas the last 130 amino acid residues are not at all involved in binding. However, these segments of adenylate cyclase might affect protein/protein interaction and catalysis by propagating conformational changes to the CaM-binding sequence which is located in the middle of the catalytic domain of bacterial enzyme. PMID:8420945

  3. Amyloid-β peptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-07-11

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloid-β peptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27411072

  4. Clay catalyzed polymerization of amino acid adenylates and its relationship to biochemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and polymerization of alanine adenylate on montmorillonite at pH 7 when either its interspacial faces or its edger are blocked by an excess of histidine or sodium hexametaphosphate was investigated. Results indicate that alanine adenylate can be adsorbed any place on the interspacial spaces of the clay; however, adsorption of its phosphate part, which is limited to the edges of the clay, is necessary for polymerization to occur. As a result, polymerization takes place only at sites on the interspacial faces bordering the edges.

  5. Activation of the Pacidamycin PacL Adenylation Domain by MbtH-Like Proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Heemstra, John R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Imker, Heidi J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines are major avenues for the biosynthesis of a vast array of peptidyl natural products. Several hundred bacterial NRPS gene clusters contain a small (~70 residue) protein belonging to the MbtH family for which no function has been defined. Here we show that two strictly conserved Trp residues in MbtH-like proteins contribute to stimulation of amino acid adenylation in some NRPS modules. We also demonstrate that adenylation can be stimulated not only by cognate MbtH-like proteins but also by homologues from disparate natural product pathways. PMID:20964365

  6. Activation of the pacidamycin PacL adenylation domain by MbtH-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Heemstra, John R; Walsh, Christopher T; Imker, Heidi J

    2010-11-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines are major avenues for the biosynthesis of a vast array of peptidyl natural products. Several hundred bacterial NRPS gene clusters contain a small (∼70-residue) protein belonging to the MbtH family for which no function has been defined. Here we show that two strictly conserved Trp residues in MbtH-like proteins contribute to stimulation of amino acid adenylation in some NRPS modules. We also demonstrate that adenylation can be stimulated not only by cognate MbtH-like proteins but also by homologues from disparate natural product pathways. PMID:20964365

  7. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  8. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptors Signal via Phospholipase C Pathway to Block Apoptosis in Newborn Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Lakk, Monika; Denes, Viktoria; Gabriel, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate induced cell death mechanisms gained considerable attention lately as excessive release of extracellular glutamate was reported to cause neurodegeneration in brain areas including the retina. Conversely, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) was shown to provide neuroprotection through anti-apoptotic effects in the glutamate-model and also in other degeneration assays. Although PACAP is known to orchestrate complex intracellular signaling primarily through cAMP production, the mechanism that mediates the anti-apoptotic effect in glutamate excitotoxicity remains to be clarified. To study this mechanism we induced retinal neurodegeneration in newborn Wistar rats by subcutaneous monosodium-glutamate injection. 100 pmol PACAP and enzyme inhibitors were administered intravitreally. Levels of caspase 3, 9, and phospho-protein kinase A were assessed by Western blots. Changes in cAMP levels were detected employing a competitive immunoassay. We found that cAMP blockade by an adenylyl-cyclase inhibitor (2',4'-dideoxy-adenosine) did not abrogate the neuroprotective effect of PACAP1-38. We show that following intravitreal PACAP1-38 treatment cAMP was unaltered, consistent with the inhibitor results and phospho-protein kinase A, an effector of the cAMP pathway was also unaffected. On the other hand, blockade of the alternative phosphatidylcholine-specific PLC pathway using an inhibitor (D609CAS) abrogated the neuroprotective effects of PACAP1-38. Our results highlight PACAP1-38 ability in protecting retinal cells against apoptosis through diverse signaling cascades. It seems that at picomolar concentrations, PACAP does not trigger cAMP production, but nonetheless, exerts a significant anti-apoptotic effect through PLC activation. In conclusion, PACAP1-38 may signal via both AC and PLC activation producing the same protective outcome. PMID:25975365

  9. Potentiation of P1075-induced K+ channel opening by stimulation of adenylate cyclase in rat isolated aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Linde, C.; Quast, U.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of analogues and stimulators of cyclic AMP on the 86Rb+ efflux-stimulating and binding properties of P1075, an opener of ATP-dependent potassium channels, were studied in rat aortic rings. The increase in 86Rb+ efflux stimulated by P1075 was taken as a qualitative measure of K+ channel opening. 2. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (db-cyclic AMP), a membrane permeant cyclic AMP-analogue, relaxed rat aortic rings contracted by noradrenaline with EC50 values of 0.06, 2 and 10 microM, respectively. 3. Forskolin, IBMX and db-cyclic AMP produced concentration-dependent increases of the 86Rb+ efflux induced by P1075 (50 nM) by up to twofold with EC50 values of about 0.1, 1.7 and 81 microM. At these concentrations the agents had little effect on the basal rate of 86Rb+ efflux. 4. The 86Rb+ efflux produced by P1075 in the presence of the cyclic AMP stimulators was inhibited by glibenclamide, a blocker of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. 5. IBMX (100 microM) induced a leftward shift of the concentration-86Rb+ efflux curve of P1075 without increasing the maximum. The enhancements of P1075-stimulated 86Rb+ efflux produced by combinations of forskolin and IBMX were either additive or less than additive. 6. The protein kinase A inhibitor, H-89, inhibited P1075-stimulated 86Rb+ efflux in the presence of IBMX significantly more than in the absence of IBMX, suggesting that the effect of increased cyclic AMP levels is mediated by protein kinase A.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582466

  10. AKAP79, PKC, PKA and PDE4 participate in a Gq-linked muscarinic receptor and adenylate cyclase 2 cAMP signalling complex

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia X.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2014-01-01

    AC2 (adenylate cyclase 2) is stimulated by activation of Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors through PKC (protein kinase C) to generate localized cAMP in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. In the present study, we utilized a sensitive live-cell imaging technique to unravel the proteins that play essential roles in a Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor-mediated cAMP signalling complex. We reveal that, upon agonist binding to the Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor, AKAP79 (A-kinase-anchoring protein 79) recruits PKC to activate AC2 to produce cAMP. The cAMP formed is degraded by PDE4 (phosphodiesterase 4) activated by an AKAP-anchored PKA (protein kinase A). Calcineurin, a phosphatase bound to AKAP79, is not involved in this regulation. Overall, a transient cAMP increase is generated from AC2 by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor activation, subject to sophisticated regulation through AKAP79, PKC, PDE4 and PKA, which significantly enhances acetylcholine-mediated signalling. PMID:23889134

  11. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of 4-Iminothiazolidinones for Inhibition of PI3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, Jo-Anne; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Frazzetto, Mark; Zheng, Zhaohua; Jennings, Ian G.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Chalmers, David K.; Thompson, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione, compound 1, has previously shown pan-inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) class I isoforms. We hypothesized the derivatization of the thiazolidinedione core of compound 1 could introduce isoform selectivity. We report the synthesis, characterization, and inhibitory activity of a novel series of 4-iminothiazolidin-2-ones for inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms. Their synthesis was successfully achieved by multiple pathways described in this paper. Initial in vitro data of 28 analogues demonstrated poor inhibition of all class I PI3K isoforms. However, we identified an alternate target, the phosphodiesterases, and present preliminary screening results showing improved inhibitory activity. PMID:23997244

  12. Protein Kinase Cδ mediates the activation of Protein Kinase D2 in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Kim, Soochong; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein Kinase D (PKD) is a subfamily of serine/threonine specific family of kinases, comprised of PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 (PKCμ, PKD2 and PKCν in humans). It is known that PKCs activate PKD, but the relative expression of isoforms of PKD or the specific PKC isoform/s responsible for its activation in platelets is not known. This study is aimed at investigating the pathway involved in activation of PKD in platelets. We show that PKD2 is the major isoform of PKD that is expressed in human as well as murine platelets but not PKD1 or PKD3. PKD2 activation induced by AYPGKF was abolished with a Gq inhibitor YM-254890, but was not affected by Y-27632, a RhoA/p160ROCK inhibitor, indicating that PKD2 activation is Gq-, but not G12/13-mediated Rho-kinase dependent. Calcium-mediated signals are also required for activation of PKD2 as dimethyl BAPTA inhibited its phosphorylation. GF109203X, a pan PKC inhibitor abolished PKD2 phosphorylation but Go6976, a classical PKC inhibitor had no effect suggesting that novel PKC isoforms are involved in PKD2 activation. Importantly, Rottlerin, a non-selective PKCδ inhibitor, inhibited AYPGKF-induced PKD2 activation in human platelets. Similarly, AYPGKF- and Convulxin-induced PKD2 phosphorylation was dramatically inhibited in PKCδ-deficient platelets, but not in PKCθ– or PKCε–deficient murine platelets compared to that of wild type platelets. Hence, we conclude that PKD2 is a common signaling target downstream of various agonist receptors in platelets and Gq-mediated signals along with calcium and novel PKC isoforms, in particular, PKCδ activate PKD2 in platelets. PMID:21736870

  13. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Fiona A.; Jensen, Thomas E.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2015-01-01

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr172 phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr172 dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. PMID:26542978

  14. Development of a new model system to dissect isoform specific Akt signalling in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajno, Esi; McGraw, Timothy E; Gonzalez, Eva

    2015-06-15

    Protein kinase B (Akt) kinases are critical signal transducers mediating insulin action. Genetic studies revealed that Akt1 and Akt2 signalling differentially contribute to sustain lipid and glucose homoeostasis; however Akt isoform-specific effectors remain elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system to mechanistically interrogate Akt isoform-specific signalling. To overcome those technical limitations we developed a novel model system that provides acute and specific control of signalling by Akt isoforms. We generated mutants of Akt1 and Akt2 resistant to the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206. We then developed adipocyte cell lines, in which endogenous Akt1 or Akt2 has been replaced by their corresponding drug-resistant Akt mutant. Treatment of those cells with MK-2206 allowed for acute and specific control of either Akt1 or Akt2 function. Our data showed that Akt1(W80A) and Akt2(W80A) mutants are resistant to MK-2206, dynamically regulated by insulin and able to signal to Akt downstream effectors. Analyses of insulin action in this cellular system showed that Akt1 and Akt2 are both able to mediate insulin regulation of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), revealing a redundant role for these Akt kinases in the control of glucose transport into fat cells. In contrast, Akt1 signalling is uniquely required for adipogenesis, by controlling the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of pre-adipocytes that precedes white adipose cell differentiation. Our data provide new insights into the role of Akt kinases in glucose transport and adipogenesis and support our model system as a valuable tool for the biochemical characterization of signalling by specific Akt isoforms. PMID:25856301

  15. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3’UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  16. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Labrie-Dion, Étienne; Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3'UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  17. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase-gamma induces Xenopus oocyte maturation via lipid kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, S; Stoyanov, B; Oehrl, W; Schönherr, R; Wetzker, R; Heinemann, S H

    2001-01-01

    Type-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) were characterized as a group of intracellular signalling proteins expressing both protein and lipid kinase activities. Recent studies implicate PI3Ks as mediators of oocyte maturation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system as a model to investigate a possible contribution of the gamma-isoform of PI3K (PI3Kgamma) in the different pathways leading to cell-cycle progression by monitoring the time course of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). Expression of a constitutive active PI3Kgamma (PI3Kgamma-CAAX) induced GVBD and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, PI3Kgamma-CAAX accelerated progesterone-induced GVBD, but had no effect on GVBD induced by insulin. The effects of PI3Kgamma-CAAX could be suppressed by pre-incubation of the oocytes with LY294002, PD98059 or roscovitine, inhibitors of PI3K, MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) and cdc2/cyclin B kinase, respectively. Mutants of PI3Kgamma-CAAX, in which either lipid kinase or both lipid and protein kinase activities were altered or eliminated, did not induce significant GVBD. Our data demonstrate that expression of PI3Kgamma in Xenopus oocytes accelerates their progesterone-induced maturation and that lipid kinase activity is required to induce this effect. PMID:11736661

  18. Differential Roles of Postsynaptic Density-93 Isoforms in Regulating Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Juliane M.; Favaro, Plinio D.; Liu, Mingna; Kitlińska, Agata; Huang, Xiaojie; Raabe, Monika; Akad, Derya S.; Liu, Yanling; Urlaub, Henning; Dong, Yan; Xu, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    In the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic synapses, the discs large (DLG)-membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of scaffolding proteins coordinates a multiplicity of signaling pathways to maintain and regulate synaptic transmission. Postsynaptic density-93 (PSD-93) is the most variable paralog in this family; it exists in six different N-terminal isoforms. Probably because of the structural and functional variability of these isoforms, the synaptic role of PSD-93 remains controversial. To accurately characterize the synaptic role of PSD-93, we quantified the expression of all six isoforms in the mouse hippocampus and examined them individually in hippocampal synapses. Using molecular manipulations, including overexpression, gene knockdown, PSD-93 knock-out mice combined with biochemical assays, and slice electrophysiology both in rat and mice, we demonstrate that PSD-93 is required at different developmental synaptic states to maintain the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. This strength is differentially regulated by the six isoforms of PSD-93, including regulations of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor-active and inactive synapses, and activity-dependent modulations. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative combinations of N-terminal PSD-93 isoforms and DLG-MAGUK paralogs can fine-tune signaling scaffolds to adjust synaptic needs to regulate synaptic transmission. PMID:24068818

  19. Physiological roles of the pantothenate kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Reeves, Stacy; Miller, Karen; Zano, Stephen P.; Frank, Matthew; Pate, Caroline; Wang, Jina; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) is an essential cofactor that is involved in many metabolic processes. CoA is derived from pantothenate in five biosynthetic reactions. The CoA biosynthetic pathway is regulated by PanKs (pantothenate kinases) and four active isoforms are expressed in mammals. The critical physiological functions of the PanKs are revealed by systematic deletion of the Pank genes in mice. PMID:25109998

  20. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, R G; Van Haastert, P J

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular or intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a heterodimer and are activated by G-proteins. In contrast, membrane-bound guanylate cyclases have only one transmembrane spanning region and one cyclase domain, and are activated by extracellular ligands to form a homodimer. In the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum, membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity is induced after cAMP stimulation; a G-protein-coupled cAMP receptor and G-proteins are essential for this activation. We have cloned a Dictyostelium gene, DdGCA, encoding a protein with 12 transmembrane spanning regions and two cyclase domains. Sequence alignment demonstrates that the two cyclase domains are transposed, relative to these domains in adenylate cyclases. DdGCA expressed in Dictyostelium exhibits high guanylate cyclase activity and no detectable adenylate cyclase activity. Deletion of the gene indicates that DdGCA is not essential for chemotaxis or osmo-regulation. The knock-out strain still exhibits substantial guanylate cyclase activity, demonstrating that Dictyostelium contains at least one other guanylate cyclase. PMID:11237875

  1. Cytochemical localization of adenylate cyclase in the various tissues of Locusta migratoria (migratorioides R.F.).

    PubMed

    Benedeczky, I; Rózsa, K S

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural cytochemical procedure to demonstrate adenyl cyclase in mammalian organs was used in insects. After several modifications, an utilizable method was applied for the detection of the enzyme in the various tissues. Adenylate cyclase which can be stimulated with octopamine was localized on the membrane of the glial cells and the axolemma of certain large axons in the insect brain. Adenylate cyclase which could be activated by NaF and isoproterenol was also demonstrated in the lipid droplets of glial cells of the brain. With the simultaneous application of NaF and isoproterenol, rather strong adenylate cyclase activity could be detected on the surface of the corpora allata cells both in the cells situated on the glandular surface and the central part of the gland. In contrast in the corpus cardiacum enzyme activity was only observable on the basal lamina of the glandular surface. An appreciable amount of reaction product, indicating the presence of the enzyme, could be found on the surface of the lipid droplets in the fat body situated near the glandular tissues. In the heart muscle, reaction product referring to enzyme activation could not be demonstrated with the help of the methods applied. PMID:7216835

  2. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  3. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  4. Efficient synthesis of stably adenylated DNA and RNA adapters for microRNA capture using T4 RNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunke; Liu, Kelvin J; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA profiling methods have become increasingly important due to the rapid rise of microRNA in both basic and translational sciences. A critical step in many microRNA profiling assays is adapter ligation using pre-adenylated adapters. While pre-adenylated adapters can be chemically or enzymatically prepared, enzymatic adenylation is preferred due to its ease and high yield. However, previously reported enzymatic methods either require tedious purification steps or use thermostable ligases that can generate side products during the subsequent ligation step. We have developed a highly efficient, template- and purification-free, adapter adenylation method using T4 RNA ligase 1. This method is capable of adenylating large amounts of adapter at ~100% efficiency and can efficiently adenylate both DNA and RNA bases. We find that the adenylation reaction speed can differ between DNA and RNA and between terminal nucleotides, leading to bias if reactions are not allowed to run to completion. We further find that the addition of high PEG levels can effectively suppress these differences. PMID:26500066

  5. Rational targeting of BRAF and PI3-Kinase signaling for melanoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deuker, Marian M.; McMahon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors elicit initial regression of BRAF-mutated melanoma, drug resistance is an inevitable and fatal event. We recently reported that in genetically engineered mouse models of BRAF-mutated melanoma, isoform-selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition cooperates with MAPK pathway inhibition to forestall the onset of MAPK pathway inhibitor resistance. PMID:27314067

  6. Rational targeting of BRAF and PI3-Kinase signaling for melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Deuker, Marian M; McMahon, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Although mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors elicit initial regression of BRAF-mutated melanoma, drug resistance is an inevitable and fatal event. We recently reported that in genetically engineered mouse models of BRAF-mutated melanoma, isoform-selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition cooperates with MAPK pathway inhibition to forestall the onset of MAPK pathway inhibitor resistance. PMID:27314067

  7. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  8. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  9. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  10. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  11. rlk/TXK Encodes Two Forms of a Novel Cysteine String Tyrosine Kinase Activated by Src Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Jayantha; Chamorro, Mario; Czar, Michael J.; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    1999-01-01

    Rlk/Txk is a member of the BTK/Tec family of tyrosine kinases and is primarily expressed in T lymphocytes. Unlike other members of this kinase family, Rlk lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain near the amino terminus and instead contains a distinctive cysteine string motif. We demonstrate here that Rlk protein consists of two isoforms that arise by alternative initiation of translation from the same cDNA. The shorter, internally initiated protein species lacks the cysteine string motif and is located in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of the larger form. In contrast, the larger form is cytoplasmic. We show that the larger form is palmitoylated and that mutation of its cysteine string motif both abolishes palmitoylation and allows the protein to migrate to the nucleus. The cysteine string, therefore, is a critical determinant of both fatty acid modification and protein localization for the larger isoform of Rlk, suggesting that Rlk regulation is distinct from the other Btk family kinases. We further show that Rlk is phosphorylated and changes localization in response to T-cell-receptor (TCR) activation and, like the other Btk family kinases, can be phosphorylated and activated by Src family kinases. However, unlike the other Btk family members, Rlk is activated independently of the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, consistent with its lack of a PH domain. Thus, Rlk has two distinct isoforms, each of which may have unique properties in signaling downstream from the TCR. PMID:9891083

  12. IsomiRage: From Functional Classification to Differential Expression of miRNA Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Heiko; Marzi, Matteo Jacopo; Nicassio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    As more small RNA sequencing libraries are becoming available, it clearly emerges that microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly heterogeneous both in length and sequence. In comparison to canonical miRNAs, miRNA isoforms (termed as “isomiRs”) might exhibit different biological properties, such as a different target repertoire, or enhanced/reduced stability. Nonetheless, this layer of information has remained largely unexplored due to the scarcity of small RNA NGS-datasets and the absence of proper analytical tools. Here, we present a workflow for the characterization and analysis of miRNAs and their variants in next-generation sequencing datasets. IsomiRs can originate from an alternative dicing event (“templated” forms) or from the addition of nucleotides through an enzymatic activity or target-dependent mechanisms (“non-templated” forms). Our pipeline allows distinguishing canonical miRNAs from templated and non-templated isomiRs by alignment to a custom database, which comprises all possible 3′-, 5′-, and trimmed variants. Functionally equivalent isomiRs can be grouped together according to the type of modification (e.g., uridylation, adenylation, trimming …) to assess which miRNAs are more intensively modified in a given biological context. When applied to the analysis of primary epithelial breast cancer cells, our methodology provided a 40% increase in the number of detected miRNA species and allowed to easily identify and classify more than 1000 variants. Most modifications were compatible with templated IsomiRs, as a consequence of imprecise Drosha or Dicer cleavage. However, some non-templated variants were consistently found either in the normal or in the cancer cells, with the 3′-end adenylation and uridylation as the most frequent events, suggesting that miRNA post-transcriptional modification frequently occurs. In conclusion, our analytical tool permits the deconvolution of miRNA heterogeneity and could be used to explore the functional role

  13. Galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human adrenocortical cells through the activation of galanin receptor subtype 1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Anna S; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin; Guidolin, Diego; Nussdorfer, Gastone G

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies showed that galanin receptors are expressed in the rat adrenal, and galanin modulates glucocorticoid secretion in this species. Hence, we investigated the expression of the various galanin receptor subtypes (GAL-R1, GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the human adrenocortical cells, and the possible involvement of galanin in the control of cortisol secretion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected the expression of GAL-R1 (but not GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the inner zones of the human adrenal cortex. The galanin concentration dependently enhanced basal, but not ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol from dispersed inner adrenocortical cells (maximal effective concentration, 10(-8) M). The cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin was abrogated by GAL-R1 immunoneutralization, and unaffected by GAL-R2 or GAL-R3 immunoneutralization. Galanin (10(-8) M) and ACTH (10(-9) M) enhanced cyclic-AMP production from dispersed cells, and the response was suppressed by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536 (10(-4) M). Galanin did not affect inositol triphosphate release, which, in contrast, was raised by angiotensin-II (10(-8) M). SQ-22536 and the protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor H-89 (10(-5) M) abolished the cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and the PKC inhibitor calphostin-C were ineffective. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (Ptx) (0.5 microg/ml) partially inhibited the cortisol response to galanin. We conclude that galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human inner adrenocortical cells, acting through GAL-R1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase/PKA-dependent signaling cascade via a Ptx-sensitive Galpha protein. PMID:17982695

  14. PKC Isoform Expression in Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that modeled (MMG) and true (USA Space Shuttle Missions STS-54 and STS-56) microgravity (MG) inhibit human lymphocyte locomotion, Modeled MG also suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Activation of PKC by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) restored the microgravity-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion as well as activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas calcium ionophore (ionomycin) was unable to restore these functions. Based on these results we hypothesized that MG-induced changes in lymphocyte functions are caused by a fundamental defect in signal transduction mechanism. This defect may be localized either at the PKC level or upstream of PKC, most likely, at the cell membrane level. In this study we examined the expression of PKC isoforms alpha, epsilon and delta in PBMC cultured in rotating wall vessel bioreactor, developed at NASA JSC, which models microgravity by sustaining cells in continuous free fall. The assessment of the isoforms was performed by FACS analysis following cell permeabilization. A decrease in the expression of isoforms epsilon and delta, but not isoform a, was observed in PBMC cultured in microgravity conditions. These data suggest that MMG might selectively affect the expression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC Molecular analysis confirm selective suppression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC.

  15. Functional Analysis of the Short Isoform of Orf Virus Protein OV20.0

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yeu-Yang; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Cheng, Sun-Fang; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Chou, Chia-Chi; Liu, Ya-Fen; Chang, Wei-Shan; Wong, Min-Liang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Orf virus (ORFV) OV20.0L is an ortholog of vaccinia virus (VACV) gene E3L. The function of VACV E3 protein as a virulence factor is well studied, but OV20.0 has received less attention. Here we show that like VACV E3L, OV20.0L encodes two proteins, a full-length protein and a shorter form (sh20). The shorter sh20 is an N-terminally truncated OV20.0 isoform generated when a downstream AUG codon is used for initiating translation. These isoforms differed in cellular localization, with full-length OV20.0 and sh20 found throughout the cell and predominantly in the cytoplasm, respectively. Nonetheless, both OV20.0 isoforms were able to bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) and dsRNA. Moreover, both isoforms strongly inhibited PKR activation as shown by decreased phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α subunit and protection of Sindbis virus infection against the activity of interferon (IFN). In spite of this apparent conservation of function in vitro, a recombinant ORFV that was able to express only the sh20 isoform was attenuated in a mouse model. IMPORTANCE The OV20.0 protein of orf virus (ORFV) has two isoforms and contributes to virulence, but the roles of the two forms are not known. This study shows that the shorter isoform (sh20) arises due to use of a downstream initiation codon and is amino-terminally truncated. The sh20 form also differs in expression kinetics and cellular localization from full-length OV20.0. Similar to the full-length isoform, sh20 is able to bind dsRNA and PKR, inactivate PKR, and thus act as an antagonist of the interferon response in vitro. In vivo, however, wild-type OV20.0 could not be replaced with sh20 alone without a loss of virulence, suggesting that the functions of the isoforms are not simply redundant. PMID:25694596

  16. Key Role of the Adenylate Moiety and Integrity of the Adenylate-Binding Site for the NAD(+)/H Binding to Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Calogero, Alessandra Maria; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein with pro-life and pro-death activities, which plays critical roles in mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent apoptosis. Defects in AIF structure or expression can cause mitochondrial abnormalities leading to mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration. The mechanism of AIF-induced apoptosis was extensively investigated, whereas the mitochondrial function of AIF is poorly understood. A unique feature of AIF is the ability to form a tight, air-stable charge-transfer (CT) complex upon reaction with NADH and to undergo a conformational switch leading to dimerization, proposed to be important for its vital and lethal functions. Although some aspects of interaction of AIF with NAD(+)/H have been analyzed, its precise mechanism is not fully understood. We investigated how the oxidized and photoreduced wild-type and G307A and -E variants of murine AIF associate with NAD(+)/H and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN(+)/H) to determine the role of the adenylate moiety in the binding process. Our results indicate that (i) the adenylate moiety of NAD(+)/H is crucial for the association with AIF and for the subsequent structural reorganization of the complex, but not for protein dimerization, (ii) FAD reduction rather than binding of NAD(+)/H to AIF initiates conformational rearrangement, and (iii) alteration of the adenylate-binding site by the G307E (equivalent to a pathological G308E mutation in human AIF) or G307A replacements decrease the affinity and association rate of NAD(+)/H, which, in turn, perturbs CT complex formation and protein dimerization but has no influence on the conformational switch in the regulatory peptide. PMID:26535916

  17. Inhibition of vaccinia mRNA methylation by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, O.K.; Goswami, B.B.

    1981-04-01

    Extracts of interferon-treated cells synthesize unique 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-phosphates in the presence of ATP and double-stranded RNA. 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-triphosphate inhibits protein synthesis at nanomolar concentrations by activating RNase. We have observed that oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-monophosphate and 5'-triphosphate are potent inhibitors of vaccinia mRNA methylation in vitro. Both the methylation of the 5'-terminal guanine at the 7 position and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of the penultimate nucleoside are inhibited. Such inhibition of mRNA methylation is not due to degradation of the mRNA. Inhibition of the requisite modification of the 5' terminus of mRNA by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acids) may be a mechanism of interferon action against both DNA and RNA viruses in which mRNAs derived from them are capped.

  18. Smad phospho-isoforms direct context-dependent TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Better understanding of TGF-β signaling has deepened our appreciation of normal epithelial cell homeostasis and its dysfunction in such human disorders as cancer and fibrosis. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, possess intermediate linker regions connecting Mad homology domains. Membrane-bound, cytoplasmic, and nuclear protein kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create C-tail (C), the linker (L), or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p, phospho-) isoforms. According to domain-specific phosphorylation, distinct transcriptional responses, and selective metabolism, Smad phospho-isoform pathways can be grouped into 4 types: cytostatic pSmad3C signaling, mitogenic pSmad3L (Ser-213) signaling, invasive/fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C or pSmad3L (Ser-204)/C signaling, and mitogenic/migratory pSmad2/3L (Thr-220/179)/C signaling. We outline how responses to TGF-β change through the multiple Smad phospho-isoforms as normal epithelial cells mature from stem cells through progenitors to differentiated cells, and further reflect upon how constitutive Ras-activating mutants favor the Smad phospho-isoform pathway promoting tumor progression. Finally, clinical analyses of reversible Smad phospho-isoform signaling during human carcinogenesis could assess effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing human cancer risk. Spatiotemporally separate, functionally different Smad phospho-isoforms have been identified in specific cells and tissues, answering long-standing questions about context-dependent TGF-β signaling. PMID:23871609

  19. The α and Δ Isoforms of CREB1 Are Required to Maintain Normal Pulmonary Vascular Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Michelle; Banahan, Mark; Frohlich, Stephen; Rowan, Simon C.; Neary, Roisín; Ryan, Donal; McLoughlin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension associated with structural alterations in pulmonary vessels and sustained vasoconstriction. The transcriptional mechanisms responsible for these distinctive changes are unclear. We have previously reported that CREB1 is activated in the lung in response to alveolar hypoxia but not in other organs. To directly investigate the role of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 in the regulation of pulmonary vascular resistance we examined the responses of mice in which these isoforms of CREB1 had been inactivated by gene mutation, leaving only the β isoform intact (CREBαΔ mice). Here we report that expression of CREB regulated genes was altered in the lungs of CREBαΔ mice. CREBαΔ mice had greater pulmonary vascular resistance than wild types, both basally in normoxia and following exposure to hypoxic conditions for three weeks. There was no difference in rho kinase mediated vasoconstriction between CREBαΔ and wild type mice. Stereological analysis of pulmonary vascular structure showed characteristic wall thickening and lumen reduction in hypoxic wild-type mice, with similar changes observed in CREBαΔ. CREBαΔ mice had larger lungs with reduced epithelial surface density suggesting increased pulmonary compliance. These findings show that α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 regulate homeostatic gene expression in the lung and that normal activity of these isoforms is essential to maintain low pulmonary vascular resistance in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions and to maintain the normal alveolar structure. Interventions that enhance the actions of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 warrant further investigation in hypoxic lung diseases. PMID:24349008

  20. GSK3β isoform-selective regulation of depression, memory and hippocampal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pardo, M; Abrial, E; Jope, R S; Beurel, E

    2016-03-01

    Abnormally active glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) contributes to pathological processes in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders. Modeled in mice, this includes increasing susceptibility to dysregulation of mood-relevant behaviors, impairing performance in several cognitive tasks and impairing adult hippocampal neural precursor cell (NPC) proliferation. These deficits are all evident in GSK3α/β knockin mice, in which serine-to-alanine mutations block the inhibitory serine phosphorylation regulation of both GSK3 isoforms, leaving GSK3 hyperactive. It was unknown if both GSK3 isoforms perform redundant actions in these processes, or if hyperactivity of one GSK3 isoform has a predominant effect. To test this, we examined GSK3α or GSK3β knockin mice in which only one isoform was mutated to a hyperactive form. Only GSK3β, not GSK3α, knockin mice displayed heightened vulnerability to the learned helplessness model of depression-like behavior. Three cognitive measures impaired in GSK3α/β knockin mice showed differential regulation by GSK3 isoforms. Novel object recognition was impaired in GSK3β, not in GSK3α, knockin mice, whereas temporal order memory was not impaired in GSK3α or GSK3β knockin mice, and co-ordinate spatial processing was impaired in both GSK3α and GSK3β knockin mice. Adult hippocampal NPC proliferation was severely impaired in GSK3β knockin mice, but not impaired in GSK3α knockin mice. Increased activity of GSK3β, in the absence of overexpression or disease pathology, is sufficient to impair mood regulation, novel object recognition and hippocampal NPC proliferation, whereas hyperactive GSK3α individually does not impair these processes. These results show that hyperactivity of the two GSK3 isoforms execute non-redundant effects on these processes. PMID:26749572

  1. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  2. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  3. Hyperexpression and purification of Escherichia coli adenylate cyclase using a vector designed for expression of lethal gene products.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P; Peterkofsky, A; McKenney, K

    1989-12-25

    We describe the construction of a new generation of vectors (pRE) for the hyperexpression of lethal gene products such as adenylate cyclase in Escherichia coli. The pRE vectors are based on the lambda PL promoter and lambda cII ribosome binding site described by Shimatake and Rosenberg (Nature, 292, 128-132, 1981). They have a unique NdeI restriction endonuclease site 3' of the lambda cII ribosome binding site that includes the ATG initiation codon, multilinker cloning sites 3' to the NdeI site, and two lambda transcription terminators 5' and 3' of the lambda PL promoter to eliminate nonspecific transcription and reduce leaky PL transcription, respectively. For hyperexpression of adenylate cyclase, tight control of transcription was necessary since elevation of cAMP levels above the physiological range is lethal to E. coli. Lethality associated with the overproduction of adenylate cyclase was shown to be mediated through the cAMP receptor protein. We used this expression system to overproduce adenylate cyclase 7500 fold, corresponding to 30% of the total cellular protein. Under these conditions the enzyme precipitated with significant loss of activity. Reducing the rate and amount of adenylate cyclase expression to 16% of the total cell protein produced one fourth of the enzyme in a soluble form with high specific activity. The soluble adenylate cyclase was purified to near homogeneity. PMID:2557591

  4. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  5. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  6. Redundancy in the World of MAP Kinases: All for One

    PubMed Central

    Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Frémin, Christophe; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector components of the prototypical ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and is essential for embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. ERK1 and ERK2 homologs share similar biochemical properties but whether they exert specific physiological functions or act redundantly has been a matter of controversy. However, recent studies now provide compelling evidence in support of functionally redundant roles of ERK1 and ERK2 in embryonic development and physiology. In this review, we present a critical assessment of the evidence for the functional specificity or redundancy of MAP kinase isoforms. We focus on the ERK1/ERK2 pathway but also discuss the case of JNK and p38 isoforms. PMID:27446918

  7. Adenylate cyclase responsiveness to hormones in various portions of the human nephron.

    PubMed Central

    Chabardès, D; Gagnan-Brunette, M; Imbert-Teboul, M; Gontcharevskaia, O; Montégut, M; Clique, A; Morel, F

    1980-01-01

    The action sites for parathyroid hormone (PTH), salmon calcitonin (SCT), and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) were investigated along the human nephron by measuring adenylate cyclase activity, using a single tubule in vitro microassay. Well-localized segments of tubule were isolated by microdissection from five human kidneys unsuitable for transplantation. PTH (10 IU/ml) increased adenylate cyclase activity in the convoluted and the straight proximal tubule, in the medullary and cortical portions of the thick ascending limb, and in the early portion of the distal convoluted tubule (corresponding stimulated:basal activity ratios were 64, 19, 10, 18, and 22, respectively). SCT (10 ng/ml) increased adenylate cyclase activity in the medullary and cortical portions of the thick ascending limb, in the early portion of the distal convoluted tubule, and, to a lesser extent, in the cortical and the medullay collecting tubule (activity ratios were 7, 14, 15, 3, and 3, respectively). AVP (1 microM) stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the terminal nephron segments only, i.e., the late portion of the distal convoluted tubule, the cortical and medullary portions of the collecting tubule (activity ratios 81, 51, and 97, respectively). As measured in one experiment, nearly one-half maximal responses were obtained with 0.1 IU/ml PTH or 0.3 ng/ml SCT in thick ascending limbs and with 1 nM AVP in collecting tubules, suggesting that enzyme sensitivity to hormones as well preserved under the conditions used in this study. PMID:7356689

  8. Non-co-ordinate development of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase in chick heart.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R W; Galper, J B; Neer, E J; Smith, T W

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the properties of beta-adrenergic receptors and of their interaction with adenylate cyclase in the chick myocardium during embryogenesis. Between 4.5 and 7.5 days in ovo the number of receptors determined by (-)-[3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) binding is constant at approx. 0.36 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. By day 9 the density decreases significantly to 0.22 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. At day 12.5--13.5 the number was 0.14--0.18 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. This number did not change further up to day 16. The same results were obtained with guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) added to the assay mixtures. There was no significant change in receptor affinity for the antagonist [3H]DHA between days 5.5 and 13. Despite the decrease in numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors, there was no change in basal, p[NH]ppG-, isoprenaline- or isoprenaline-plus-p[NH]ppG-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity between days 3 and 12 of development. We conclude that beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase are not co-ordinately regulated during early embryonic development of the chick heart. Some of the beta-adrenergic receptors present very early in the ontogeny of cardiac tissue appear not to be coupled to adenylate cyclase since their loss is not reflected in decreased activation of the enzyme. PMID:6289805

  9. The anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Oltean, Sebastian; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O

    2009-12-01

    Anti-angiogenic VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) isoforms, generated from differential splicing of exon 8, are widely expressed in normal human tissues but down-regulated in cancers and other pathologies associated with abnormal angiogenesis (cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, the Denys-Drash syndrome and pre-eclampsia). Administration of recombinant VEGF(165)b inhibits ocular angiogenesis in mouse models of retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, and colorectal carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Splicing factors and their regulatory molecules alter splice site selection, such that cells can switch from the anti-angiogenic VEGF(xxx)b isoforms to the pro-angiogenic VEGF(xxx) isoforms, including SRp55 (serine/arginine protein 55), ASF/SF2 (alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2) and SRPK (serine arginine domain protein kinase), and inhibitors of these molecules can inhibit angiogenesis in the eye, and splice site selection in cancer cells, opening up the possibility of using splicing factor inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenic therapeutics. Endogenous anti-angiogenic VEGF(xxx)b isoforms are cytoprotective for endothelial, epithelial and neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting both an improved safety profile and an explanation for unpredicted anti-VEGF side effects. In summary, C-terminal distal splicing is a key component of VEGF biology, overlooked by the vast majority of publications in the field, and these findings require a radical revision of our understanding of VEGF biology in normal human physiology. PMID:19909248

  10. The anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yan; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Oltean, Sebastian; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) isoforms, generated from differential splicing of exon 8, are widely expressed in normal human tissues but down-regulated in cancers and other pathologies associated with abnormal angiogenesis (cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, the Denys-Drash syndrome and pre-eclampsia). Administration of recombinant VEGF165b inhibits ocular angiogenesis in mouse models of retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, and colorectal carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Splicing factors and their regulatory molecules alter splice site selection, such that cells can switch from the anti-angiogenic VEGFxxxb isoforms to the pro-angiogenic VEGFxxx isoforms, including SRp55 (serine/arginine protein 55), ASF/SF2 (alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2) and SRPK (serine arginine domain protein kinase), and inhibitors of these molecules can inhibit angiogenesis in the eye, and splice site selection in cancer cells, opening up the possibility of using splicing factor inhibitors as novel anti-angiogenic therapeutics. Endogenous anti-angiogenic VEGFxxxb isoforms are cytoprotective for endothelial, epithelial and neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting both an improved safety profile and an explanation for unpredicted anti-VEGF side effects. In summary, C-terminal distal splicing is a key component of VEGF biology, overlooked by the vast majority of publications in the field, and these findings require a radical revision of our understanding of VEGF biology in normal human physiology. PMID:19909248

  11. CGX1037 is a novel PKC isoform delta selective inhibitor in platelets

    PubMed Central

    BHAVANASI, DHEERAJ; KOSTYAK, JOHN C.; SWINDLE, JOHN; KILPATRICK, LAURIE E.; KUNAPULI, SATYA P.

    2014-01-01

    Platelets upon activation change their shape, aggregate and secrete alpha and dense granule contents among which ADP acts as a feedback activator. Different Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms have specific non-redundant roles in mediating platelet responses including secretion and thrombus formation. Murine platelets lacking specific PKC isoforms have been used to evaluate the isoform specific functions. Novel PKC isoform δ has been shown to play an important role in some pathological processes. Lack of specific inhibitors for PKCδ has restricted analysis of its role in various cells. The current study was carried out to evaluate a novel small molecule PKCδ inhibitor, CGX1037 in platelets. Platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and western blotting experiments were performed to evaluate CGX1037. In human platelets, CGX1037 inhibited PAR4-mediated phosphorylation on PKD2, a PKCδ-specific substrate. Pretreatment of human or murine platelets with CGX1037 inhibited PAR4-mediated dense granule secretion whereas it potentiated GPVI-mediated dense granule secretion similar to the responses observed in murine platelets lacking PKCδ Furthermore, pre-treatment of platelets from PKCδ−/− mice with CGX1037 had no significant additive effect on platelet responses suggesting the specificity of CGX1037. Hence, we show that CGX1037 is a selective small molecule inhibitor of PKCδ in platelets. PMID:24433221

  12. Functional in vivo interactions between JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tuncman, Gürol; Hirosumi, Jiro; Solinas, Giovanni; Chang, Lufen; Karin, Michael; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2006-07-11

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are key regulators of inflammation and interfere with insulin action in cultured cells and whole animals. Obesity increases total JNK activity, and JNK1, but not JNK2, deficiency results in reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, a higher-than-normal level of JNK activation is observed in Jnk2(-/-) mice, particularly in the liver, indicating an interaction between the isoforms that might have masked the metabolic activity of JNK2 in isolated mutant mice. To address the role of the JNK2 isoform in metabolic homeostasis, we intercrossed Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk2(-/-) mice and examined body weight and glucose metabolism in the resulting mutant allele combinations. Among all of the viable genotypes examined, we observed only reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity in Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk1(+/-)Jnk2(-/-) mice. These two groups of mice also exhibited reduced total JNK activity and cytokine expression in liver tissue compared with all other genotypes examined. These data indicate that the JNK2 isoform is also involved in metabolic regulation, but its function is not obvious when JNK1 is fully expressed because of regulatory crosstalk between the two isoforms. PMID:16818881

  13. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions. PMID:26304132

  14. XLF-Cernunnos promotes DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 re-adenylation following ligation.

    PubMed

    Riballo, Enriqueta; Woodbine, Lisa; Stiff, Thomas; Walker, Sarah A; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-02-01

    XLF-Cernunnos (XLF) is a component of the DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 (LX) complex, which functions during DNA non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we use biochemical and cellular approaches to probe the impact of XLF on LX activities. We show that XLF stimulates adenylation of LX complexes de-adenylated by pyrophosphate or following LX decharging during ligation. XLF enhances LX ligation activity in an ATP-independent and dependent manner. ATP-independent stimulation can be attributed to enhanced end-bridging. Whilst ATP alone fails to stimulate LX ligation activity, addition of XLF and ATP promotes ligation in a manner consistent with XLF-stimulated readenylation linked to ligation. We show that XLF is a weakly bound partner of the tightly associated LX complex and, unlike XRCC4, is dispensable for LX stability. 2BN cells, which have little, if any, residual XLF activity, show a 3-fold decreased ability to repair DNA double strand breaks covering a range of complexity. These findings strongly suggest that XLF is not essential for NHEJ but promotes LX adenylation and hence ligation. We propose a model in which XLF, by in situ recharging DNA ligase IV after the first ligation event, promotes double stranded ligation by a single LX complex. PMID:19056826

  15. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  16. Modulation of ischemic-induced damage to cerebral adenylate cyclase in gerbils by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Christie-Pope, B C; Palmer, G C

    1986-12-01

    It has been previously established that prolonged bilateral carotid occlusion followed by recirculation produces damage to the synaptic enzyme adenylate cyclase in the frontal cortex of the gerbil. Since calcium entrance into the brain may account in part for the deleterious consequences of stroke, the present study examined whether pretreatment with calcium channel blockers would modify the effects of 60 min of bilateral ischemia plus 40 min of reflow on various parameters of cortical adenylate cyclase activation. In this context activation of cerebral homogenates by norepinephrine with or without 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate was preserved by pretreatment of ischemic gerbils with verapamil but worsened by flunarizine. In contrast, in particulate fractions (treated with EGTA to reduce metallic ion levels) the damage to the Mn2+-sensitive catalytic site of adenylate cyclase was prevented only by flunarizine. Pretreatment with the two calcium channel blockers resulted in an elevated basal activity of the enzyme, thereby reducing the response in the homogenate preparation to forskolin. Gerbils pretreated with verapamil tended to have an increased ability for survival resulting from the ischemic episode. Under in vitro conditions the enzyme preparations were not markedly influenced by either drug. PMID:3508245

  17. Persistent stimulation of adenylate cyclase and urea transport by an AVP photolabel

    SciTech Connect

    Eggena, P.; Ma, C.L.; Fahrenholz, F.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a photoaffinity label for arginine vasopressin receptors, (Phe2, Phe(p-N3)3)AVP (N3-AVP), on urea permeability and adenylate cyclase activity have been investigated in the toad urinary bladder. This compound, when activated by ultraviolet light, induced a maximal and persistent increase in the urea permeability of the intact bladder and a persistent increase in the adenylate cyclase activity of toad bladder epithelial cell homogenates. Covalent attachment of the analogue to target tissue during photolysis was equivalent at 4 and 20 degrees C. Bladders exposed to N3-AVP in the presence of AVP during photolysis were substantially less permeable to urea than controls that had been exposed to N3-AVP alone. These findings constitute further evidence in support of the previous suggestion that N3-AVP binds covalently to AVP receptors and, in addition, demonstrates that N3-AVP evokes a persistent increase in adenylate cyclase activity which, in turn, triggers a persistent increase in bladder permeability to urea.

  18. Opioid inhibition of adenylate cyclase in the striatum and vas deferens of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bhoola, K. D.; Pay, S.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of adenylate cyclase in striatal membrane-enriched fractions (25,000 g) was inhibited by morphine, beta-endorphin, [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADLenk), fentanyl and bremazocine. Whereas guanosine triphosphate (GTP) appeared essential for the expression of this effect, sodium chloride seemed to enhance the degree of inhibition. Dopamine stimulation and sodium fluoride activation of the enzyme was also suppressed by morphine, beta-endorphin and DADLenk. beta-Endorphin and DADLenk inhibited adenylate cyclase activity in vasa deferentia membrane-enriched fractions (25,000 g); both opioids required GTP and NaCl and were inhibited by a delta-opioid receptor antagonist and by naloxone. Morphine, bremazocine and tifluadom did not significantly alter the activity of the vas deferens enzyme. Basal cyclic AMP values of striatal slices were not significantly altered by morphine, beta-endorphin or DADLenk. However, dopamine-induced elevation of cyclic AMP was reduced by morphine and this effect of the opiate was suppressed by naloxone. Only beta-endorphin lowered the basal cyclic AMP values in the vas deferens. The physiological relevance of adenylate cyclase coupling to opioid receptor subtypes is considered. PMID:3026542

  19. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  20. Isolation and characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant affected in the regulation of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Guidi-Rontani, C; Danchin, A; Ullmann, A

    1981-01-01

    A mutant, cyaR1, affecting regulation of adenylate cyclase expression or activity is described. It was obtained as a thermoresistant revertant of a strain harboring a thermosensitive transcription termination factor, rho (rho-15). This mutant failed to synthesize adenosine 3',5'-phosphate and exhibited a carbohydrate-negative phenotype. A secondary mutation at the crp locus (crpC) restored the ability of the mutant to synthesize adenosine 3',5'-phosphate, enabled the expression of catabolite-sensitive operons, and conferred on the strain an extreme sensitivity to catabolite repression. In addition, we showed that the crpC mutation restored the pleiotropic carbohydrate-positive phenotype even in a delta cya background. We interpret this to mean that the adenosine 3',5'-phosphate receptor protein regulates negatively either the activity or synthesis of adenylate cyclase and that the cyaR1 mutation is either in a regulatory protein or a regulatory site of adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:6273380

  1. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity.

    PubMed

    Israeli, Ma'ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  2. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Nila; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Lorenzoni, Paola; Di Lazzaro, Francesco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Margherita; Giannini, Fabio; Grasso, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis) and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides. PMID:23840094

  3. B cell receptor-mediated apoptosis of human lymphocytes is associated with a new regulatory pathway of Bim isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Mouhamad, Shahul; Besnault, Laurence; Auffredou, Marie Thérèse; Leprince, Corinne; Bourgeade, Marie Françoise; Leca, Gérald; Vazquez, Aimé

    2004-02-15

    Studies in Bim-deficient mice have shown that the proapoptotic molecule Bim plays a key role in the control of B cell homeostasis and activation. However, the role of Bim in human B lymphocyte apoptosis is unknown. We show in this study that, depending on the degree of cross-linking, B cell receptors can mediate both Bim-dependent and apparent Bim-independent apoptotic pathways. Cross-linked anti-mu Ab-mediated activation induces an original pathway governing the expression of the various Bim isoforms. This new pathway involves the following three sequential steps: 1) extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the BimEL isoform, which is produced in large amounts in healthy B cells; 2) proteasome-mediated degradation of phosphorylated BimEL; and 3) increased expression of the shorter apoptotic isoforms BimL and BimS. PMID:14764673

  4. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  6. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  7. Effect of 3' terminal adenylic acid residue on the uridylation of human small RNAs in vitro and in frog oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Sinha, K; Perumal, K; Reddy, R

    2000-01-01

    It is known that several small RNAs including human and Xenopus signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 7SK RNAs are posttranscriptionally adenylated, whereas U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA are posttranscriptionally uridylated on their 3' ends. In this study, we provide evidence that a small fraction of U6 snRNA and 5S ribosomal RNA molecules from human as well as Xenopus oocytes contain a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends. These data show that U6 snRNA and 5S rRNAs are posttranscriptionally modified on their 3' ends by both uridylation and adenylation. Although the SRP RNA, 7SK RNA, 5S RNA, and U6 snRNA with the uridylic acid residue on their 3' ends were readily uridylated, all these RNAs with posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends were not uridylated in vitro, or when U6 snRNA with 3' A(OH) was injected into Xenopus oocytes. These results show that the presence of a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on the 3' end of SRP RNA, U6 snRNA, 5S rRNA, or 7SK RNA prevents 3' uridylation. These data also show that adenylation and uridylation are two competing processes that add nucleotides on the 3' end of some small RNAs and suggest that one of the functions of the 3' adenylation may be to negatively affect the 3' uridylation of small RNAs. PMID:10999605

  8. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. Sphingosine kinase regulation and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of sphingosine kinase/sphingosine-1-phosphate (SK/S1P)-mediated signalling has been recognized as critical for cardioprotection in response to acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Incubation of S1P with cultured cardiac myocytes subjected to hypoxia or treatment of isolated hearts either before ischaemia or at the onset of reperfusion (pharmacologic pre- or postconditioning) results in reduced myocyte injury. Synthetic agonists active at S1P receptors mimic these responses. Gene-targeted mice null for the SK1 isoform whose hearts are subjected to ischaemia/reperfusion injury exhibit increased infarct size and respond poorly either to ischaemic pre- or postconditioning. Measurements of cardiac SK activity and S1P parallel these observations. Ischaemic postconditioning combined with sphingosine and S1P rescues the heart from prolonged ischaemia. These observations may have considerable relevance for future therapeutic approaches to acute and chronic myocardial injury. PMID:19017750

  10. Sat-Nav for T cells: Role of PI3K isoforms and lipid phosphatases in migration of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephen G; Westwick, John; Harris, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling has been placed at the heart of conserved biochemical mechanisms that facilitate cell migration of leukocytes in response to a range of chemoattractant stimuli. This review assesses the evidence for and against PI3K-dependent mechanisms of T lymphocyte migration and whether pharmacological targeting of PI3K isoforms is likely to offer potential benefit for T cell mediated pathologies. PMID:21333676

  11. The selectivity of protein kinase inhibitors: a further update

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jenny; Plater, Lorna; Elliott, Matt; Shpiro, Natalia; Hastie, C. James; Mclauchlan, Hilary; Klevernic, Iva; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Alessi, Dario R.; Cohen, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The specificities of 65 compounds reported to be relatively specific inhibitors of protein kinases have been profiled against a panel of 70–80 protein kinases. On the basis of this information, the effects of compounds that we have studied in cells and other data in the literature, we recommend the use of the following small-molecule inhibitors: SB 203580/SB202190 and BIRB 0796 to be used in parallel to assess the physiological roles of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) isoforms, PI-103 and wortmannin to be used in parallel to inhibit phosphatidylinositol (phosphoinositide) 3-kinases, PP1 or PP2 to be used in parallel with Src-I1 (Src inhibitor-1) to inhibit Src family members; PD 184352 or PD 0325901 to inhibit MKK1 (MAPK kinase-1) or MKK1 plus MKK5, Akt-I-1/2 to inhibit the activation of PKB (protein kinase B/Akt), rapamycin to inhibit TORC1 [mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)–raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR) complex], CT 99021 to inhibit GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3), BI-D1870 and SL0101 or FMK (fluoromethylketone) to be used in parallel to inhibit RSK (ribosomal S6 kinase), D4476 to inhibit CK1 (casein kinase 1), VX680 to inhibit Aurora kinases, and roscovitine as a pan-CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor. We have also identified harmine as a potent and specific inhibitor of DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and -regulated kinase 1A) in vitro. The results have further emphasized the need for considerable caution in using small-molecule inhibitors of protein kinases to assess the physiological roles of these enzymes. Despite being used widely, many of the compounds that we analysed were too non-specific for useful conclusions to be made, other than to exclude the involvement of particular protein kinases in cellular processes. PMID:17850214

  12. Pyruvate kinase: function, regulation and role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Israelsen, William J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP to pyruvate and ATP in glycolysis and plays a role in regulating cell metabolism. There are four mammalian pyruvate kinase isoforms with unique tissue expression patterns and regulatory properties. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) supports anabolic metabolism and is expressed both in cancer and normal tissue. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is allosterically regulated by both intracellular signaling pathways and metabolites; PKM2 thus integrates signaling and metabolic inputs to modulate glucose metabolism according to the needs of the cell. Recent advances have increased our understanding of metabolic regulation by pyruvate kinase, raised new questions, and suggested the possibility of non-canonical PKM2 functions to regulate gene expression and cell cycle progression via protein-protein interactions and protein kinase activity. Here we review the structure, function, and regulation of pyruvate kinase and discuss how these properties enable regulation of PKM2 for cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:26277545

  13. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth DT; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP, resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23996525

  14. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent microglia migration

    PubMed Central

    Cudaback, Eiron; Li, Xianwu; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.; Keene, C. Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Complement component C5a and ATP are potent effectors of microglial movement and are increased in diverse neurodegenerative diseases and at sites of injury. Apolipoprotein E (apoE) influences microglial function, and different human apoE isoforms confer variable risk for development of neurodegenerative disorders, especially Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mouse apoE and human apoE isoforms influence microglial migration. Using primary wild-type and apoE-deficient microglia, we show that C5a- and ATP-stimulated chemotaxis are largely apoE-dependent processes with different molecular bases. Although the C5a-dependent chemotaxis of wild-type microglia was completely blocked by receptor-associated protein (RAP), suggesting apoE receptor involvement, ATP-stimulated migration was unaffected by RAP but was associated with differential ERK phosphorylation. Studies using primary microglia derived from targeted replacement mice “humanized” for the coding exons (protein isoform) of human ε2 (apoE2), ε3 (apoE3), or ε4 (apoE4) allele of APOE revealed that primary mouse microglia expressing apoE4 or apoE2 exhibited significantly reduced C5a- and ATP-stimulated migration compared with microglia expressing human apoE3. This study, for the first time, demonstrates apoE dependence and apoE isoform-specific modulation of microglial migration in response to distinct chemotactic stimuli commonly associated with neurodegenerative disease.—Cudaback, E., Li, X., Montine, K. S., Montine, T. J., Keene, C. D. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent microglia migration. PMID:21385991

  15. FGF and stress regulate CREB and ATF-1 via a pathway involving p38 MAP kinase and MAPKAP kinase-2.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Y; Rouse, J; Zhang, A; Cariati, S; Cohen, P; Comb, M J

    1996-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) activates a protein kinase cascade in SK-N-MC cells that regulates gene expression at a cyclic-AMP response element (CRE) by stimulating the transcriptional activity of CREB. The activation of CREB is prevented by a dominant negative mutant of Ras and triggered via the same site (Ser133) that becomes phosphorylated in response to cyclic AMP and Ca2+. However, the effect of FGF is not mediated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, TPA-sensitive isoforms of protein kinase-C, p70S6K or p90rsk (all of which phosphorylate CREB at Ser133 in vitro). Instead, we identify the FGF-stimulated CREB kinase as MAP kinase-activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase-2, an enzyme that lies immediately downstream of p38 MAP kinase, in a pathway that is also stimulated by cellular stresses. We show that MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylates CREB at Ser133 in vitro, that the FGF- or stress-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase-2 and phosphorylation of CREB and ATF-1 are prevented by similar concentrations of the specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB 203580, and that MAPKAP kinase-2 is the only detectable SB 203580-sensitive CREB kinase in SK-N-MC cell extracts. We also show that transfection of RK/p38 MAP kinase in SK-N-MC cells, but not transfection of p44 MAP kinase, activates Gal4-CREB-dependent transcription via Ser133. These findings identify a new growth factor and stress-activated signaling pathway that regulates gene expression at the CRE. Images PMID:8887554

  16. PI3K in cancer: divergent roles of isoforms, modes of activation, and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Lauren M.; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Zhao, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are critical coordinators of intracellular signaling in response to extracellular stimuli. Hyperactivation of PI3K signaling cascades is one of the most common events in human cancers. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the roles of distinct PI3K isoforms in normal and oncogenic signaling, the different ways in which PI3K can be upregulated, and the current state and future potential of targeting this pathway in the clinic. PMID:25533673

  17. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  18. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  19. On the Dynamics of the Adenylate Energy System: Homeorhesis vs Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Valero, Edelmira; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim; Malaina, Iker; Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical energy is the fundamental element that maintains both the adequate turnover of the biomolecular structures and the functional metabolic viability of unicellular organisms. The levels of ATP, ADP and AMP reflect roughly the energetic status of the cell, and a precise ratio relating them was proposed by Atkinson as the adenylate energy charge (AEC). Under growth-phase conditions, cells maintain the AEC within narrow physiological values, despite extremely large fluctuations in the adenine nucleotides concentration. Intensive experimental studies have shown that these AEC values are preserved in a wide variety of organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Here, to understand some of the functional elements involved in the cellular energy status, we present a computational model conformed by some key essential parts of the adenylate energy system. Specifically, we have considered (I) the main synthesis process of ATP from ADP, (II) the main catalyzed phosphotransfer reaction for interconversion of ATP, ADP and AMP, (III) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP yielding ADP, and (IV) the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP providing AMP. This leads to a dynamic metabolic model (with the form of a delayed differential system) in which the enzymatic rate equations and all the physiological kinetic parameters have been explicitly considered and experimentally tested in vitro. Our central hypothesis is that cells are characterized by changing energy dynamics (homeorhesis). The results show that the AEC presents stable transitions between steady states and periodic oscillations and, in agreement with experimental data these oscillations range within the narrow AEC window. Furthermore, the model shows sustained oscillations in the Gibbs free energy and in the total nucleotide pool. The present study provides a step forward towards the understanding of the fundamental principles and quantitative laws governing the adenylate energy system, which is a fundamental element for

  20. Reconstitution of beta 1-adrenoceptor-dependent adenylate cyclase from purified components.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, D; Im, M J; Klein, H W; Hekman, M; Holzhöfer, A; Dees, C; Levitzki, A; Helmreich, E J; Pfeuffer, T

    1986-01-01

    In continuation of our efforts to reconstitute from purified components into lipid vesicles the signal transmission chain from beta 1-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase, we now report on the total reconstitution of the hormone-dependent adenylate cyclase. In these reconstitution experiments we have employed the purified adenylate cyclase (C) from bovine brain and rabbit heart, the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GS) purified from turkey erythrocytes and rabbit liver and the beta 1-adrenoceptor (R) from turkey erythrocytes. Several detergents were compared with respect to their suitability to allow reconstitution of subunits into phospholipid vesicles. While octyl-polyoxyethylene (octyl-POE) was almost as potent as lauroyl-sucrose for preparation of vesicles containing GS.C, the latter detergent was clearly superior for vesicles enabling productive R.GS and R.GS.C coupling. The catalytic subunit from either bovine brain or rabbit heart was equally efficient in reconstitution. However, GS from turkey erythrocytes and rabbit liver revealed significant differences in RGS and RGS.C containing vesicles. While isoproterenol-induced activation of GS by GTP gamma S was first order in both instances, kon with turkey GS was 0.12 min-1, whereas kon with rabbit liver GS was 0.6 min-1. Moreover, GTP gamma S activation of erythrocyte GS was significantly more dependent on the presence of hormone than that of liver GS, confirming observations made on the native membrane-bound system. Compared with stimulation by isoproterenol (GTP gamma S) (4-fold), stimulation by isoproterenol/GTP was modest (1.3- to 1.6-fold).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:3017696

  1. Insect Stage-Specific Adenylate Cyclases Regulate Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Saada, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed “social motility,” based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  2. Pyruvate kinase M2 at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Reprogrammed metabolism is a key feature of cancer cells. The pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform, which is commonly upregulated in many human cancers, has been recently shown to play a crucial role in metabolism reprogramming, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. In this Cell Science at a glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a brief overview of recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of PKM2 expression, enzymatic activity, metabolic functions and subcellular location. We highlight the instrumental role of the non-metabolic functions of PKM2 in tumorigenesis and evaluate the potential to target PKM2 for cancer treatment. PMID:25770102

  3. Aluminum: a requirement for activation of the regulatory component of adenylate cyclase by fluoride.

    PubMed Central

    Sternweis, P C; Gilman, A G

    1982-01-01

    Activation of the purified guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory component (G/F) of adenylate cyclase by F- requires the presence of Mg2+ and another factor. This factor, which contaminates commercial preparations of various nucleotides and disposable glass test tubes, has been identified as Al3+. In the presence of 10 mM Mg2+ and 5 mM F-, AlCl3 causes activation of G/F with an apparent activation constant of approximately 1-5 muM. The requirement for Al3+ is highly specific; of 28 other metals tested, only Be2+ promoted activation of G/F by F-. PMID:6289322

  4. Adenylate Energy Pool and Energy Charge in Maturing Rape Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Te May; Crane, Jim M.; Stamp, David L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of energy state and chemical composition of pod walls and seeds of maturing rape (Brassica napus L.) was conducted on two varieties, Victor and Gorczanski. Total adenosine phosphates, ATP, and adenylate energy charge increased with increasing cell number and cellular synthesis during the early stages, remained high at maximum dry weight accumulation and maximum substrate influx time, and decreased with ripening. A temporal control of energy supply and ATP concentration is evident in developing tissues with determined functions; whereas the association of a high energy charge and active cellular biosynthesis occurs only in tissues with a stabilized cell number. PMID:16658964

  5. Effect of serum lipoproteins on the adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Sirtori, C R; Nicosia, S

    1981-01-01

    Four rat lipoprotein classes [lymph chylomicrons, VLD (very-low-density), LD (low-density) and HD (high-density) lipoproteins] were tested for their ability to affect basal adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity of rat liver plasma membranes. All the lipoproteins, with the exception of lymph chylomicrons, effectively increase the enzyme activity. VLD lipoproteins are the most active class (67% maximal increase), followed by HD lipoproteins (33%) and LD lipoproteins (23%). The effect of VLD lipoproteins is additive to that elicited by GTP or GTP plus glucagon (at least within a certain concentration range). VLD lipoproteins affect only the Vmax. of the enzyme, not the Km. PMID:7317023

  6. All Akt Isoforms (Akt1, Akt2, Akt3) Are Involved in Normal Hearing, but Only Akt2 and Akt3 Are Involved in Auditory Hair Cell Survival in the Mammalian Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Yves; Levano, Soledad; Radojevic, Vesna; Naldi, Arianne Monge; Setz, Cristian; Ryan, Allen F.; Pak, Kwang; Hemmings, Brian A.; Bodmer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The kinase Akt is a key downstream mediator of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathway and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Akt comprises three isoforms each encoded by a separate gene. There is evidence to indicate that Akt is involved in the survival and protection of auditory hair cells in vitro. However, little is known about the physiological role of Akt in the inner ear—especially in the intact animal. To elucidate this issue, we first analyzed the mRNA expression of the three Akt isoforms in the inner ear of C57/BL6 mice by real-time PCR. Next, we tested the susceptibility to gentamicin-induced auditory hair cell loss in isoform-specific Akt knockout mice compared to wild-types (C57/BL6) in vitro. To analyze the effect of gene deletion in vivo, hearing and cochlear microanatomy were evaluated in Akt isoform knockout animals. In this study, we found that all three Akt isoforms are expressed in the cochlea. Our results further indicate that Akt2 and Akt3 enhance hair cell resistance to ototoxicity, while Akt1 does not. Finally, we determined that untreated Akt1 and Akt2/Akt3 double knockout mice display significant hearing loss, indicating a role for these isoforms in normal hearing. Taken together, our results indicate that each of the Akt isoforms plays a distinct role in the mammalian inner ear. PMID:25811375

  7. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus–truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element–luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21937726

  8. Immunochemical characterization and transacting properties of upstream stimulatory factor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Lefrançois-Martinez, A M; Henrion, A; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M; Martinez, A

    1996-01-19

    The ubiquitous upstream stimulatory factor (USF) transcription factors encoded by two distinct genes (USF1 and USF2) exist under the form of various dimers able to bind E-boxes. We report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of USF2 isoforms, corresponding to a 44-kDa subunit, USF2a, and a new 38-kDa subunit, USF2b, generated by differential splicing. Using specific anti-USF antibodies, we define the different binding complexes in various nuclear extracts. In vivo, the USF1/USF2a heterodimer represents over 66% of the USF binding activity whereas the USF1 and USF2a homodimers represent less than 10%, which strongly suggests an in vivo preferential association in heterodimers. In particular, an USF1/USF2b heterodimer accounted for almost 15% of the USF species in some cells. The preferential heterodimerization of USF subunits was reproduced ex vivo, while the in vitro association of cotranslated subunits, or recombinant USF proteins, appeared to be random. In transiently transfected HeLa or hepatoma cells, USF2a and USF1 homodimers transactivated a minimal promoter with similar efficiency, whereas USF2b, which lacks an internal 67-amino acid domain, was a poor transactivator. Additionally, USF2b was an efficient as USF1 and USF2a homodimers in transactivating the liver-specific pyruvate kinase gene promoter. PMID:8576131

  9. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways used by interleukin 1 in tissues in vivo: activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1 and 2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, A; Davis, W; Carter, W G; Saklatvala, J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of interleukin 1 (IL-1) are mediated by the activation of protein kinase signalling pathways, which have been well characterized in cultured cells. We have investigated the activation of these pathways in rabbit liver and other tissues after the systemic administration of IL-1alpha. In liver there was 30-40-fold activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and 5-fold activation of both JNK kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. IL-1alpha also caused 2-3-fold activation of p38 MAPK and degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB ('IkappaB'), although no activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (p42/44 MAPK) was observed. The use of antibodies against specific JNK isoforms showed that, in liver, short (p46) JNK1 and long (p54) JNK2 are the predominant forms activated, with smaller amounts of long JNK1 and short JNK2. No active JNK3 was detected. A similar pattern of JNK activation was seen in lung, spleen, skeletal muscle and kidney. Significant JNK3 activity was detectable only in the brain, although little activation of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1alpha was observed in this tissue. This distribution of active JNK isoforms probably results from a different expression of JNKs within the tissues, rather than from a selective activation of isoforms. We conclude that IL-1alpha might activate a more restricted set of signalling pathways in tissues in vivo than it does in cultured cells, where ERK and JNK3 activation are often observed. Cultured cells might represent a 'repair' phenotype that undergoes a broader set of responses to the cytokine. PMID:11139391

  10. Protein Kinase C and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mondrinos, Mark J.; Kennedy, Paul A.; Lyons, Melanie; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a major public health problem and a leading source of morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Lung tissue in patients with ARDS is characterized by inflammation, with exuberant neutrophil infiltration, activation and degranulation that is thought to initiate tissue injury through the release of proteases and oxygen radicals. Treatment of ARDS is supportive primarily because the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. This gap in knowledge must be addressed in order to identify urgently needed therapies. Recent research efforts in anti-inflammatory drug development have focused on identifying common control points in multiple signaling pathways. The protein kinase C (PKC) serine-threonine kinases are master regulators of proinflammatory signaling hubs, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Pharmacological inhibition of broad spectrum PKC activity and, more importantly, of specific PKC isoforms (as well as deletion of PKCs in mice) exerts protective effects in various experimental models of lung injury. Furthermore, PKC isoforms have been implicated in inflammatory processes that may be involved in the pathophysiologic changes that result in ARDS, including activation of innate immune and endothelial cells, neutrophil trafficking to the lung, regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier functions and control of neutrophil pro-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling. This review focuses on the mechanistic involvement of PKC isoforms in the pathogenesis of ARDS and highlights the potential of developing new therapeutic paradigms based on the selective inhibition (or activation) of specific PKC isoforms. PMID:23572089

  11. Differential and Conditional Activation of PKC-Isoforms Dictates Cardiac Adaptation during Physiological to Pathological Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Naskar, Shaon; Datta, Kaberi; Mitra, Arkadeep; Pathak, Kanchan; Datta, Ritwik; Bansal, Trisha; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2014-01-01

    A cardiac hypertrophy is defined as an increase in heart mass which may either be beneficial (physiological hypertrophy) or detrimental (pathological hypertrophy). This study was undertaken to establish the role of different protein kinase-C (PKC) isoforms in the regulation of cardiac adaptation during two types of cardiac hypertrophy. Phosphorylation of specific PKC-isoforms and expression of their downstream proteins were studied during physiological and pathological hypertrophy in 24 week male Balb/c mice (Mus musculus) models, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, western blot analysis and M-mode echocardiography for cardiac function analysis. PKC-δ was significantly induced during pathological hypertrophy while PKC-α was exclusively activated during physiological hypertrophy in our study. PKC-δ activation during pathological hypertrophy resulted in cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to compromised cardiac function and on the other hand, activation of PKC-α during physiological hypertrophy promoted cardiomyocyte growth but down regulated cellular apoptotic load resulting in improved cardiac function. Reversal in PKC-isoform with induced activation of PKC-δ and simultaneous inhibition of phospho-PKC-α resulted in an efficient myocardium to deteriorate considerably resulting in compromised cardiac function during physiological hypertrophy via augmentation of apoptotic and fibrotic load. This is the first report where PKC-α and -δ have been shown to play crucial role in cardiac adaptation during physiological and pathological hypertrophy respectively thereby rendering compromised cardiac function to an otherwise efficient heart by conditional reversal of their activation. PMID:25116170

  12. 55K isoform of CDK9 associates with Ku70 and is involved in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongbing; Herrmann, Christine H.; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-06-25

    Positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a cellular protein kinase that is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional elongation of protein coding genes. P-TEFb is a set of different molecular complexes, each containing CDK9 as the catalytic subunit. There are two isoforms of the CDK9 protein - the major 42 KDa CDK9 isoform and the minor 55KDa isoform that is translated from an in-frame mRNA that arises from an upstream transcriptional start site. We found that shRNA depletion of the 55K CDK9 protein in HeLa cells induces apoptosis and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). The levels of apoptosis and DSBs induced by the depletion were reduced by expression of a 55K CDK9 protein variant resistant to the shRNA, indicating that these phenotypes are the consequence of depletion of the 55K protein and not off-target effects. We also found that the 55K CDK9 protein, but not the 42K CDK9 protein, specifically associates with Ku70, a protein involved in DSB repair. Our findings suggest that the 55K CDK9 protein may function in repair of DNA through an association with Ku70.

  13. Structural Basis of Dscam Isoform Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Meijers,R.; Puettmann-Holgado, R.; Skiniotis, G.; Liu, J.; Walz, T.; Wang, J.; Schmucker, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Dscam gene gives rise to thousands of diverse cell surface receptors1 thought to provide homophilic and heterophilic recognition specificity for neuronal wiring and immune responses. Mutually exclusive splicing allows for the generation of sequence variability in three immunoglobulin ecto-domains, D2, D3 and D7. We report X-ray structures of the amino-terminal four immunoglobulin domains (D1-D4) of two distinct Dscam isoforms. The structures reveal a horseshoe configuration, with variable residues of D2 and D3 constituting two independent surface epitopes on either side of the receptor. Both isoforms engage in homo-dimerization coupling variable domain D2 with D2, and D3 with D3. These interactions involve symmetric, antiparallel pairing of identical peptide segments from epitope I that are unique to each isoform. Structure-guided mutagenesis and swapping of peptide segments confirm that epitope I, but not epitope II, confers homophilic binding specificity of full-length Dscam receptors. Phylogenetic analysis shows strong selection of matching peptide sequences only for epitope I. We propose that peptide complementarity of variable residues in epitope I of Dscam is essential for homophilic binding specificity.

  14. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  15. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  16. Binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to solubilized preparations of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Seamon, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to proteins solubilized from bovine brain membranes was studied by precipitating proteins with polyethylene glycol and separating (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to protein from free (/sup 3/H)forskolin by rapid filtration. The K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to solubilized proteins was 14 nM which was similar to that for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites in membranes from rat brain and human platelets. Forskolin analogs competed for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites with the same rank potency in both brain membranes and in proteins solubilized from brain membranes. (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to proteins solubilized from membranes with a Bmax of 38 fmolmg protein which increased to 94 fmolmg protein when GppNHp was included in the binding assay. In contrast, GppNHp had no effect on (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to proteins solubilized from membranes preactivated with GppNHp. Solubilized adenylate cyclase from non-preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 130 pmolmgmin which was increased 7-fold by GppNHp. In contrast, adenylate cyclase from preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 850 pmolmgmin which was not stimulated by GppNHp or forskolin

  17. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  18. Influence of the beta-adrenergic receptor concentration on functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase system.

    PubMed Central

    Severne, Y; Coppens, D; Bottari, S; Riviere, M; Kram, R; Vauquelin, G

    1984-01-01

    Only part of the beta-adrenergic receptors can undergo functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase regulatory unit. This receptor subpopulation shows an increased affinity for agonists in the presence of Mg2+ and undergoes rapid "inactivation" (locking-in of the agonist) by the alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide in the presence of agonists. Several experimental conditions, known to modify the total receptor concentration without alteration of the other components of the adenylate cyclase system, do not affect the percentage of receptors that can undergo functional coupling: (i) homologous regulation of beta 1 receptors in rat brain by noradrenaline (through antidepressive drug or reserpine injections); (ii) up- and down-regulation of the beta 2 receptors in Friend erythroleukemia cells by, respectively, sodium butyrate and cinnarizine treatment; and (iii) dithiothreitol-mediated inactivation of receptors in turkey erythrocytes, Friend erythroleukemia cells, and rat brain. Our findings argue against a stoichiometric limitation in the number of regulatory components, genetically different receptor subpopulations, bound guanine nucleotides, or reduced accessibility of part of the receptors to the agonists as the cause for functional receptor heterogeneity. Differences in either the receptor conformation or its membrane microenvironment are more plausible explanations. PMID:6087337

  19. Crystal structure of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate.

    PubMed Central

    Arnez, J G; Harris, D C; Mitschler, A; Rees, B; Francklyn, C S; Moras, D

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structure at 2.6 A of the histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate has been determined. The enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular weight of 94 kDa and belongs to the class II of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). The asymmetric unit is composed of two homodimers. Each monomer consists of two domains. The N-terminal catalytic core domain contains a six-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet sitting on two alpha-helices, which can be superposed with the catalytic domains of yeast AspRS, and GlyRS and SerRS from Thermus thermophilus with a root-mean-square difference on the C alpha atoms of 1.7-1.9 A. The active sites of all four monomers are occupied by histidyl-adenylate, which apparently forms during crystallization. The 100 residue C-terminal alpha/beta domain resembles half of a beta-barrel, and provides an independent domain oriented to contact the anticodon stem and part of the anticodon loop of tRNA(His). The modular domain organization of histidyl-tRNA synthetase reiterates a repeated theme in aaRS, and its structure should provide insight into the ability of certain aaRS to aminoacylate minihelices and other non-tRNA molecules. Images PMID:7556055

  20. Adenylate cyclase regulation in the spermatogenic cell plasma membrane: Modulating effects of TPA and TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    This research was designed to compare the effects of TPA, a phorbol ester, and TCDD in a spermatogenic cell population, a target of TCDD toxicity. Membrane-bound adenylate cyclase activity was used an index of membrane function, and was quantified by the amount of {sup 32}P-cAMP formed from {sup 32}P-ATP following chromatographic separation. Exposure to male germ cells in-vitro to TPA and TCDD followed by direct measurement of enzyme activity was used to investigate the potential of each agent to perturb membrane function. TPA and TCDD consistently inhibited adenylate cyclase activity at the levels of G{sub s}-catalytic unit coupling and hormone-receptor activation, as measured by the stimulation of enzyme activity by concomitant addition of forskolin and GTP and FSH and GTP, respectively. The effect on coupling required at least 60 minutes of exposure to TPA or TCDD. Concentration-response curves demonstrated a progressive desensitization with increasing TPA concentration, while TCDD exhibited consistent inhibition over the same concentration range.

  1. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  2. Protein kinase C mediates platelet secretion and thrombus formation through protein kinase D2

    PubMed Central

    Konopatskaya, Olga; Matthews, Sharon A.; Harper, Matthew T.; Gilio, Karen; Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Williams, Christopher M.; Navarro, Maria N.; Carter, Deborah A.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Leitges, Michael; Cantrell, Doreen; Poole, Alastair W.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are highly specialized blood cells critically involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. Members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family have established roles in regulating platelet function and thrombosis, but the molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. In particular, the conventional PKC isoform, PKCα, is a major regulator of platelet granule secretion, but the molecular pathway from PKCα to secretion is not defined. Protein kinase D (PKD) is a family of 3 kinases activated by PKC, which may represent a step in the PKC signaling pathway to secretion. In the present study, we show that PKD2 is the sole PKD member regulated downstream of PKC in platelets, and that the conventional, but not novel, PKC isoforms provide the upstream signal. Platelets from a gene knock-in mouse in which 2 key phosphorylation sites in PKD2 have been mutated (Ser707Ala/Ser711Ala) show a significant reduction in agonist-induced dense granule secretion, but not in α-granule secretion. This deficiency in dense granule release was responsible for a reduced platelet aggregation and a marked reduction in thrombus formation. Our results show that in the molecular pathway to secretion, PKD2 is a key component of the PKC-mediated pathway to platelet activation and thrombus formation through its selective regulation of dense granule secretion. PMID:21527521

  3. Identification of a Novel C-Terminal Truncated WT1 Isoform with Antagonistic Effects against Major WT1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Naoya; Hojo, Nozomi; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Inaba, Rena; Moriguchi, Nahoko; Matsuno, Keiko; Fukuda, Mari; Matsumura, Akihide; Hayashi, Seiji; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakata, Jun; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Hosen, Naoki; Sugiyama, Haruo; Oji, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    The Wilms’ tumor gene WT1 consists of 10 exons and encodes a zinc finger transcription factor. There are four major WT1 isoforms resulting from alternative splicing at two sites, exon 5 (17AA) and exon 9 (KTS). All major WT1 isoforms are overexpressed in leukemia and solid tumors and play oncogenic roles such as inhibition of apoptosis, and promotion of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In the present study, a novel alternatively spliced WT1 isoform that had an extended exon 4 (designated as exon 4a) with an additional 153 bp (designated as 4a sequence) at the 3’ end was identified and designated as an Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform. The insertion of exon 4a resulted in the introduction of premature translational stop codons in the reading frame in exon 4a and production of C-terminal truncated WT1 proteins lacking zinc finger DNA-binding domain. Overexpression of the truncated Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform inhibited the major WT1-mediated transcriptional activation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL gene promoter and induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Conversely, suppression of the Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform by Ex4a-specific siRNA attenuated apoptosis. These results indicated that the Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform exerted dominant negative effects on anti-apoptotic function of major WT1 isoforms. Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform was endogenously expressed as a minor isoform in myeloid leukemia and solid tumor cells and increased regardless of decrease in major WT1 isoforms during apoptosis, suggesting the dominant negative effects on anti-apoptotic function of major WT1 isoforms. These results indicated that Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform had an important physiological function that regulated oncogenic function of major WT1 isoforms. PMID:26090994

  4. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  5. WNK1/HSN2 isoform and the regulation of KCC2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Bercier, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 is a rare autosomal recessive pathology presenting with early onset peripheral sensory defects. It arises from mutations affecting a specific isoform of the WNK1 kinase (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1) termed WNK1/HSN2. The role of WNK1 in the nervous system is not well understood. In our recent paper, we examined the effect of a pathological loss-of-function of the Wnk1/Hsn2 isoform on the development of the peripheral nervous system of the zebrafish embryo. Upon Wnk1/Hsn2 silencing using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we observed defects in the development of the sensory peripheral lateral line (PLL). Phenotypical embryos were also found to overexpress RNA for potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), a downstream target of WNK1 phosphorylation. Injection of recombinant mRNA for active KCC2, but not for inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, replicated the PLL defects observed in wnk1/hsn2 deficient animals, suggesting an essential role for WNK1/HSN2 in KCC2 regulation. PMID:25003007

  6. Isolation, characterization, and mapping of two mouse mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, M.J.; Lovell, R.S.; Craigen, W.J.

    1996-04-15

    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are small pore-forming channels found in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. VDACs conduct adenine nucleotides and are the binding sites for several cytosolic enzymes, including the isoforms of hexokinase and glycerol kinase. VDAC binding is developmentally and metabolically regulated and allows the kinases preferential access to mitochondrial ATP. Two human VDAC cDNAs have recently been identified, and a total four VDAC loci have been mapped. Here, the isolation of two mouse VDAC cDNAs (VDAC5 and VDAC6) is described. By Northern analysis the two mouse VDAC isoforms show nearly identical expression patterns, with high levels of expression detected in heart, kidney, brain, and skeletal muscle and lesser levels of expression in all other tissues examined. The only exception is the lack of expression is highest in this tissue. VDAC6 appears to be encoded by more than one transcript. The mouse VDAC5 gene was mapped using an interspecies DNA mapping panel to the proximal region of chromosome 11, and the mouse VDAC6 gene was mapped using a panel to the proximal region of chromosome 14. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  8. Phosphorylation of the 27-kDa heat shock protein via p38 MAP kinase and MAPKAP kinase in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J K; Yamboliev, I A; Weber, L A; Gerthoffer, W T

    1997-11-01

    The 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) is expressed in a variety of tissues in the absence of stress and is thought to regulate actin filament dynamics, possibly by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanism. HSP27 has also been suggested to be involved in contraction of intestinal smooth muscle. We have investigated phosphorylation of HSP27 in airway smooth muscle in response to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Carbachol increased 32P incorporation into canine tracheal HSP27 and induced a shift in the distribution of charge isoforms on two-dimensional gels to more acidic, phosphorylated forms. The canine HSP27 amino acid sequence includes three serine residues corresponding to sites in human HSP27 known to be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase-2. To determine whether muscarinic receptors are coupled to a "stress response" pathway in smooth muscle culminating in phosphorylation of HSP27, we assayed MAPKAP kinase-2 activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, the enzyme thought to activate MAPKAP kinase-2. Recombinant canine HSP27 expressed in Escherichia coli was a substrate for MAPKAP kinase-2 in vitro as well as a substrate for endogenous smooth muscle HSP27 kinase, which was activated by carbachol. Carbachol also increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. SB-203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinases, reduced activation of endogenous HSP27 kinase activity and blocked the shift in HSP27 charge isoforms to acidic forms. We suggest that HSP27 in airway smooth muscle, in addition to being a stress response protein, is phosphorylated by a receptor-initiated signaling cascade involving muscarinic receptors, tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, and activation of MAPKAP kinase-2. PMID:9374719

  9. EXPERIENCE-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF TRKB ISOFORMS IN RODENT VISUAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2010-01-01

    Within primary visual cortex (V1), BDNF signaling through its high affinity receptor TrkB is important for normal development and experience-dependent plasticity. TrkB is expressed in several alternatively spliced isoforms, including full length TrkB (TrkB.FL), and several truncated isoforms (TrkB.T1, TrkB.T2 and TrkB.T4) that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These isoforms are important components of BDNF signaling, yet little is known about the developmental or experience-dependent regulation of their expression. Using immunohistochemistry, we found TrkB.FL and TrkB.T1 expressed in interneurons and pyramidal neurons within V1, but not in cortical astrocytes. We used real-time PCR to quantify changes in mRNA expression of BDNF, the four TrkB isoforms, and the low affinity receptor P75NTR during normal development, and in response to visual deprivation at two different ages. BDNF expression increased between postnatal days 10 (P10) and P30, and was rapidly down-regulated by 3 days of visual deprivation during both the pre-critical period (P14–P17) and the critical period (P18–P21). Over the same developmental period expression of each TrkB isoform was regulated independently; TrkB.T1 increased, TrkB.FL and TrkB.T2 decreased, and TrkB.T4 showed transient changes. Neither brief visual deprivation nor prolonged dark-rearing induced changes in TrkB.FL or TrkB.T1 expression. However, TrkB.T4 expression was reduced by brief visual deprivation, while TrkB.T4, TrkB.T2 and P75NTR were up-regulated by prolonged dark-rearing into the critical period. Our data indicate that TrkB isoform expression can be selectively regulated by visual experience, and may contribute to experience-dependent cortical plasticity. PMID:19224567

  10. Wnt isoform-specific interactions with coreceptor specify inhibition or potentiation of signaling by LRP6 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I; Liu, Bob Y; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C; Carano, Richard A D; Ernst, James A; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-Catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  11. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  12. Increased Phospho-Keratin 8 Isoforms in Colorectal Tumors Associated with EGFR Pathway Activation and Reduced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Arentz, Georgia; Chataway, Tim; Condina, Mark R.; Price, Timothy J.; Hoffmann, Peter; Hardingham, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylated keratin (K) 8 acts as a phosphate “sponge” for stress-activated protein kinases thereby inhibiting pro-apoptotic molecules and thus apoptosis. MAP kinase/ERK1 has increased activity in colorectal cancer (CRC) and is known to phosphorylate K8. The aims were to identify the K8 isoforms abundantly present in colon tumors, using 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE), to identify the modifications using mass spectrometry, and to validate the differential abundance of these isoforms in tumors relative to matched normal mucosae. 2D DIGE showed 3 isoforms of K8 significantly increased in tumor ≥2-fold in 6/8 pairs. Metal oxide affinity chromatography mass spectrometry and bioinformatics were used to identify phosphorylated serine residues. Levels of PS24, PS432, and PS74 by western blotting were found to be significantly increased in tumor versus matched normal. Blocking of EGFR signaling in Caco2 cells showed a significant decrease (P < 0.0001) in K8 PS74 and PS432 levels by 59% and 66%, respectively, resulting in increased apoptosis.

  13. Biochemical methods for quantifying sphingolipids: ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine kinase-1 activity, and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Leyre; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids (ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate) are bioactive lipids with important biological functions in proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Herein, we describe easy and rapid biochemical methods with the use of radiolabeled molecules ((3)H, (32)P) for their mass determination. Quantitation of sphingosine kinase-1 activity, the most studied isoform, is also included. PMID:22528435

  14. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Regulates Gene Transcription by Acting as A Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueliang; Wang, Haizhen; Jenny, J. Yang; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolysis enzyme catalyzing conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate with transferring a phosphate from PEP to ADP. We report here that PKM2 localizes to the cell nucleus. The levels of nuclear PKM2 correlate with cell proliferation. PKM2 activates transcription of MEK5 by phosphorylating stat3 at Y705. In vitro phosphorylation assays show that PKM2 is a protein kinase using PEP as phosphate donor. ADP competes with the protein substrate binding, indicating that the substrate may bind to the ADP site of PKM2. Our experiments suggest that PKM2 dimer is an active protein kinase, while the tetramer is an active pyruvate kinase. Expression a PKM2 mutant that exists as a dimer promotes cell proliferation, indicating that protein kinase activity of PKM2 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation. Our study reveals an important link between metabolism alteration and gene expression during tumor transformation and progression. PMID:22306293

  15. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  16. Decoding RAS isoform and codon-specific signalling

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Hood, Fiona E.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    RAS proteins are key signalling hubs that are oncogenically mutated in 30% of all cancer cases. Three genes encode almost identical isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed, but are not functionally redundant. The network responses associated with each isoform and individual oncogenic mutations remain to be fully characterized. In the present article, we review recent data defining the differences between the RAS isoforms and their most commonly mutated codons and discuss the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25109951

  17. Separation of plasmid DNA isoforms using centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Borujeni, Ehsan Espah; Zydney, Andrew L

    2012-07-01

    Centrifugal ultrafiltration is a well-established method for concentrating and purifying DNA. Here, we describe the use of centrifugal ultrafiltration for the separation of plasmid DNA isoforms based on differences in elongational flexibility of the supercoiled, open-circular, and linear plasmids. Transmission of each isoform is minimal below a critical value of the filtration velocity, which is directly related to the magnitude of the centrifugal speed and the system geometry. A discontinuous diafiltration process was used to enrich the desired isoform, as determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. The simplicity and efficacy of this membrane-based separation are attractive for multiple applications requiring the use of separated DNA isoforms. PMID:22780319

  18. The influence of various cations on the catalytic properties of clays. [polymerization of alanine adenylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The polymerization of alanine adenylate in the presence of the sodium form of various clays was studied, and hectorite was found to cause more polymerization than nontronite and montmorillonite (in that order) although the differences were not great. The effect on polymerization of presaturating montmorillonite with different cations was determined. Hectorite, with increased basicity of the interspatial planes, allows polymerization of lysine, which montmorillonite does not. The general trend is that, for the same amino acid, higher degrees of polymerization are obtained when the cation in the octahedral lattice of the clay is divalent rather than trivalent. With the exchangeable cations the order is reversed, for a reason that is explained. The main role of clays in the polymerization mechanism of amino acids is concentration and neutralization of charges.

  19. Alterations in adenylate ratios in plant cells after accelerated ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, A; Sidorenko, P G

    1996-01-01

    Levels of adenylate metabolism have been studied in cells of Nicotiana tabacum growing in vitro, and in root apex extracts of Pisum sativum irradiated at the 95-in. isochronous cyclotron U-240, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Kyiv. Particle beams of accelerated helium ions with energy 9.34 keV/micrometer were used. Replacement and rapid freezing of the irradiated plants samples in liquid nitrogen were carried out with a manipulator and a remote control system. After doses of 5, 20, 50, and 100 Gy of gamma-irradiation, as well as 50 and 100 Gy 4He irradiation, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio increased during early stages of the response. This effect was absent at higher doses and after exposure to sparesly-ionizing radiation, when a rapid decline in the cellular ATP concentration and the ATP/ADP ratio occurred. PMID:11538989

  20. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  2. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  3. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in rat brown fat

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.; Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Catecholamines stimulate thermogenesis in rat brown fat through a mechanism which involves binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR), stimulation of adenylate cyclase (AC) and culminating with uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. The authors characterized BAR, AC and cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase in CDF (F-344) interscapular brown fat. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/)Iodopindolol binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 41.8 +/- 12.0 fmol BAR/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 118 +/- 15 pM. Binding was both specific and stereospecific. Competition with 1-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 6.7 nM) was 15 times more potent than d-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 103 nM). Competition with isoproterenol (K/sub d/ = 79 nM) was 10 times more potent than epinephrine (K/sub d/ = 820 nM) which was 35 times more potent than norepinephrine (K/sub d/ = 2.9 x 10/sup -5/ M) suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Cyt c oxidase activity was assessed in brown fat mitochrondrial preparations. The ratio of BAR to cyt c activity was 959 +/- 275 nmol BAR/mol cyc c/min. Isoproterenol (0.1 mM) stimulated AC activity was 24 times GTP (0.1 mM) stimulated AC (98.5 vs 40.7 pmol cAMP/min/mg). NaF-stimulated AC was nine times basal activity (90.5 vs 11.3 pmol cAMP/min/mg). These data demonstrate the presence of a beta-/sub 2/-type BAR coupled to adenylate cyclase in rat brown fat.

  4. Basal activity of GIRK5 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Carolina; Mora, Silvia I; Ordaz, Benito; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis; Escobar, Laura I

    2003-02-14

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by Gbetagamma subunits. GIRK channels are critical for functions as diverse as heart rate modulation and neuronal post-synaptic inhibition. GIRK5 (Kir3.5) is the oocyte homologue of the mammalian GIRK subunits that conform the K(ACh) channel. It has been claimed that even when the oocytes express GIRK5 proteins they do not form functional channels. However, the GIRK5 gene shows three initiation sites that suggest the existence of three isoforms. In a previous work we demonstrated the functionality of homomultimers of the shortest isoform overexpressed in the own oocytes. Remarkably, the basal GIRK5-Delta25 inward currents were not coupled to the activation of a G-protein receptor in the oocytes. These results encouraged us to study this channel in another expression system. In this work we show that Sf21 insect cells can be successfully transfected with this channel. GIRK5-Delta25 homomultimers produce time-dependent inward currents only with GTPgammaS in the recording pipette. Therefore, alternative modes of stimulus input to heterotrimeric G-proteins should be present in the oocytes to account for these results. PMID:12535718

  5. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  6. The Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway in Human Cancer: Genetic Alterations and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Alexandre; Guerreiro, Ana S

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently activated in human cancer and represents an attractive target for therapies based on small molecule inhibitors. PI3K isoforms play an essential role in the signal transduction events activated by cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There are eight known PI3K isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes (I-III). Therefore PI3Ks show considerable diversity and it remains unclear which kinases in this family should be targeted in cancer. The class IA of PI3K comprises the p110α, p110β and p110δ isoforms, which associate with activated RTKs. In human cancer, recent reports have described activating mutations in the PIK3CA gene encoding p110α, and inactivating mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene, a tumour suppressor and antagonist of the PI3K pathway. The PIK3CA mutations described in cancer constitutively activate p110α and, when expressed in cells drive oncogenic transformation. Moreover, these mutations cause the constitutive activation of downstream signaling molecules such as Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) that is commonly observed in cancer cells. In addition to p110α, the other isoforms of the PI3K family may also play a role in human cancer, although their individual functions remain to be precisely identified. In this review we will discuss the evidence implicating individual PI3K isoforms in human cancer and their potential as drug targets in this context. PMID:19384426

  7. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W; Wood, Matthew J A; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-09-21

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light including circadian entrainment, sleep induction, the pupillary light response (PLR), and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light). How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  8. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  9. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A.; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S.; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A.; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light [1, 2] including circadian entrainment [3], sleep induction [4], the pupillary light response (PLR) [5], and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light) [6]. How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails [7]. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments [7]. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  10. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF. PMID:25649277

  11. Method of empirical dependences in estimation and prediction of activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Moshkova, Albina N.; Erlykina, Elena I.; Khvatova, Elena M.

    2016-04-01

    Creatine kinase is a key enzyme of energy metabolism in the brain. There are known cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase exists as a mixture of two oligomeric forms - dimer and octamer. The aim of investigation was to study catalytic properties of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase and using of the method of empirical dependences for the possible prediction of the activity of these enzymes in cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was revealed to be accompanied with the changes of the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes and oligomeric state of mitochondrial isoform. There were made the models of multiple regression that permit to study the activity of creatine kinase system in cerebral ischemia using a calculating method. Therefore, the mathematical method of empirical dependences can be applied for estimation and prediction of the functional state of the brain by the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia.

  12. A protein kinase screen of Neurospora crassa mutant strains reveals that the SNF1 protein kinase promotes glycogen synthase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Thiago De Souza; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Felício, Ana Paula; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; De Carvalho, Ana Carolina Gomes Vieira; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2014-12-15

    Glycogen functions as a carbohydrate reserve in a variety of organisms and its metabolism is highly regulated. The activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of the synthesis and degradation processes, respectively, are regulated by allosteric modulation and reversible phosphorylation. To identify the protein kinases affecting glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa, we performed a screen of 84 serine/threonine kinase knockout strains. We identified multiple kinases that have already been described as controlling glycogen metabolism in different organisms, such as NcSNF1, NcPHO85, NcGSK3, NcPKA, PSK2 homologue and NcATG1. In addition, many hypothetical kinases have been implicated in the control of glycogen metabolism. Two kinases, NcIME-2 and NcNIMA, already functionally characterized but with no functions related to glycogen metabolism regulation, were also identified. Among the kinases identified, it is important to mention the role of NcSNF1. We showed in the present study that this kinase was implicated in glycogen synthase phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the higher levels of glycogen accumulated during growth, along with a higher glycogen synthase (GSN) ±glucose 6-phosphate activity ratio and a lesser set of phosphorylated GSN isoforms in strain Ncsnf1KO, when compared with the wild-type strain. The results led us to conclude that, in N. crassa, this kinase promotes phosphorylation of glycogen synthase either directly or indirectly, which is the opposite of what is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The kinases also play a role in gene expression regulation, in that gdn, the gene encoding the debranching enzyme, was down-regulated by the proteins identified in the screen. Some kinases affected growth and development, suggesting a connection linking glycogen metabolism with cell growth and development. PMID:25253091

  13. Alternative transcription initiation leads to expression of a novel ALK isoform in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Lee, William; Obenauf, Anna C.; Ran, Leili; Murali, Rajmohan; Zhang, Qi Fan; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Hu, Wenhuo; Scott, Sasinya N.; Shah, Ronak H.; Landa, Iñigo; Button, Julia; Lailler, Nathalie; Sboner, Andrea; Gao, Dong; Murphy, Devan A.; Cao, Zhen; Shukla, Shipra; Hollmann, Travis J.; Wang, Lu; Borsu, Laetitia; Merghoub, Taha; Schwartz, Gary K.; Postow, Michael A.; Ariyan, Charlotte E.; Fagin, James A.; Zheng, Deyou; Ladanyi, Marc; Busam, Klaus J.; Berger, Michael F.; Chen, Yu; Chi, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes by mechanisms other than genetic aberrations such as mutations, translocations, or amplifications is largely undefined. Here we report a novel isoform of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) that is expressed in ~ 11% of melanomas and sporadically in other human cancer types, but not in normal tissues. The novel ALK transcript initiates from a de novo alternative transcription initiation (ATI) site in ALK intron 19, and was termed ALKATI. In ALKATI-expressing tumours, the ATI site is enriched for H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II, chromatin marks characteristic of active transcription initiation sites1. ALKATI is expressed from both ALK alleles, and no recurrent genetic aberrations are found at the ALK locus, indicating that the transcriptional activation is independent of genetic aberrations at the ALK locus. The ALKATI transcript encodes three proteins with molecular weights of 61.1, 60.8 and 58.7 kilodaltons, consisting primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. ALKATI stimulates multiple oncogenic signalling pathways, drives growth-factor-independent cell proliferation in vitro, and promotes tumorigenesis in vivo in mouse models. ALK inhibitors can suppress the kinase activity of ALKATI, suggesting that patients with ALKATI-expressing tumours may benefit from ALK inhibitors. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of oncogene activation in cancer through de novo alternative transcription initiation. PMID:26444240

  14. IL-33 isoforms: their future as vaccine adjuvants?

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of cytokine isoforms is likely to provide critical important new insight into immunobiology. Cytokine isoforms can provide additional diversity to their complex biological effects that participate in control and protection against different foreign pathogens. Recently, IL-33 has been identified as a proinflammatory cytokine having several different biologically active isoform products. Originally associated with Th2 immunity, new evidence now supports the role of two IL-33 isoforms to facilitate the generation of protective Th1 and CD8 T cell immunity against specific pathogens. Therefore, a better understanding of the IL-33 isoforms will inform us on how to utilize them to facilitate their development as tools as vaccine adjuvants for immune therapy. PMID:25656504

  15. Studying MAP Kinase pathways during early development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Aviad; Bengal, Eyal

    2010-01-01

    The following chapter describes several methods involved in the detection of MAPK activities and phosphorylated proteins during early development of Xenopus laevis. The Xenopus embryo provides a powerful platform for biochemical studies. We describe here basic methods of embryo manipulations such as egg fertilization, embryo growth and maintenance, microinjection of capped RNA and antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs), and isolation of explants. In addition, we describe methods to detect phosphorylated proteins, to analyze kinase activity, and to interfere with signaling pathways. Immunohistochemical staining performed on whole embryos or on tissue sections is an additional method for the detection of phosphorylated proteins in the developing embryo. Approaches to activate or inhibit MAPK activities including the ectopic expression of mutated isoforms of MAPK kinase, or the incubation of embryo explants with pharmacological inhibitors are described. Finally, we describe an in vitro kinase assay specifically designed for the Xenopus embryo. PMID:20811998

  16. Pim-1 kinase as cancer drug target: An update

    PubMed Central

    TURSYNBAY, YERNAR; ZHANG, JINFU; LI, ZHI; TOKAY, TURSONJAN; ZHUMADILOV, ZHAXYBAY; WU, DENGLONG; XIE, YINGQIU

    2016-01-01

    Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus-1 (Pim-1) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle, cell survival, drug resistance. Aberrant elevation of Pim-1 kinase is associated with numerous types of cancer. Two distinct isoforms of Pim-1 (Pim-1S and Pim-1L) show distinct cellular functions. Pim-1S predominately localizes to the nucleus and Pim-1L localizes to plasma membrane for drug resistance. Recent studies show that mitochondrial Pim-1 maintains mitochondrial integrity. Pim-1 is emerging as a cancer drug target, particularly in prostate cancer. Recently the potent new functions of Pim-1 in immunotherapy, senescence bypass, metastasis and epigenetic dynamics have been found. The aim of the present updated review is to provide brief information regarding networks of Pim-1 kinase and focus on its recent advances as a novel drug target. PMID:26893828

  17. [Dependence of creatine kinase and glycogen synthetase activities of skeletal muscles on state of adenine nucleotide phosphorylation and cAMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, N N; Chagovets, N R; Maksimova, L V

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the contents of adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate, creatine, glucose-6-phosphate and glycogen and the activity of adenylate cyclase, creatine kinase, glycogen phosphorylase 31:51-AMP-phosphodiesterase and glycogen synthetase in muscles and of blood catecholamines were studied in adult rats before loading, immediately after the cessation of the muscular activity, and at rest. Adenine nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes related to the muscular activity. It is established that compensation and supercompensation of the working losses of muscular creatine phosphate and glycogen are due to activation of anabolic processes under conditions of higher phosphorylation of the adenylic system. PMID:6247797

  18. Affinity Purification Method for the Identification of Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthetic Enzymes Using a Synthetic Probe for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    A series of inhibitors have been designed based on 5'-O-sulfamoyl adenosine (AMS) that display tight binding characteristics towards the inhibition of adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). We recently developed an affinity probe for A domains that could be used to facilitate the specific isolation and identification of NRPS modules. Our synthetic probe, which is a biotinylated variant of L-Phe-AMS (L-Phe-AMS-biotin), selectively targets the A domains in NRPS modules that recognize and convert L-Phe to an aminoacyl adenylate in whole proteomes. In this chapter, we describe the design and synthesis of L-Phe-AMS-biotin and provide a summary of our work towards the development of a series of protocols for the specific enrichment of NRPS modules using this probe. PMID:26831701

  19. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2011-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl2 homology domain 3(BH3)-only protein Bim is controlled by stringent post-translational regulation, predominantly through alterations in phosphorylation status. To identify new kinases involved in its regulation, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a non-spliceable variant of the predominant isoform--Bim(EL)--as the bait and identified the regulatory subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A--PRKAR1A--as an interacting partner. We also show that protein kinase A (PKA) is a Bim(EL) isoform-specific kinase that promotes its stabilization. Inhibition of PKA or mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site within Bim(EL) resulted in its accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation. These results might have implications for human diseases that are characterized by abnormally increased PKA activity, such as the Carney complex and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:21151042

  20. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Laurent; Gasser, Christelle; Bracher, Franz; Huber, Kilian; Knapp, Stefan; Schwaller, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology. Whereas elevated levels of PIM1 and PIM2 were mostly found in hematologic malignancies and prostate cancer, increased PIM3 expression was observed in different solid tumors. PIM kinases are constitutively active and their activity supports in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth and survival through modification of an increasing number of common as well as isoform-specific substrates including several cell cycle regulators and apoptosis mediators. PIM1 but not PIM2 seems also to mediate homing and migration of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells by regulating chemokine receptor surface expression. Knockdown experiments by RNA interference or dominant-negative acting mutants suggested that PIM kinases are important for maintenance of a transformed phenotype and therefore potential therapeutic targets. Determination of the protein structure facilitated identification of an increasing number of potent small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors with in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. Ongoing efforts aim to identify isoform-specific PIM inhibitors that would not only help to dissect the kinase function but hopefully also provide targeted therapeutics. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of PIM serine/threonine kinases for the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers, and we highlight structural principles and recent progress on small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors that are on their way into first clinical trials. PMID:20145274

  1. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Monika B; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a hereditary progressive disorder and the most frequent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). PKAN patients present with a progressive movement disorder, dysarthria, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. In magnetic resonance imaging, PKAN patients exhibit the pathognonomic "eye of the tiger" sign in the globus pallidus which corresponds to iron accumulation and gliosis as shown in neuropathological examinations. The discovery of the disease causing mutations in PANK2 has linked the disorder to coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. PANK2 is the only one out of four PANK genes encoding an isoform which localizes to mitochondria. At least two other NBIA genes (PLA2G6, C19orf12) encode proteins that share with PANK2 a mitochondrial localization and all are suggested to play a role in lipid homeostasis. With no causal therapy available for PKAN until now, only symptomatic treatment is possible. A multi-centre retrospective study with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with NBIA revealed a significant improvement of dystonia. Recently, studies in the PANK Drosophila model "fumble" revealed improvement by the compound pantethine which is hypothesized to feed an alternate CoA biosynthesis pathway. In addition, pilot studies with the iron chelator deferiprone that crosses the blood brain barrier showed a good safety profile and some indication of efficacy. An adequately powered randomized clinical trial will start in 2012. This review summarizes clinical presentation, neuropathology and pathogenesis of PKAN. PMID:22515741

  2. Analysis of the N-terminal region of human MLKL, as well as two distinct MLKL isoforms, reveals new insights into necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Arnež, Katja Hrovat; Kindlova, Michaela; Bokil, Nilesh J.; Murphy, James M.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Gunčar, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) is an essential effector of necroptotic cell death. Two distinct human MLKL isoforms have previously been reported, but their capacities to trigger cell death have not been compared directly. Herein, we examine these two MLKL isoforms, and further probe the features of the human MLKL N-terminal domain that are required for cell death. Expression in HEK293T cells of the N-terminal 201 amino acids (aa) of human MLKL is sufficient to cause cell death, whereas expression of the first 154 aa is not. Given that aa 1–125 are able to initiate necroptosis, our findings indicate that the helix that follows this region restrains necroptotic activity, which is again restored in longer constructs. Furthermore, MLKL isoform 2 (MLKL2), which lacks much of the regulatory pseudokinase domain, is a much more potent inducer of cell death than MLKL isoform 1 (MLKL1) in ectopic expression studies in HEK293T cells. Modelling predicts that a C-terminal helix constrains the activity of MLKL1, but not MLKL2. Although both isoforms are expressed by human monocyte-derived macrophages at the mRNA level, MLKL2 is expressed at much lower levels. We propose that it may have a regulatory role in controlling macrophage survival, either in the steady state or in response to specific stimuli. PMID:26704887

  3. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  4. Structure of the RNA 30-Phosphate Cyclase-Adenylate Intermediate Illuminates Nucleotide Specificity and Covalent Nucleotidyl Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Smith, P; Shuman, S

    2010-01-01

    RNA 3-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) synthesizes RNA 2,3 cyclic phosphate ends via three steps: reaction with ATP to form a covalent RtcA-AMP intermediate; transfer of adenylate to an RNA 3-phosphate to form RNA(3)pp(5)A; and attack of the vicinal O2 on the 3-phosphorus to form a 2,3 cyclic phosphate. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RtcA-AMP intermediate, which reveals the mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer. Adenylate is linked via a phosphoamide bond to the His309 N{var_epsilon} atom. A network of hydrogen bonds to the ribose O2 and O3 accounts for the stringent ribonucleotide preference. Adenine is sandwiched in a hydrophobic pocket between Tyr284 and Pro131 and the preference for adenine is enforced by Phe135, which packs against the purine C2 edge. Two sulfates bound near the adenylate plausibly mimic the 3-terminal and penultimate phosphates of RNA. The structure illuminates how the four {alpha}2/{beta}4 domains contribute to substrate binding and catalysis.

  5. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  6. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  7. High throughput synthetic lethality screen reveals a tumorigenic role of adenylate cyclase in fumarate hydratase-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethality is an appealing technique for selectively targeting cancer cells which have acquired molecular changes that distinguish them from normal cells. High-throughput RNAi-based screens have been successfully used to identify synthetic lethal pathways with well-characterized tumor suppressors and oncogenes. The recent identification of metabolic tumor suppressors suggests that the concept of synthetic lethality can be applied to selectively target cancer metabolism as well. Results Here, we perform a high-throughput RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal genes with fumarate hydratase (FH), a metabolic tumor suppressor whose loss-of-function has been associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC). Our unbiased screen identified synthetic lethality between FH and several genes in heme metabolism, in accordance with recent findings. Furthermore, we identified an enrichment of synthetic lethality with adenylate cyclases. The effects were validated in an embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T) and in HLRCC-patient derived cells (UOK262) via both genetic and pharmacological inhibition. The reliance on adenylate cyclases in FH-deficient cells is consistent with increased cyclic-AMP levels, which may act to regulate cellular energy metabolism. Conclusions The identified synthetic lethality of FH with adenylate cyclases suggests a new potential target for treating HLRCC patients. PMID:24568598

  8. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  9. Sargaquinoic acid promotes neurite outgrowth via protein kinase A and MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathways in PC12D cells.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yuto; Tsang, Chi Kwan

    2003-08-01

    We previously isolated a nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent neurite outgrowth promoting substance MC14 (sargaquinoic acid) from a marine brown alga, Sargassum macrocarpum. In the present study, the NGF-potentiating activity of MC14 to neural differentiation of PC12D cells was investigated in detail. The treatment of cells with 3 microg/ml MC14 in the presence of 1.25-100 ng/ml NGF markedly enhanced the proportion of neurite-bearing cells compared with the NGF-only controls. In addition, MC14 significantly elevated the NGF-induced specific acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in PC12D cells, suggesting that MC14 could morphologically and biochemically promote the differentiation of PC12D cells. The mechanism of action of MC14 was further investigated by pharmacological inhibition of several intracellular signaling molecules. Results indicated that the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14 was almost completely blocked by 10 microM PD98059, suggesting that a TrkA-dependent MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathway may play a crucial role in modulating the effect of MC14. Besides, the MC14-enhanced neurite outgrowth was substantially suppressed by the pretreatment with 10 ng/ml protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, demonstrating that the adenylate cyclase-PKA signaling cascade was also involved in the action of MC14. In contrast, a PKC inhibitor chelerythrine chloride did not inhibit the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MC14 enhances the neurite outgrowth by cooperating at least two separated signaling pathways, a TrkA-MAP kinases pathway and an adenylate cyclase-PKA pathway, in PC12D cells. PMID:12850058

  10. Exon Skipping in the RET Gene Encodes Novel Isoforms That Differentially Regulate RET Protein Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Gabreski, Nicole A; Vaghasia, Janki K; Novakova, Silvia S; McDonald, Neil Q; Pierchala, Brian A

    2016-07-29

    Rearranged during transfection (RET), a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs), plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system and additionally is required for kidney development and spermatogenesis. RET encodes a transmembrane receptor that is 20 exons long and produces two known protein isoforms differing in C-terminal amino acid composition, referred to as RET9 and RET51. Studies of human pheochromocytomas identified two additional novel transcripts involving the skipping of exon 3 or exons 3, 4, and 5 and are referred to as RET(Δ) (E3) and RET(Δ) (E345), respectively. Here we report the presence of Ret(Δ) (E3) and Ret(Δ) (E345) in zebrafish, mice, and rats and show that these transcripts are dynamically expressed throughout development of the CNS, peripheral nervous system, and kidneys. We further explore the biochemical properties of these isoforms, demonstrating that, like full-length RET, RET(ΔE3) and RET(ΔE345) are trafficked to the cell surface, interact with all four GFRα co-receptors, and have the ability to heterodimerize with full-length RET. Signaling experiments indicate that RET(ΔE3) is phosphorylated in a similar manner to full-length RET. RET(ΔE345), in contrast, displays higher baseline autophosphorylation, specifically on the catalytic tyrosine, Tyr(905), and also on one of the most important signaling residues, Tyr(1062) These data provide the first evidence for a physiologic role of these isoforms in RET pathway function. PMID:27226544

  11. Myosin VI small insert isoform maintains exocytosis by tethering secretory granules to the cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Vanesa M.; Papadopulos, Andreas; Malintan, Nancy T.; Martin, Sally; Wallis, Tristan; Gormal, Rachel S.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Before undergoing neuroexocytosis, secretory granules (SGs) are mobilized and tethered to the cortical actin network by an unknown mechanism. Using an SG pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, we found that myosin VI was recruited to SGs in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Interfering with myosin VI function in PC12 cells reduced the density of SGs near the plasma membrane without affecting their biogenesis. Myosin VI knockdown selectively impaired a late phase of exocytosis, consistent with a replenishment defect. This exocytic defect was selectively rescued by expression of the myosin VI small insert (SI) isoform, which efficiently tethered SGs to the cortical actin network. These myosin VI SI–specific effects were prevented by deletion of a c-Src kinase phosphorylation DYD motif, identified in silico. Myosin VI SI thus recruits SGs to the cortical actin network, potentially via c-Src phosphorylation, thereby maintaining an active pool of SGs near the plasma membrane. PMID:23382463

  12. Assembly of an Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Proteasome Isoform in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Achuth; Vuong, Simone Anh-Thu; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Summary Targeted intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes is largely mediated by the proteasome. Here we report formation of an alternative proteasome isoform in human cells, previously found only in budding yeast, which bears an altered subunit arrangement in the outer ring of the proteasome core particle. These proteasomes result from incorporation of an additional α4 (PSMA7) subunit in the position normally occupied by α3 (PSMA4). Assembly of ‘α4-α4’ proteasomes depends on the relative cellular levels of α4 and α3, and on the proteasome assembly chaperone PAC3. The oncogenic tyrosine kinases ABL and ARG and the tumor suppressor BRCA1 regulate cellular α4 levels and formation of α4-α4 proteasomes. Cells primed to assemble α4-α4 proteasomes exhibit enhanced resistance to toxic metal ions. Taken together, our results establish the existence of a novel mammalian proteasome isoform and suggest a potential role in enabling cells to adapt to environmental stresses. PMID:26997268

  13. Assembly of an Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Proteasome Isoform in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Achuth; Vuong, Simone Anh-Thu; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-03-29

    Targeted intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes is largely mediated by the proteasome. Here, we report the formation of an alternative proteasome isoform in human cells, previously found only in budding yeast, that bears an altered subunit arrangement in the outer ring of the proteasome core particle. These proteasomes result from incorporation of an additional α4 (PSMA7) subunit in the position normally occupied by α3 (PSMA4). Assembly of "α4-α4" proteasomes depends on the relative cellular levels of α4 and α3 and on the proteasome assembly chaperone PAC3. The oncogenic tyrosine kinases ABL and ARG and the tumor suppressor BRCA1 regulate cellular α4 levels and formation of α4-α4 proteasomes. Cells primed to assemble α4-α4 proteasomes exhibit enhanced resistance to toxic metal ions. Taken together, our results establish the existence of an alternative mammalian proteasome isoform and suggest a potential role in enabling cells to adapt to environmental stresses. PMID:26997268

  14. Phosphodiesterase Isoform Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Fluid Secretion in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele S; Raman, Archana; Reif, Gail A; Magenheimer, Brenda S; White, Corey; Calvet, James P; Wallace, Darren P

    2016-04-01

    cAMP stimulates cell proliferation and Cl(-)-dependent fluid secretion, promoting the progressive enlargement of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Intracellular cAMP levels are determined by the balance of cAMP synthesis by adenylyl cyclases and degradation by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Therefore, PDE isoform expression and activity strongly influence global and compartmentalized cAMP levels. We report here that PDE3 and PDE4 expression levels are lower in human ADPKD tissue and cells compared with those of normal human kidneys (NHKs), whereas PDE1 levels are not significantly different. Inhibition of PDE4 caused a greater increase in basal and vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated cAMP levels and Cl(-) secretion by ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE1, and inhibition of PDE4 induced cyst-like dilations in cultured mouse Pkd1(-/-) embryonic kidneys. In contrast, inhibition of PDE1 caused greater stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and proliferation of ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE4, and inhibition of PDE1 enhanced AVP-induced ERK activation. Notably, inhibition of PDE1, the only family of Ca(2+)-regulated PDEs, also induced a mitogenic response to AVP in NHK cells, similar to the effect of restricting intracellular Ca(2+). PDE1 coimmunoprecipitated with B-Raf and A-kinase anchoring protein 79, and AVP increased this interaction in ADPKD but not NHK cells. These data suggest that whereas PDE4 is the major PDE isoform involved in the regulation of global intracellular cAMP and Cl(-) secretion, PDE1 specifically affects the cAMP signal to the B-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway and regulates AVP-induced proliferation of ADPKD cells. PMID:26289612

  15. Differential function and regulation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3 isoforms in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Cui, Pengfei; Zhao, Shengqiang; Ye, Taiyang; Li, Yan; Peng, Jin; Niu, Gengming; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    TR3 has been reported to be an excellent target for angiogenesis therapies. We reported three TR3 transcript variant messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and are differentially regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). TR3 transcript variant 1 (TR3-TV1) and variant 2 (TR3-TV2) encoding the same TR3 isoform 1 protein (TR3-iso1) that was named TR3 has been extensively studied. However, the function of TR3 isoform 2 protein (TR3-iso2) encoded by TR3 transcript variant 3 (TR3-TV3) is still not known. Here, we clone and express the novel TR3-iso2 protein and find that expression of TR3-iso2, in contrast to TR3-iso1, inhibits en-dothelial cell proliferation induced by VEGF-A, histamine, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The differential function of TR3-iso2 correlates with the down-regulation of cyclin D1. However, TR3-iso2 plays similar roles in endothelial cell migration and monolayer permeability as TR3-iso1. We further demonstrate that several intracellular signaling pathways are involved in histamine-induced TR3 transcript variants, including histamine receptor H1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)/calcium/calcineurin/protein kinase C (PKC)/ protein kinase D (PKD) pathway and ERK pathway, as well as histamine receptor H3-mediated PKC-ERK pathway. Further, expressions of TR3-TV1, TR3-TV2, and TR3-TV3 by VEGF and histamine are regulated by different promoters, but not by their mRNA stability. PMID:26440050

  16. Inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells of cockroach reduces nicotine- and clothianidin-induced currents.

    PubMed

    List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Taillebois, Emiliane; Juchaux, Marjorie; Heuland, Emilie; Thany, Steeve H

    2014-08-01

    Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), which transduces the signal into downstream effects. We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms, and only PaCaMKII-E isoform is specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. In the present study, using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that PaCaMKII-E isoform inhibition reduced nicotine-induced currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. Specifically, PaCaMKII-E isoform is sufficient to repress nicotinic current amplitudes as a result of its depression by antisense oligonucleotides. Similar results were found using the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin, which acted as a full agonist of dorsal unpaired median neuron nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Clothianidin current amplitudes are strongly reduced under bath application of PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides but no significant results are found with α-bungarotoxin co-applied, demonstrating that CaMKII-E isoform affects nicotine currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive receptor subtypes whereas clothianidin currents are reduced via α-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptors. In addition, we found that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin were reduced by PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides, demonstrating that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin are affected by PaCaMKII-E inhibition. Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms and only PaCaMKII-E isoform was specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. Here we show that specific inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform is

  17. Diacylglycerol Kinases in the Coordination of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwon; Kim, Eunjoon; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is activity-dependent modification of the efficacy of synaptic transmission. Although, detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are diverse and vary at different types of synapses, diacylglycerol (DAG)-associated signaling has been considered as an important regulator of many forms of synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Recent evidences indicate that DAG kinases (DGKs), which phosphorylate DAG to phosphatidic acid to terminate DAG signaling, are important regulators of LTP and LTD, as supported by the results from mice lacking specific DGK isoforms. This review will summarize these studies and discuss how specific DGK isoforms distinctly regulate different forms of synaptic plasticity at pre- and postsynaptic sites. In addition, we propose a general role of DGKs as coordinators of synaptic plasticity that make local synaptic environments more permissive for synaptic plasticity by regulating DAG concentration and interacting with other synaptic proteins.

  18. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10766.001 PMID:26650353

  19. Characterization of the thermoregulatory response to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in rodents.

    PubMed

    Banki, Eszter; Pakai, Eszter; Gaszner, Balazs; Zsiboras, Csaba; Czett, Andras; Bhuddi, Paras Rahul Parkash; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Toth, Gabor; Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Garami, Andras

    2014-11-01

    Administration of the long form (38 amino acids) of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) into the central nervous system causes hyperthermia, suggesting that PACAP38 plays a role in the regulation of deep body temperature (T b). In this study, we investigated the thermoregulatory role of PACAP38 in details. First, we infused PACAP38 intracerebroventricularly to rats and measured their T b and autonomic thermoeffector responses. We found that central PACAP38 infusion caused dose-dependent hyperthermia, which was brought about by increased thermogenesis and tail skin vasoconstriction. Compared to intracerebroventricular administration, systemic (intravenous) infusion of the same dose of PACAP38 caused significantly smaller hyperthermia, indicating a central site of action. We then investigated the thermoregulatory phenotype of mice lacking the Pacap gene (Pacap (-/-)). Freely moving Pacap (-/-) mice had higher locomotor activity throughout the day and elevated deep T b during the light phase. When the Pacap (-/-) mice were loosely restrained, their metabolic rate and T b were lower compared to their wild-type littermates. We conclude that PACAP38 causes hyperthermia via activation of the autonomic cold-defense thermoeffectors through central targets. Pacap (-/-) mice express hyperkinesis, which is presumably a compensatory mechanism, because under restrained conditions, these mice are hypometabolic and hypothermic compared to controls. PMID:24994541

  20. A Conserved Glutamate Controls the Commitment to Acyl-adenylate Formation in Asparagine Synthetase†

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Megan E.; Gutierrez, Jemy A.; Raushel, Frank M.; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor docking studies have implicated a conserved glutamate residue (Glu-348) as a general base in the synthetase active site of the enzyme asparagine synthetase B from Escherichia coli (AS-B). We now report steady-state kinetic, isotope transfer and positional isotope exchange experiments for a series of site-directed AS-B mutants in which Glu-348 is substituted by conservative amino acid replacements. We find that formation of the β-aspartyl-AMP intermediate, and therefore the eventual production of asparagine, is dependent on the presence of a carboxylate side chain at this position in the synthetase active site. In addition, Glu-348 may also play a role in mediating the conformational changes needed to (i) coordinate, albeit weakly, the glutaminase and synthetase activities of the enzyme, and (ii) establish the structural integrity of the intramolecular tunnel along which ammonia is translocated. The importance of Glu-348 in mediating acyl-adenylate formation contrasts with the functional role of the cognate residues in β-lactam synthetase (BLS) and carbapenam synthetase (CPS) (Tyr-348 and Tyr-345, respectively), which both likely evolved from asparagine synthetase. Given the similarity of the chemistry catalyzed by AS-B, BLS and CPS, our work highlights the difficulty of predicting the functional outcome of single site mutations on enzymes that catalyze almost identical chemical transformations. PMID:20853825

  1. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-11-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine.

  2. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase.

    PubMed

    Guard, Jean; Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  3. Adenylate cyclase 3: a new target for anti-obesity drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Shen, C; Seed Ahmed, M; Östenson, C-G; Gu, H F

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become epidemic worldwide, and abdominal obesity has a negative impact on health. Current treatment options on obesity, however, still remain limited. It is then of importance to find a new target for anti-obesity drug development based upon recent molecular studies in obesity. Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is the third member of adenylyl cyclase family and catalyses the synthesis of cAMP from ATP. Genetic studies with candidate gene and genome-wide association study approaches have demonstrated that ADCY3 genetic polymorphisms are associated with obesity in European and Chinese populations. Epigenetic studies have indicated that increased DNA methylation levels in the ADCY3 gene are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Furthermore, biological analyses with animal models have implicated that ADCY3 dysfunction resulted in increased body weight and fat mass, while reduction of body weight is partially explained by ADCY3 activation. In this review, we describe genomic and biological features of ADCY3, summarize genetic and epigenetic association studies of the ADCY3 gene with obesity and discuss dysfunction and activation of ADCY3. Based upon all data, we suggest that ADCY3 is a new target for anti-obesity drug development. Further investigation on the effectiveness of ADCY3 activator and its delivery approach to treat abdominal obesity has been taken into our consideration. PMID:27256589

  4. Homology modeling and molecular docking of human pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide I receptor

    PubMed Central

    WU, LUSHENG; GUANG, WENHUA; CHEN, XIAOJIA; HONG, AN

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide I receptor (PAC1R) is member of the B class of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors, with molecular functions associated with neural cell differentiation, regeneration and the inhibition of apoptosis. However, the integrity of the protein structure is difficult to be determined in vitro. In the present study, the physicochemical properties of PAC1R were analyzed, the extracellular, transmembrane and intracellular regions were constructed and a three-dimensional structure model of PAC1R was produced using extracellular loop region optimization and the energy minimization homology modeling method. Preliminary studies on the PAC1R protein and ligand interactions used a molecular docking method. The results indicated that the interaction sites of PAC1R were at Ile63, Ser100 and Gln105. These were the sites where the PAC1R combined with a hydrazide small molecule inhibitor. This study provides a theoretical basis for further studies on the model for the development of PAC1R target drugs. PMID:25069645

  5. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. PMID:26650353

  6. The adenylate energy charge as a new and useful indicator of capture stress in chondrichthyans.

    PubMed

    Guida, Leonardo; Walker, Terence I; Reina, Richard D

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying the physiological stress response of chondrichthyans to capture has assisted the development of fishing practices conducive to their survival. However, currently used indicators of stress show significant interspecific and intraspecific variation in species' physiological responses and tolerances to capture. To improve our understanding of chondrichthyan stress physiology and potentially reduce variation when quantifying the stress response, we investigated the use of the adenylate energy charge (AEC); a measure of available metabolic energy. To determine tissues sensitive to metabolic stress, we extracted samples of the brain, heart, liver, white muscle and blood from gummy sharks (Mustelus antarcticus) immediately following gillnet capture and after 3 h recovery under laboratory conditions. Capture caused significant declines in liver, white muscle and blood AEC, whereas no decline was detected in the heart and brain AEC. Following 3 h of recovery from capture, the AEC of the liver and blood returned to "unstressed" levels (control values) whereas white muscle AEC was not significantly different to that immediately after capture. Our results show that the liver is most sensitive to metabolic stress and white muscle offers a practical method to sample animals non-lethally for determination of the AEC. The AEC is a highly informative indicator of stress and unlike current indicators, it can directly measure the change in available energy and thus the metabolic stress experienced by a given tissue. Cellular metabolism is highly conserved across organisms and, therefore, we think the AEC can also provide a standardised form of measuring capture stress in many chondrichthyan species. PMID:26660290

  7. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  8. The Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX) Domain Is Immunodominant and Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianzhe; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is a multifunctional virulence factor secreted by Bordetella species. Upon interaction of its C-terminal hemolysin moiety with the cell surface receptor αMβ2 integrin, the N-terminal cyclase domain translocates into the host cell cytosol where it rapidly generates supraphysiological cAMP concentrations, which inhibit host cell anti-bacterial activities. Although ACT has been shown to induce protective immunity in mice, it is not included in any current acellular pertussis vaccines due to protein stability issues and a poor understanding of its role as a protective antigen. Here, we aimed to determine whether any single domain could recapitulate the antibody responses induced by the holo-toxin and to characterize the dominant neutralizing antibody response. We first immunized mice with ACT and screened antibody phage display libraries for binding to purified ACT. The vast majority of unique antibodies identified bound the C-terminal repeat-in-toxin (RTX) domain. Representative antibodies binding two nonoverlapping, neutralizing epitopes in the RTX domain prevented ACT association with J774A.1 macrophages and soluble αMβ2 integrin, suggesting that these antibodies inhibit the ACT-receptor interaction. Sera from mice immunized with the RTX domain showed similar neutralizing activity as ACT-immunized mice, indicating that this domain induced an antibody response similar to that induced by ACT. These data demonstrate that RTX can elicit neutralizing antibodies and suggest it may present an alternative to ACT. PMID:25505186

  9. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tlili, Mounira; Rouatbi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Vaudry, David; Wurtz, Olivier; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h) for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM) for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC) and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α) in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders. PMID:26199679

  10. Effects of Temperature on Infected Cell O2 Concentration and Adenylate Levels in Attached Soybean Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, M. M.; Topunov, A. F.; Layzell, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the role of O2 in the regulation of nodule metabolism following a decrease or an increase in temperature, the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin (FOL) was measured in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules during rapid and gradual changes in temperature from 20[deg]C to either 15 or 25[deg]C. The affinity of leghemoglobin for O2 was also measured at each temperature and the values were used to calculate the infected cell O2 concentration (Oi). After nodules were transferred to 15[deg]C, FOL and Oi increased and adenylate energy charge (AEC = [ATP + 0.5ADP]/[ATP + ADP + AMP]) increased from 0.70 to 0.78. The temperature increase was associated with a decrease in FOL and Oi. We concluded that changes in nodule temperature alter the respiratory demand of the nodules for O2, resulting in a change in Oi and a shift in the balance between ATP consumption and ATP production within the nodule tissue. PMID:12228427

  11. Posttraumatic administration of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in central fluid percussion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kövesdi, Erzsébet; Tamás, Andrea; Reglodi, Dóra; Farkas, Orsolya; Pál, József; Tóth, Gábor; Bukovics, Péter; Dóczi, Tamás; Büki, András

    2008-04-01

    Several in vitro and in vivo experiments have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) in focal cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of PACAP administration on diffuse axonal injury (DAI), an important contributor to morbidity and mortality associated with TBI, in a central fluid percussion (CFP) model of TBI. Rats were subjected to moderate (2 Atm) CFP injury. Thirty min after injury, 100 microg PACAP was administered intracerebroventricularly. DAI was assessed by immunohistochemical detection of beta-amyloid precursor protein, indicating impaired axoplasmic transport, and RMO-14 antibody, representing foci of cytoskeletal alterations (neurofilament compaction), both considered classical markers of axonal damage. Analysis of damaged, immunoreactive axonal profiles revealed significant axonal protection in the PACAP-treated versus vehicle-treated animals in the corticospinal tract, as far as traumatically induced disturbance of axoplasmic transport and cytoskeletal alteration were considered. Similarly to our former observations in an impact acceleration model of diffuse TBI, the present study demonstrated that PACAP also inhibits DAI in the CFP injury model. The finding indicates that PACAP and derivates can be considered potential candidates for further experimental studies, or purportedly for clinical trials in the therapy of TBI. PMID:18515209

  12. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  13. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed. PMID:26573433

  14. Neutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor antiangiogenic isoforms or administration of proangiogenic isoforms stimulates vascular development in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Baltes-Breitwisch, Michelle M; Artac, Robin A; Bott, Rebecca C; McFee, Renee M; Kerl, Jill G; Clopton, Debra T; Cupp, Andrea S

    2010-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) plays a role in both angiogenesis and seminiferous cord formation, and alternative splicing of the Vegfa gene produces both proangiogenic isoforms and antiangiogenic isoforms (B-isoforms). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the expression of pro- and antiangiogenic isoforms during testis development and to determine the role of VEGFA isoforms in testis morphogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR determined that Vegfa_165b mRNA was most abundant between embryonic days 13.5 and 16 (E13.5 and 16; P<0.05). Compared with ovarian mRNA levels, Vegfa_120 was more abundant at E13-14 (P<0.05), Vegfa_164 was less abundant at E13 (P<0.05), and Vegfa_165b tended to be less abundant at E13 (P<0.09) in testes. Immunohistochemical staining localized antiangiogenic isoforms to subsets of germ cells at E14-16, and western blot analysis revealed similar protein levels for VEGFA_165B, VEGFA_189B, and VEGFA_206B at this time point. Treatment of E13 organ culture testes with VEGFA_120, VEGFA_164, and an antibody to antiangiogenic isoforms (anti-VEGFAxxxB) resulted in less organized and defined seminiferous cords compared with paired controls. In addition, 50 ng/ml VEGFA_120 and VEGFA_164 treatments increased vascular density in cultured testes by 60 and 48% respectively, and treatment with VEGFAxxxB antibody increased vascular density by 76% in testes (0.5 ng/ml) and 81% in ovaries (5 ng/ml) compared with controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, both pro- and antiangiogenic VEGFA isoforms are involved in the development of vasculature and seminiferous cords in rat testes, and differential expression of these isoforms may be important for normal gonadal development. PMID:20457593

  15. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  16. EASI--enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This directly purifies the single-stranded regions of heteroduplexes between alternative splices formed in the PCR, enabling direct sequencing of all the rare alternative splice forms of any gene. As a proof of principle the alternative transcripts of three tumour suppressor genes, TP53, MLH1 and MSH2, were isolated from testis cDNA. These contain missing exons, cryptic splice sites or include completely novel exons. EASI beads are stable for months in the fridge and can be easily combined with standard protocols to speed the cloning of novel transcripts. PMID:16951290

  17. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF PROTEIN KINASE B ACTIVATION IS ISOFORM SPECIFIC IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial activation of the insulin signaling pathway that leads to translation initiation is enhanced in skeletal muscle of the neonate and decreases with development in parallel with the developmental decline in muscle protein synthesis. Our previous study showed that the activity of protei...

  18. ALTERATIONS IN BRAIN PROTEIN KINASE C ISOFORMS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    PCBs have been shown to alter several neurochemical end-points and are implicated in the etiology of some neurological diseases. Recent in vivo studies from our laboratory indicated that developmental exposure to a commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254, caused perturbations in cal...

  19. SELECTIVE CHANGES IN BRAIN PROTEIN KINASE C ISOFORMS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO A PCB MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction
    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) offer a unique model to understand the major issues related to complex environmental mixtures. These environmental pollutants are ubiquitous, persistent, bioaccumulate in human body through the food chain, and exist as mixtures of ...

  20. High-throughput, cell-free, liposome-based approach for assessing in vitro activity of lipid kinases.

    PubMed

    Demian, Douglas J; Clugston, Susan L; Foster, Meta M; Rameh, Lucia; Sarkes, Deborah; Townson, Sharon A; Yang, Lily; Zhang, Melvin; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-08-01

    Lipid kinases are central players in lipid signaling pathways involved in inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metabolic syndrome. A number of these kinase targets have proven difficult to investigate in higher throughput cell-free assay systems. This challenge is partially due to specific substrate interaction requirements for several of the lipid kinase family members and the resulting incompatibility of these substrates with most established, homogeneous assay formats. Traditional, cell-free in vitro investigational methods for members of the lipid kinase family typically involve substrate incorporation of [gamma-32P] and resolution of signal by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and autoradiograph densitometry. This approach, although highly sensitive, does not lend itself to high-throughput testing of large numbers of small molecules (100 s to 1 MM+). The authors present the development and implementation of a fully synthetic, liposome-based assay for assessing in vitro activity of phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate-4-kinase isoforms (PIP4KIIbeta and alpha) in 2 commonly used homogeneous technologies. They have validated these assays through compound testing in both traditional TLC and radioactive filterplate approaches as well as binding validation using isothermic calorimetry. A directed library representing known kinase pharmacophores was screened against type IIbeta phosphatidylinositol-phosphate kinase (PIPK) to identify small-molecule inhibitors. This assay system can be applied to other types and isoforms of PIPKs as well as a variety of other lipid kinase targets. PMID:19641220

  1. p53 Isoforms: Key Regulators of the Cell Fate Decision.

    PubMed

    Joruiz, Sebastien M; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    It is poorly understood how a single protein, p53, can be responsive to so many stress signals and orchestrates very diverse cell responses to maintain/restore cell/tissue functions. The uncovering that TP53 gene physiologically expresses, in a tissue-dependent manner, several p53 splice variants (isoforms) provides an explanation to its pleiotropic biological activities. Here, we summarize a decade of research on p53 isoforms. The clinical studies and the diverse cellular and animal models of p53 isoforms (zebrafish, Drosophila, and mouse) lead us to realize that a p53-mediated cell response is, in fact, the sum of the intrinsic activities of the coexpressed p53 isoforms and that unbalancing expression of different p53 isoforms leads to cancer, premature aging, (neuro)degenerative diseases, inflammation, embryo malformations, or defects in tissue regeneration. Cracking the p53 isoforms' code is, thus, a necessary step to improve cancer treatment. It also opens new exciting perspectives in tissue regeneration. PMID:26801896

  2. Frac-seq reveals isoform-specific recruitment to polyribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Martinez-Nunez, Rocio Teresa; Howard, Jonathan M.; Cvitovik, Ivan; Katzman, Sol; Tariq, Muhammad A.; Pourmand, Nader; Sanford, Jeremy R.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is required for the accurate expression of virtually all human protein coding genes. However, splicing also plays important roles in coordinating subsequent steps of pre-mRNA processing such as polyadenylation and mRNA export. Here, we test the hypothesis that nuclear pre-mRNA processing influences the polyribosome association of alternative mRNA isoforms. By comparing isoform ratios in cytoplasmic and polyribosomal extracts, we determined that the alternative products of ∼30% (597/1954) of mRNA processing events are differentially partitioned between these subcellular fractions. Many of the events exhibiting isoform-specific polyribosome association are highly conserved across mammalian genomes, underscoring their possible biological importance. We find that differences in polyribosome association may be explained, at least in part by the observation that alternative splicing alters the cis-regulatory landscape of mRNAs isoforms. For example, inclusion or exclusion of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′UTR as well as Alu-elements and microRNA target sites in the 3′UTR have a strong influence on polyribosome association of alternative mRNA isoforms. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time the potential link between alternative splicing and translational control of the resultant mRNA isoforms. PMID:23783272

  3. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  4. Isoform dependent regulation of human HCN channels by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has been shown to regulate numerous ion channels. HCN channels represent the molecular correlate of If or Ih in sinoatrial node (SAN) and neuronal cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for cholesterol in the regulation of rabbit HCN4 channels with effects on pacing in the rabbit SAN. Using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we examined the effect of cholesterol modulation on human HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms. Patch-clamp experiments uncovered isoform specific differences in the effect of cholesterol on gating kinetics upon depletion by MβCD or mevastatin or enrichment using MβCD/cholesterol. Most dramatically cholesterol had isoform specific effects on mode-shifting, which has been suggested to play a key role in stabilizing firing rate and preventing arrhythmic firing in SAN cells and neurons. Mode-shifting in HCN1 channels was insensitive to cholesterol manipulation, while HCN2 and HCN4 were strongly affected. Trafficking of each isoform to the plasma membrane was also affected by cholesterol modulation differentially between isoforms, however, each isoform remained localized in lipid raft domains after cholesterol depletion. These effects may contribute to the side effects of cholesterol reducing therapies including disrupted heart rhythm and neuropathic pain, as well as the susceptibility of sinus dysfunction in patients with elevated cholesterol. PMID:26404789

  5. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  6. Dopamine inhibition of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase is mediated through the high-affinity state of the D/sub 2/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Borgundvaag, B.; George, S.R.

    1985-07-29

    The diterpinoid forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (/sup 3/H)-ATP to (/sup 3/H)-cAMP) in anterior pituitary from male and female rats. Inhibition of stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by potent dopaminergic agonists was demonstrable only in female anterior pituitary. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity displayed a typically dopaminergic rank order of agonist potencies and could be completely reversed by a specific dopamine receptor antagonist. The IC/sub 50/ values of dopamine agonist inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity correlated with equal molarity with the dissociation constant of the high-affinity dopamine agonist-detected receptor binding site and with the IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition of prolactin secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the high-affinity form of the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor in anterior pituitary which is responsible for mediating the dopaminergic function of attenuating adenylate cyclase activity. 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  7. KEA: kinase enrichment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Alexander; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Multivariate experiments applied to mammalian cells often produce lists of proteins/genes altered under treatment versus control conditions. Such lists can be projected onto prior knowledge of kinase–substrate interactions to infer the list of kinases associated with a specific protein list. By computing how the proportion of kinases, associated with a specific list of proteins/genes, deviates from an expected distribution, we can rank kinases and kinase families based on the likelihood that these kinases are functionally associated with regulating the cell under specific experimental conditions. Such analysis can assist in producing hypotheses that can explain how the kinome is involved in the maintenance of different cellular states and can be manipulated to modulate cells towards a desired phenotype. Summary: Kinase enrichment analysis (KEA) is a web-based tool with an underlying database providing users with the ability to link lists of mammalian proteins/genes with the kinases that phosphorylate them. The system draws from several available kinase–substrate databases to compute kinase enrichment probability based on the distribution of kinase–substrate proportions in the background kinase–substrate database compared with kinases found to be associated with an input list of genes/proteins. Availability: The KEA system is freely available at http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/lib/kea.jsp Contact: avi.maayan@mssm.edu PMID:19176546

  8. Selective synthesis of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase isoform 2 and identification of specifically phosphorylated serine residues.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R C; Braun, P E

    2000-02-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is a protein found abundantly in the cytoplasmic compartments of CNS myelin. Two isoforms of this protein, CNP1 and CNP2, are detectable. They differ by a 20-amino acid extension exclusive to CNP2. Additionally, CNP2 is essentially the only isoform to be phosphorylated in vivo. In this study, we examine the phosphorylation of CNP2 in transfected cells. CNP2 was selectively expressed ectopically in 293T cells and labeled with 32P. Immunoprecipitation of labeled CNP2 and tryptic phosphopeptide mapping analyses identified serines 9 and 22 as the major sites of phosphorylation. Only serine 22 was phosphorylated initially in oligodendrocyte-enriched cultures of neonatal rat brain glial cells. However, 4beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) induced the phosphorylation of serine 9, thereby producing the same pattern seen in 293T cells. These results suggest that serine 9 is phosphorylated by a PDB-sensitive kinase, likely protein kinase C, and that serine 22 appears to be constitutively phosphorylated. PMID:10646504

  9. Multiple isoform recovery (MIR)-PCR: a simple method for the isolation of related mRNA isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, A; Gabbiani, G; Pascolini, R; Neuville, P

    1998-01-01

    We present a rapid and efficient method for the detection of related transcripts with different expression levels. This approach combines the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method with a cDNA subtractive technique. The strategy is based on successive subtractions of prevalent isoforms resulting in enrichment of less expressed transcripts. For each subtraction, a biotinylated primer specific for the prevalent isoform is hybridized on the total cDNA and the hybrid is retained on a streptavidin affinity column. The unbound cDNA serves as a template for subsequent isoform identification. To illustrate its application we describe the isolation of three new actin cDNA isoforms in the freshwater planarian Dugesia (S) polychroa. PMID:9518500

  10. Alignment-Free Methods for the Detection and Specificity Prediction of Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin; Pérez-Machado, Gisselle; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Santos, Miguel Machado; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    Identifying adenylation domains (A-domains) and their substrate specificity can aid the detection of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) at genome/proteome level and allow inferring the structure of oligopeptides with relevant biological activities. However, that is challenging task due to the high sequence diversity of A-domains (~10-40 % of amino acid identity) and their selectivity for 50 different natural/unnatural amino acids. Altogether these characteristics make their detection and the prediction of their substrate specificity a real challenge when using traditional sequence alignment methods, e.g., BLAST searches. In this chapter we describe two workflows based on alignment-free methods intended for the identification and substrate specificity prediction of A-domains. To identify A-domains we introduce a graphical-numerical method, implemented in TI2BioP version 2.0 (topological indices to biopolymers), which in a first step uses protein four-color maps to represent A-domains. In a second step, simple topological indices (TIs), called spectral moments, are derived from the graphical representations of known A-domains (positive dataset) and of unrelated but well-characterized sequences (negative set). Spectral moments are then used as input predictors for statistical classification techniques to build alignment-free models. Finally, the resulting alignment-free models can be used to explore entire proteomes for unannotated A-domains. In addition, this graphical-numerical methodology works as a sequence-search method that can be ensemble with homology-based tools to deeply explore the A-domain signature and cope with the diversity of this class (Aguero-Chapin et al., PLoS One 8(7):e65926, 2013). The second workflow for the prediction of A-domain's substrate specificity is based on alignment-free models constructed by transductive support vector machines (TSVMs) that incorporate information of uncharacterized A-domains. The construction of the models was

  11. Apoptosis induced by a HIPK2 full-length-specific siRNA is due to off-target effects rather than prevalence of HIPK2-Δe8 isoform.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Verdina, Alessandra; Gatti, Veronica; Virdia, Ilaria; Toietta, Gabriele; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-01-12

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are widely used to study gene function and extensively exploited for their potential therapeutic applications. HIPK2 is an evolutionary conserved kinase that binds and phosphorylates several proteins directly or indirectly related to apoptosis. Recently, an alternatively spliced isoform skipping 81 nucleotides of exon 8 (Hipk2-Δe8) has been described. Selective depletion of Hipk2 full-length (Hipk2-FL) with a specific siRNA that spares the Hipk2-Δe8 isoform has been shown to strongly induce apoptosis, suggesting an unpredicted dominant-negative effect of Hipk2-FL over the Δe8 isoform. From this observation, we sought to take advantage and assessed the therapeutic potential of generating Hipk2 isoform unbalance in tumor-initiating cells derived from colorectal cancer patients. Strong reduction of cell viability was induced in vitro and in vivo by the originally described exon 8-specific siRNA, supporting a potential therapeutic application. However, validation analyses performed with additional exon8-specific siRNAs with different stabilities showed that all exon8-targeting siRNAs can induce comparable Hipk2 isoform unbalance but only the originally reported e8-siRNA promotes cell death. These data show that loss of viability does not depend on the prevalence of Hipk2-Δe8 isoform but it is rather due to microRNA-like off-target effects. PMID:26625198

  12. Mechanisms of Transient Signaling via Short and Long Prolactin Receptor Isoforms in Female and Male Sensory Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Belugin, Sergei; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Patil, Mayur J.; Ginsburg, Erika; Henry, Michael A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) regulates activity of nociceptors and causes hyperalgesia in pain conditions. PRL enhances nociceptive responses by rapidly modulating channels in nociceptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying PRL-induced transient signaling in neurons are not well understood. Here we use a variety of cell biology and pharmacological approaches to show that PRL transiently enhanced capsaicin-evoked responses involve protein kinase C ϵ (PKCϵ) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in female rat trigeminal (TG) neurons. We next reconstituted PRL-induced signaling in a heterologous expression system and TG neurons from PRL receptor (PRLR)-null mutant mice by expressing rat PRLR-long isoform (PRLR-L), PRLR-short isoform (PRLR-S), or a mix of both. Results show that PRLR-S, but not PRLR-L, is capable of mediating PRL-induced transient enhancement of capsaicin responses in both male and female TG neurons. However, co-expression of PRLR-L with PRLR-S (1:1 ratio) leads to the inhibition of the transient PRL actions. Co-expression of PRLR-L deletion mutants with PRLR-S indicated that the cytoplasmic site adjacent to the trans-membrane domain of PRLR-L was responsible for inhibitory effects of PRLR-L. Furthermore, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data indicate that in normal conditions, PRLR-L is expressed mainly in glia with little expression in rat sensory neurons (3–5%) and human nerves. The predominant PRLR form in TG neurons/nerves from rats and humans is PRLR-S. Altogether, PRL-induced transient signaling in sensory neurons is governed by PI3K or PKCϵ, mediated via the PRLR-S isoform, and transient effects mediated by PRLR-S are inhibited by presence of PRLR-L in these cells. PMID:24142695

  13. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  14. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  15. Region-Specific Disruption of Adenylate Cyclase Type 1 Gene Differentially Affects Somatosensorimotor Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase type I (AC1) is primarily, and, abundantly, expressed in the brain. Intracellular calcium/ calmodulin increases regulate AC1 in an activity-dependent manner. Upon stimulation, AC1 produces cAMP and it is involved in the patterning and the refinement of neural circuits. In mice, spontaneous mutations or targeted deletion of the Adcy1 gene, which encodes AC1, resulted in neuronal pattern formation defects. Neural modules in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex, the barrels, which represent the topographic distribution of the whiskers on the snout, failed to form (Welker et al., 1996; Abdel-Majid et al., 1998). Cortex- or thalamus-specific Adcy1 deletions led to different cortical pattern phenotypes, with thalamus-specific disruption phenotype being more severe (Iwasato et al., 2008; Suzuki et al., 2013). Despite the absence of barrels in the “barrelless”/Adcy1 null mice, thalamocortical terminal bouton density and activation of cortical zones following whisker stimulation were roughly topographic (Abdel-Majid et al., 1998; Gheorghita et al., 2006). To what extent does patterning of the cortical somatosensory body map play a role in sensorimotor behaviors? In this study, we tested mice with global, cortical, or thalamic loss of AC1 function in a battery of sensorimotor and social behavior tests and compared them to mice with all of the whiskers clipped. Contrary to intuitive expectations that any region-specific or global disruption of the AC1 function would lead to similar behavioral phenotypes, we found significant differences in the degree of impairment between these strains. PMID:26023682

  16. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew M; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E; Frenkel, Mogen M; Reilly, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  17. Hemodynamic actions of systemically injected pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to characterize the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP-27 0.1-2.0 nmol/kg, i.v.) in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and (2) to determine the roles of the autonomic nervous system, adrenal catecholamines and endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of PACAP-27-mediated effects on hemodynamic function. PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial blood pressure and hindquarter and mesenteric vascular resistances in saline-treated rats. PACAP-27 also produced pronounced falls in mean arterial blood pressure in rats treated with the ganglion blocker, chlorisondamine (5 mg/kg, i.v.). The hypotensive and vasodilator actions of PACAP-27 were not attenuated by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.), or the NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 50 micromol/kg, i.v.). PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate whereas the hypotensive response produced by the nitrovasodilator, sodium nitroprusside (10 microg/kg, i.v.), was associated with a minimal tachycardia. The PACAP-27-induced tachycardia was unaffected by chlorisondamine, but was virtually abolished by propranolol. These results suggest that the vasodilator effects of PACAP-27 are due to actions in the microcirculation rather than to the release of adrenal catecholamines and that this vasodilation may not involve the release of endothelium-derived NO. These results also suggest that PACAP-27 produces tachycardia by directly releasing norepinephrine from cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals rather than by direct or baroreceptor reflex-mediated increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  18. Reconstitution of beta-adrenergic receptor with components of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Hekman, M; Feder, D; Keenan, A K; Gal, A; Klein, H W; Pfeuffer, T; Levitzki, A; Helmreich, E J

    1984-01-01

    Beta 1-Adrenergic receptor proteins were extracted from turkey erythrocyte membranes with lauroyl sucrose and digitonin and purified by affinity chromatography on a column of alprenolol agarose Affi-gel 10 or 15. The 5000-fold purified receptor is able to couple functionally with the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GS) from either turkey or duck erythrocytes. Functional coupling was achieved by three different approaches. (i) Purified beta-receptor polypeptides were coupled in phospholipid (asolectin) vesicles with GS from a crude cholate or lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes. The detergent was removed and vesicles were formed with SM-2 beads. (ii) Purified beta-receptor was reconstituted with pure, homogeneous GS in asolectin vesicles. (iii) Purified beta-receptors were either coupled in asolectin vesicles with a mixture of pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS and a lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes, or with pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS alone. The decay of activity was measured on addition of GTP and hormone. In (ii) and (iii), the detergent was removed and vesicles were formed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 columns. In each of the three different experimental conditions, the beta-receptor was activated with l-isoproterenol and activation was blocked with d,l-propranolol. Activated GS were measured separately by means of their capacity to activate a crude Lubrol PX-solubilized adenylate cyclase preparation from rabbit myocardial membrane. The kinetics of GS activation by purified beta-receptors occupied by l-isoproterenol was first order and activation was linearly dependent on receptor concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:6098472

  19. Quantification of the Adenylate Cyclase Toxin of Bordetella pertussis In Vitro and during Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Joshua C.; Gray, Mary C.; Warfel, Jason M.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Jones, Tara F.; Day, Shandra R.; Bowden, James; Poulter, Melinda D.; Donato, Gina M.; Merkel, Tod J.

    2013-01-01

    Whooping cough results from infection of the respiratory tract with Bordetella pertussis, and the secreted adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is essential for the bacterium to establish infection. Despite extensive study of the mechanism of ACT cytotoxicity and its effects over a range of concentrations in vitro, ACT has not been observed or quantified in vivo, and thus the concentration of ACT at the site of infection is unknown. The recently developed baboon model of infection mimics the prolonged cough and transmissibility of pertussis, and we hypothesized that measurement of ACT in nasopharyngeal washes (NPW) from baboons, combined with human and in vitro data, would provide an estimate of the ACT concentration in the airway during infection. NPW contained up to ∼108 CFU/ml B. pertussis and 1 to 5 ng/ml ACT at the peak of infection. Nasal aspirate specimens from two human infants with pertussis contained bacterial concentrations similar to those in the baboons, with 12 to 20 ng/ml ACT. When ∼108 CFU/ml of a laboratory strain of B. pertussis was cultured in vitro, ACT production was detected in 60 min and reached a plateau of ∼60 ng/ml in 6 h. Furthermore, when bacteria were brought into close proximity to target cells by centrifugation, intoxication was increased 4-fold. Collectively, these data suggest that at the bacterium-target cell interface during infection of the respiratory tract, the concentration of ACT can exceed 100 ng/ml, providing a reference point for future studies of ACT and pertussis pathogenesis. PMID:23429530

  20. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-Ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R H; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-06-14

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  1. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction" and "neurological disease." The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  2. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  3. With no lysine L-WNK1 isoforms are negative regulators of the K+-Cl- cotransporters.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Adriana; de Los Heros, Paola; Melo, Zesergio; Chávez-Canales, María; Murillo-de-Ozores, Adrián R; Moreno, Erika; Bazúa-Valenti, Silvana; Vázquez, Norma; Hadchouel, Juliette; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (KCC1-KCC4) encompass a branch of the SLC12 family of electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters that translocate ions out of the cell to regulate various factors, including cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration, among others. L-WNK1 is an ubiquitously expressed kinase that is activated in response to osmotic stress and intracellular chloride depletion, and it is implicated in two distinct hereditary syndromes: the renal disease pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) and the neurological disease hereditary sensory neuropathy 2 (HSN2). The effect of L-WNK1 on KCC activity is unknown. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells, we show that the activation of KCCs by cell swelling was prevented by L-WNK1 coexpression. In contrast, the activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 was remarkably increased with L-WNK1 coexpression. The negative effect of L-WNK1 on the KCCs is kinase dependent. Elimination of the STE20 proline-alanine rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress-responsive kinase (OSR1) binding site or the HQ motif required for the WNK-WNK interaction prevented the effect of L-WNK1 on KCCs, suggesting a required interaction between L-WNK1 molecules and SPAK. Together, our data support that NKCC1 and KCCs are coordinately regulated by L-WNK1 isoforms. PMID:27170636

  4. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK. PMID:26510622

  5. Characterization of a novel Eph receptor tyrosine kinase, EphA10, expressed in testis.

    PubMed

    Aasheim, Hans-Christian; Patzke, Sebastian; Hjorthaug, Hanne Sagsveen; Finne, Eivind Farmen

    2005-05-25

    In mammals, 14 members of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family have been described so far. Here we present a not yet described member of this family denoted EphA10. We report the identification of three putative EphA10 isoforms: one soluble and two transmembrane isoforms. One of the latter isoforms lacked the sterile alpha motif commonly found in Eph receptors. The gene encoding EphA10 is located on chromosome 1p34 and expression studies show that EphA10 mRNA is mainly expressed in testis. Binding studies to ephrin ligands suggests that this receptor belongs to the EphA subclass of Eph receptors binding mainly to ephrin-A ligands. PMID:15777695

  6. Evaluation of Improved Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Inhibitors in Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Theresa; Benajiba, Lina; Göring, Stefan; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor design lies in achieving high selectivity for one isoform over the other. The therapy of certain diseases, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may require α-isoform specific targeting. The scorpion shaped GSK-3 inhibitors developed by our group achieved the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported so far, but suffered from insufficient aqueous solubility. This work presents the solubility-driven optimization of our isoform-selective inhibitors using a scorpion shaped lead. Among 15 novel compounds, compound 27 showed high activity against GSK-3α/β with the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported to date. Compound 27 was profiled for bioavailability and toxicity in a zebrafish embryo phenotype assay. Selective GSK-3α targeting in AML cell lines was achieved with compound 27, resulting in a strong differentiation phenotype and colony formation impairment, confirming the potential of GSK-3α inhibition in AML therapy. PMID:26496242

  7. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-10-17

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK){zeta}, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGK{zeta} siRNA transfection decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGK{zeta} also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGK{zeta} rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGK{zeta}, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells.

  8. Characterization of a tissue-specific CDP/Cux isoform, p75, activated in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Brigitte; Watson, Peter; Poirier, Madeleine; Leduy, Lam; Bérubé, Ginette; Meterissian, Sarkis; Jolicoeur, Paul; Nepveu, Alain

    2002-11-15

    Two isoforms of the CCAAT-displacement protein/cut homeobox (CDP/Cux) transcription factor have been characterized thus far. The full length protein, p200, which contains four DNA binding domains, transiently binds to DNA and carries the CCAAT-displacement activity. The p110 isoform is generated by proteolytic processing at the G1-S transition and is capable of stable interaction with DNA. Here we demonstrate the existence of a shorter CDP/Cux isoform, p75, which contains only two DNA binding domains, Cut repeat 3 and the Cut homeodomain, and binds more stably to DNA. CDP/Cux p75 was able to repress a reporter carrying the promoter for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene and to activate a DNA polymerase alpha gene reporter. Expression of CDP/Cux p75 involved a novel mechanism: transcription initiation within intron 20. The intron 20-initiated mRNA (I20-mRNA) was expressed at higher level in the thymus and in CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. I20-mRNA was expressed only weakly or not at all in normal human mammary epithelial cells and normal breast tissues but was detected in many breast tumor cells lines and breast tumors. In invasive tumors a significant association was established between higher I20-mRNA expression and a diffuse infiltrative growth pattern (n = 41, P = 0.0137). In agreement with these findings, T47D breast cancer cells stably expressing p75 could not form tubule structures in collagen but rather developed as solid undifferentiated aggregates of cells. Taken together, these results suggest that aberrant expression of the CDP/Cux p75 isoform in mammary epithelial cells may be associated with the process of tumorigenesis in breast cancer. PMID:12438259

  9. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  10. From Phosphosites to Kinases.

    PubMed

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations aim to understand the global signaling modulation that takes place in different biological conditions investigated. For phosphoproteomics data, identifying the kinases central to mediating this response is key. This has prompted several efforts to catalogue the immense amounts of phosphorylation data and known or predicted kinases responsible for the modifications. However, barely 20 % of the known phosphosites are assigned to a kinase, initiating various bioinformatics efforts that attempt to predict the responsible kinases. These algorithms employ different approaches to predict kinase consensus sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available bioinformatics tools. This chapter summarizes the use of the larger phosphorylation databases, and approaches that can be applied to predict kinases that phosphorylate individual sites or that are globally modulated in phosphoproteomics datasets. PMID:26584935

  11. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  12. Protein kinase A activity is associated with metacyclogenesis in Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Genestra, Marcelo; Cysne-Finkelstein, Léa; Leon, Leonor

    2004-01-01

    Because of the importance of cell signalling processes in proliferation and differentiation, the adenylate cyclase pathway was studied, specifically the protein kinase A (PKA) in Leishmania amazonensis. The PKAs of soluble (SF) and enriched membrane fractions (MF) from infective/non-infective promastigotes and axenic amastigotes were assayed. In order to purify the PKA molecule, fractions were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns and the phosphorylative activity was evaluated using [gamma(32)P]-ATP as the phosphate source. These experiments were performed in the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and an inhibitor of PKA. Our data demonstrated that the PKA activity was significantly higher (about two times) in SF from promastigotes with a high concentration of metacyclic forms, when compared with the non-infective promastigotes, suggesting an association of this activity and the metacyclogenesis process. A discrete phosphorylative activity in axenic amastigotes was observed. As the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway would be involved in the parasite-host interiorization, the PKA activity may constitute a good intracellular target for studies of leishmanicidal drugs. PMID:15338471

  13. Free energy of hydrolysis of tyrosyl adenylate and its binding to wild-type and engineered mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, T.N.C.; Ho, C.K.; Fersht, A.R.

    1986-10-21

    The equilibrium constant for the formation of tyrosyl adenylate and pyrophosphate from ATP and tyrosine in solution has been measured by applying the Haldane relationship to wild-type and three mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases from Bacillus stearothermophilus. The formation constant (=(Tyr-AMP)(PP/sub i/)/(ATP)(Tyr)) at pH 7.78, 25/sup 0/C, and 10 mM MgCl/sub 2/ (3.5 +/- 0.5) x 10/sup -7/. This corresponds to a free energy of hydrolysis of tyrosyl adenylate at pH 7.0 and 25/sup 0/C of -16.7 kcal mol/sup -1/. All necessary rate constants had been determined previously for the calculations apart from the dissociation constant of tyrosyl adenylate from its enzyme-bound complex. This was measured by taking advantage of the 100-fold difference in hydrolysis rates of the tyrosyl adenylate when sequestered by the enzyme and when free in solution. These are technically difficult measurements because the dissociation constants are so low and the complexes unstable. The task was simplified by using mutants prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. These were designed to have different rate and equilibrium constants for dissociation of tyrosyl adenylate from the enzyme-bound complexes. The dissociation constants were in the range (3.5-38) x 10/sup -12/ M, with that for wild type at 13 x 10/sup -12/ M. The four enzymes all gave consistent data for the formation constant of tyrosyl adenylate in solution. This not only improves the reliability of the measurement but also provides confirmation of the reliability of the measured kinetic constants for the series of enzymes.

  14. Protein Kinase D Enzymes as Regulators of EMT and Cancer Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Durand, Nisha; Borges, Sahra; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Protein Kinase D (PKD) isoforms PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 are effectors of the novel Protein Kinase Cs (nPKCs) and diacylglycerol (DAG). PKDs impact diverse biological processes like protein transport, cell migration, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and apoptosis. PKDs however, have distinct effects on these functions. While PKD1 blocks EMT and cell migration, PKD2 and PKD3 tend to drive both processes. Given the importance of EMT and cell migration to the initiation and progression of various malignancies, abnormal expression of PKDs has been reported in multiple types of cancers, including breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss how EMT and cell migration are regulated by PKD isoforms and the significance of this regulation in the context of cancer development. PMID:26848698

  15. Role of diacylglycerol kinase in cellular regulatory processes: a new regulator for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Goto, Kaoru; Kubota, Isao

    2007-09-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates and converts DAG to phosphatidic acid. DGK regulates cellular DAG levels and attenuates DAG signaling. The 10 mammalian DGK isoforms have been identified to date. In cardiac myocytes, DGKalpha, epsilon, and zeta are expressed, and DGKzeta is the predominant isoform. DGKzeta inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) activation and subsequent hypertrophic programs in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1) in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. DGKzeta blocks cardiac hypertrophy induced by G protein-coupled receptor agonists and pressure overload in vivo. DGKzeta attenuates ventricular remodeling and improves survival after myocardial infarction. These data provide a novel insight for subcellular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and DGKzeta may be a new therapeutic target to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and progression to heart failure. PMID:17659347

  16. Protein Kinase D Enzymes as Regulators of EMT and Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Nisha; Borges, Sahra; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Protein Kinase D (PKD) isoforms PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 are effectors of the novel Protein Kinase Cs (nPKCs) and diacylglycerol (DAG). PKDs impact diverse biological processes like protein transport, cell migration, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and apoptosis. PKDs however, have distinct effects on these functions. While PKD1 blocks EMT and cell migration, PKD2 and PKD3 tend to drive both processes. Given the importance of EMT and cell migration to the initiation and progression of various malignancies, abnormal expression of PKDs has been reported in multiple types of cancers, including breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss how EMT and cell migration are regulated by PKD isoforms and the significance of this regulation in the context of cancer development. PMID:26848698

  17. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  18. Adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase is essential for Arabidopsis viability.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sarah G; Matthewman, Colette A; Hill, Lionel; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APK) provides activated sulfate for sulfation of secondary metabolites, including the glucosinolates. We have successfully isolated three of the four possible triple homozygous mutant combinations of this family. The APK1 isoform alone was sufficient to maintain WT levels of growth and development. Analysis of apk1 apk2 apk3 and apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants suggests that APK3 and APK4 are functionally redundant, despite being located in cytosol and plastids, respectively. We were, however, unable to isolate apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants, most probably because the apk1 apk3 apk4 triple mutant combination is pollen lethal. Therefore, we conclude that APS kinase is essential for plant reproduction and viability. PMID:19903478

  19. Cellular distribution of COT1 kinase in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, R; Sjollema, K A; Sietsma, J H; Yarden, O

    2000-06-01

    The Neurospora crassa cot-1 gene encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase, which is involved in hyphal elongation. Many vacuoles, abnormally shaped mitochondria, and nuclei, along with differences in the structure of the cell wall and hyphal septa, were observed in hyphae of the cot-1 mutant shortly after a shift to the restrictive temperature. Immunolocalization experiments indicated that COT1 was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane; COT1 was also detected in the cytoplasm. The membrane-associated COT1 was absent from the cot-1 mutant when shifted to the restrictive temperature, as was a lower molecular weight isoform of COT1. We propose that COT1 may be involved in several cellular processes, and the spatial and temporal regulation of COT1 activity involves trafficking of the kinase within the fungal cell and its possible interaction with additional proteins. PMID:10955908

  20. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling. PMID:27582064

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  2. Adenosine-dependent activation of tyrosine hydroxylase is defective in adenosine kinase-deficient PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, R; Wagner, J A

    1984-01-01

    (R)-N6-Phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) stimulates dopa production 3- to 5-fold in PC12 cells, with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 50 nM. This increase can be explained by a stable activation of tyrosine hydroxylase [TyrOHase; L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2] when it is phosphorylated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The activation of TyrOHase is mediated by the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase (EC50 = 600 nM). PIA (10 microM) is as effective as cholera toxin or dibutyryl cAMP in activating TyrOHase in wild-type cells. Adenosine kinase-deficient mutants of PC12 were found to be resistant to PIA-dependent activation of TyrOHase (EC50 = 100-1000 nM). This phenomenon was explored in detail in one adenosine kinase-deficient mutant and was shown to occur because the mutant was resistant to the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. In this mutant, TyrOHase was activated 14-fold by cholera toxin, suggesting that activated TyrOHase is about 14 times as active as unactivated TyrOHase. These studies with kinase-deficient PC12 cells provide genetic evidence that adenosine-dependent activation of TyrOHase is mediated by acute increases in cAMP. When the adenosine receptor found on PC12 cells is expressed in vivo, it might function as either a presynaptic (i.e., localized on the nerve terminal) or a postsynaptic (i.e., localized on the cell body or dendrite) receptor that regulates rates of transmitter synthesis in response to cell activity. PMID:6146982

  3. Heterogeneity of presynaptic proteins: do not forget isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Luca; Fattorini, Giorgia; Giovedì, Silvia; Bosco, Federica; Benfenati, Fabio; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of presynaptic protein expression in glutamatergic and GABAergic central synapses performed in several laboratories and with different techniques is unveiling a complex scenario, largely because each presynaptic protein exists in several isoforms. The interpretation of these findings is generally based on the notion that each synapse and each synaptic vesicle contains one of the isoforms of each family of presynaptic proteins. We verified whether this interpretation is tenable by performing triple labeling and immunoisolation studies with the aim of detecting two isoforms of a given presynaptic protein in glutamatergic or GABAergic axon terminals and/or synaptic vesicles (SVs). Here, we show that: (1) the possibility that not all families of presynaptic proteins are expressed in all terminals must be taken into serious account; (2) the expression of a given protein isoform in a terminal does not exclude the expression of other isoforms of the same protein in the same terminal and in the same vesicle. These conclusions open new and interesting problems; their experimental analysis might improve our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of central synapses. PMID:23382710

  4. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  5. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Rie; Giannini, Caterina; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Schroeder, Mark; Rogers, Joseph; Mastroeni, Diego; Scrable, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10–70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, which have been shown to modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain, and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry, and RT-PCR. At the protein level, we found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared to tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions. PMID:22824800

  6. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  7. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam or pramipexole) or antinatriuresis (NE) occurred, the kidneys were removed for analysis of PLC isoform protein expression activity. Western blot analysis revealed that in renal cortical membranes, fenoldopam and pramipexole increased expression of PLC beta 1 and decreased expression of PLC gamma 1; PLC delta was unchanged. In the cytosol, pramipexole and fenoldopam increased expression of both PLC beta 1 and PLC gamma 1. No effects were noted in the medulla. A preferential D1 antagonist, SKF 83742, which by itself had no effect, blocked the effects of pramipexole, thus confirming the involvement of the D1 receptor. In contrast, NE also increased PLC beta 1 but did not affect PLC gamma 1 protein expression in membranes. The changes in PLC isoform expression were accompanied by similar changes in PLC isoform activity. These studies demonstrate for the first time differential regulation of PLC isoforms by catecholamines. PMID:7814630

  8. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  9. S6K2: The Neglected S6 Kinase Family Member.